HotFreeBooks.com
The Story of Paris
by Thomas Okey
Previous Part     1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9
Home - Random Browse

To the south of the Champs Elysees is the Cours de la Reine, planted by Catherine de' Medici, for two years the most fashionable carriage drive in Paris. This we follow and at No. 16 find the charming Maison Francois I. brought from Moret, stone by stone, in 1826. To the north, in the Cours de Gabriel, a fine gilded grille, surmounted with the arms of the Republic, gives access to the Elysee, the official residence of the President. It was once Madame Pompadour's favourite house in Paris, and the piece of land she appropriated from the public to round off her gardens is still retained in its grounds. In the Avenue Montaigne, leading S.W. from the Rond Point (once the Allee des Veuves, a retired walk used by widows during their term of seclusion) Nos. 51 and 53 stand on the site of the notorious Bal Mabille,[236] the temple of the bacchanalia of the gay world of the Second Empire. In 1764 the Champs Elysees ended at Chaillot, a little to the W. of the Rond Point, an old feudal property which Louis XI. gave to Philippe de Comines in 1450, and which in 1651 sheltered the unhappy widow of Charles I. Here Catherine de' Medici built a chateau, but chateau and nunnery of the Filles de Sainte Marie, founded by the English queen, disappeared in 1790. S. of the Champs Elysees on the opposite bank of the Seine rises the gilded dome of the Invalides, and to the S.W. stretches the vast field of Mars, the scene of the Feast of Pikes, and now encumbered with the relics of four World-Fairs.

[Footnote 236: A description of this and of other public balls of the Second Empire will be found in Taine's Notes sur Paris, which has been translated into English.]

The Paris we have rapidly surveyed is, mainly, enclosed by the inner boulevards, which correspond to the ramparts of Louis XIII. on the north, demolished by his successor between 1676 and 1707, and the line of the Philip Augustus wall and the Boulevard St. Germain on the south. Beyond this historic area are the outer boulevards which mark the octroi wall of Louis XVI.; further yet are the Thiers wall and fortifications of 1841. Within these wider boundaries is the greater Paris of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, of profound concern to the economical and social student, but of minor interest to the ordinary traveller. The vogue of the brilliant and gay inner boulevards of the north bank so familiar to the foreigner in Paris is of comparatively recent growth. In the early nineteenth century the boulevard from the Place de la Madeleine to the Rue Cambon was almost deserted by day and dangerous by night—a vast waste, the proceeds of the confiscated lands of the Filles de la Conception. From the Boulevard Montmartre to the Boulevard St. Martin followed lines of private hotels, villas, gardens and convent walls. A great mound which separated the Boulevard St. Martin from the Boulevard du Temple was not cleared away until 1853. From 1760 to 1862 the Boulevard du Temple was a centre of pleasure and amusement, where charming suburban houses and pretty gardens alternated with cheap restaurants, hotels, theatres, cafes, marionette shows, circuses, tight-rope dancers, waxworks, and cafes-chantants. In 1835, so lurid were the dramas played there, that the boulevard was popularly known as the Boulevard du Crime.

In the early nineteenth century the favourite promenade of Parisian flaneurs was displaced from the Palais Royal to the Boulevard des Italiens, whither the proprietors of cafes and restaurants followed. A group of young fellows entered one evening a small cabaret near the Comedie Italienne (now Opera Comique), found the wine to their taste and the cuisine excellent, praised host and fare to their friends, and the modest cabaret developed into the Cafe Anglais, most famous of epicurean temples, frequented during the Second Empire by kings and princes, to whom alone the haughty proprietor would devote personal care. The sumptuous cafes Tortoni, founded in 1798, and De Paris, opened 1822, have long since passed away. So has the Cafe Hardy, whose proprietor invented dejeuners a la fourchette, although its rival and neighbour, the Cafe Riche, stills exists. Many others of the celebrated cafes of the Boulevards have disappeared or suffered a transformation into the more popular Brasseries and Tavernes of which so many, alternating with the theatres, restaurants and dazzling shops that line the most-frequented evening promenade of Paris, invite the thirsty or leisurely pleasure-seeker of to-day.

Nowhere may the traveller gain a better impression of the essential gaiety and sociability of the Parisian temperament than by sitting outside a cafe on the boulevards on a public festival and observing his neighbours and the passers-by: their imperturbable good humour; their easy manners; their simple enjoyments; their quick intelligence, alert gait and expressive gestures; the wonderful skill of the women in dress. The glittering halls of pleasure that appeal to so many visitors, the Bohemian cafes of the outer boulevards, the Folies Bergeres, the Moulins Rouges, the Bals Bulliers, with their meretricious and vulgar attractions, frequented by the more facile daughters of Gaul, "whose havoc of virtue is measured by the length of their laundresses' bills," as a genial satirist of their sex has phrased it—all these manifestations of la vie, so unutterably dull and sordid, are of small concern to the cultured traveller. The intimate charm and spirit of Paris will be heard and felt by him not amid the whirlwind of these saturnalia largely maintained by the patronage of English-speaking visitors, but rather in the smaller voices that speak from the inmost Paris which we have essayed to describe. Nor can we bid more fitting adieu to Lutetia than by translating Goethe's words to Eckermann: "Think of the city of Paris where all the best of the realms of nature and art in the whole earth are open to daily contemplation, a world-city where the crossing of every bridge or every square recalls a great past, and where at every street corner a piece of history has been unfolded."



SECTION X

The Basilica of St. Denis and the Monuments of the Kings, Queens and Princes of France.

No historical pilgrimage to Paris would be complete without a visit to the Sanctuary of its protomartyr and the burial-place of its kings. Taking train from the Gare du Nord, either main line or local train-tramway and being arrived at the railway station of the grimy industrial suburb of St. Denis, we cross the canal and continue along the Rue du Chemin de Fer and the Rue de la Republique, to the Cathedral, architecturally the most important relic of the great age of the early ecclesiastical builders. The west facade before us, completed about 1140 by Abbot Suger, is of profound interest, for here we may behold the round Romanesque arch side by side with the Pointed, and the very first grip of the new Gothic on the heavy Norman architecture it was about to overthrow. The sculptures on the W. portals, however, almost wholly and clumsily renewed, need not detain us long. We enter and descend from the sombre vestibule. As we wait for the verger we revel in the airy and graceful symmetry of the nave and aisles; the beautiful raised choir and lovely apse with its chevets and round of chapels, where structural science and beauty of form are so admirably blended. The choir was so far advanced in 1143 that mass was sung at the high altar during a heavy storm while the incomplete ribs of the new Gothic vaulting swayed over head. In 1219, however, Suger's structure was nearly destroyed by fire and the upper part of the choir, the nave and transepts were afterwards rebuilt in the pure Gothic of the times, the more active reconstruction being effected between 1231 and 1281. A visit to the monuments is unhappily a somewhat mingled experience. Owing to the inscrutable official regulations in force, the best of the mediaeval tombs are only seen with difficulty and from a distance that renders any appreciation of their beauty impossible.[237] The monuments are mainly those claimed by Lenoir for his Museum at Paris when the decree of 1792 was promulgated, ordering the "effacement of the proud epitaphs and the destruction of the Mausoleums, that recalled the dread memories of kings": they were restored to their original places so far as possible by Viollet le Duc. The head of St. Denis is said to have been found when his shrine was desecrated and appropriated by the revolutionists, and in the cant of the time was brought back to Paris by "a miracle greater and more authentic than that which conveyed it from Montmartre to St. Denis, a miracle of the regeneration of opinion, registered not in the martyrology but in the annals of reason."

[Footnote 237: We cannot too strongly impress on the traveller the desirability of visiting the admirable Musee de Sculpture Comparee at the Trocadero where casts of the most important sculpture and architecture in France, including many of the monuments, here and elsewhere in Paris, may be conveniently studied.]



We are first led past some mediaeval tombs in the N. transept, then by those of the family of St. Louis, which include that of his eldest son, one of the most beautiful creations of thirteenth-century sculpture. Our own Henry III. who attended the funeral is figured among the mourners around the base which are only partially seen from afar. The monument to Louis XII. and his beloved and chere Bretonne, Anne, is next shown. It is in Italian style and was wrought by the Justes, a family of Tourraine sculptors. The Royal effigies are twice rendered: once naked in death under a tabernacle and again kneeling in prayer. Before we ascend the steps leading to the raised ambulatory, we are shown across the choir, and R. of the high altar, the fine thirteenth-century tomb of Dagobert, with some quaint reliefs, impossible to see in detail, illustrating his legend (p. 34) and a statue of Queen Nantilde also of the thirteenth century. Nor should we omit to note the two rare and beautiful twelfth-century statues, in the style of the Chartres sculpture, of a king and queen on either side of the portal of the N. transept brought from the church of Notre Dame de Corbeil. To our L. is a masterpiece of the French renaissance, the tomb by Lescot and Pilon of Henry II. and Catherine de' Medici, who are represented twice, as in the monument to Louis XII. We ascend the steps to the ambulatory and below, to our L., are summarily shown some important Valois tombs: Philippe de Valois, John II., Charles V. and others, by contemporary sculptors, such as Andrieu Beaunepveu and Pierre de Chelles—all of great interest to the traveller but utterly impossible of appreciation under the cursory glance permitted by the vergers. A second monument to Henry II. and Catherine, with recumbent and draped figures, is next indicated; Catherine is portrayed in her old age and rigid devotion. As we pace round the ambulatory we are shown some remains of twelfth-century stained glass in the choir chapels (that in the Lady Chapel including the figure of Abbot Suger,) and a modern representation of the Oriflamme to the L. of the high altar. Opposite the sacristy is a curious twelfth-century tomb from St. Germain des Pres, with the effigy of Queen Fredegonde outlined in mosaic and copper. We descend to the gloomy old crypt, with the curious Romanesque capitals of its columns, where now lie the remains of the later Bourbons. On returning to the church the tombs of Philip the Bold and Philip the Fair are shown, and to the L. the grandiose monument to Francis I., designed by Delorme, with five kneeling effigies: the king, Claude his queen, and their three children. The fine base reliefs represent the battles of Marignano and Cerisole. Then follows the beautiful urn executed by Pierre Bontemps, to contain the heart of the gran re Francesco. In conclusion, we are permitted to see the tombs of Louis of Orleans and of Valentine of Milan, early fifteenth-century, by a Milanese artist; and Charles of Etampes, an excellent work of the middle of the fourteenth-century. Before returning to Paris we should not omit to walk round the basilica and examine the sculptures of the portal of the N. transept, which have suffered less from iconoclasts and restorers.



INDEX

A

ABBEYS, their foundation and growth, 30

Abbo, his story of the siege of Paris, 43-49

Abbots, their power and wealth, 39, 52

Abelard and Heloise, 91-93; their tomb, 93; and house, 305

Academie Francaise, 213

Acephali, the, 47, 49

Adam du Petit Pont, 94

Agincourt, 134

Aignan's, St., remains of, 305

Alcuin, 40

Alencon, Duke of, 177, 187

Amphitheatre, Roman, 13, 14, 332

Ancien Regime, the, 275, 280, 286

Anselm, story of, 58

Antheric, Bishop, 47, 48

Antoine, St., Abbey of, 79

Antoinette, Marie, note, 78, 249, 257, 265, 268, 311, 312

Aqueduct, Roman, 13, 208

Aquinas, 103, 104

Aristotle, study of, at Paris, 103

Armagnac, Count of, 134

Armagnacs, the, 134; massacre of, 136

Augustins, the Grands, 75

Austria, Anne of, 207, 212, 215, 217, 237

B

BACON, ROGER, 104

Bailly, 282

Balafre, le, 187

Bal des Ardents, 131

Barrere, 282

Barry, Mme. du, 248, 421

Bartholomew, St., massacre of, 175, 179-185

Basoche, the, 309

Bastille, the, 128, 146, 218, 261-264; column of, 291; site of, 406

Baths, Roman, 13, 17; public, note, 90

Bazoches, Guy of, his impression of Paris, 69

Beauharnais, Mme. de, 282

Beaux Arts, Ecole des, 318

Bedford, Duke of, note, 127; Regent at Paris, 137; his death there, 140

Beguines, the, 79

Bellay, du, 169

Benvenuto da Imola, 104

Bernard, St., 58, 59, 61, 63, 89, 92

Bernini, 234, 235, 398

Bibliotheque Nationale, 222, 429; de l'Arsenal, 406

Billettes, cloister of, 410

Bishops, their power and patriotism, 30

Blancs Manteaux, church of, 133

Blancs Manteaux, the, 76, 142

Boccaccio, 417

Bonaventure, St., 78

Boniface VIII., Pope, 107-109, 111

Boulevards, the, 238, 434-436

Bourbon, Hotel de, 204, 233

Bretigny, treaty of, 125

Brunehaut, her career and death, 27-29

Brunswick, Duke of, his proclamation, 269

Bullant, Jean, 198

Burgundy, Duke of, 132; defeat of, 146

Buridan, note, 68, 313

Bursaries, foundation of, 97

Bussy, Island of, note, 117

C

CAESAR, JULIUS, 11, 13, 297

Cafe Corazza, 428

Cafe de Foy, 261, 427

Cafe de la Regence, 426, 427

Cafe Milles Colonnes, 428

Ca ira, origin of, 266

Calvin, 98, 164

Campan, Madame, Memoirs of, 248, 267

Capet, Hugh, 51

Capetians, rise of, 51

Cards, playing, renamed, 203

Carlovingians, their rise, 35

Carlyle, his history, 260, 268

Carmelites, the, 75, 316

Carrousel, the, 225; arch of, 291

Casaubon, Isaac, 202

Castile, Blanche of, 70, 96

Catholic Faith, restoration of, 286

Cellini, at Paris, 160, 163

Champ de Mars, 22, 261, 264, 433

Champeaux, William of, 63, 90, 94; market of, 63

Champs Elysees, 432

Chapelle, Sainte, the, 72, 86, 306-309

Charlemagne at St. Denis, 37; his love of learning, 40

Charles, the Bold, 41; the Fat, 47, 48; the Simple, 49

Charles V., completes Marcel's wall, 125; his success against English, 125; a great builder, 126

Charles VI., minority of, 128; narrow escape of, 131; his vengeance on the Parisians, 130; his madness, 131

Charles VII., 138; his wretched death, 144

Charles VIII, 151

Charles IX., 176; his pitiful death, 185

Charles X., 267

Charonne, 219

Charterhouse, the monks of, 75

Chatelet, the Grand, 44, 154, 408

Chatelet, the Petit, 152, 192, 408

Chaumette, note, 299

Chelles, Jean de, 87

Chenier, Marie Joseph, 282

Childebert, 26

Chilperic III., 35

Choiseul, Duke of, 248

Cite, the, 11, note, 36, 37, 295

Clarence, Duke of, 138

Claude Lorrain, 224, 377

Clement V., Pope, 111

Clement, Jacques, 189, 190

Clergy, their wealth, 256

Clisson, Constable of, 129

Clootz, 282

Clotilde, 24, 26

Cloud, St., 27

Clovis, captures Paris, 21; stories of, 21, 24; conversion of, 24; makes Paris his capital, 26; Tower of, 331

Cluny, Hotel de, 159; Museum of, 324-329

Colbert, 223, 234, 235, 237

Coligny, Admiral, 176; attempted assassination of, 178; his assassination, 181

College, de Cluny, 98; de France, 163, 329; des Jesuits, 105; des Lombards, 316; de Montaigu, 97; de Navarre, 97; de la Sorbonne, 96

Colleges, foundation of, 95-98

Comedie Francaise, 424-426

Comines, De, 145, 148, 163

Commune, origin of, 17

Conciergerie, the, 120, 312

Concini, assassination of, 205

Conde, Prince of, 175, 176, 178, 183, 204, 209, 210

Condorcet, 282

Constance of Aquitaine, 54

Contrat, Social, the, 279, 280

Convention, the National, its constructive work, 275

Cordeliers, the, 76; club of, 324

Corneille, 224, 314

Cortona, Dom. da, 155, 159

Coryat, his impressions of Paris, 200-203

Cour du Dragon, 321; des Miracles, 421; de Rouen, 67

Crecy, 121,134

D

DAGOBERT THE GREAT, 33, 34, 305

Damiens, 247

Dante, 59, 89, 103, 109, 159, 278

Danton, 273, 324

Dark Ages, the so-called, 88, 89

Da Vinci, 158, 354, 372

Debrosse, Solomon, 208

Deffand, Mme. du, 282

Denis, St., legends of, 15; Abbey of, 33; body of, exposed, 56; church of, 23, 84, 193; head of, 203; tombs at, 436-440

Desmoulins, Camille, 98, 213, 261, 324

Diamond necklace, the, 78

Dickens, at Paris, 416

Dionysius, 13, 15

Dolet, Etienne, 316

Dominic, St., at Paris, 76

Dominicans, the, 76

Dubois, Abbe, 242

Durham, Bishop of, his praise of Paris, 104

E

EBLES, ABBOT, 44, 47

Edward IV., of England, 146

Egalite, Philip, 213, 272

Elizabeth, Queen, her crooked policy, 177

Eloy, St., 33; abbey of, 37, 60

Elysee, the, 433

Emigres, the, 267, 268

Empire, the second, its fall, 287; changes under, at Paris, 292

Encyclopedists, the, 279, 281, 282

English Barons at Paris, 125

English, occupy Paris, 138; expelled from Paris, 143

Erasmus, 98, 163

Estampes, Mme. d', 162

Estiennes, the, 148-150

Estrees, Gabrielle d', 193, 195, 196, 216

Etienne du Mont, St., note, 85, 159, 331

Etoile, Arch of, l', 291

Eudes, Count, 44, 47, 48, 49

Eugene III., Pope, at Paris, 61

Eustache, St., church of, 159, 421

Evelyn, at Paris, 210, 275

F

FEUDALISM, rise of, 50, 52

Fioretti, the, note, 78

Fontainebleau, school of, 160, 372

Francis I., 149, 156, 157; fixes hotel charges, note, 164; his morbid piety, 166; and death, 169; Maison de, 433

Francis II., 175

Francis, St., 102

Franciscan Refectory, 322

Franciscans, the, 76

Franklin, Benjamin, 266, 282

Fredegonde, her career and death, 27-29

French art, its stubborn individuality, 159

French language, the, its universality, 102

Froissart, 300

Fronde, the, 218, 219

Fulbert, Canon, 91

Fulrad, Abbot, 38

G

GALERIE, GRANDE, 198, 353

Galerie, Petite, 198, 250, 399

Galilee, Island of, 14

Gauls, their permanent traits, 3, 4

Genevieve, St., 22, 23, 47; church and abbey of, 23, 36, 61, 112, 254, 331

Germain, St., of Paris, 28, 30

Germain, St., des Pres, church and abbey of, 32, 36, 85, 89, 152, 319-321; abbot's palace of, 321

Germain, St., l'Auxerrois, 22, 30; church of, 32, 44, 423

Gervais, St., church of, 36, 402

Gibbon, 255, note, 282

Giocondo, Fra, 155

Girondins, the, 311, 312

Goethe, 259, 269, 275, 436

Goldoni, 275

Gothic architecture, rise of, 53, 84-88; its development to Flamboyant style, 151

Goujon, Jean, 174, 337, 343, 399, 415; his death, note, 174

Gozlin, Bishop, 43, 45, 46, 47

Greek first taught at Paris, 151

Gregory, St., 21, 28, 30, 31, 32

Greuze, 282, 384, 386

Guillaume de Nogaret, 113

Guillemites, the, 76

Guise, Cardinal of, 171

Guise, Duke of, 178, 180, 187; assassination of, 188

Guises, the, 171, 175, 176

H

HALLE AUX VINS, the, 63

Halles, the, 69, 129, 146, 154, 422

Heine, his appreciation of Paris, 5; at the Louvre, 339

Helvetius, 282

Henry I., 56

Henry II., 171; his tragic death, 172

Henry III., 178, 186, 188; his assassination, 189

Henry V. of England, 136, 137

Henry VI. of England, 137, 141

Heretics, first execution of, 69

Holy Ghost, order of, 187, 326

Hotel, d'Aumont, 403; de Beauvais, 403; de Bourbon, 153; Burgundy, 133; Carnavalet, 415; de Clisson, 412; Dieu, 37, 80, 81, 200, 297; Fieubert, 406; de Hollande, 414; de Lulli, 429; de Mayenne, 405; de Nesle, 68; Provost of Paris, 403; de Rohan, 413; St. Paul, 127, 133, 152; de Soubise, 411; de Sully, 416; des Tournelles, 146, 153; de Ville, 159, 199, 292, 400

Hugo, Victor, 7, 155, 255, 287, 310; house of, 416

Huguenots, the, 175, 176, 177, 179, 206, 228

I

INFANTA, the, 244; garden of, 244, 250

Innocents, cemetery of the, 69, 155, 182, 417-420; fountain of, 417

Institut, the, 222

Invalides, the, 237

Iron Mask, Man of, 261, 405

Isabella of Bavaria, her welcome, 130; joins Jean sans Peur, 136

Italian art at Paris, 155, 159

J

JACOBINS, the, 76; club of, 208

Jacquerie, the, 122

Jacques, St., de la Boucherie, 63, 154, 408

Jansenists, the, 231, 245, 247

Jean sans Peur, 131-136, 414, 420

Jeanne d'Arc wounded at siege of Paris, 139; her trial and rehabilitation, 140

Jefferson, Thomas, 265

Jesuits, the, 164, 198, 231, 245, 247, 248

John the Good, 118, 121, 125

Joinville, 81, note, 82

Julian, the Emperor, 17; statue of, 18, 341; his love of Paris, 18

Julien le Pauvre, St., church of, 32, 37, 85, 99, 313

Justice, bed of, 216

L

LATIN QUARTER, the, 93, 99

Latini, Brunetto, note, 89

Lavoisier, 282

Law, John, 242, 243

League, the, 187, 188, 191, 193

Lebrun, 215, 224, 235, 378, 379

Leczinska, Marie, 244, 249

Lemercier, Jacques, 210, 421

Lenoir, Alexandre, 335

Lescot, his work on the Louvre, 165, 173, 174

Lesueur, 75, 215, 373, 374

Levau, 215, 234

Lombard, Peter, 94

Londonne, Jocius de, 96

Lorraine, Cardinal of, assassinated, 189

Louis VI., the Lusty, 58, 62, 63

Louis, St., his youth, 70; affection for his mother, 70; conception of kingship, 71; popular justice, 71; piety, 72; love of stories, 72; the Jews and, 73, 74; founds library of Sainte Chapelle, 75; his rigid justice, 79, 81; death, 81; personal appearance and prowess, 83

Louis, St., island of, 214, 407; church of, 215

Louis XI. at Paris, 145, 146; his death, 148

Louis XII. returns taxes, 156

Louis XIII., 204, 205, 208

Louis XIV., 212, 215, 220; his court, 224, 225; hatred of Paris, 225; his "three queens" at the wars, 230; his death, 233 Louis XV., his majority, 243; popularity, 244, 246; death, 249

Louis XVI., 256, 257; trial and execution of, 271-273

Louis XVIII., 255

Louis Philippe, 287

Louviers, island of, 14, 240, 406

Louvois, 224

Louvre, the, 68, 126, 164, 173, 198, 210, 233-237, 250-252, 289-290, 333-336; Sculpture, ancient, 336-341; mediaeval and renaissance, 341-346; modern, 346-350; Pictures, foreign schools, 350-368; French schools, 368-398; Persian and Egyptian art, 398-399

Loyola, Ignatius, 164

Lutetia, 11, 14, 18, 19

Luther, appeals to Paris, 104

Lutherans at Paris, 167, 169

Luxembourg, palace of, 208; museum of, 322; palace and gardens of, 322

Luxor, column of, 291

Luynes, Albert de, 205

M

MADELEINE, Church of, 291

Maillart, Jean, 123

Maillotins, the, 129

Maintenon, Mme. de, 227, 228, 229, 231, 233

Maison aux Piliers, 122, 123, 130

Manege, Salle du, 271, 429

Mansard, Francois, 212, 237

Mansard, J.H., 226, 237

Marais, the, 15, 407

Marat, 255, 289, 324

Marcel, Etienne, 122-124

Marchands d'Eau, Provost of, 122

Margaret of Angouleme, 149

Marguerite of Valois, 176, 177, 181, 194, 195

Marly, 227, 230, 232

Marseillaises, the, 275

Martel, Charles, 35

Martin, St., legend of, 16

Martin, St., des Champs, 57, 86, 155, note, 412

Maur des Fosses, St., note, 39, 60

Mayenne, Duke of, 192, 204

Mazarin, 213, 216, 219, 222; palais, 222, 429

Mazzini, 279

Medard, St., church of, 333

Medici, Catherine de', 173, 176, 180; her death, 189

Medici, Marie de', 195, 196, 204, 206, 207

Medici fountain, 322

Medicine, faculty of, 318

Merovingian dynasty, 26

Merri, St., church of, 159, 408

Mirabeau, 255, 267; funeral of, 422; the elder, 258

Mississippi bubble, the, 243

Molay, Jacques de, 111, 112, 113, 116

Moliere, 224, 233

Monarchy, growing power of, 174; absolutism of, 220, 223

Monasteries, reform of, 60; suppression of, 284

Montereau, Pierre de, 57, 88

Montfaucon, 48; gallows of, 201

Montgomery, Count of, 172

Montjoie, St. Denis, war cry of, note, 121

Montmartre, 15; abbey of, 65

Morris, Governor, 265

Morris, William, 88

N

NANTES, EDICT OF, revocation of, 228

Napoleon I., 276, 277, 278, 279, 281, 289, 290, 291, 426

Napoleon, Louis, 255, 287

Navarre, Charles of, 123

Navarre, Henry of, 178, 183, 189; his conversion and kingship, 193, 194; divorce, 193; assassination, 197; statue of, 208, 210

Navarre, Jeanne of, 176, 177

Nautae, altar of, 17, 328

Necker, Mme., 282

Nemours, Duke of, execution of, 147

Nicholas, St., chapel of, 39, 72; church of, 251

Noces vermeilles, the, 177

Normans, the, 41, 49

Norwich, Canons of, 314

Notre Dame, church of, 32, 36, 72, 85, 107, 109, 116, 142, 143, 252, 298-305; de Lorette, 291; des Victoires, 206; island of, 14; Parvis of, 297

O

ODEON, theatre of the, 322

Opera, Italian, the, 233

Opera, the new, 293

Orders, the religious, 59

Oriflamme, the, 62, 440

Orleans, Duke of, 133; assassinated, 136; Philip of, 212, 242

Orme, Philibert de l', 198

Ovens, public, 57

P

PAINE, THOMAS, 272

Palace of Archbishop of Sens, 407

Palais de Justice, 53, 118, 137, 152, 309-313

Palais Royal, 15, 212, 213, 217, 234; gardens of, 261, 427

Palissy, 199

Pantheon, the, 254, 330

Paris, her essential unity, 2; apprehension of coming changes, 4; intellectual culture, 5, 21; conquest by Romans, 12; origin of, 9-12; geographical position, 10-13; device of, 17; sacked by the Northmen, 41; siege of, by Northmen, 43; growth under Capets, 53; expansion under Louis VI., 63; evil smells at, 65; first paving of, 65; capital of intellectual world, 101; faubourgs wasted by English, 121, 124, 125; first library at, 126; occupied by English, 138, 143; life at, under English, 141-143; bridges of, 152; sieges of, by Henry of Navarre, 189, 191; sections of, their insurrection, 191, 192; its dirt, 202; misery at, 231, 241, 247, 256; a vast camp, 273, 274

Parisian democracy, its enlightenment, 7

Parisians, their responsive nature and love of order, 6; loss of liberties, 130; their loyalty and tolerance, 286

Parisii, the, 10, 11

Parlement, the, 118, 216-218, 220

Parloir aux Bourgeois, 122

Pascal, 231

Passion, Confreres de la, 420

Paul, St., charnel-houses, 405

Paul and Louis, SS., church of, 405

Peasantry, their condition, 260

Pepin the Short, 35

Pere la Chaise, 220

Peronne, peace of, 146

Perrault, Charles, 235; Claude, 224, 235-236, 250

Petit, Nesle, the, 160

Philip I., 57

Philip Augustus, birth of, 64; his entry into Paris, 65; wall of, 65-68, 405, 407

Philip le Bel, 78, 100, 107, 117

Philip VI., 121

Pierre, St., church of, 15

Pierre aux Boeufs, St., church of, 63, 297

Pillory, the, 423

Place, Chatelet, 407; de la Concorde, 430-433; de Greve, 116, 146, 154, 168, 197, 400; Maubert, 169, 316; Royale, 186, 200, 207, 415, 416; Vendome, 429

Plantes, Jardin des, 214

Poitiers, 121, 134; Diana of, 150, 173

Pol, St., Count of, 146

Pompadour, Mme., 215, 247

Pont, au Change, note, 15, 154, 200; de la Concorde, 264; Grand, 15, 70; Marie, 214; aux Meuniers, 200; Neuf, 210; Notre Dame, 155; aux Oiseaux, 200; Petit, 14, 70, 152, 155; Royal, 240

Ponzardus de Gysiaco, 113

Pope Paul III., his humane protest, 169

Port Royal, suppression of, 232

Porte, St. Antoine, 124; St. Denis, 123, 238; St. Jacques, 143; St. Martin, 238

Poussin, 234, 375-377

Pres aux Clercs, the, 100; students at, 101

Printing, art of, at Paris, 148-150

Provost, of Marchands d'Eau, 17; suppressed, 130; royal, note, 17

Puget, 224, 347

Punishments, cruelty of, during Renaissance, 168

Q

QUAI, DES AUGUSTINS, 283; de la Megisserie, 154

Quinze-Vingts, the, 78

R

RABELAIS, note, 39, 98, 405

Racine, 224

Radegonde, St., note, 27

Ravaillac, 197

Reason, temples of, 285, 286

Reformation, the, 174

Renaissance, architecture at Paris, 156

Republic, the second, 287

Republic, the third, 287, 292

Retz, de, Cardinal, 216, 219

Revolution, the great, its beneficent results, 288

Reynolds, 236, 361, 362, 377, 380

Richelieu, 205, 206, 208, 214

Robert the Pious, 53, 54, 55

Robespierre, 106, 260, 267, 426

Roch, St., church of, 429

Rohan, Cardinal of, 78

Rollo, 42, 49

Romilly, Sir S., his letters, 265

Ronsard, 337

Rousseau, J.J., 240, 255, 257, 281, 426

Royalty abolished, 270

Rue, des Anglais, 316; de l'Arbre Sec, 29, 423; des Archives, 410, 412; du Bac, 240; des Blancs Manteaux, 410; du Dante, 316; Etienne Marcel, 133, 420; de la Ferronnerie, 238, 417; du Fouarre, 103, 316; Francois Miron, 403; des Francs Bourgeois, 412; Guenegaud, 68; des Lombards, 154, 417; Montorgeuil, 421; Mouffetard, 333; des Petits Champs, 429; Quincampoix, 243; de Rivoli, 154; St. Antoine, 405; St. Denis, 407; St. Jacques, 13, 149, 283, 313; St. Martin, 15, 408; de Venise, 409; Vieille du Temple, 136, 414

Ruggieri column, 422, 423

Ruskin, 86, 375

S

SACRE COEUR, church of the, 293

Salisbury, John of, 94

Salons, the, 281

Samaritaine, la, 210

Sans-culottes, the, 274

Savoy, Adelaide of, 232

Saxony, Henry of, 47

Scholars, poor, at Paris, 94

Schools, rise of, at Paris, 90; elementary, 106

Scotus Duns, 78, 306

Sculpture, French, 87

Seigneurs, their lawlessness, 58

Sens, archbishop of, 61, 114, 116

September, massacres of, 270

Serfs, at Paris, 54

Severin, St., church of, 297, 314

Sevigne, Mme. de, 415

Sick, the care of in Middle Ages, 80

Sieyes, 281, 282

Siger, 103, 316

Signs, old, 283, 423

Simon, St., Duke of, 224, 232, 242

Sorbon, Robert of, 72, 96

Sorbonne, the, 292; chapel of, 329

Soufflot, 237, 252, 254

Stael, Mme. de, 282

States-General, the, 107, 122, 192, 204

Stephen, St., church of, 32, 85

Streets, renaming of, 283

Stuart, Marie, 175

Suger, Abbot, 62, 84

Sully, Duke of, 193, 196, 406

Sully, Maurice de, 85, 94

Sulpice, St., church of, 255, 321

T

TALLEYRAND, 265, 282

Talma, Julie, 282

Tasso, 405

Tellier, le, 231

Templars, destruction of, 109-118; fortress of, 117, 155

Terror, the, 260, 275; the White, 261

Thermidorians, the, 260

Thomas, St., of Canterbury, 94; church of, 95

Thorns, Crown of, redeemed by St. Louis, 71

Tiers Etat, the, 107

Tolbiac, battle of, 24

Torture, late use of in England, note, 114

Tour de Nesle, 68

Trellises, island of, 117

Tribunal, revolutionary, 311

Trocadero, the, 292, note, 438

Truce of God, the, 101

Tuileries, the, 153, 273; gardens of, 179, 430; palace of, 198; attack on, 269

Turenne, 219, 260

Twelve, the, 46, 47, 313

U

UNIVERSITY, origin of the, 98; decadence of, 104; the modern, 329

Ursins, Mme. des, 229

V

VACHES, ISLE DES, 14

Val de Grace, 237

Valliere, Mme. de la, 212, 226

Valois, House of, 121

Varennes, flight to, 267

Vauban, 224

Vendome, Duke of, 230; column of, 291, 430; place, 240

Venetian merchants at Paris, 40

Vergniaud, 272, 282

Versailles, 226, 230

Victoires, Place des, 240

Victor, St., abbey of, 61

Villon, Francois, note, 68, 94, 330

Vincennes, chapel of, 128

Vincent, St., 36; de Paul, church of, 291

Viollet le Duc, 80, 292

Volney, 282

Voltaire, 215, 223, 244, 255, 258, 281, 426

W

WALL, GALLO-ROMAN, 16, 36; of Philip-Augustus, 66, 68, 233, 330; of Marcel, 123; of Charles V., 128

Wars, religious, 175

Watch, the royal, 81

Willoughby, Lord, 143

Workmen, compensation of; by Charles V., 127



PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN BY RICHARD CLAY & SONS, LIMITED, BRUNSWICK ST., STAMFORD ST., S.E. 1, AND BUNGAY, SUFFOLK.

The Mediaeval Town Series

ASSISI.* By LINA DUFF GORDON. [4th Edition.

BRUGES.+ By ERNEST GILLIAT-SMITH. [3rd Edition.

BRUSSELS.+ By ERNEST GILLIAT-SMITH.

CAIRO.+ By STANLEY LANE-POOLE. [2nd Edition.

CAMBRIDGE.+ By CHARLES W. STUBBs, D.D.

CHARTRES.+ By CECIL HEADLAM.

CONSTANTINOPLE.* By WILLIAM H. HUTTON. [2nd Edition.

EDINBURGH.+ By OLIPHANT SMEATON.

FERRARA.+ By ELLA NOYES.

FLORENCE.+ By EDMUND G. GARDNER. [8th Edition.

LONDON.+ By HENRY B. WHEATLEY. [2nd Edition.

MOSCOW.* By WIRT GERRARE. [2nd Edition.

NUREMBERG.* By CECIL HEADLAM. [4th Edition.

PARIS.+ By THOMAS OKEY.

PERUGIA.* By MARGARET SYMONDS and LINA DUFF GORDON. [5th Edition.

PRAGUE.* By Count Lutzow.

ROME.+ By NORWOOD YOUNG. [4th Edition.

ROUEN.+ By THEODORE A. COOK. [3rd Edition.

SEVILLE.+ By WALTER M. GALLICHAN.

SIENA.+ By EDMUND G. GARDNER. [2nd Edition.

TOLEDO.* By HANNAH LYNCH. [2nd Edition.

VERONA.+ By ALETHEA WIEL. [2nd Edition.

VENICE.+ By THOMAS OKEY.

The prices of these(*) are 3s. 6d. net in cloth, 4s. 6d. net in leather; these(+) 4s. 6d. net in cloth, 5s. 6d. net in leather.

THE END

Previous Part     1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9
Home - Random Browse