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Notes and Queries, Number 193, July 9, 1853
Author: Various
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From an interesting conversation I had with Dr. Green in a railway carriage, on our return from the Commemoration at Oxford, I learned that he has in his possession, (1.) A complete section of a work on The Philosophy of Nature which he took down from the mouth of Coleridge, filling a large volume; (2.) A complete treatise on Logic; and (3.) If I did not mistake, a fragment on Ideas. The reason Dr. Green assigns for their not having been published, is, that they contain nothing but what has already seen the light in the Aids to Reflection, The Theory of Life, and the Treatise on Method. This appears to me a very inadequate reason for withholding them from the press. That the works would pay, there can be no doubt. Besides the editing of these MSS., who is so well qualified as Dr. Green to give us a good biography of Coleridge?

C. MANSFIELD INGLEBY.

Birmingham.

Selling a Wife (Vol. vii., p. 602.).—A case of selling a wife actually and bona fide happened in the provincial town in which I reside, about eighteen years ago. A man publicly sold his wife at the market cross for 15l.: the buyer carried her away with him some seven miles off, and she lived with him till his death. The seller and the buyer are both now dead, but the woman is alive, and is married to a third (or a second) husband. The legality of the transaction has, I believe, some chance of being tried, as she now claims some property belonging to her first husband (the seller), her right to which is questioned in consequence of her supposed alienation by sale; and I am informed that a lawyer has been applied to in the case. Of course there can be little doubt as to the result.

SC.

Life (Vol. vii., pp. 429. 608.).—Compare with the lines quoted by your correspondents those of Moore, entitled "My Birthday," the four following especially:

"Vain was the man, and false as vain, Who said[9], 'Were he ordain'd to run His long career of life again, He would do all that he had done.'"

Many a man would gladly live his life over again, were he allowed to bring to bear on his {44} second life the experience he had acquired in that past. For in the grave there is no room, either for ambition or repentance; and the degree of our happiness or misery for eternity is proportioned to the state of preparation or unpreparation in which we leave this world. Instead of many a man, I might have said most good men; and of the others, all who have not passed the rubicon of hope and grace. The vista of the past, however, appears a long and dreary retrospect, and any future is hailed as a relief: yet on second and deeper thought, we would mount again the rugged hill of life, and try for a brighter prospect, a higher eminence.

JARLTZBERG.

[Footnote 9: Fontenelle.]

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"Immo Deus mihi si dederit renovare juventam, Utve iterum in cunis possim vagire; recusem." Isaac Hawkins Browne, De Animi Immortalitate, lib. i., near the end.

(See Selecta Poemata Anglorum Latina, iii. 251.)

F. W. J.

Passage of Thucydides on the Greek Factions (Vol. vii., p. 594.).—The passage alluded to by SIR A. ALISON appears to be the celebrated description of the moral effects produced by the conflicts of the Greek factions, which is subjoined to the account of the Corcyraean sedition, iii. 82. The quotation must, however, have been made from memory, and it is amplified and expanded from the original. The words adverted to seem to be:

[Greek: mellesis de promethes deilia euprepes, to de sophron tou anandrou proschema, kai to pros hapan xuneton epi pan argon.]

Thucydides, however, proceeds to say that the cunning which enabled a man to plot with success against an enemy, or still more to discover his hostile purposes, was highly esteemed.

L.

Archbishop King (Vol. vii., p. 430.).—A few days since I met with the following passage in a brief sketch of Kane O'Hara, in the last number of the Irish Quarterly Review:

"In the extremely meagre published notices of O'Hara (the celebrated burletta writer), no reference has been made to his skill as an artist, of which we have a specimen in his etching of Dr. William King, archbishop of Dublin, in a wig and cap, of which portrait a copy has been made by Richardson."

This extract is taken from one of a very interesting series of papers upon "The Streets of Dublin."

ABHBA.

Devonianisms (Vol. vii., p. 544.).—Pilm, Forrell.—Pillom is the full word, of which pilm is a contraction. It appears to have been derived from the British word pylor, dust. Forell is an archaic name for the cover of a book. The Welsh appear to have adopted it from the English, as their name for a bookbinder is fforelwr, literally, one who covers books. I may mention another Devonianism. The cover of a book is called its healing. A man who lays slates on the roof of a house is, in Devonshire, called a hellier.

N. W. S. (2.)

Perseverant, Perseverance (Vol. vii., p. 400.).—Can MR. ARROWSMITH supply any instances of the verb persever (or perceyuer, as it is spelt in the 1555 edition of Hawes, M. i. col. 2.), from any other author? and will he inform us when this "abortive hog" and his litter became extinct.

In explaining speare (so strangely misunderstood by the editor of Dodsley), he should, I think, have added, that it was an old way of writing spar. In Shakspeare's Prologue to Troilus and Cressida, it is written sperr. Sparred, quoted by Richardson from the Romance of the Rose, and Troilus and Creseide, is in the edition of Chaucer referred to by Tyrwhitt, written in the Romance "spered," and in Troilus "sperred."

Q.

Bloomsbury.

"The Good Old Cause" (Vol. vi., passim).—Mrs. Behn, who gained some notoriety for her licentious writings even in Charles II.'s days, was the author of a play called The Roundheads, or the Good Old Cause: London, 1682. In the Epilogue she puts into the mouth of the Puritans the following lines respecting the Royalists:

"Yet then they rail'd against The Good Old Cause; Rail'd foolishly for loyalty and laws: But when the Saints had put them to a stand, We left them loyalty, and took their land: Yea, and the pious work of Reformation Rewarded was with plunder and sequestration."

The following lines are quoted by Mr. Teale in his Life of Viscount Falkland, p. 131.:

"The wealthiest man among us is the best: No grandeur now in Nature or in book Delights us—repose, avarice, expense, This is the idolatry; and these we adore: Plain living and high thinking are no more; The homely beauty of The Good Old Cause Is gone: our peace and fearful innocence, And pure religion breathing household laws."

Whence did Mr. Teale get these lines? Either The Good Old Cause is here used in a peculiar sense, or Mr. Teale makes an unhappy use of the quotation.

JARLTZBERG.

Saying of Pascal (Vol. vii., p. 596.).—In reply to the question of W. FRASER, I would refer him to Pascal's sixteenth Provincial Letter, where, in the last paragraph but one, we read,—

"Mes reverends peres, mes lettres n'avaient pas accoutume de se suivre de si pres, ni d'etre si etendues. Le peu de temps que j'ai eu a ete cause de l'un et de l'autre. Je n'ai fait celle-ci plus longue que parceque je {45} n'ai pas eu le loisir de la faire plus courte. La raison qui m'a oblige de hater vous est mieux connue qu'a moi."

R. E. T.

Paint taken off of old Oak (Vol. vii., p. 620.).—About twenty-six years ago, by the adoption of a very simple process recommended by Dr. Wollaston, the paint was entirely removed from the screen of carved oak which fills the north end of the great hall at Audley End, and the wood reassumed its original colour and brilliancy. The result was brought about by the application of soft-soap, laid on of the thickness of a shilling over the whole surface of the oak, and allowed to remain there two or three days; at the end of which it was washed off with plenty of cold water. I am aware that potash has been often tried with success for the same purpose; but, in many instances, unless it is used with due caution, the wood becomes of a darker hue, and has the appearance of having been charred. It is worthy of remark, that Dr. Wollaston made the suggestion with great diffidence, not having, as he said, had any practical experience of the effect of such an application.

BRAYBROOKE.

Passage in the "Tempest" (Vol. ii., pp. 259. 299. 337. 429.).—As a parallel to the expression "most busy least" (meaning "least busy" emphatically), I would suggest the common expression of the Northumbrians, "Far over near" (signifying "much too near").

H. T. RILEY.

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Miscellaneous.

NOTES ON BOOKS, ETC.

The Committee appointed by the Society of Antiquaries to consider what improvements could be introduced into its management, has at length issued a Report; and we are glad to find that the alterations suggested by them have been frankly adopted by the Council. The principal changes proposed refer to the election of the Council; the having but one Secretary, who is not to be a member of that body; the appointment of Local Secretaries; the retirement annually of the Senior Vice-President; and lastly, that which more than anything else must operate for the future benefit of the Society, the appointment of a third Standing Committee, to be called The Executive Committee, whose duty shall be "to superintend the correspondence of the Society on all subjects relating to literature and antiquities, to direct any antiquarian operations or excavations carried on by the Society, to examine all papers sent for reading, all objects sent for exhibition, and to assist the Director generally in taking care that the publications of the Society are consistent with its position and importance." It is easy to see that if a proper selection be made of the Fellows to serve on this Committee, their activity, and the renewed interest which will be thereby awakened in the proceedings of the Society, will ensure for the Thursday Evening Meetings a regular supply of objects for exhibition, and papers for reading, worthy of the body—and therefore unlike many which we have too frequently heard, and to which, but for the undeserved imputation which we should seem to cast upon our good friend Sir Henry Ellis, might be applied, with a slight alteration, that couplet of Mathias which tells—

"How o'er the bulk of these transacted deeds Sir Henry pants, and d——ns 'em as he reads."

We have now little doubt that better days are in store for the Society of Antiquaries.

The Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute commences at Chichester on Tuesday next, under the patronage of the Dukes of Norfolk and Richmond, and the Bishop of Chichester, and the Presidentship of Lord Talbot de Malahide. There is a good bill of fare provided in the shape of Lectures on the Cathedral, by Professor Willis; excursions to Boxgrove Priory, Halnaker, Godwood, Cowdray, Petworth, Pevensey, Amberley, Shoreham, Lewes, and Arundel; excavations on Bow Hill; Meetings of the Sections of History, Antiquities, and Architecture; and, what we think will be one of the pleasantest features of the programme, the Annual Meeting of the Sussex Archaeological Society, in the proceedings of which the Members of the Institute are invited to participate.

BOOKS RECEIVED.—A Glossary of Provincialisms in Use in the County of Sussex, by W. Durrant Cooper, second edition: a small but very valuable addition to our provincial glossaries, with an introduction well worth the reading. We shall be surprised if the meeting of the Institute this year in Sussex does not furnish Mr. Cooper with materials for a third and enlarged edition.—The Traveller's Library, No. 44., A Tour on the Continent by Rail and Road, by John Barrow: a brief itinerary of dates and distances, showing what may be done in a two months' visit to the Continent.—No. 45. Swiss Men and Swiss Mountains, by Robert Ferguson: a very graphic and well-written narrative of a tour in Switzerland, which deserves a corner in the knapsack of the "intending" traveller.—The Essays, or Counsels Civil and Moral, by Francis Bacon, Viscount St. Alban, edited by Thomas Markby: a cheap edition of this valuable "handbook for thinking men," produced by the ready sale which has attended The Advancement of Learning by the same editor.—Reynard the Fox, after the German Version of Goethe, with Illustrations by J. Wolf, Part VII., in which the translator carries on the story to The Outlawry in well-tuned verse.—Cyclopaedia Bibliographica, Part X. This tenth Part concludes the first half of the volume of authors and their works; and the punctuality with which the Parts have succeeded each other is a sufficient pledge that we shall see this most useful library companion completed in a satisfactory manner.

* * * * *

BOOKS AND ODD VOLUMES WANTED TO PURCHASE.

MOORE'S MELODIES. 15th Edition.

WOOD'S ATHENAE OXONIENSES (ed. Bliss). 4 vols. 4to. 1813-20.

THE COMPLAYNTS OF SCOTLAND. 8vo. Edited by Leyden. 1804.

SHAKSPEARE'S PLAYS. Vol. V. of Johnson and Steevens's edition, in 15 vols. 8vo. 1739.

CIRCLE OF THE SEASONS. 12mo. London, 1828. (Two Copies.)

JONES' ACCOUNT OF ABERYSTWITH. Trevecka, 8vo. 1779.

{46} M. C. H. BROEMEL'S FEST-TANZEN DER ERSTEN CHRISTEN. Jena, 1705.

COOPER'S ACCOUNT OF PUBLIC RECORDS. 8vo. 1832. Vol. I.

PASSIONAEL EFTE DAT LEVENT DER HEILIGEN. Basil, 1522.

LORD LANSDOWNE'S WORKS. Vol. I. Tonson, 1736.

JAMES BAKER'S PICTURESQUE GUIDE TO THE LOCAL BEAUTIES OF WALES. Vol. I. 4to. 1794.

SANDERS' HISTORY OF SHENSTONE IN STAFFORDSHIRE. J. Nichols, London, 1794. Two Copies.

HERBERT'S CAROLINA THRENODIA. 8vo. 1702.

THEOBOLD'S SHAKSPEARE RESTORED. 4to. 1726.

*** Correspondents sending Lists of Books Wanted are requested to send their names.

*** Letters, stating particulars and lowest price, carriage free, to be sent to MR. BELL, Publisher of "NOTES AND QUERIES," 186. Fleet Street.

* * * * *

Notices to Correspondents.

J. M. G., who writes respecting the Leigh Peerage, is informed that we have a private letter for him. How can it be addressed to him?

W. W. (Malta) has our best thanks for his letter of the 25th of June. His suggestion will be adopted; but we shall shortly have the pleasure of addressing a private communication to him.

SHAKSPEARE CRITICISM. We have to apologise to many friends and Correspondents for the postponement of their communications. As Soon as the Index to Vol. vii. is published, we shall take steps to get out of these arrears.

C. P. F. The Ch in the name of Chobham is soft. There is a Cobham within a few miles of the Camp.

IODIDE (June 24th). There is much care required in iodizing paper; we have no hesitation in saying at present the subject has not met with sufficient attention. When the iodized paper is immersed in water, it is some time before it assumes a yellow colour. This may be accelerated by often changing the water. The brightness of the colour is by no means an index of its degree of sensitiveness—on the contrary, paper of a bright yellow colour is more apt to brown than one of a pale primrose. Too bright a yellow would also indicate an insufficient soaking; and suffering the paper to remain longer than is needful not only lessens its sensitive powers, but does much damage by removing all the size.

H. N. (Kingston). Violet-coloured glass, ground on one side, may be obtained at 11d. per square foot of Messrs. Forest and Brownley, Lime Street, Liverpool. It may also be had in London, but the price charged is much higher. This glass obstructs just a sufficient degree of light, and is most agreeable to the sitter; not much advantage accrues from the use of large sheets, and it is objectionable for price. No doubt such an application as you mention would be useful; but, from the difficulty there is in keeping out the wet from a glass roof, it would be very objectionable. Beyond a reference to our advertising columns, we cannot enter upon the subject of the prices of chemicals and their purity. In making gun cotton, the time of immersion in the acids must be the same for twenty grains as for any large quantity: when good, there is a peculiar crispness in the cotton, and it is quite soluble in the ether. If our Correspondent (who expresses so much earnestness of success) will forward his address, he shall receive a small portion made according to DR. DIAMOND'S formulary, which we find extremely soluble; and he can compare it with that of his own production.

F. M. (Malta). 1st. We are informed by DR. DIAMOND that however beautiful the results obtained by others in the use of Canson's paper, in his hands he has found no certainty in its action, and, for iodized paper for negatives, far inferior to the best English papers. If the salts of gold are to be used, deep tints are very readily obtained by the French papers. The propriety of using gold is very questionable, not only as affecting the after permanence of the picture, but from the strong contrasts generally produced being very offensive to an artist's eye. 2ndly. Xyloidine may be iodized precisely the same as collodion, but no advantage whatever is gained from its use. A collodion for the taking of positives on glass should be differently made to one for negative pictures. There should be less of the iodides contained in it, and it should be more fluid. When this is the case, the image is never washed out by the hypo., and the delineation is equal in minuteness to any Daguerreotype on metal plates, as has been shown by the specimens of the reduction of printing exhibited by Mr. Rosling at the Society of Arts' Exhibition, where the letters were reduced to 1-750th of an inch, or less than half the diameter of a human hair. If the protonitrate of iron properly prepared be used in the development, the deposit assumes the beautiful appearance of dead white silver, having none of the reflecting qualities of the metal plates.

C. E. F. (June 13th). The spots in the specimen sent depend upon minute substances in your collodion not receiving the action of the nitrate of silver bath; and you will find this upon looking through a prepared plate after it has been in the nitrate bath, and previously to its ever having been in the camera. They may be iodide or iodate of silver, or small crystals of nitrate of potash. If the former, add a little piece of iodide of potassium, say ten grains to two ounces of collodion; or if the latter, it would depend upon a defective washing of the gun cotton by which all the soluble salts have not been removed: thus more care must be used. We would recommend you to use an entirely new bath and stronger, four ounces of hypo. to a pint: it is evident that your very nice specimens have been spoiled by the stains of the bath. Allow us again to draw your attention to the process given by MR. POLLOCK; we have seen most satisfactory pictures produced by it.

R. H. CHATTOCK (Solihull). The "freckled" appearance which you mention in your positives in all probability depends upon the action of the light upon the silver, which still remains in your proof. We have often found it to be the case when old hyposulphite of soda is used, and when the strength of the bath is becoming weak and doubtful. It is certainly a safe process to soak the picture in clean water for an hour or two, the light being excluded previous to the immersion into the hypo.; and the water extracting a large portion of the solutions remaining on the paper, the after application of the hypo. need not be so long continued, whereby the tone of the picture is not so much lowered. Your own observation, that a piece of Whatman's paper being merely divided, and one point exhibiting the defects and the other not, at once negatives the idea that the size in the paper has been affected.

The Index to our SEVENTH VOLUME will be ready on Saturday next, the 16th.

A few complete sets of "NOTES AND QUERIES," Vols. i. to vi., price Three Guineas, may now be had; for which early application is desirable.

"NOTES AND QUERIES" is published at noon on Friday, so that the Country Booksellers may receive Copies in that night's parcels, and deliver them to their Subscribers on the Saturday.

* * * * *

The Twenty-eighth Edition.

NEUROTONICS, or the Art of Strengthening the Nerves, containing Remarks on the influence of the Nerves upon the Health of Body and Mind, and the means of Cure for Nervousness, Debility, Melancholy, and all Chronic Diseases, by DR. NAPIER, M.D. London: HOULSTON & STONEMAN. Price 4d., or Post Free from the Author for Five Penny Stamps.

"We can conscientiously recommend 'Neurotonics,' by Dr. Napier, to the careful perusal of our invalid readers."—John Bull Newspaper, June 5, 1852.

* * * * *

WANTED, for the Ladies' Institute, 83. Regent Street, Quadrant, LADIES of taste for fancy work,—by paying 21s. will be received as members, and taught the new style of velvet wool work, which is acquired in a few easy lessons. Each lady will be guaranteed constant employment and ready cash payment for her work. Apply personally to Mr. Thoughey. N.B. Ladies taught by letter at any distance from London.

* * * * *

BENNETT'S MODEL WATCH, as shown at the GREAT EXHIBITION, No. 1. Class X., in Gold and Silver Cases, in five qualities, and adapted to all Climates, may now be had at the MANUFACTORY, 65. CHEAPSIDE. Superior Gold London-made Patent Levers, 17, 15, and 12 guineas. Ditto, in Silver Cases, 8, 6 and 4 guineas. First-rate Geneva Levers, in Gold Cases, 12, 10, and 8 guineas. Ditto, in Silver Cases, 8, 6, and 5 guineas. Superior Lever, with Chronometer Balance, Gold, 27, 23, and 19 guineas. Bennett's Pocket Chronometer, Gold, 50 guineas; Silver, 40 guineas. Every Watch skilfully examined, timed, and its performance guaranteed. Barometers, 2l., 3l., and 4l. Thermometers from 1s. each.

BENNETT, Watch, Clock, and Instrument Maker to the Royal Observatory, the Board of Ordnance, the Admiralty, and the Queen,

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SPECTACLES.—WM. ACKLAND applies his medical knowledge as a Licentiate of the Apothecaries' Company, London, his theory as a Mathematician, and his practice as a working Optician, aided by Smee's Optometer, in the selection of Spectacles suitable to every derangement of vision, so as to preserve the sight to extreme old age.

ACHROMATIC TELESCOPES, with the New Vetzlar Eye-pieces, as exhibited at the Academy of Sciences in Paris. The Lenses of these Eye-pieces are so constructed that the rays of light fall nearly perpendicular to the surface of the various lenses, by which the aberration is completely removed; and a telescope so fitted gives one-third more magnifying power and light than could be obtained by the old Eye-pieces. Prices of the various sizes on application to

WM. ACKLAND, Optician, 93. Hatton Garden, London.

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{47}

PHOTOGRAPHIC PICTURES.—A Selection of the above beautiful Productions (comprising Views in VENICE, PARIS, RUSSIA, NUBIA, &c.) may be seen at BLAND & LONG'S, 153. Fleet Street, where may also be procured Apparatus of every Description, and pure Chemicals for the practice of Photography in all its Branches.

Calotype, Daguerreotype, and Glass Pictures for the Stereoscope.

*** Catalogues may be had on application.

BLAND & LONG, Opticians, Philosophical and Photographical Instrument Makers, and Operative Chemists, 153. Fleet Street.

* * * * *

PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS MANUFACTORY, Charlotte Terrace, Barnsbury Road, Islington.

T. OTTEWILL (from Horne & Co.'s) begs most respectfully to call the attention of Gentlemen, Tourists, and Photographers, to the superiority of his newly registered DOUBLE-BODIED FOLDING CAMERAS, possessing the efficiency and ready adjustment of the Sliding Camera, with the portability and convenience of the Folding Ditto.

Every description of Apparatus to order.

* * * * *

PHOTOGRAPHY.—HORNE & CO.'S Iodized Collodion, for obtaining Instantaneous Views, and Portraits in from three to thirty seconds, according to light.

Portraits obtained by the above, for delicacy of detail rival the choicest Daguerreotypes, specimens of which may be seen at their Establishment.

Also every description of Apparatus, Chemicals, &c. &c. used in this beautiful Art.—123. and 121. Newgate Street.

* * * * *

Just published, price 1s., free by Post 1s. 4d.,

THE WAXED-PAPER PHOTOGRAPHIC PROCESS of GUSTAVE LE GRAY'S NEW EDITION. Translated from the French.

Sole Agents in the United Kingdom for VOIGHTLANDER & SON'S celebrated Lenses for Portraits and Views.

General Depot for Turner's, Whatman's, Canson Freres', La Croix, and other Talbotype Papers.

Pure Photographic Chemicals.

Instructions and Specimens in every Branch of the Art.

GEORGE KNIGHT & SONS, Foster Lane, London.

* * * * *

PHOTOGRAPHY.—Collodion (Iodized with the Ammonio-Iodide of Silver).—J. B. HOCKIN & CO., Chemists, 289. Strand, were the first in England who published the application of this agent (see Athenaeum, Aug. 14th). Their Collodion (price 9d. per oz.) retains its extraordinary sensitiveness, tenacity, and colour unimpaired for months; it may be exported to any climate, and the Iodizing Compound mixed as required. J. B. HOCKIN & CO. manufacture PURE CHEMICALS and all APPARATUS with the latest Improvements adapted for all the Photographic and Daguerreotype processes. Cameras for Developing in the open Country. GLASS BATHS adapted to any Camera. Lenses from the best Makers. Waxed and Iodized Papers, &c.

* * * * *

PHOTOGRAPHIC PAPER.—Negative and Positive Papers of Whatman's Turner's, Sanford's, and Canson Freres' make. Waxed-Paper for Le Gray's Process. Iodized and Sensitive Paper for every kind of Photography.

Sold by JOHN SANFORD, Photographic Stationer, Aldine Chambers, 13. Paternoster Row, London.

* * * * *

CLERICAL, MEDICAL, AND GENERAL LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY.

* * * * *

Established 1824.

* * * * *

FIVE BONUSES have been declared: at the last in January, 1852, the sum of 131,125l. was added to the Policies, producing a Bonus varying with the different ages from 24-1/2 to 55 per cent. on the Premiums paid during the five years, or from 5l. to 12l. 10s. per cent. on the Sum Assured.

The small share of Profit divisible in future among the Shareholders being now provided for, the ASSURED will hereafter derive all the benefits obtainable from a Mutual Office, WITHOUT ANY LIABILITY OR RISK OF PARTNERSHIP.

POLICIES effected before the 30th June next, will be entitled, at the next Division, to one year's additional share of Profits over later Assurers.

On Assurances for the whole of Life only one half of the Premiums need be paid for the first five years.

INVALID LIVES may be Assured at rates proportioned to the risk.

Claims paid thirty days after proof of death, and all Policies are Indisputable except in cases of fraud.

Tables of Rates and forms of Proposal can be obtained of any of the Society's Agents, or of

GEORGE H. PINCKARD, Resident Secretary.

99. Great Russell Street, Bloomsbury, London.

* * * * *

UNITED KINGDOM LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY: established by Act of Parliament in 1834.—8. Waterloo Place, Pall Mall, London.

HONORARY PRESIDENTS.

Earl of Courtown Earl Leven and Melville Earl of Norbury Earl of Stair Viscount Falkland Lord Elphinstone Lord Belhaven and Stenton Wm. Campbell, Esq., of Tillichewan

LONDON BOARD.

Chairman.—Charles Graham, Esq. Deputy-Chairman.—Charles Downes, Esq.

H. Blair Avarne, Esq. E. Lennox Boyd, Esq., F.S.A., Resident. C. Berwick Curtis, Esq. William Fairlie, Esq. D. Q. Henriques, Esq. J. G. Henriques, Esq. F. C. Maitland, Esq. William Railton, Esq. F. H. Thomson, Esq. Thomas Thorby, Esq.

MEDICAL OFFICERS.

Physician.—Arthur H. Hassall, Esq., M.D., 8. Bennett Street, St. James's. Surgeon.—F. H. Tomson, Esq., 48. Berners Street.

The Bonus added to Policies from March, 1834, to December 31, 1847, is as follows:—

-+ + + Sum Time Sum added to Sum Assured. Assured. Policy Payable + + at Death. In 1841. In 1848. -+ + -+ + L L s.d. L s.d. L s.d. 5000 14 years 683 6 8 787 10 0 6470 16 8 * 1000 7 years - - 157 10 0 1157 10 0 500 1 year - - 11 5 0 511 5 0 -+ + -+ +

* EXAMPLE.—At the commencement of the year 1841, a person aged thirty took out a Policy for 1000l., the annual payment for which is 24l. 1s. 8d.; in 1847 he had paid in premiums 168l. 11s. 8d.; but the profits being 2-1/4 per cent. per annum on the sum insured (which is 22l. 10s. per annum for each 1000l.) he had 157l. 10s. added to the Policy, almost as much as the premiums paid.

The Premiums, nevertheless, are on the most moderate scale, and only one-half need be paid for the first five years, when the Insurance is for Life. Every information will be afforded on application to the Resident Director.

* * * * *

PURE NERVOUS or MIND COMPLAINTS.—If the readers of NOTES AND QUERIES, who suffer from depression of spirits, confusion, headache, blushing, groundless fears, unfitness for business or society, blood to the head, failure of memory, delusions, suicidal thoughts, fear of insanity, &c., will call on, or correspond with, REV. DR. WILLIS MOSELEY, who, out of above 22,000 applicants, knows not fifty uncured who have followed his advice, he will instruct them how to get well, without a fee, and will render the same service to the friends of the insane.—At home from 11 to 3.

18. BLOOMSBURY STREET, BEDFORD SQUARE.

* * * * *

WESTERN LIFE ASSURANCE AND ANNUITY SOCIETY.

3. PARLIAMENT STREET, LONDON.

Founded A.D. 1842.

Directors.

H. E. Bicknell, Esq. T. Grissell, Esq. T. S. Cocks, Jun. Esq., M.P. J. Hunt, Esq. G. H. Drew, Esq. J. A. Lethbridge, Esq. W. Evans, Esq. E. Lucas, Esq. W. Freeman, Esq. J. Lys Seager, Esq. F. Fuller, Esq. J. B. White, Esq. J. H. Goodhart, Esq. J. Carter Wood, Esq.

Trustees.—W. Whateley, Esq., Q.C.; George Drew, Esq., T. Grissell, Esq. Physician.—William Rich. Basham, M.D. Bankers.—Messrs. Cocks, Biddulph, and Co., Charing Cross.

VALUABLE PRIVILEGE.

POLICIES effected in this Office do not become void through temporary difficulty in paying a Premium, as permission is given upon application to suspend the payment at interest, according to the conditions detailed in the Prospectus.

Specimens of Rates of Premium for Assuring 100l., with a Share in three-fourths of the Profits:—

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Now ready, price 10s. 6d., Second Edition, with material additions, INDUSTRIAL INVESTMENT and EMIGRATION: being a TREATISE ON BENEFIT BUILDING SOCIETIES, and on the General Principles of Land Investment, exemplified in the Cases of Freehold Land Societies, Building Companies, &c. With a Mathematical Appendix on Compound Interest and Life Assurance. By ARTHUR SCRATCHLEY, M.A., Actuary to the Western Life Assurance Society, 3. Parliament Street, London.

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{48}

MURRAY'S RAILWAY READING.

This Day, new and revised Edition, post 8vo., 2s. 6d.

ANCIENT SPANISH BALLADS: Historical and Romantic. Translated, with Notes, by JOHN GIBSON LOCKHART, ESQ.

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TO ALL WHO HAVE FARMS OR GARDENS.

THE GARDENERS' CHRONICLE AND AGRICULTURAL GAZETTE,

(The Horticultural Part edited by PROF. LINDLEY)

Of Saturday, July 2, contains Articles on

Aloes, to water, by Mr. Burgess Analyses of roots Ants, black Banana, by Mr. Bidwell Beetles, to kill Begonia Prestoniensis Books noticed Botanic Garden, Glasnevin, fete in Calendar, horticultural —— agricultural Celery, to blanch, by Mr. Bennett Chopwell Wood Digger, Samuelson's Drainage, land Farming on Dartmoor Fences, land occupied by Fir, miniature Scotch, by Mr. McPherson Forests, royal Fruit, to pack Grapes, to pack —— at Chiswick Grape mildew Grasses for lawns Grubbers or scufflers Horticultural Society's garden Law of fixtures Lawn grasses Lisianthus Russellianus Lycoperdon Proteus, by Mr. Richardson Mangold Wurzel Manuring, liquid, by Professor Hay Mildew, grape Newbury Horticultural Show Packing fruit Peaches, to pack Pear disease (with engraving) Pelargoniums, to bed out —— window Poultry literature Rhubarb wine Root crops Roots, best size of, by Mr. Hamilton Royal Botanic Gardens Scufflers or grubbers Seeding, thin Societies, proceedings of the Horticultural, Agricultural of England Turnip crops Wine, rhubarb

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ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE

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ANNUAL MEETING, CHICHESTER, 1853.

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MADVIG'S GREEK SYNTAX, BY ARNOLD AND BROWNE.

In square 8vo., price 8s. 6d.

SYNTAX OF THE GREEK LANGUAGE, especially of the Attic Dialect, for the Use of Schools. By PROFESSOR MADVIG. Translated from the German by the REV. H. BROWNE, M.A., and edited by the REV. T. K. ARNOLD, M.A., late Rector of Lyndon, and formerly Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. With an Appendix on the GREEK PARTICLES, by the Translator.

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ARNOLD'S EDITIONS OF THE GREEK DRAMAS, WITH ENGLISH NOTES.

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THE MEDEA of EURIPIDES; with ENGLISH NOTES, from the German of Witzschel. Edited by the REV. THOMAS KERCHEVER ARNOLD, M.A., late Rector of Lyndon, and formerly Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge.

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THE STORY OF CORFE CASTLE, and of many who have lived there. Collected from Ancient Chronicles and Records; also from the Private Memoirs of a Family resident there in the Time of the Civil Wars, which include various particulars of the Court of Charles I., when at York, and afterwards at Oxford. By the RIGHT HON. GEORGE BANKES, M.P.

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THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE for JULY, 1853, being the First of a New Volume, contains:—1. Memoirs of Thomas Moore. 2. Wanderings of an Antiquary, from York to Godmanham (with Engravings). 3. Female Novelists. 4. A Political Caricature, temp. Charles I. 5. A Midland Town (Leicester) in the Reign of George III., and Mr. Gardiner's Anecdotes of T. Moore. 6. Historical Notes on the Retaining of Counsel. 7. Roman Antiquities found at Kingsholm, near Gloucester. 8. Remains of Norman Cross at Birstall, co. York (with an Engraving). 9. The Bourne Stream near Croydon. 10. Dr. Guest on the Etymology of Stonehenge. Correspondence of Sylvanus Urban: The Itinerary of Richard of Cirencester.—The Roches and Viscounty of Fermoy.—Recent repairs of Lambeth Church.—Early state of St. James's Park.—Postmen, temp. Charles I., &c. &c. With Notes of the Month, Reviews of New Publications, Historical Chronicle, and OBITUARY, including Memoirs of the Earl of Ducie, Lord Dacre, Sir John Hope, Bart., Sir Charles A. Elton, Bart., Lt.-Gen. Sir R. Arbuthnot, Vice-Adm. Sir F. Mason, Sir Richard B. Comyn, Culling C. Smith, Esq., J. L. Dampier, Esq., Ludwig Tieck, &c. Price 2s. 6d.

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Now ready, price 4s. 6d. By Post, 5s.

THE PRACTICE OF PHOTOGRAPHY. A Manual for Students and Amateurs. By PHILIP DELAMOTTE, F.S.A. Illustrated with a Photographic Picture taken by the Collodion Process. This Manual contains much practical information of a valuable nature.

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Printed by THOMAS CLARK SHAW, of No. 10 Stonefield Street, in the Parish of St. Mary, Islington, at No. 5. New Street Square, in the Parish of St. Bride, in the City of London; and published by GEORGE BELL, of No. 186. Fleet Street, in the Parish of St. Dunstan in the West, in the City of London, Publisher, at No. 186. Fleet Street aforesaid.—Saturday, July 9, 1853.

* * * * *

Corrections made to printed original.

page 25, "awe, auge, ave, campus": 'campres' in original (Errata, Issue 194).

page 26, "the Coptic iaro": 'iars' in original (Errata, Issue 194).

page 28, "connecting the following words with one another": 'word' in original.

page 35, "any other source than those": 'that those' in original.

page 36, "the regularity of the petals.": 'irregularity' in original (Errata, Issue 194).

THE END

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