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Little Folks (November 1884) - A Magazine for the Young
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And now he was lying on the bare ground, with only a cold, hard stone for his pillow: all that he loved left far behind; an unknown future before him; and wild beasts prowling about in the distance, in hungry search of prey. How heavily on his conscience lay his deep sin! And how the pure, bright moon and the peaceful stars seemed to be reproaching him!

He thought upon his father's God, and his grandfather's trusting obedience, that had gained for him the title of the friend of the great Ruler of the universe. And, as he contrasted with Abraham's faith his own wicked conduct, he felt miserably unworthy to bear his name. Gladly would he have closed his eyes in repose, and thankfully would he have forgotten, for a time at least, his heavy sorrows; but—

"Tired nature's sweet restorer, balmy sleep,"

flies from the guilty conscience; and there was no rest for Jacob.

Oh! Why had he so easily and so weakly yielded to that strong temptation to obtain by fraud the coveted blessing? Why had he not, like Abraham, patiently waited for the fulfilment of the sure promise made on his behalf? Why had he not waited till God Himself had brought it about—that the elder should serve the younger—instead of faithlessly and sinfully hurrying it on himself, and bringing down upon himself and his home all this misery?

There was no book of sweet Psalms to comfort him and assure him of forgiveness; but, as he turned uneasily on his hard bed, and looked up to the quiet heavens, something of their peace stole into his heart. He thought of the great God who dwells above; of the kindness which He had shown to Abraham and Isaac; of the gentle, loving way in which He had drawn near to them; and of the gracious promises which He had made to them.

And he felt sure that such a God must be merciful and compassionate to a poor erring wanderer like himself; and that, enthroned in glory as He was, He would listen to his cry, as He had listened to the outcast Ishmael's before him; and forgive. He would tell Him how sorry he was for what he had done, and ask Him to take away the load that was weighing him down.

So the restless young man arose; and, kneeling upon the bare ground, and raising his beseeching eyes to the star-lit heavens, he poured out to Him who reigns above them the tale of his griefs, and asked Him, in mercy, to forgive the sins that he had committed against Him.

And there, as he knelt, his prayer was heard; the weight of guilt was lifted from his oppressed spirit; and he breathed more freely than he had done since he committed that dark sin. He could not now go back to his old home. Early on the morrow he must go forward on his long journey, and endure all that he had brought upon himself; but his mind was at ease; his heart was at rest. The God of his fathers had heard him, and with His forgiveness and blessing he could be happy.

So he lay down again, not to toss uneasily about as before, but to sleep the sleep of those who are at peace with Heaven.

And the pitying Father above, who, as the Bible assures us, does not deal with us after our sins, nor reward us according to our iniquities, not only put away Jacob's transgression, but drew near to the poor, erring, but repentant wanderer, lying out there in the lone desert, to comfort him.

A peaceful smile now rested on the face of the sleeper, reflecting the deep happiness which filled his breast; and soon over his countenance was spread an expression of joy that it had never worn before.

He saw in his sleep a great ladder of light, the one end of which rested on the earth, while the other reached right up to heaven. Beautiful, bright-winged angels, with faces shining like the sun, were going up and coming down it. And the Lord of Glory Himself, to whom he had just prayed, stood above it. No words of anger or stern rebuke were on His lips. No ominous frown darkened His face. Only a look of tenderness and love lighted it up; and the pardoned Jacob, unworthy as he knew himself to be, did not shrink from looking up to Him, who in His gracious compassion had deigned to appear to him.

"I am the Lord God of Abraham thy father, and the God of Isaac," He said; "and I am with thee, and will keep thee in all places whither thou goest."

Oh, how glad and thankful Jacob was thus to be assured that, though he had so sinned, yet God had not left him, but was still with him! How deeply thankful he was that he would not now have to go on his journey alone, as he had feared, but that the God of his fathers would go with him, to take care of him, wherever he went! His bosom swelled with joy, and his face grew still brighter; for this was the happiest moment in all his life.

There, lying on that cold stone, he felt nothing but joy. With the good and Holy One so near, with His peace and gladness in his heart, he could smile at all outward miseries.

But the gracious and gentle voice did not cease yet. "I will not leave thee," it went on to say, "until I have done that which I have spoken to thee of. The land whereon thou liest, to thee will I give it, and to thy seed. And thy seed shall be as the dust of the earth; and thou shalt spread abroad to the west, and to the east, and to the north, and to the south; and in thee, and in thy seed, shall all the families of the earth be blessed."

So he, who was all alone, was to become the father of innumerable people; and the one who had deserved only cursing was not only to be blessed himself, but to be made a blessing to all the earth!

The vision passed away, and Jacob awoke, astounded at God's goodness and mercy. For he knew that the dream was no idle thing, but that it told of present and future realities. And as he meditated on it his joy increased. He took the big, hard stone, that had afforded him so sweet a resting-place, and setting it up for a pillar, in grateful remembrance of his happy dream, poured oil on the top of it. The sweet perfume of the precious oil filled all the air, and rose up like an offering of glad thanksgiving, well-pleasing to Him who looked down upon it.

"Surely God is in this place, and I knew it not," Jacob said. For he could never have imagined, as, with tearful eyes, he first lay down on that lone spot, that God would have revealed Himself there; and this was the first great lesson of love and mercy that he had ever spelled over. "I knew it not; but now I know, and will go on my way with gladness, fearing nothing."

So sacred had the spot become to him, that he called it Bethel, the House of God. And he vowed a vow, that if God would indeed be with him, as He had promised, and prosper him, and bring him back again to his father's house, then he would serve Him faithfully all his life, and would give Him a tenth of all that was bestowed upon him.

He went on his journey no longer lonely and sad; for the God of his fathers was with him; and His presence brightened up the dreary wilderness, and made the solitary place glad.

In the new land to which he went Jacob had much to endure; but the vision of the bright ladder that he had seen in his dream rose up again and again to comfort him; and his heart grew stronger and braver as he thought of the abiding presence of God.

Years afterwards, when he came back to the land of Canaan, he visited the spot where, on that memorable night, he had lain down in such sorrow, and risen up in such joy. He had then rosy children, and numerous possessions. And as he thought of all the unmerited goodness and mercy which had followed him in the strange land, and of the faithfulness which had brought him back, he built another altar, and praised God anew.

But, though Jacob was so comforted by his dream, it is scarcely likely that he could see, as we can, the full meaning of it; for the vision of the bright ladder was intended to comfort God's people in all ages, and to grow brighter and brighter as it came to be understood.

So, we, who know how the glorious ladder is Jesus Christ, through whom all blessings come down from heaven to us, and through whom, also, we may mount up to the very throne of "our Father," in the highest heavens; we, too, will raise up our altar of thanksgiving, and go on our way, rejoicing in the God of Bethel, who is still with His people, and who, from the top of the ladder, holds sweet communion with them, cheering them on their way, till He brings them into the goodly land.

"Oh! touch mine eyes, that I may see The vision of the Ladder bright; Reveal Thy glory, Lord, to me, And cheer the darkness of the night.

A stone is all my pillow here: No other rest I seek below; 'A stranger and a sojourner,' Like all my fathers, I would go.

But be Thou with me, and the night More glad shall be than high noon-day, And the lone desert shall be bright With glories that ne'er pass away."

H. D.

BIBLE EXERCISES FOR SUNDAY AFTERNOONS.

49. Who were the first to apply to Jesus the title of King of the Jews?

50. Where is wisdom set forth as better than strength or the weapons of war?

51. Which of the four Evangelists has preserved to us an account of our Lord's being sent by Pilate to Herod for trial?

52. Who tells us in the Old Testament that death and life are in the power of the tongue?

53. Which of the New Testament writers speaks of the tongue as "a little member," and tells us that the one who keeps it in order is a perfect man?

54. Which of the Epistles tells us that he who is a friend of the world is an enemy of God?

55. Where in the Book of the Revelation do we see the redeemed and glorified saints ascribing praise to Jesus, as having made them kings and priests unto God?

56. Where are we told that to be guarded in our speech saves us from trouble?

57. On what occasion is Saul of Tarsus first called Paul?

58. Where, after the Ark of the Covenant was removed to the new Tabernacle at Jerusalem, did the original brazen altar remain?

59. Of what colour was the lace to be upon which was placed the golden plate worn on the forehead of the High Priest?

60. Show that the last cry of Jesus on the Cross was one of triumph.

ANSWERS TO BIBLE EXERCISES (37-48. See p. 216).

37. The woman who had touched His garment (St. Matt. ix. 22; St. Mark v. 34; St. Luke viii. 48).

38. In Rev. xxi. 8, 27, xxii. 15.

39. Isaiah (Isaiah lxi. 6).

40. In Rev. v. 6, 9, 12, xiii. 8.

41. Prov. xx. 11.

42. In Prov. xxix. 25.

43. Herod Antipas (St. Luke xiii. 31, 32).

44. The ants, the conies, the locusts, and the spider (Prov. xxx. 24, 28).

45. In Deut. xxi. 6-8; Ps. xxvi. 6.

46. Solomon (Eccles. ix. 8); St. James (James i. 27).

47. Nebuchadnezzar (Dan. ii. 47).

48. In Ps. cxii. 4.



The Editor's Pocket-Book



A Product of the Soudan.

It is said that the Mahdi, of whom so much has been printed in the papers for months past, has been the means of increasing the price of gum arabic. This material, which is obtained from the Soudan, is largely used in the making of sweet-meats, while the Government envelope factory in the United States uses one ton every week. Owing to the war in the Soudan, the supply, amounting to ten millions of pounds yearly, has been stopped for more than a twelvemonth. The price has been gradually rising, and it will be not a little odd if we have to blame the Mahdi, among other things, for dear jujubes.

The Vallary Crown.

The old Romans were before all things a military people. Consequently, they took care to confer rewards upon soldiers for bravery and other forms of service, so as to preserve proper spirit among the men. One of these rewards of valour was called the Vallary Crown, and was bestowed upon the soldier who was the first to mount the enemy's rampart (vallum). It consisted of a circle of gold, with palisades attached to it. One can imagine with what zeal an attack would be made, and how hotly the foremost place would be struggled for, so that the crown might be won.

Supposed Relic of Trafalgar.

While a diver was engaged off the coast near Gibraltar in the search for the whereabouts of a recent wreck, he discovered at the bottom from eighty to one hundred large guns, mostly 24- and 32-pounders, and two big anchors. As no appliance for raising them was at hand, they were not brought up, and their nationality has not been ascertained. It is supposed that they belonged to a line-of-battle ship, which sank in the Peninsular war, possibly after the battle of Trafalgar.

The Founder of Ragged Schools.

John Pounds, a poor shoemaker of Portsmouth, was the originator of this well-known method of educating city arabs and other very poor children. For twenty years before his death in 1839, he used to collect around him the ragged children of the district in which he lived, and teach them while he worked at his cobbling. He taught them for nothing, and his class was well attended. His success at length attracted general notice, and systematic effort was in due course made for the establishment of such schools in other towns and cities throughout the kingdom.

Tallow Trees.

In different parts of the globe are found various sorts of trees that yield a thick oil or resin, that, like tallow, is used for making candles, and hence the trees are popularly styled tallow trees. The substance is commonly extracted by making a cut in the bark, from which the oily matter exudes. In other cases the seeds are boiled, from which a fine white tallow is obtained. The candles and soap so made are beautifully white.

A Saucy Sparrow.

One day a boy picked up a young sparrow, which he brought home. His father put it in a big cage, and in course of time it became thoroughly domesticated. It used to fly about the garden and perch upon the heads and hands of the family. After a while it would venture upon an oak and carry on a very voluble conversation with its fellows who also patronised the tree. It soon grew as impudent and pugnacious and ravenous as most sparrows. It was always hungry and talkative. Though it had the freedom of the neighbourhood, it came down daily before sunset and roosted on a perch in its cage, the door of which was left open for its convenience. It was let out the first thing in the morning, but returned about six times a day for food, usually taking care to attend all the family meals, and often breakfasting with the master of the house, with whom it struck up a firm friendship. Sometimes it brought home a friend or two, but as they lacked its faith they invariably remained outside while it feasted indoors. It generally watched the boy's father as he left home every morning, chirping "good-bye" from a gutter-pipe. Its appetite continued healthy and its taste accommodating. Latterly it started a home of its own, but did not give up its old friends, looking in upon the household almost as often as ever.

"Sansculottes."

This term—in allusion to their poor and mean attire—was applied, during the earlier stages of the great French Revolution, by the Court party to those democrats of Paris who were foremost in urging the demand for reform. The epithet given in scorn was accepted with pleasure by the people, and it soon came in their eyes to indicate a patriot, and some even affected a ruder mode of dress as if to show they gloried in the title. However, after the lapse of a very few years, the name fell into disuse, as it had been connected with so many scenes of bloodshed and revolting cruelty.

Fresh-water Springs in the Sea.

There is a hot region on the Persian Gulf where little or no rain falls. At Babrin, though the dry shore has no fresh water, the people obtain a supply from springs which burst forth copiously from the bottom of the sea. The fresh water is got by diving. The diver winds a large goatskin bag round his left arm, his hand grasping the bag's mouth. He next takes a heavy stone to which a stout line is fastened, and then plunges in. As soon as he reaches the bottom, he opens the bag over the strong jet of fresh water, ascends with the upward current, shutting the bag the while, and is helped on board. The stone having been pulled up and the driver refreshed, he plunges in again. These submarine springs are believed to take their source in the hills of Osman, some 500 or 600 miles distant.

Feathered Thieves.

It is very well known that jackdaws are accomplished thieves, and their evil fame in this respect has been humorously pictured in the story of "The Jackdaw of Rheims," in the "Ingoldsby Legends." It seems, however, that other birds besides jackdaws may be occasional robbers, and may cause much mischief. Not long ago, a gentleman on going to his letter-box discovered that a letter containing a cheque for 10 pounds had been tampered with, and that the cheque was missing. He immediately came to the conclusion that human thieves had been at work, and gave information to the police at the nearest station. On his return home, however, he examined his letter-box more closely, and then found several tomtits in it; and on further search, he discovered the missing cheque lying twenty-six yards away on the turnpike road, whither it was evident it had been carried by a tomtit, since it bore abundant marks of the bird's beak.

Carlyle's Birthplace.

The house in Ecclefechan, in Dumfriesshire, where Carlyle was born, and which was purchased by a niece, has been restored and has had some interesting relics placed in it. It will no doubt be the scene of many pilgrimages. In carrying out the alterations, the old doors and the like have been scrupulously preserved. The room where the young Carlyle lived contains the philosopher's easy-chair, a mahogany table well stained with ink, an old-fashioned bookcase consisting of a series of shelves supported by pillars at the side and hung upon the wall, besides appropriate photographs and other articles.

Memory in Dogs.

Several years ago a gentleman was presented with a black-and-tan terrier. One evening he went to St. John's Wood, London, to fetch it to his own home, some five miles on the south of the Thames. For the greater part of the way the dog and his new owner travelled (in the dark of course) outside an omnibus. The terrier was confined for a week and then set at liberty. Next day it disappeared, and it was afterwards learnt that it arrived at its old home—ragged and starved—six or seven days after effecting its escape. As the dog had been taken on a vehicle right across London, over the river, and in the dark, to a strange district nine miles from its home, its finding its way back to St. John's Wood must be regarded as a remarkable instance of canine intelligence.

Anecdotes of Apelles.

Some interesting anecdotes have been preserved about Apelles, who flourished during the latter half of the fourth century before Christ, and who was considered to be the most famous painter of the ancient world. Alexander the Great once visited his studio, and exhibited so much ignorance of art that Apelles desired him to be silent, as the boys who were grinding his colours were laughing at him. He painted an ideal portrait of this celebrated king, of which Alexander said, "There are only two Alexanders—the invincible son of Philip, and the inimitable Alexander of Apelles." The painter's disposition was so generous that he purchased a picture of an artist whose talents were not recognised as they deserved, and spread a report that he would sell it again as one of his own. His industry was such that he never allowed a day to pass without painting one line—a habit which has become proverbial in the Latin phrase, nulla dies sine linea ("No day without a line"). Apelles was not above criticism. When his paintings were exposed to the public view, it is said that he used to conceal himself near them so that he might hear the comments of onlookers. A cobbler finding fault with the shoe of one of his figures, Apelles at once corrected it. But next day when the cobbler ventured to criticise the legs, the painter came forth from his hiding-place and recommended the cobbler to stick to the shoes—advice which in the words of the Latin version of the story also has been adopted as a proverb, Ne sutor ultra crepidam ("Let not the shoemaker overstep his last").

Drawing the Badger.

Badger-baiting was a brutal sport at one time in vogue in this country as a kind of "attraction" in public-houses of the lowest class. The animal was kept in a tub or barrel and was attacked by dogs. Yielding at last to superior numbers, it was dragged or drawn out. The badger was then set free and permitted to return to its tub until it recovered from the effects of the struggle, after which it was again baited. It had to submit to this barbarous treatment several times a day. The verb "to badger," now often applied to persons, was originally used in direct reference to this cruel practice.

A Gallant Rescue.

Not many months since some boys were sitting on the banks of the River Devon, near Tillicoultry (Scotland), when one of them, aged ten, waded into the stream in search of an article. He had hardly entered the water when he walked into a deep pool, in which he was whirled about quite helplessly, like a cork. Fortunately, a lad named James Henderson happened to be passing at the time, and observing the imminent peril of the poor boy, plunged into the river at the risk of his life, and brought him to the bank, where, after treatment, he recovered. The painful screams of the boy created great excitement in the neighbourhood, and there seems no doubt that but for the gallant rescue here recorded he would have been drowned. It would be a great advantage if the teaching of boys and girls how to swim were made a necessary part of their education.



War Elephants.

From time immemorial elephants have been employed in war in the East and in Africa, though the Indian kind is more familiar to us in this respect. At first they were equipped with a huge tower, in which fighting-men were carried—a practice of which we are reminded in the sign of the "Elephant and Castle" still in vogue in some inns—and were even trained to use swords with their trunks. In the present day, however, the creatures are found more useful in assisting the transport of artillery in hilly or marshy districts. The "castle" has been replaced by a howdah, from which the soldiers use the modern weapons of war. Military service may, therefore, be regarded as being a good deal easier than it once was—so far, at least, as elephants are concerned.



POOR PUSSY.

It was early morning, near eight of the clock, And all might hear the milkman's knock, When a wandering stranger strolled the street, Well clad in fur, but with nothing to eat. Poor Pussy!

She had passed by the houses of ladies in silk, But no response to her quest for milk, And while beginning to feel "dead beat," The passers by she would entreat. Poor Pussy!

No food whate'er could Pussy buy, And travellers passed her. I'll tell you why: They thought, of course, "It's only a cat, And nothing much to be marvelled at." Poor Pussy!

In vain, dear Puss, was thy appeal, No hammer could reach those hearts of steel, And in this world, so full of strife, A plaintive mew won't save a life. Poor Pussy!

Ill did it seem thy tabby grace, The woes of London streets to face, Cold glances, or a kick for thy fur, And none to list to thy murmuring purr. Poor Pussy!

But pussy, strolling down the street, Chanced a child's kind glance to meet, And soon her troubles all were passed, And love and plenty came at last To Pussy.



The "Little Folks" Humane Society.

THIRTY-THIRD LIST OF OFFICERS AND MEMBERS.

Officers' Names are printed in Small Capital Letters, and the names of their Members are printed beneath. Where a short line, thus, "——", is printed, the end of an Officer's List is indicated.

AGE

47276 Louisa Davies 12 47277 Fanny Pugh 17 47278 Ada Davies 16 47279 Florence Lewis 14 47280 Louisa Lewis 12 47281 Mary Watson 11 —— 47282 Gertrude Gaskell 17 47283 ARTHUR BLACKBURN, Leeds 15 47284 C. W. Killick 15 47285 Walter Smith 13 47286 Annie Moore 14 47287 Mary J. Lester 18 47288 Pattie Brooke 17 47289 Ada Bradley 20 47290 Maggie Brooke 13 47291 Fanny Brooke 12 47292 Florence Neal 15 47293 Alice Blackburn 20 47294 John Blackburn 10 47295 Eliza A. Lupton 20 47296 George Blackburn 13 47297 Mathew Tilford 7 47298 Alice Liddiard 12 47299 Ellen Liddiard 11 47300 Louisa Child 11 47301 Annie Batty 9 47302 Eva Bateson 13 47303 Harry Bateson 11 47304 Charles Neal 6 47305 Louisa Wright 16 47306 Geo. Richmond 11 47307 Ellenor Child 11 47308 Louisa Emmett 12 47309 Tom Tilford 10 47310 Annie Wilton 10 47311 Lucy Neal 10 47312 Kate Scott 9 47313 John W. Kay 10 47314 Mary J. Weatley 11 47315 Elizbth. Hawkins 12 47316 Hellen Harrison 11 47317 Wm. Agar 8 47318 Louisa Hawkins 8 47319 Fanny Webster 20 47320 W. Whitehead 8 47321 Cressy Brooke 8 47322 Fredk. Wist 7 47323 Harry West 12 47324 Wm. Liddiard 18 47325 Henry Neal 12 47326 Charles Lister 11 47327 Wm. D. Harrison 13 47328 John Brooksbank 10 47329 James Wilkinson 13 47330 Walter Kendall 14 47331 L. Wilkinson 12 47332 John Bradley 16 47333 Harry Lupton 18 47334 Eliza Robinson 12 47335 A. Cullingworth 12 47336 Albert Kendall 12 47337 Fredk. Scott 11 47338 Fredk. Broughton 10 47339 John Ranson 7 47340 Sam Hirst 9 47341 James Richmond 9 47342 Mary Ranson 8 47343 Arthur Bateson 17 47344 Edith Scott 6 47345 ALICK MCLENNAN, Glasgow 10 47346 William Chalmers 9 47347 David Govan 11 47348 James Thomson 11 47349 Robert Galloway 9 47350 Florence Faill 8 47351 Alice Faill 9 47352 Maggie Stirrat 10 47353 William Orr 9 47354 Lars Sundt 21 47355 J. W. Silcox 11 47356 Isabel Taylor 14 47357 J. A. M. Adams 12 47358 Hugh Findlay 13 47359 John McDougall 11 47360 A. Gibson 11 47361 S. McLennan 20 47362 David Millar 14 47363 John Burns 13 47364 Mary Cown 7 47365 Charles Black 9 47366 George Moultrie 13 47367 H. Thornton 11 47368 Robert Thomson 14 47369 Arthur Wardrop 12 47370 M. Macallam 12 47371 Geo. Hamilton 10 47372 George Silcox 8 47373 Wm. McDougall 13 47374 W. McDonald 13 47375 J. A. Duncan 12 47376 Wm. Stewart 13 47377 E. Hamilton 12 47378 Wm. N. Simpson 10 47379 William Smellie 13 47380 James Keith 13 47381 William Cowan 6 47382 Agnes Faill 12 47383 M. McLennan 16 47384 Wm. McLennan 18 47385 Robert Black 11 47386 Harold Black 10 47387 James Thomson 15 47388 A. McFarlane 13 47389 A. F. McEwen 11 47390 Tom Moody 9 47391 John G. Miller 12 47392 Andrew Miller 11 47393 Isabella Cowan 9 47394 Willie Henry 11 47395 John Thomson 12 —— 47396 Harriet E. Ross 13 47397 E. G. Bennett 12 47398 Harold Cobb 12 47399 Ida G. Bennett 7 47400 C. M. Hunt 11 47401 Henry W. Hunt 9 47402 Kate A. Mortlock 19 47403 Edith C. Terry 12 47404 Florence Stiles 12 47405 Sarah Ball 12 47406 Jane Skudder 9 47407 Lily Richards 8 47408 Rosanna Ditch 19 47409 Laura Campbell 11 47410 Bertha Campbell 13 47411 Jessie Bradford 13 47412 Kate Bradford 15 47413 Margrt. Leigton 6 47414 Willie Norman 8 47415 Sarah Lund 9 47416 Albert J. Buck 13 47417 Rosa Engley 14 47418 Amy Milledge 17 47419 Charles Reynolds 12 47420 Clara Milledge 7 47421 Nellie Newling 15 47422 Maud Jones 6 47423 Reggie Brattle 6 47424 L. A. Flemming 13 47425 Daisy Cox 5 47426 Annie Stevens 16 47427 Wm. Stevens 12 47428 George Stevens 10 47429 Rosa Milledge 12 47430 Agnes Parry 13 47431 Florce. Milledge 9 47432 Jessie McLay 11 47433 Annie Leigton 13 47434 Alfred Mady 14 47435 Bella Axford 12 47436 M. Robinson 13 47437 F. Pervanoglu 20 47438 Emily Barnden 14 47439 Lura Brattle 13 47440 Nellie Pervanoglu 17 47441 E. M. Reynolds 13 47442 Gertrude Cousins 9 47443 Lilly Marshall 11 47444 Eva Connor 12 47445 Nellie Johnson 8 47446 Carrie Cawlane 12 47447 Bessie Ellison 10 47448 Bertha Cousins 14 47449 Louisa Rignall 17 47450 Mary Brodie 13 47451 Harry Porter 8 47452 Arthur Oakenfull 7 47453 Emily Jones 6 47454 Maud Brattle 8 47455 Lizzie Riches 7 47456 Wrenny Grant 6 47457 J. N. Campbell 8 47458 Clara Cousins 12 47459 Isabel J. Moxon 12 47460 SUSAN JACKSON, Hackney, 13 47461 W. W. Weigley 6 47462 Edith Jackson 16 47463 Rosetta Walker 7 47464 Winifred Clarke 16 47465 A. Wedgwood 13 47466 Jane Reynolds 14 47467 Florence Pearce 11 47468 Annie Dyster 12 47469 Emma Steil 11 47470 Cecilia Lotcho 12 47471 Florce. Wasdall 10 47472 Jessie Wasdall 12 47473 A. M. H. Solomon 15 47474 Maud Freeman 15 47475 Julia G. Wheeler 16 47476 Alice Reynolds 18 47477 F. G. Solomon 12 47478 S. L. Solomon 7 47479 Katie L. Solomon 10 47480 Edith Holt 7 47481 Leslie Clarke 9 47482 Irene Clarke 7 47483 Theresa Cockett 14 47484 Florrie Leggett 11 47485 Fredk. Reynolds 10 47486 Lily Kirton 7 47487 Effie L. Bailey 11 47488 Daisy I. Bailey 9 47489 Fredk. W. Feast 5 47490 Rosie Entwistle 15 47491 Hannah Hall 16 47492 John W. Allan 14 47493 F. Bartholomew 12 47494 Lily Smee 10 47495 L. Bartholomew 9 47496 Agnes Blyton 11 47497 Nellie Cooper 8 47498 Maude Bell 11 47499 A. Bartholomew 10 47500 G. Bartholomew 12 47501 F. Bartholomew 8 47502 M. Bartholomew 6 47503 K. MacArthur 9 47504 May Smee 9 47505 Kate Milner 16 47506 Alfred Milner 14 47507 Louise Milner 9 47508 Beatrice Milner 11 47509 Katie Hay 14 47510 Aphie Hickson 10 —— 47511 B. M. Beverley 12 47512 M. K. Beverley 16 47513 William Miller 14 47514 C. Prideaux 10 47515 W. T. Prideaux 9 47516 Nellie de Castro 13 47517 G. P. Morris 14 47518 F. M. Morris 12 47519 Hilda C. Morris 9 47520 Lilian Paull 13 47521 Sarah B. Owen 15 47522 E. G. Walker 11 47523 M. E. A. HILLSWORTH, Clapton 11 47524 John L. Allen 6 47525 E. S. Bodger 9 47526 Kate Bodger 7 47527 Ellen Boxall 13 47528 Ada E. Boys 16 47529 Chas. H. Boys 13 47530 Edith M. Boys 13 47531 Alice M. Brazil 8 47532 Edward Bunten 8 47533 Kate E. Bunten 7 47534 Ernest C. Butler 11 47535 Fredk. Callow 8 47536 Alice Chilvers 8 47537 William Chilvers 8 47538 H. E. Daniel 9 47539 E. A. Francis 11 47540 J. T. Francis 8 47541 J. A. Francis 9 47542 Ada Frost 10 47543 Clara A. Gilbert 9 47544 H. G. Gilbert 7 47545 E. J. Hepper 10 47546 A. W. Hillsworth 17 47547 E. L. Howard 17 47548 Alice Hinchley 19 47549 Charles J. King 12 47550 Geo. W. King 10 47551 Edith Macey 12 47552 F. A. Marquis 10 47553 E. T. J. Mepstead 14 47554 L. H. Moore 12 47555 V. O. Morris 9 47556 E. Muirhead 9 47557 M. H. Muirhead 11 47558 E. E. E. Orchard 9 47559 Ada F. Palmer 13 47560 L. B. Palmer 16 47561 Rose M. Palmer 11 47562 Florence Peachy 11 47563 Joseph Pedgrift 6 47564 Alfred Pope 7 47565 Rachel Roderick 10 47566 Robt. Roderick 9 47567 Henry Sayer 11 47568 A. S. Taylor 9 47569 F. E. Taylor 7 47570 K. A. Taylor 11 47571 Eliza Watkins 10 47572 Mary G. Watkins 7 47573 Lucy M. Wellum 12 47574 C. D. Wheeler 16 47575 H. W. Windett 7 47576 H. R. BLUNT, Wallingford 9 47577 H. L. Smith 14 47578 Mabel Ross 10 47572 H. Eckersley 13 47580 M. M. Meldrum 16 47581 G. M. Molloy 10 47582 Ada Clanfield 12 47583 Louisa Roberts 12 47584 James Kent 12 47585 Amy Cobb 7 47586 M. A. D. Field 6 47587 Thos. Jennings 7 47588 John Toovey 8 47589 J. T. Fenton 5 47590 Matilda Cobb 15 47591 Ada Ring 11 47592 F. L. Anderson 14 47593 Edith Roberts 12 47594 Constance Lyde 11 47595 Edith Lyde 8 47596 Mary Anderson 11 47597 E. Wilkinson 12 47598 Ada Kent 9 47599 Emily Crook 14 47600 Edgar H. Bird 9 47601 E. Richardson 10 47602 Henry Crook 10 47603 M. F. Barber 14 47604 Fanny Morrell 13 47605 E. F. Barber 10 47606 M. Whitworth 16 47607 Monica Coulton 10 47608 M. E. Hare 15 47609 Thomas Wells 11 47610 V. A. Alexander 11 47611 Albert Roberts 10 77612 Hugh Waddox 6 47613 Thomas Crook 11 47614 Benjmn. Bowden 11 47615 L. G. Molyneux 14 47616 Edith Matthews 14 47617 Gertie Andrew 16 47618 E. M. Roberts 11 47619 E. G. Molyneux 15 47620 G. Leigh 12 47621 B. E. D. Field 7 47622 Ada Troll 9 47623 Emily Gardner 11 47624 Edith Townsend 6 —— 47625 Fanny Rowe 13 47626 Agnes Watt 14 47627 Alice M. White 12 47628 A. K. Moorman 12 47629 M. E. Broderick 13 47630 Ernest Knight 11 47631 Mary Carter 15 47632 Walter J. Law 13 47633 Leonard Law 10 47634 Nellie Hawes 15 47635 Jessie R. Ramsay 17 47636 Ruth E. Tinker 11 47637 Annie Harpin 13 47638 Ibbie Milner 15 47639 AMY STAMP, Sunderland 9 47640 George Parker 7 47641 F. W. Stamp 7 47642 Lillie Stamp 16 47643 Alfred Stamp 12 47644 L. Greenwell 14 47645 H. Greenwell 12 47646 E. Greenwell 11 47647 Maud Greenwell 10 47648 Mabel Greenwell 8 47649 Arthur Greenwell 6 47650 L. Westgarth 18 47651 Eliza Girling 19 47652 E. Dora Pringle 20 47653 M. L. White 14 47654 Mary Wilson 12 47655 C. M. Stevenson 11 47656 Mary A. Clark 8 47657 W. S. Rinner 8 47658 H. Wrightson 8 47659 Nellie Potter 21 47660 M. Liptrot 20 47661 Gertie Liptrot 16 47662 Lilla Greive 17 47663 Maud Hampson 18 47664 Sallie Justice 16 47665 Cathie Camm 14 47666 Susie Houlden 15 47667 Floss Hall 15 47668 Cissy Mangles 13 47669 M. B. Addingley 15 47670 Lizzie Taylor 15 47671 F. Richardson 13 47672 Janet King 13 47673 Sallie Bennett 13 47674 Albert Bennett 10 47675 Norman Potter 9 47676 Pollie Bell 18 47677 M. A. Morley 11 47678 Willie Robinson 9 47679 F. Robinson 9 47680 Lucy Robinson 11 47681 Clara Robinson 12 47682 Ann Robinson 13 47683 Annie Robinson 14 47684 Ellen Robinson 15 47685 Ruth Lodge 12 47686 Samuel Lodge 14 47687 Eliza A. Lodge 20 47688 E. Lockwood 15 47689 Amy Lockwood 13 47690 Lilian Heap 14 47691 Lucy Green 15 47692 L. E. Schofield 12 47693 Clara Jones 14 47694 Hannah Addy 16 47695 Jane E. Dyson 13 47696 Milinda Dodgson 12 47697 Helene Coith 21 47698 Nellie Ellis 17 47699 Lucy M. Dickson 17 47700 Annie Yeats 15 47701 M. Bradley 14 47702 Sallie Richmond 13 47703 Ella Jepsew 13 47704 Maggie Bland 13 47705 Emily Lawley 12 47706 Beatrice Wright 6 47707 Jeanie Wilson 9 47708 Edward Parker 5 —— 47709 Ethel L. Turner 12 47710 Rose A. Hart 15 47711 Lily A. Cousins 14 47712 Florence Hawes 13 47713 Carrie Hornby 20 47714 P. E Twamley 5 47715 Betsey Collins 17 47716 K. S. Twamley 7 47717 Janie G. Twamley 9 47718 R. Twamley 8 47719 V. M. A. WEBB, Hythe 9 47720 Arthur Shutler 10 47721 Ada Church 10 47722 Lucy Daish 10 47723 Elizabeth Church 9 47724 Agnes Bull 11 47725 Fanny Warne 10 47726 Elizabeth Bull 10 47727 Fanny Woolgar 13 47728 Ada Gull 11 47729 Emma Blackwell 10 47730 L. Chamberlain 10 47731 Ellen Mouland 11 47732 Ellen Ash 14 47733 Lizzie Shutler 8 47734 Ellen Bull 9 47735 Emily Larkham 11 47736 Wm. Newnham 11 47737 Wm. Hackett 11 47738 Jane Cooper 9 47739 Agnes Plumley 12 47740 Clara Bull 9 47741 Alice Hamilton 9 47742 Ada Neat 9 47743 Annie Brown 10 47744 Elizabeth Urry 13 47745 Harry Williams 10 47746 Thomas Piper 13 47747 Fredk. Salter 11 47748 Percy Spencer 10 47749 Thomas Morris 11 47750 Charles Henning 10 47751 Elizabeth Brown 8 47752 Emily Woodford 11 47753 Charles Coster 10 47754 Arthur Mathews 11 47755 Harry Hackett 12 47756 May Spencer 12 47757 Edith Small 13 47758 Ellen Parnell 10 47759 Harry Smith 11 47760 Albert Seal 10 47761 Albert Salter 10 47762 Nellia Snow 10 47763 Hannah Way 11 47764 F. Westmore 8 47765 Ellen Cass 10 47766 A. Wiltshire 13 47767 Marria Chessell 11 47768 Frances Gelf 9 47769 John Duffey 13 47770 Louisa Smith 11 —— 47771 Mabel Davies 12 47772 Millie Walker 10 47773 Hannah Dogdson 16 47774 E. McCracken 17 47775 Ada Whittington 8 47776 S. A. Whittington 9 47777 Nellie Temple 11 47778 Lila Temple 13 47779 Blanche Price 13 47780 Edith Price 14 47781 Minnie Price 16 47782 Louisa M. Leake 5 47783 Leonard C. Leake 6 47784 Annie Hill 6 47785 William Hill 8 47786 Alice Harding 8 47787 Edward Harding 10 47788 Louisa Harding 12 47789 Sisie Davison 5 47790 Edward Davison 6 47791 Georgina Davison 8 47792 Violet G. Davies 4 47793 F. E. Davies 6 47794 John Davies 7 47795 Fredk. Cox 6 47796 Emma Cox 8 47797 Annie Cox 11 47798 H. C. Cramford 8 47799 Abel Britnell 10 47800 William Britnell 13 47801 Rosey Ansley 9 47802 Henry Ansley 15 47803 Edith Lowe 10 47804 Minnie Lowe 14 47805 CLARA M. LEGGE, Bilston 12 47806 Emily Cole 11 47807 Alice Hill 13 47808 Clara G. Bailey 13 47809 Jessie Price 7 47810 Alice Sutton 14 47811 Arthur Price 10 47812 Jessie M. Jenks 13 47813 Clara Bubee 13 47814 N. Elkington 9 47815 Nellie Lockley 10 47816 May Kelly 9 47817 Wm Harper 13 47818 Janet Adams 11 47819 Mable Smith 10 47820 Maud Beaman 10 47821 Harrie Allan 10 47822 Claribel Roberts 10 47823 Kate A. Webster 10 47824 F. Longmore 9 47825 Willie Tart 10 47826 Blanche Tart 12 47827 Allan Instone 8 47828 Ernest Instone 10 47829 Maude Adderley 10 47830 Connie Adderley 12 47831 Agnes Harper 15 47832 Annie Harper 15 47833 Amy Harper 6 47834 Lucy Harper 8 47835 Edith Harper 11 47836 Jessie Wright 12 47837 Daisy Wright 15 47838 Alice Jones 13 47839 Harriette Jones 18 47840 F. Elkington 11 47841 L. Elkington 12 47842 Jenny Elkington 15 47843 Lilian Lawley 7 47844 Edith Lawley 9 47845 Annie Lawley 11 47846 Rose Lawley 13 47847 Lillian Adams 9 47848 Ethel Adams 12 47849 M. Adams 14 47850 Bertha Adams 16 47851 Annie Harper 8 47852 Thomas Harper 12 47853 Sarah Harper 10 47854 Emily Smith 13 47855 Lizzie Harper 15 —— 47856 C. Anderson 11 47857 G. W. H. PAULL, Stoke Newington 12 47858 Ellen K. Paull 8 47859 F. E. Martin 12 47860 K. P. Banister 7 47861 H. H. Smith 7 47862 Percy M. Smith 9 47863 Thomas Cook 13 47864 Helen L. Hiller 14 47865 W. N. Hough 10 47866 George E. Korn 11 47867 Chas. R. Morling 10 47868 A. Robinson 9 47869 A. S. Robinson 12 47870 Arthur C. Warren 12 47871 Thos. H. Clark 11 47872 G. Waymark 12 47873 E. W. Wesson 10 47874 Arthur E. Rous 12 47875 Richd. J. Evans 12 47876 F. A. Williams 8 47877 Harry S. Ayres 13 47878 Alfred J. Mills 9 47879 James Wright 6 47880 George Wright 8 47881 P. J. G. Fordham 12 47882 A. C. S. Roberts 7 47883 M. A. Marquis 8 47884 Horatio Bartlett 13 47885 Wm. C. H. Long 10 47886 John M. White. 12 47887 Wm. C. Riding 10 47888 Geo. Riding 7 47889 George Reeves 9 47890 Ernest Reeves 10 47891 Geo. W. Morris 8 47892 Jessie M. Rich 9 47893 Eleanor Boxall 10 47894 Wm. F. Rayner 10 47895 Rhoda Payne 13 47896 Rose Mortimore 7 47897 Eliza King 10 47898 A. H. Mortimore 11 47899 F. L. J. Meyer 9 47900 F. J. Lowe 11 47901 Jas. T. Jennings 10 47902 Alice E. Jennings 12 47903 Eliza C. French 9 47904 Rosa Burch 12 47905 Frank A. Boys 9 47906 Alfred E. Boys 9 47907 Arthur L. Baker 12 47908 E. E. Matthews 10 —— 47909 C. Creighton 7 47910 L. Creighton 9 47911 B. Creighton 11 47912 Isabel Eacott 10 47913 Ellen A. Mellersh 10 47914 Maud Mellersh 8 47915 Violet Yaldwyn 11 47916 BERTIE BELL, Swaffham 7 47917 Caroline Pullan 20 47918 Nina Todd 7 47919 Jeannie Wheen 4 47920 Ella Abell 2 47921 Maria Todd 5 47922 William Sellers 8 47923 Sidney Hemshall 7 47924 Winifred Abell 15 47925 Tom Brazier 6 47926 Jennie Anderson 6 47927 A. Hebblethwaite 6 47928 Harry Wheen 6 47929 H. K. Stanton 10 47930 E. M. Stanton 9 47931 Winifred Stanton 8 47932 G. Hamant 17 47933 A. W. F. Pollard 8 47934 Horace T. Pollard 6 47935 Edward Pollard 4 47936 Georg Rix 6 47937 R. R. Sillitoe 15 47938 Oliver M. Parker 14 47939 G. R. Read 15 47940 S. Hungerford 20 47941 Maud London 15 47942 May Hungerford 13 47943 J. E. Devenport 19 47944 Minnie Maggi 11 47945 Ada Sykes 12 47946 Mabel Spray 6 47947 Edith Verity 9 47948 Josephine Boyle 10 47949 Fannie Marshall 14 47950 Maud Jones 14 47951 Jenny Lawson 12 47952 Amy Jones 11 47953 Annie Jowett 12 47954 Ethel Hill 10 47955 Gertrude Sykes 14 47956 Ada Hill 8 47957 A. Chamberlain 13 47958 L. Chamberlain 7 47959 W. Chamberlain 5 47960 B. Chamberlain 7 47961 Rosa Bell 15 47962 F. Chamberlain 11 47963 C. Chamberlain 4 47964 Geo. A. Petch 16 47965 E. Chamberlain 15 47966 Lizzie Carr 14 —— 47967 Wm. J. Smith 11 47968 A. L. Ralston 8 47969 Janet Whitty 12 47970 Kate Parkes 15 47971 M. Caddick 17 47972 Walter Benington 11 47973 Julius E. Woods 11 47974 A. G. NICKOLSON, Oxford St., L. 13 47975 Bertha Wilson 13 47976 Florence Kirby 12 47977 Edith Thomson 8 47978 Alice Pritchett 12 47979 Louisa Wyatt 9 47980 Charlotte Overett 9 47981 E. L. Houghton 12 47982 Kate Tolman 9 47983 A. M. Bundock 10 47984 Ethel Hibbert 14 47985 Harriet Perry 13 47986 Lucy Wheeler 11 47987 Ada Frost 9 47988 Jessie Gotts 10 47989 L. J. Allaway 12 47990 Helena Smell 8 47991 Julia Davis 10 47992 Ada Davis 13 47993 Agnes Luckett 8 47994 F. Warwick 8 47995 Louisa Dickens 11 47996 Alice Green 10 47997 Ada Blakey 11 47998 G. Barnard 13 47999 Anne Pooles 9 48000 J. Hawksworth 11 48001 Rebecca Payne 8 48002 Mary A. Soall 10 48003 Emma Martin 9 48004 Mary Horton 8 48005 F. Mackelew 10 48006 Mary Jones 10 48007 Hannah Dalby 10 48008 Harriet Davies 8 48009 Emily Jones 13 48010 Mary A. Dean 11 48011 Fanny Wood 11 48012 Eleanor Ben 14 48013 Emma Smith 12 48014 Ada Lowe 11 48015 A. Bowerman 11 48016 Gertrude Lowe 15 48017 Alice Arger 9 48018 Florrie Donovan 13 48019 Elizbth. Erwood 10 48020 Alice Pett 10 48021 Nellie Houching 8 48022 Mary Goots 10 48023 Clara Evenett 8 48024 Mary A. Prior 14 —— 48025 Mary McLaren 13 48026 M. McLaren 9 48027 Edwd J. Pascoe 9 48028 CHAS. WHITMAN, Kensington 14 48029 S. H. Whitman 11 48030 Annie Rolfe 7 48031 A. M. Whitman 18 48032 A. E. Whitman 15 48033 William Harris 16 48034 Rhoda White 12 48035 Jennie Harris 18 48036 Hettie Harris 9 48037 Edith Rolfe 9 48038 Emily Griffiths 18 48039 John Graham 15 48040 Florce. Graham 16 48041 Minnie Graham 12 48042 Emily Barnes 17 48043 Harry Barnes 10 48044 Amy Smith 13 48045 A. Hatton 12 48046 E. Hatton 10 48047 E. Blowers 11 48048 Rose Blowers 18 48049 Lily Blowers 15 48050 Carlisle King 13 48051 Willie Nichols 12 48052 Lizzie Nichols 16 48053 Thomas Nichols 18 48054 Emily Nichols 14 48055 F. Faulkner 10 48056 Edith Faulkner 12 48057 William Davis 17 48058 E. A. Briggs 18 48059 W. York 16 48060 E. Bell 10 48061 Chas. Hoddson 13 48062 Wm. Killick 19 48063 Herbert Lees 12 48064 J. G. Davis 19 48065 Kate Barnes 19 48966 Anne Barnes 17 48067 William Barnes 15 48068 Edith Benham 11 48069 J. Wade 16 48070 A. Brooks 17 48071 R. Pelman 15 48072 Amy Dey 19 48073 Laura Biddle 18 48074 Beatrice Mason 14 48075 Edith Good 12 48076 Edith Lowe 13 48077 Lottie Lane 13 48078 A. Smith 9 48079 A. Pichersgill 13 48080 E. SINCLAIR, Worthing 13 48081 W. W. Sinclair 15 48082 A. M. McHardy 11 48083 J. K. McHardy 14 48084 C. McHardy 12 48085 Wm. S. Moir 17 48086 J. K. Edmunds 10 48087 M. B. Moir 14 48088 M. I. Moir 11 48089 David R. Moir 10 48090 V. M. Sinclair 12 48091 Isabel Sinclair 15 48092 K. E. Sinclair 7 48093 Edmund Sinclair 12 48094 Geo. W. Sinclair 11 48095 Ann W. Sinclair 9 48096 Katie Sinclair 7 48097 Lizzie J. Milne 9 48098 B. M. Greenlaw 14 48099 Harry Smith 18 48100 M. D. Thomson 10 48101 G. F. Thomson 9 48102 P. M. Thomson 7 48103 Lucy L. Taylor 9 48104 John Spark 12 48105 Lizzie Johnston 13 48106 Bella Milne 11 48107 Wm. Johnston 9 48108 F. W. Webster 12 48109 Jeannie Willox 14 48110 S. T. Gillespie 10 48111 Wm. C. Edwards 7 48112 J. E. Taylor 10 48113 Annie Gillespie 12 48114 Flora Walker 14 48115 Jeannie Middleton 11 48116 M. E. Beverly 13 48117 C. H. Milne 13 48118 F. J. Milne 11 48119 L. Milne 10 48120 M. de Alcazar 13 48121 F. S. Mitchell 10 48122 Maggie Robb 11 48123 George Rae 13 48124 A. J. Mathieson 12 48125 F. A. Mathieson 14 48126 Bella Gillan 10 48127 E. M. Mathieson 13 48128 M. E. Green 12 48129 Lizzie Rae 15 48130 H. L. Forbes 10 48131 A. McLeod 12 48132 Juliet Sutherland 12 48133 Jane Keith 12 48134 J. Sutherland 8 48135 L. M. Sutherland 11 48136 Robina May 13 48137 LILIAN THOMPSON, H'smith 12 48138 Charles Harper 20 48139 Julia Grover 20 48140 Harriet Cuthbert 19 48141 Annie Thompson 19 48142 F. Thompson 19 48143 K. L. Thompson 18 48144 B. E. Denham 18 48145 E. G. Strickland 18 48146 H. J. Wood 19 48147 Antony Hewes 19 48148 P. Tettenborn 18 48149 E. A. Smith 18 48150 F. W. Jones 17 48151 F. D. Thompson 17 48152 A. W. Thompson 17 48153 A. Hollingsworth 16 48154 M. Thompson 16 48155 James Byass 15 48156 J. C. Hoffmann 15 48157 A. Hutchison 15 48158 G. Thompson 15 48159 F. Tettenborn 15 48160 N. Baldwin 15 48161 Sarah Pitt 15 48162 Florce. Sparkes 14 48163 Ada Taylor 14 48164 F. Philbey 14 48165 Winnie Curtis 14 48166 Alice Roberts 13 48167 M. Cordingley 13 48168 H. Stradling 13 48169 F. Hoffmann 13 48170 Esther Brown 12 48171 Florce. Cullis 12 48172 Edith Philbey 11 48173 Annie Hoffmann 11 48174 Marian Dixon 11 48175 Geo. Carpenter 11 48176 F. Sheffield 10 48177 Emily Ratcliffe 10 48178 Blanche Bennett 10 48179 J. W. Thompson 9 48180 Florence Dixon 9 48181 Charles Baldwin 8 48182 Harry Thompson 8 48183 C. A. Sheffield 8 48184 Amy Cordingley 7 48185 Gertrude Ryle 6 48186 Maggie Dixon 6 48187 K. L. JOHNSON, Lewisham 12 48188 Ellen A. Watts 12 48189 H. Papps 17 48190 Thos. J. Dixon 15 48191 A. S. Kenneford 19 48192 Florence Watts 8 48193 Frank Lewry 18 48194 Louie Watts 10 48195 Ernest Watts 14 48196 A. Wright 8 48197 Herbert Wright 10 48198 Winifred Wright 12 48199 M. J. Funnell 20 48200 Edward Wright 14 48201 A. Spalding 16 48202 Arthur Watts 17 48203 Elizabeth Watts 19 48204 M. C. Fountain 11 48205 E. Underwood 11 48206 Louie Smith 11 48207 M. A. Graham 12 48208 Lizzie Fawsett 12 48209 Mabel Wilson 10 48210 Edith M. Reed 12 48211 Augusta Holland 11 48212 Johanna Hacker 13 48213 Mary Whileway 11 48214 Beatrice Palmer 12 48215 F. M. Gamble 14 48216 Isabella Axford 11 48217 Alice Wilson 19 48218 Theresa Holland 14 48219 William Witts 14 48220 Rhoda Mady 12 48221 Amy Wilson 17 48222 Annie Glover 15 48223 Lauie Risch 11 48224 Gertrude Cox 9 48225 Edith Cox 11 48226 M. Matthewson 13 48227 Emily Taylor 12 48228 L. Fishenden 11 48229 Lauie Guyer 14 48230 T. Friedrick 14 48231 Jas. F. Shelton 9 48232 H. Botham 15 48233 Miriam Shelton 6 48234 Alfred Shelton 8 48235 Edith Shelton 5 48236 Arthur Gill 6 48237 Lavinia Parks 13 48238 Lina Draper 14 48239 Rosa Tipper 15 48240 Emily Cordwell 15 48241 A. Hambrook 13 48242 Fanny Connor 14 48243 Nellie Park 8 48244 Jessie Lambert 10 48245 E. Fairbarns 15 48246 Elizbth. Bignell 13 48247 Harriet Barnett 14 48248 M. E. Jennings 13 48249 N. Emmerson 11 48250 A. G. M. Roberts 11 48251 F. A. Hefford 11 48252 Emma Langley 13 48253 Emily Williams 13 48254 R. G. F. Roberts 13 48255 Alice Trafford 17 48256 N. E. Trafford 8 48257 Annie Trafford 15 48258 F. H. Emmerson 13 48259 Herbert Helm 6 48260 Lucy C. Helm 9 48261 May E. Smith 9 48262 Alice G. Smith 7 48263 Herbert H. Smith 6 48264 Wm. R. Tyers 8 48265 G. J. E. Mollett 11 —— 48266 Amelia Barber 12 48267 Florence Gibbs 15 48268 K. FORDHAM, Huntingdon 14 48269 A. W. Matthews 12 48270 Gertrude Moore 15 48271 M. A. Warrington 16 48272 Grace Mooney 15 48273 Emma Turner 16 48274 Florence Cross 13 48275 Emma Holley 13 48276 Claud Hunter 9 48277 Maria L. Pooley 15 48278 Frederick Cox 12 48279 James W. Cox 13 48280 Mary L. Cox 15 48281 Nellie Fisher 7 48282 Mary Lancaster 17 48283 Elizabeth Angus 13 48284 Maud Johns 17 48285 Emma A. Bitten 16 48286 G. McGennis 13 48287 M. Warrington 10 48288 F. Warrington 14 48289 Minnie Lee 16 48290 Fredk. Mathews 8 48291 Louise Madder 14 48292 Florence Hall 16 48293 F. C. Pooley 14 48294 Florrie Dear 12 48295 Annie Hitchcock 16 48296 Minnie Spanton 10 48297 Florrie Geeson 8 48298 S. E. Fordham 8 48299 Lizzie Cox 15 48300 Katie Dear 13 48301 E. J. Norton 8 48302 Ada Richardson 17 48303 M. Richardson 19 48304 Maud Matthews 7 48305 Frank Matthews 10 48306 Annie Clark 9 48307 Sidney Smith 13 48308 Harold Browning 8 48309 E. J. Browning 10 48310 N. F. Browning 13 48311 Wm. Beresford 7 48312 A. H. Beresford 8 48313 Blanche Spanton 6 48314 A. B. Hendley 20 48315 Jack Browning 6 48316 W. M. Browning 12 48317 Chas. Beresford 10 48318 Sarah Clarke 16 48319 Ellen Peacock 17 48320 Fredk. H. Ware 12 48321 E. HILLSWORTHY Clapton 16 48322 W. A. Allen 11 48323 E. Bartholomew 11 48324 Alexander Bolton 11 48325 Fredk. Brooks 10 48326 Fredk. J. Bunten 9 48327 Henry Bunten 11 48328 H. W. Bunten 13 48329 S. Connelly 12 48330 Thomas Death 12 48331 Wm. Fairbairn 9 48332 Ellen Goddard 10 48333 Joseph Hockley 11 48334 R. R. Hockley 9 48335 Geo. R. Horn 11 48336 John M. Horn 9 48337 G. Hutchingson 18 48338 Florence Inward 6 48339 Edith Inward 8 48340 Robert C. James 15 48341 Eleanor Jones 15 48342 E. Kingswell 6 48343 W. C. Ludlow 10 48344 Henry Mallett 15 48345 J. A. Matthews 18 48346 Alfred E. Moon 16 48347 Leonard A. Moss 12 48348 C. J. Nicholson 14 48349 F. J. Orchard 10 48350 Edward Peachy 9 48351 Robt. C. Peattie 17 48352 Annie M. Perrin 11 48353 Lucy E. Perrin 6 48354 Robt. J. Perrin 8 48355 Wm. B. F. Pope 9 48356 Myra Price 14 48357 A. C. Rayner 13 48358 Frank C. Rich 16 48359 F. F. Richardson 11 48360 Edith E. Riding 6 48361 Kate Roderick 11 48362 Wm. C. Saunders 10 48363 John Shaw 12 48364 Eleanor L. Smith 9 48365 Wm. H. Smith 11 48366 Wm. Templeman 19 48367 F. H. H. Thomas 9 48368 Henry Wall 10 48369 Edward Ward 11 48370 Walter H Ware 17 48371 Alfred E. Watson 16 48372 A. W. Watson 13 —— 48373 F. A. B. Rice 12 48374 Edwd. Wharmby 12 48375 Helen Miller 10 48376 F. H. Ware 12 48377 Amy Merson 14 48378 L. Truman 16 48379 Ada Dixon 16 48380 B. Huthwaite 15 48381 Carrie Cropper 8 48382 Mildred Cropper 9 48383 Clara Dixon 20 48384 Annie Harrison 14 48385 E. G. Mather 14 48386 Rosa G. Jessop 14 48387 G. M. Hole 15 48388 Margaret Hall 18 48389 E. M. Clarke 12 48390 ALPHA HANSEN, Penarth 12 48391 G. Johnson 7 48392 Nellie Farrell 9 48393 Ernest Hurley 13 48394 May Tapson 7 48395 E. M. Tapson 10 48396 Daisy John 10 48397 John J. Gutherie 11 48398 J. H. Hughes 13 48399 Arthur Heald 12 48400 Edith Cross 7 48401 Harry Jotham 8 48402 M. A. Powenland 18 48403 N. E. Stokes 11 48404 Florry Stokes 9 48405 Florrie Hurman 10 48406 Maud Cooper 12 48407 Miriam Webb 13 48408 Ellen Stokes 12 48409 Gertrude Smith 15 48410 Lilian Smith 13 48411 Jessie Mason 12 48412 Annie Sweet 17 48413 Fredk. Jennings 8 48414 Ada Greenhill 8 48415 Chrissie Nancy 7 48416 N. M. Davis 15 48417 Emily Tape 13 48418 Edith Davis 12 48419 Nellie Tucker 10 48420 Louie Heald 9 48421 H. Schroeter 10 48422 W. Cross 10 48423 F. Schroeter 9 48424 W. Corfield 13 48425 Claus Hansen 6 48426 W. Hansen 14 48427 W. Pyman 8 48428 Edith Heald 10 48429 G. P. Nanoe 10 48430 S. Davis 11 48431 Thomas Morrell 10 48432 B. Nance 10 48433 H. Leyshon 11 48434 Anna Leyshon 7 48435 F. de Candia 14 48436 A. Ellery 14 48437 J. L. Madland 14 48438 W. de Candia 17 48439 W. Stockdale 14 48440 W. Black 13 48441 Sven W. Hansen 8 48442 Ida M. Pimom 19 48443 H. W. Hansen 9 48444 MAUD M. BERRY, Greenwich 14 48445 B. Weller 11 48446 Jane Wells 12 48447 Ada Vincent 9 48448 A. Wetheral 7 48449 Frank Mowbray 7 48450 F. Bason 10 48451 Benzeville Byles 8 48452 Arthur Canter 7 48453 A. Stevenson 8 48454 Arthur Mason 6 48455 Sydney Mowbray 8 48456 Leonard Wood 8 48457 Emma Field 9 48458 Jane Bartlett 13 48459 Sarah Morsley 11 48460 Mary Morsley 8 48461 Lizzard Kellard 15 48462 Edith Kellard 11 48463 Alice Griffith 12 48464 Emily Bartlett 11 48465 Alice Vincent 7 48466 L. Cuthbertson 12 48467 Mary Canter 8 48468 Eleanor Hall 10 48469 F. Vincent 12 48470 M. Trenery 11 48471 Lizzie Livett 14 48472 Bessie Hall 7 48473 J. M. Tadhunter 10 48474 L. M. Newsham 11 48475 Maud C. Reeves 11 48476 Rosina Hore 10 48477 F. Hefford 13 48478 Marie Bapty 12 48479 Ann. E. Douglas 11 48480 Nellie Moore 11 48481 Edith Stevenson 11 48482 Emma Douglass 7 48483 A. J. Field 7 48484 R. R. Vokins 9 48485 C. J. Chandler 11 48486 F. H. Weller 13 48487 Ada Bates 12 48488 Jessie Lawrence 12 48489 G. A. Woollard 10 48490 Bertha Weller 11 48491 H. Trenery 9 48492 Ada Beaver 11 48493 Eliza Miles 9 48494 Selina Griffiths 9 48495 Fanny Spinks 10 48496 L. C. Chandler 9 48497 Ellen Abbot 11 —— 48498 Nellie Darvall 10 48499 FLORENCE HAWES, Islington 13 48500 Edith Ghostt 7 48501 John Thompson 11 48502 Arthur Shum 12 48503 Lucy Parker 11 48504 Alice Davis 12 48505 Nellie Parks 13 48506 Hetty Drew 7 48507 Beatie Whigham 8 48508 Annie G. Bull 13 48509 Minnie Jocoby 14 48510 Kate Mitchell 12 48511 Mabel Astell 13 48512 Gertrude Fisher 12 48513 Lizzie Gurney 9 48514 Hetty Payne 13 48515 Emily Knox 14 48516 G. Anderson 10 48517 Elzbth. Groome 15 48518 Louisa Higgins 14 48519 W. Brightman 9 48520 Louisa Willis 13 48521 Katie Whigham 11 48522 Mary Hartley 13 48523 Violet Shelsey 14 48524 L. Anderson 16 48525 E. McKenna 12 48526 Annie Hartley 8 48527 Mary Watson 12 48528 Augusta Godley 11 48529 Rosina Ede 13 48530 K. Waterman 12 48531 H. Thompson 12 48532 Emily Lucas 13 48533 Henry Bailey 6 48534 Kate Hawes 11 48535 Chas. A. Hawes 18 48536 Lizzie Sharp 12 48537 Emily Pocock 8 48538 Gracie Godley 13 48539 Kate Marchant 12 48540 Beatrice Pocock 10 48541 Jane Lawther 12 48542 Jane Godley 18 48543 Cicely Jenner 13 48544 G. Willoughby 14 48545 Elizabth. Parrock 12 48546 M. Jenkinson 12 48547 T. Harding 12 48548 Mary Stanley 14 48549 B. Tregoning 10 48550 C. Hawes 14 48551 IRENE SMITH, Hampstead 16 48552 Ralph H. Smith 13 48553 Edith E. Clodd 10 48554 Ada Gait 10 48555 Flora Maas 11 48556 Rose Maas 14 48557 Arthur Maas 8 48558 Charles Maas 4 48559 May Maas 13 48560 E. J. Cooper 6 48561 Lulu McElroy 11 48562 Bessie Davis 18 48563 Jane M. Davis 16 48564 W. E. Davis 14 48565 H. H. Davis 9 48566 Fredk. M. Davis 12 48567 Janet Balmer 19 48568 A. D. McKinlay 14 48569 Wm. Jackson 14 48570 Alfred E. Lee 13 48571 R. J. Brown 14 48572 G. A. Wallace 12 48573 Harris Reid 14 48574 A. D. Arthur 13 48575 E. S. C. Barfield 11 48576 W. A. Ashbery 12 48577 E. J. Sissons 13 48578 A. G. Deighton 14 48579 H. E. Brierley 10 48580 Archie Williams 13 48581 Wm. Brownjohn 14 48582 Henry T. Jones 13 48583 Cecil W. Harry 12 48584 Jas. H. Burgess 12 48585 E. E. Mackenzie 15 48586 Margt. E. Green 13 48587 Margt. L. Green 13 48588 Samuel Green 10 48589 Edith B. Cook 8 48590 Willoughby Cook 10 48591 Sidney M. Young 12 48592 Miriam G. Young 6 48593 Anne Bridge 15 48594 Ethel Mathieson 10 48595 D. H. Asbury 9 48596 A. R. Edwards 9 48597 Sophy Edwards 13 48598 A. M. Edwards 11 48599 M. E. Patterson 11 48600 M. C. Hamkens 9 48601 Alfred Hamkens 8 48602 H. P. Hamkens 4 48603 F. L. Hamkens 6 48604 Ellen Gittens 10 48605 E. G. Concanon 9 48606 R. C. Marchant 11 —— 48607 Amelia Meadows 13 48608 Ella Robinson 14 48609 W. L. Coventry 11 48610 MAGGIE BOOTY, Norwich 11 48611 James Pratt 13 48612 Michael Hartley 10 48613 Herbert Moore 11 48614 Henry Cheesman 12 48615 Charles Moore 11 48616 R. J. Kerrison 11 48617 Fredk. Tuck 10 48618 Herbert Hagg 11 48619 C. L. Payne 10 48620 Richard Seaman 11 48621 Wm. Perowne 13 48622 Chas. Goldsmith 12 48623 James Waller 12 48624 Godfrey Goward 11 48625 John Fisher 13 48626 Fred. Arthurton 10 48627 George Goff 12 48628 Henry Culyer 12 48629 Arthur Edwards 11 48630 William Brown 10 48631 Herbert Bannock 12 48632 Harry Robertson 11 48633 Alfred Pank 12 48634 George Bone 13 48635 Ernest Laws 13 48636 Archie Watson 12 48637 Harry Hendry 12 48638 Edward Burton 11 48639 Fredk. Muskett 11 48640 F. W. Barker 12 48641 J. H. Browne 12 48642 Ernest Barrett 12 48643 George Dye 11 48644 Fredk. Gifford 1 48645 George Kirkham 13 48646 Arthur Pleasants 13 48647 William Ellis 12 48648 Wm. Phillips 12 48649 John Morley 12 48650 Albert Balls 12 48651 Hrbt. Lockwood 10 48652 W. Stannard 12 48653 A. C. Roper 12 48654 Walter Carey 10 48655 Charles Gallant 11 48656 John Hayden 12 48657 Albert Pollard 11 48658 Walter Waller 10 48659 Fredk. White 12 48660 William Cornish 11 48661 H. M. Wright 11 —— 48662 Maria R. Horne 15 48663 J. Sutcliffe 15 48664 Mary L. Sutcliffe 13 48665 Alice L. Heaps 14 48666 Arthur T. Pink 13 48667 Grace Pettman 14 48668 Alice M. Squire 12 48669 Mary J. Land 16 48670 Rebecca Land 15 48671 ELLEN RITA, Holloway 14 48672 Ralph Gosset 5 48673 Ellen Gosset 9 48674 Florce. Gosset 14 48675 H. E. Kimbell 12 48676 May E. Kimbell 7 48677 J. J. Gerhardt 15 48678 Alfred T. Payne 20 48679 Madeline Leed 13 48680 William Wood 13 48681 Caroline Coad 17 48682 K. L. Eaton 11 48683 Corelli Barnett 13 48684 Alice Barnett 8 48685 Annie Barnett 6 48686 Susan J. Miller 17 48687 Alice S. Eaton 18 48688 Anne Miles 16 48689 A. Winterbourne 16 48690 Sidney Wood 6 48691 Sarah Lamb 15 48692 Susan H. Miles 12 48693 Hugh Brydges 9 48694 Emily Holbard 19 48695 F. Matthews 12 48696 E. F. Gillott 15 48697 Millett A. Wood 19 48698 Mary Shepherd 16 48699 T. B. Rice 20 48700 Maud Eaton 13 48701 Ellen W. Wood 21 48702 Rose J. Brown 18 48703 Flce. Binckes 15 48704 Kate Wood 10 48705 E. Robertson 14 48706 Florence Barnett 10 48707 Ernest Brown 20 48708 Emmeline Wood 11 48709 S. H. E. Speller 12 48710 F. J. Speller 8 48711 Thomas Speller 11 48712 Fredk. Edwards 11 48713 Lucy A. Coates 16 48714 Sarah Cooper 15 48715 Annie B. Coates 13 48716 Martha Hortin 17 48717 G. Horton 16 48718 Geo. W. Powell 14 48719 Marian Henwood 16 48720 E. J. Henwood 12 48721 E. F. A. Cook 21 48722 Sarah A. Money 18 48723 Prissy Coates 12 48724 Alice M. Coates 14 —— 48725 J. H. Twamley 15 48726 Agnes Roberts 12 48727 Trixy Roberts 10 48728 Arthur Scott 8 48729 Katie Scott 11 48730 Edith Shaw 10 48731 Charles F. Shaw 9 48732 M. J. Basnett 13 48733 PHOEBE ALLAN, Hackney 13 48734 Florence Hind 15 48735 Amy Kirton 6 48736 A. Lahaye 12 48737 Beatrice Cooper 7 48738 Louise Bathus 12 48739 Henrietta Laby 10 48740 Ethel Hind 8 48741 Aleck Sampson 14 48742 Alice Turner 10 48743 D. McAlister 9 48744 M. McAlister 6 48745 Chas. McAlister 8 48746 E. Statham 13 48747 Ada Pennells 9 48748 Rosa Cooke 11 48749 Pernon Rorve 12 48750 G. Y. McArthur 7 48751 Ethel M. Beck 16 48752 Helene Bayille 9 48753 L. Antheaume 8 48754 L. Gaulupean 11 48755 H. B. Lewis 12 48756 E. Hennequin 7 48757 A. Messager 10 48758 M. Lahaye 10 48759 Jeanne Allain 8 48760 Julette Gorgibus 13 48761 M. J. Duval 9 48762 Edmie Zaillon 6 48763 G. H. A. Perechon 10 48764 J. M. L. Crucket 11 48765 Edith Beale 7 48766 Claire Masle 9 48767 Agatha Rutty 14 48768 Jessie L. Keeble 17 48769 Ethel Boyce 7 48770 Mary Hoyle 12 48771 Rose Solomons 12 48772 Ellen Evans 11 48773 Emma Tournoft 12 48774 Florce. Radford 12 48775 W. McAlister 5 48776 Alice Haley 10 48777 W. O. MacArthur 12 48778 Sarah Codling 13 48779 M. A. Courneur 11 48780 H. L. Macie 13 48781 Marie G. Loisel 7 48782 Margrt. Ducuing 7 48783 Josephine Poron 11 48784 Alice Lewis 6 48785 Maria L. Allaine 11 48786 Marthe M. Laby 11 48787 L. Gaulupeau 10 48788 Eliza Tarrola 10 48789 Alice B. Zung 11 48790 Blanche R. Berols 10 48791 E. D. Giverne 7 48792 C. E. Draper 13 48793 E. M. M'Neight 12 48794 S. D. Maconchy 16 48795 A. A. Brunker 9 48796 Arabella Thorn 16 48797 M. Nicholson 15 —— 48798 Lillian Robinson 19 48799 Ralph Manning 15 48800 K. Manning 14 48801 George Hanlon 14 48802 Agnes E. Barbor 11 48803 Frances Brunker 11 48804 E. G. Brunker 13 48805 E. G. Flewry 16 48806 May E. Greene 13 48807 Mabel Gick 10 48808 Louisa Gick 12 48809 G. H. Brunker 10 48810 Jessie L. Aimers 10 48811 Lilias J. Aimers 12 48812 Blanche Mayston 17 48813 Louisa Leash 14 48814 M. C. Hayes 14 48815 Eleanor Hanlon 13 48816 Chas. H. Gick 17 48817 E. M. Armstrong 10 48818 Maud Davies 12 48819 Mirian Jackson 13 48820 Thos. J. B. Cross 11 48821 MARY H. WELSH, Dawlish 14 48822 Maud Harvest 12 48823 Lucy Harvest 19 48824 P. H Skipton 15 48825 H. L. Norton 14 48826 F. J. H. F. Cann 13 48827 Ethel Tozer 11 48828 Grace Olliver 12 48829 Anne Fortescue 16 48830 Winifred Watson 14 48831 M. Rolleston 15 48832 Florence Danger 18 48833 Amy Cann 16 48834 Harriet Crabbe 18 48835 Emma Partridge 19 48836 Tom Radford 9 48837 Alice Radford 8 48338 Arnold Radford 18 48839 Mary Lloyd 13 48840 Mary Abbott 16 48841 Leslie Webb 8 48842 Robin Webb 9 48843 Violet Collins 16 48844 Leila Gray 9 48845 Ellen Smith 20 48846 M. F. Wheeler 16 48847 Clare Harrison 18 48848 Lillian Holt 14 48849 Frances Harvest 6 48850 Katie Pinkett 6 48851 Lizzie Langford 15 48852 Ellen McFerran 17 48853 Maggie Raynes 15 48854 Eva McFerran 15 48855 Maggie Stephens 12 48856 Anne Curtis 15 48857 H. J. Thackeray 12 48858 H. Henderson 12 48859 Ada E. Fiske 13 48860 Lallah Roe 14 48861 Caroline Pinketts 14 48862 Nellie Welsh 10 48863 Alice Webb 11 48864 Amy Radford 15 48865 S. J. Adams 13 48866 Elsie Hale 11 48867 Beatrice Hirtzel 14 48868 Hector Harvest 16 48869 Sarah Fursdon 18 48870 Flossie Raynes 17 48871 Mabel Badcock 15 —— 48872 E. L. Allhusen 9 48873 M. E. Allhusen 10 48874 WINIFRD. GLADSTONE, Eaton Place, London 13 48875 Annie Allen 12 48876 Philadelphia Ades 17 48877 Elizabeth Smith 11 48878 Sarah Turner 12 48879 Hannah Sharp 11 48880 Blanche Rowland 9 48881 Florce. Blundell 14 48882 Nettie Johnson 16 48883 Elsie Barrow 16 48884 Ethel Hopson 14 48885 Anna E. Piper 8 48886 Emily Kear 13 48887 Jessie Rowland 11 48888 Annie Watkins 10 48889 Flora Freeman 14 48890 H. Godfrey 18 48891 Mary Meredith 12 48892 Elizabeth Ades 15 48893 Elizabeth Gaston 13 48894 Rose Weaver 9 48895 Mabel Bowen 10 48896 Clara Parks 12 48897 Ada Dawes 10 48898 Edith Perks 9 48899 Alice Perks 7 48900 Clara Wilks 18 48901 W. E. Morris 10 48902 Frances Turner 14 48903 Annie Weaver 13 48904 Millicent Dawes 8 48905 Hannah Gorring 12 48906 E. Cunninghame 10 48907 G. M. E. Jones 7 48908 A. Woodland 15 48909 Ellen Russell 11 48910 Rhoda Kear 10 48911 George Turner 9 48912 Mabel Stevenson 7 48913 Florence Cooper 11 48914 M. D. Franks 11 48915 C. E. Adis 13 48916 Lillie Simmons 16 48917 Lucy Vickers 15 48918 Mary B. Bufton 9 48919 E. A. Millest 13 48920 Emily Pugh 16 48921 Sarah J. Perks 11 48922 Lily J. Veale 17 48923 M. Mylu 18 48924 Marion Reynolds 16 48925 Mary J. Hawis 17 48926 Annie Venon 20 —— 48927 Minnie M. Leage 11 48928 C. F. Trenerry 11 48929 Elsie Bayley 15 48930 L. M. Littlewood 15 48931 F. E. Wurburton 6 48932 Emma T. Cooper 9 48933 A. S Harrison 12 48934 ROSE CRANE, Falkland Road, N.W. London 15 48935 Violet Crane 8 48936 S. Prendergast 19 48937 E. Hazlewood 16 48938 G. Butcher 16 48939 Olive Crane 6 48940 W. G. Crane 13 48941 May Crane 13 48942 L. Reynolds 16 48943 Florence Mays 14 48944 Ada L. J. Lane 17 48945 A. E. D. Willmott 19 48946 Violet Wrightson 17 48947 Annie Body 18 48948 May Back 12 48949 Mabel Kennett 15 48950 Mary Coveney 17 48951 Emma Sutton 18 48952 Rosa Sutton 12 48953 Minnie Sutton 14 48954 Wm. O. Jones 15 48955 Annie M. Bowen 14 48956 Alice Riddall 15 48957 Helen Everitt 15 48958 B. Holmes 17 48959 Clara Warman 14 48960 F. Holmes 15 48961 A. B. Garrett 11 48962 Emma Capes 17 48963 Agnes Rae 15 48964 Anne Chandler 19 48965 Ellen Higginson 16

[Officers and Members are referred to a Special Notice on page 55.]



The Happy Little River.

Words from "LITTLE FOLKS."

Music by CHARLES BASSETT.

(For one or two Voices.) With simplicity.

VOICE.

PIANO.



1. A* tiny river ripples onward, Babbles over moss and stone, Flowing, flowing, ever flowing, Singing in a joyous tone.

2. Gladly smile the little daisies, Which that river grow beside; Gladly sing the happy song-birds, While 'mid sedgy haunts they hide

3. Gladly nod the dewy grasses On its bonny banks and green; Gladly grow the river mosses, Peeping little stones between.

4. Gladly stoop the pensive willows Those bright river-ripples o'er, Thanking for its cooling water, Telling how they thirst no more.

5. Gladly talk the little children, As they look upon the stream; Gladly smiles the dancing sunlight, While the brook reflects its gleam.

6. Flow, thou happy little river, Bear thy message night and day, Telling how the sunny-hearted Carry sunshine on their way.

* This note required for first verse only.



OUR LITTLE FOLKS' OWN PUZZLES.

POETICAL ACROSTIC.

1. My first is a French poet. 2. My second is a celebrated Italian tragic poet. 3. My third is a blind English poet. 4. My fourth is an Italian poet born at Arezzo. 5. My fifth is an English poet who died in Greece. 6. My sixth is a Spanish poet. 7. My seventh is another Italian poet. 8. My eighth is another French poet. 9. My whole is a celebrated British poet.

TERESINA VITTADINI. (Aged 14.)

Collegio Dame Inglesi, Lodi, Italy.

MENTAL HISTORICAL SCENE.

Outside the walls of an ancient town a furious battle is being fought between two great states. Early in the day one of the generals, a brave and just man, is pierced in the breast with a javelin. He is carried to a little hill, where his first question is whether his shield is safe; and when he sees it he allows his wound to be examined. The weapon remains in the wound, and the weeping attendants fear to draw it out; but he, only waiting to hear that the victory is won, with a steady hand draws out the javelin, and expires in a minute.

ALGERNON S. BEAN. (Aged 12.)

The Firs, West Mersea.



MISSING VOWEL PUZZLE.

From the following all the vowels have been omitted, and the remaining consonants joined together. When put in their proper places they will form a verse by Tennyson.

B r k b r k b r k n t h y c l d g r y s t n s s, n d w l d t h t m y t n g c l d t t r T h t h g h t s t h t r s n m.

S. R. SPOOR. (Aged 11)

Heatherview, Aldershot.

DOUBLE GEOGRAPHICAL ACROSTIC.

My initials form a country in Europe, and my finals one of its lakes.

1. A river in Russia. 2. A town in Spain. 3. A gulf of Asia. 4. A town in England. 5. A town in Australia.

FLORENCE E. ATKINSON. (Aged 14.)

153, Carlton Road, Kilburn, N.W.

NUMERICAL ENIGMA.

My whole consists of fifty-one letters, and is a very well-known quotation from "Marmion."

1. My 11, 34, 4, 30 = character of Shakespeare. 2. My 5, 36, 6, 29, 27 = means of conveyance. 3. My 45, 36, 6, 29, 9 = draw off water. 4. My 14, 26, 34, 35 = to cry. 5. My 38, 25, 8, 36, 37, 47, 32, 12, 36 = reputation. 6. My 16, 30, 15, 33 = to make beer. 7. My 10, 1, 21, 13 = to incite. 8. My 17, 3, 21, 7 = an interrogative pronoun. 9. My 19, 49, 28, 48 = a married woman. 10. My 45, 30, 44, 22, 18 = a herd of cattle. 11. My 2, 21, 27, 45, 20, 36 = to rove. 12. My 41, 21, 50, 46 = to rescue. 13. My 31, 39, 42, 24 = to seethe in water. 14. My 41, 11, 42, 31, 35 = to repose. 15. My 40, 43 = a pronoun.

ALICE C. WILSON. (Aged 14-3/4)

Heatherbank, Weybridge,

PRIZE PUZZLE COMPETITION.

WINTER COMPETITION.

The Puzzles given in the present and the December numbers of LITTLE FOLKS will, as announced, form the WINTER COMPETITION.

PRIZES.

In the WINTER COMPETITION there will be a First Prize of a Guinea Volume; a Second Prize of a Half-Guinea Volume; a Third Prize of a Five-Shilling Volume, awarded in Each Division, viz., the SENIOR DIVISION for girls and boys between the ages of 14 and 16 (inclusive), and the JUNIOR DIVISION for those under 14 years of age. There will also be awards of Bronze Medals of the LITTLE FOLKS Legion of Honour to the three next highest of the Competitors following the Prize-winners in each Division.

REGULATIONS.

Solutions of the Puzzles published in this number must reach the Editor not later than November 8th (November 12th for Competitors residing abroad), addressed as under:—

The Editor of "Little Folks," La Belle Sauvage Yard, Ludgate Hill, London, E.C. Answers to Puzzles. Junior [or Senior] Division.

Solutions to Puzzles must be accompanied by certificates from a Parent, Teacher, or other responsible person, stating that they are the sole and unaided work of the competitor. No assistance must be given by any other person.

Competitors can be credited only under their own name.

The decision of the Editor of LITTLE FOLKS on all matters must be considered final.

The names and addresses of Prize and Medal winners will be duly published in LITTLE FOLKS.

GAME PUZZLE FOR NOVEMBER.

Rhyming couplets, working in first lines of nursery rhymes.

Few children are aware, until they actually try it, how easy it is to make Rhyming Couplets; but now, any who may not have had exercise in this amusement will have an opportunity of making a very interesting game by carrying out the instructions given below.

First of all, Mamma or one of the elders will perhaps start the game thus: Send one (or two, if preferred) out of the room, and then give each player left in the room a word or words which they will have to work into their rhyme. We will suppose the lines selected are—

"Old Mother Hubbard Went to the cupboard."

In arranging the game, the easy words, such as old, went, to, and the, should be given to the little ones, the other words to the elders.

Now the Guesser (or Guessers) may return to the room and the game commences—

"The old and young together go,"

says player No. 1. Now No. 2 has to make a line rhyming with "go," and bringing in "mother."

"My mother thinks me very slow,"

would do. No. 3 can make a fresh rhyme, and has a knotty word to bring in, so will probably need a longer line.

"Messrs. Stebbings and Hubbard two stockbrokers were."

The fourth player has to compose a line, not necessarily containing the same number of syllables as No. 3, but it must rhyme.

"We went to the orchard and found a large pear."

We will now finish the rhyme as each player might perform his part.

"I came to the city on Wednesday night." "The dog was returned in a terrible plight." "In the store-room or cupboard you're sure to find mice."

The guesser would probably find out this at once by the introduction of the word "Hubbard," but you can, of course, select more difficult lines (viz., those which give less clue to the nursery rhyme) according to requirement.

WINTER PUZZLE, NO. 1.

In these Puzzles the idea we have propounded will be found carried out with slight modification. In each four lines will be found hidden the first two lines of various Nursery Rhymes. Thus, supposing the lines already given were those we wished to conceal, the four-line verse might run thus—

Messrs. Hutton and Hubbard once went to reside In a house that was old, on the hill; In each room was a cupboard, a sight very rare, And my mother was constantly ill.

With this explanation our Competitors will, we think, have little difficulty in finding out the following Puzzles. In sending in Solutions it will only be necessary to write out the two first lines of the Nursery Rhymes hidden in each four lines given below.

SENIOR DIVISION.

I.

If you ever go to Spain It will rain, and rain again; And you never will come back, If you're left upon the rack.

II.

I sat upon a hod, In my hand there was a clod, And I threw it at a crow— An old one I trow.

III.

I stand on the bridge, and the waters dance by, For my lady I look o'er the lee; I gaze down the stream, for by London at length Is the solitude broken for me.

IV.

There lived a fair young woman Whom an old man sought in vain, It was under rocks by vale and hill That she wandered on amain.

V.

How short the days are Now October is here! If you long for a song, I'll sing one to cheer.

JUNIOR DIVISION.

I.

Jingle, jingle, Little Jack Had a key put down his back; Single, single, I declare, He used to live for many a year.

II.

'Twas night, the moon shone bright, The rats came down in scores, Munching, squeaking, each man shrieking, Tumbling down indoors.

III.

We went out four and twenty strong, Sailors and tailors in a throng; We heard a tale, we saw a sail, And then returned to kill a snail.

IV.

Here Harry and Richard, Here Robin and John! If there were but two men You would pretty soon come!

V.

Five, four, three, two, one, Won't we have some fun, A cat has caught a hare Alive, I do declare.



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS.

[The Editor requests that all inquiries and replies intended for insertion in LITTLE FOLKS should have the words "Questions and Answers" written on the left-hand top corners of the envelopes containing them. Only those which the Editor considers suitable and of general interest to his readers will be printed.]

PRIZE COMPETITIONS, &C.

H. FORTESCUE.—[Several important announcements as to new Competitions, &c., will be made in the January Number of LITTLE FOLKS.—ED.]

A VERY LITTLE READER.—[I am glad to tell you that I have arranged to again give every month the "Pages for Very Little Folk," with large type and bold pictures, commencing with the January Number.—ED.]

LITERATURE.

SANTA CLAUS writes, in reply to LITTLE BO-PEEP'S question, that the lines—

"There is a reaper, whose name is Death, And, with his sickle keen, He reaps the bearded grain at a breath, And the flowers that grow between"

are by Longfellow, and are to be found in a poem called "The Reaper and the Flowers." Answers also received from twenty-two other readers.

CELIA OAKLEY writes that the line—

"Music hath charms to sooth the savage breast"

is to be found in the tragedy of The Mourning Bride, by William Congreve (1670-1729). Thirty-six answers to the same effect also received.

T. C. would like to know if any one could tell her the author of the following verse, and where it is to be found—

"Rain, rain, for ever falling, Trembling, pouring slow or fast, Through the mist a voice is calling From the unforgotten past."

WORK.

LILIAN BOWYER writes, in answer to GEORGINA DEXTER'S inquiry how to make a pair of bedroom slippers, that one way is to crochet the tops with double Berlin wool and procure a pair of cork soles wool lined. Answers also received from BUMPKIN, TOBY, and A. J.

MINNIE WALSHAM writes, in answer to FLORENCE WATERS' question, that to clean crewel-work it should be washed in soap-suds, then rinsed out in salt and water, and, after drying it quickly, it should be smoothed out on the wrong side of the work. Answers also received from T. X. Z., MARY WILTSHIRE, and A. J.

COOKERY.

MATTY would like to know the way to make Madeira cake.

LADY OF THE LAKE asks how to make pine-apple cushions.

GENERAL.

A TABBY KITTEN will be glad if any reader could tell her of a good, inexpensive varnish for a picture-screen, as the one she is now using colours the pictures, and makes the printing on the backs of thin ones shine through.

ETHEL wants to know a new kind of dip, or bran-pie.

J. F. H. writes to inform HERBERT MASTERS, in reply to his inquiry, that a small carpenter's bench would cost about twenty shillings or a little more.

ANOTHER YOUNG MECHANIC writes, in answer to AN AMATEUR MECHANIC'S question, that walnut, oak, and sandal are among the best woods for fretwork purposes. The fret-saws may be bought in packets at an ironmonger's. Answers also received from J. A. WACE, A YOUNG CARPENTER, and X. Y. Z.

NATURAL HISTORY.

P. F wishes to know if anything can be done for her little kitten? In the last few weeks her head has become quite bare, and she has lost a lot of hair from her shoulders; she is very lively, but does not drink her milk properly?—[She is probably kept indoors too much. Put a little sulphur in her milk about twice a week, and rub the places with vaseline. Let her run out where she can bite grass or plants if she wants to, and give her a little meat.]

HELEN wishes to know if she ought to give her canary a bath in winter, and if so ought it to be cold or warm.—[Offer the bath, and let it do as it likes. The water should be about 60 deg.]

LADY CARA will be very glad to know what can be given to her parrot when it pulls its feathers off. The bird in question is now quite bare, and has been so for some time past, although well in health.—[We fear you have been giving him meat, or too much of rich nuts and biscuits. Parrots should have no meat, and plain food. Get him some scraped cuttle-fish bone, if he will eat it, and rub on a little vaseline, and on a bright day get him to bathe. Give him now and then a fig, and some ripe fruit, only begin very gradually.]

A NEW "'LITTLE FOLKS' PAINTING BOOK" COMPETITION.

PRELIMINARY NOTICE.

The Editor has much pleasure in informing his Readers that, in response to repeated requests, there is now in preparation a new "LITTLE FOLKS Painting Book," and that he is arranging for a Special Competition in connection with it, open to Children of all Ages, in which a large number of Prizes in Money, Books, and Medals will be offered for the best Coloured copies of it. This book, which will be called "The LITTLE FOLKS Proverb Painting Book," and contain 96 pages of outline Illustrations and Verses, will be ready on the 25th of November; and the full Regulations of the Competition, with the list of the Prizes offered, will be printed in the January, 1885, Number of LITTLE FOLKS.



Picture Wanting Words.



A Guinea Book and an Officer's Medal of the LITTLE FOLKS Legion of Honour will be given for the best Poem having special reference to the Picture below. A smaller Book and an Officer's Medal will be given, in addition, for the best Poem (on the same subject) relatively to the age of the Competitor; so that no Competitor is too young to try for this second Prize. The Poems must not exceed 24 lines in length, and must be certified as strictly original by a Minister, Teacher, Parent, or some other responsible person. All the Competitors must be under the age of Sixteen years. The Poems must reach the Editor by the 10th of November (the 15th of November in the case of Competitors residing abroad). In addition to the Two Prizes and Officers' Medals, some of the most deserving Competitors will be included in a special List of Honour, and will be awarded Members' Medals of the LITTLE FOLKS Legion of Honour. The Editor requests that each envelope containing a Poem having reference to this Picture should have the words "Picture Wanting Words" on the left-hand top corner. (Competitors are referred to a notice respecting the Silver Medal on page 115 of the last Volume.)

ANSWERS TO OUR LITTLE FOLKS' OWN PUZZLES (p. 253).

GEOGRAPHICAL ACROSTIC.—ZEALAND.

1. Z urich. 2. E bro. 3. A rno. 4. L isbon. 5. A lps. 6. N ile. 7. D anube.

MISSING LETTER PUZZLE.

"'Twas in the prime of summer-time, An evening calm and cool, And four-and-twenty happy boys Came bounding out of school: There were some that ran and some that leapt, Like troutlets in a pool."

SQUARE WORDS.

1. SCAR. 2. CAKE. 3. AKIN. 4. RENT.

1. CART. 2. ALOE. 3. RODE. 4. TEES. 1. MATE. 2. ALUM. 3. TUNE. 4. EMEU.

BURIED NAMES OF RIVERS.

1. Iser. 2. Weser. 3. Indus. 4. Aar. 5. Amstel.

RIDDLE-ME-REE.

TOMATO.

BURIED PROVERB.

"People who live in glass houses must not throw stones."

PICTORIAL NATURAL HISTORY PUZZLE.

SACRED IBIS OF EGYPT.

1. Acrid. 2. Sip. 3. Fogs. 4. Bey. 5. Diet.



Transcriber's Note: p. 257 The o in "of" from "By the Author of" was originally an o with a circumflex. It has been changed to a normal o p. 265 The caption THE CHILD GLANCED AT HER WONDERINGLY (p. 264. has been changed to THE CHILD GLANCED AT HER WONDERINGLY (p. 264). p. 266 "rumours of the lost children" has been changed to "rumours of the lost children." with a period p. 270 I am holding back the sea!" has been changed to "I am holding back the sea!" with opening quotation marks p. 271 was the weary answer." has been changed to was the weary answer. without quotation marks p. 274 "entice the flies to settle on' em." has been changed to "entice the flies to settle on 'em." p. 277 "cried the white king, fiercely," has been changed to "cried the white king, fiercely." with a period p. 282 a better turn than he knew to-day;" has been changed to a better turn than he knew to-day;' with a single quotation mark p. 291 "Skelton, the first Poet Laureate" has been changed to "Skelton, the first Poet Laureate." with a period p. 292 "conspicious" has been changed to "conspicuous" p. 294 "glitering" has been changed to "glittering" p. 294 So you can get behind her,' has been changed to So you can get behind her," with double quotes p. 295 "Was the girl the fairy queen? has been changed to Was the girl the fairy queen? without quotation marks p. 300 "and a dormouse elsewhere" has been changed to "and a dormouse elsewhere." with a period p. 305 "Home, Sweet Home.' has been changed to "Home, Sweet Home." with double quotes p. 306 "He remembered how. when he" has been changed to "He remembered how, when he" with a comma p. 306 "Tired nature's sweet restorer, balmy sleep, has been changed to "Tired nature's sweet restorer, balmy sleep," with closing quotation marks p. 313 <Where a short line, thus, " , is printed,> has been changed to <Where a short line, thus, " ", is printed,> with closing quotation marks p. 313 the name Rosie Entwistle is unclear p. 314 the name Sallie Justice is unclear p. 314 the name Edith Price is unclear p. 314 "7801 Rosey Ansley" has been changed to "47801 Rosey Ansley" p. 314 the age 9 of L. Creighton is unclear p. 314 the name Chas. Hoddson is unclear p. 315 E. J, Norton has been changed to E. J. Norton p. 315 48570 was originally printed with an a with a circumflex instead of the digit 8; it was changed to 48570. p. 315 Fredk, Muskett has been changed to Fredk. Muskett p. 315 the number 48680 William Wood is unclear p. 315 the number 48804 E. G. Brunker is unclear p. 315 the number 48810 Jessie L. Aimers is unclear p. 318 "will, as announced, from the Winter Competition" has been changed to "will, as announced, form the Winter Competition"

THE END

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