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Gulliver's Travels - Into Several Remote Regions of the World
by Jonathan Swift
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The captain having been at Tonquin, was, in his return to England, driven northeastward, to the latitude of 44 degrees, and of longitude 143. But meeting a trade-wind two days after I came on board him, we sailed southward a long time, and, coasting New Holland, kept our course west-south-west, and then south-south-west, till we doubled the Cape of Good Hope. Our voyage was very prosperous, but I shall not trouble the reader with a journal of it. The captain called in at one or two ports, and sent in his long-boat for provisions and fresh water, but I never went out of the ship till we came into the Downs, which was on the third day of June, 1706, about nine months after my escape. I offered to leave pay goods in security for payment of my freight, but the captain protested he would not receive one farthing. We took a kind leave of each other, and I made him promise he would come to see me at my house in Redriff. I hired a horse and guide for five shillings, which I borrowed of the captain.

As I was on the road, observing the littleness of the houses—the trees, the cattle, and the people, I began to think myself in Lilliput. I was afraid of trampling on every traveller I met, and often called aloud to have them stand out of the way, so that I had like to have gotten one or two broken heads for my impertinence.

When I came to my own house, for which I was forced to inquire, one of the servants opened the door, I bent down to go in (like a goose under a gate), for fear of striking my head. My wife ran out to embrace me, but I stooped lower than her knees, thinking she could otherwise never be able to reach my mouth. My daughter kneeled to ask my blessing, but I could not see her till she arose, having been so long used to stand with my head and eyes erect to above sixty feet; and then I went to take her up with one hand by the waist. I looked down upon the servants, and one or two friends who were in the house, as if they had been pygmies, and I a giant. I told my wife she had been too thrifty, for I found she had starved herself and her daughter to nothing. In short, I behaved myself so unaccountably, that they were all of the captain's opinion when he first saw me, and concluded I had lost my wits. This I mention as an instance of the great power of habit and prejudice.

In a little time, I and my family and friends came to a right understanding: but my wife protested I should never go to sea any more; although my evil destiny so ordered, that she had not power to hinder me, as the reader may know hereafter. In the meantime I here conclude the second part of my unfortunate voyages.



NOTE.

Jonathan Swift was born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1667, and died in 1745. His parents were English. His father died before he was born, and his mother was supported on a slender pittance by his father's brother. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, and all through his early life was dependent on the generosity of others. His college career was not highly creditable, either from the point of view of manners, morals, or learning. After leaving college, he travelled through England on foot, and found employment with a relative of his mother's, Sir William Temple, in whose house was a noble library; and for two years Swift made up for some of his shortcomings by studying diligently therein. He went to Oxford in 1692, took a degree and was ordained in 1694. He was given a parish in Ireland, which he soon resigned, returning to the home of Sir William Temple, where he remained until the death of the latter in 1699.

Temple left Swift a legacy, and confided to him the editing and publishing of his works. This task completed, Swift went again to Ireland to another parish, and threw himself into political pamphleteering with great effect, one of the results of his exertions being the securing of freedom from taxation for the Irish clergy. He subsequently became Dean of St. Patrick's in Dublin, and for a period achieved great popularity owing to his powerful political writings.

While in what he called his "exile" he wrote Gulliver's Travels, which was at first published anonymously, the secret of the authorship being so closely guarded that the publisher did not know who was the author. Dr. Johnson characterized it as "A production so new and strange that it filled the reader with admiration and amazement. It was read by the high and low, the learned and the illiterate." In this work, Jonathan Swift appears as one of the greatest masters of English we have ever had; as endowed with an imaginative genius inferior to few; as a keen and pitiless critic of the world, and a bitter misanthropic accounter of humanity at large. Dean Swift was indeed a misanthrope by theory, however he may have made exception to private life. His hero, Gulliver, discovers race after race of beings who typify the genera in his classification of mankind. Extremely diverting are Gulliver's adventures among the tiny Lilliputians; only less so are his more perilous encounters with the giants of Brobdingnag.... By a singular dispensation of Providence, we usually read the Travels while we are children; we are delighted with the marvellous story, we are not at all injured by the poison. Poor Swift! he was conscious of insanity's approach; he repeated annually Job's curse upon the day of his birth; he died a madman.

There are numerous biographies of Swift; but probably the best characterization of the man and his life, rather than of his books, is to be found in Thackeray's English Humorists, and a closer study of the man and his works in Leslie Stevenson's "Swift," in Morley's English Men of Letters. The other biographies of him are: Lord Orrery Remarks on the Life and Writings of Dr. Jonathan Swift, 1751; Hawkes, on his life, 1765; Sheridan's life, 1785; Forster's life, 1875 (unfinished); Henry Craik's life (1882). The best edition of Swift's writings and correspondence is that edited by Scott, 1824.



FOOTNOTES:

[1] Redriff Rotherhithe: then a Thames side village, now part of London.

[2] Pound: nearly five dollars.

[3] Levant: the point where the sun rises. The countries about the eastern part of the Mediterranean Sea and its adjoining waters.

[4] Mrs.: it was formerly the custom to call unmarried women Mrs.

[5] The South Sea: the Pacific Ocean.

[6] Van Diemen's Land: N.W. from Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania) and in latitude 30 degrees 2 minutes would be in Australia or off the West Coast.

[7] Cable's length: about six hundred or seven hundred feet.

[8] Buff jerkin a leather jacket or waistcoat.

[9] Small: weak, thin.

[10] Signet-royal: the king's seal.

[11] Half-pike a short wooden staff, upon one end of which was a steel head.

[12] Stang: an old word for a perch, sixteen feet and a half, also for a rood of ground.

[13] Chairs: a sedan chair is here meant. It held one person, and was carried by two men by means of projecting poles.

[14] Crest: a decoration to denote rank.

[15] Lingua Franca: a language—Italian mixed with Arabic, Greek, and Turkish—used by Frenchmen, Spaniards, and Italians trading with Arabs, Turks, and Greeks. It is the commercial language of Constantinople.

[16] Imprimis: in the first place, (pr.) im pri' mis.

[17] Lucid: shining, transparent.

[18] Yeomen of the guards: freemen forming the bodyguard of the sovereign.

[19] Pocket perspective: a small spy-glass or telescope.

[20] Trencher: a wooden plate or platter.

[21] Corn: such grains as wheat, rye, barley, oats.

[22] Quadrant: an instrument long used for measuring altitudes.

[23] Skirt: coat-tail.

[24] Alcoran the Koran or Mohammedan Bible.

[25] Embargo: an order not to sail.

[26] Discompose them: displace them.

[27] Puissant: powerful.

[28] Junto: a body of men secretly united to gain some political end.

[29] Pulling: plucking and drawing, preparatory to cooking,

[30] Meaner: of lower rank.

[31] Portion: the part of an estate given to a child.

[32] Domestic: the household and all pertaining thereto.

[33] Exchequer bills: bills of credit issued from the exchequer by authority of parliament.

[34] Close chair: sedan chair.

[35] Cabal: a body of men united for some sinister purpose.

[36] Lee side: side sheltered from the wind.

[37] Ancient: flag, corrupted from ensign.

[38] Downs: A famous natural roadstead off the southeast coast of Kent, between Goodwin Sands and the mainland, south of the Thames entrance.

[39] Black Bull: inns in England are often named after animals with an adjective descriptive of the color of the sign; as, The Golden Lion, The White Horse.

[40] Towardly: apt, docile.

[41] Straits of Madagascar: Mozambique Channel.

[42] The line: the equator.

[43] Hinds: peasants; rustics.

[44] Pistoles: about three dollars and sixty cents.

[45] Trencher-side: up to his trencher or wooden plate.

[46] Discovering: Showing.

[47] From London Bridge to Chelsea: about three miles as the birds fly.

[48] Pillion: a cushion for a woman to ride on behind a person on horseback. From London to St. Alban's: about twenty miles.

[49] Pumpion: pumpkin.

[50] Parts: accomplishments.

[51] Sanson's Atlas: a very large atlas by a French geographer in use in Swift's time.

[52] As good a hand of me: as much money of me.

[53] Moidore: a Portuguese gold piece worth about six dollars.

[54] Guineas: an obsolete English gold coin, of the value of five dollars.

[55] Phoenix: a bird of fable said to live for a long time and rise anew from its own ashes.

[56] Cabinet: a private room.

[57] Scrutoire: a writing-desk.

[58] Waiting: attendance on the king.

[59] Lusus naturae: a freak of nature.

[60] Royal Sovereign: one of the great ships of Swift's time.

[61] Dunstable lark: large larks are caught on the downs near Dunstable between September and February, and sent to London for luxurious tables.

[62] Drone: the largest tube of a bag-pipe, giving forth a dull heavy tone.

[63] Gresham College, in London, is named after the founder, an English merchant, who died in 1579.

[64] The square of: as large as the square of.

[65] Salisbury Steeple: this is about four hundred feet high.

[66] Battalia: the order of battle.

[67] Espalier: a lattice upon which fruit-trees or shrubs are trained.

[68] Scull: a short oar.

[69] Starboard or larboard: right or left.

[70] Corking-pin: a larger-sized pin.

[71] Stomacher: a broad belt.

[72] Varlet: knave.

[73] Levee: a ceremonious visit received by a distinguished person in the morning.

[74] Spinet: a stringed instrument, a forerunner of out piano.

[75] Closet: private room.

[76] Signal: memorable.

[77] Chancery: a high court of equity.

[78] Glossing: commenting.

[79] Dionysius of Halicarnassus was born about the middle of the first century, B.C.; he endeavored in his history to relieve his Greek countrymen from the mortification they had felt in their subjection to the Romans, and patched up an old legend about Rome being of Greek origin and therefore their "political mother."

[80] Ideas, entities, abstractions, transcendentals, words used in that philosophy which deals with thinking, existence, and things beyond the senses.

[81] Mercurial: active, spirited.

[82] Composition: compact, agreement.

[83] Progress: an old term for the travelling of the sovereign to different parts of his country.

[84] Tumbrel: a rough cart.

[85] Page: a serving-boy, and especially one who waits on a person of rank.

[86] Quarry: prey.

[87] Squash: shock, concussion.

[88] To rights speedily.

[89] To make To get alongside.

[90] Phaeton a son of Apollo who was dashed into the river Endanus for his foolhardiness in attempting to drive the steeds of the sun for one day.



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THE END

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