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Donahoe's Magazine, Volume 15, No. 2, February 1886
Author: Various
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The Rev. Dr. O'Reilly, of Detroit, Treasurer of the National League in America, announces that he has sent $80,000 to the League in Ireland since Oct. 1.

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THE FUTURE OF FRANCE.—In answer to a question on the eventual solution of the French political difficulty, the Bishop of Angers says: "When I spoke of the affairs of French Catholics, and, above all, of those of my diocese," said his Lordship, "I was within my domain. But of the future of Catholic France the less conversation and the more prayer the better. I believe that Providence will bless the Apostolic spirit of our missionaries, and the obscure zeal of our Sisters of Charity. I believe, with Monseigneur Dupanloup, that the French Church, with fifty thousand priests, and more, daily saying Mass, and hundreds of thousands of innocent children praying in her churches, must emerge triumphant from this terrible crisis. Ask me nothing of Pretenders or of the Republic. The work of a Catholic Bishop in France is too absorbing to be overwhelmed by difficulties of political detail. We must be patriots, worthy citizens, and faithful Catholics, and leave the rest to God. The great bulk of the French people is not deceived. A cloud is passing over the nation; but the bright sun will soon pierce through that cloud, and a reaction will set in. The sooner the better, say I."

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CATHEDRAL T. A. & B. SOCIETY.—The Cathedral Total Abstinence and Benevolent Society is making extensive preparations for its third annual social, which takes place in Parker Fraternity Hall, Wednesday evening, February 10th. Tickets are selling very rapidly, and the committee of arrangements will spare nothing to make the occasion an enjoyable one to all who attend. The officers of the society are as follows: Spiritual director, Rev. James F. Talbot, D.D.; President, John F. Marrin; vice-president, William J. Keenan; recording secretary, James P. Gorman; financial secretary, Jeremiah Conners; treasurer, Patrick Cooney; sergeant-at-arms, Dennis Desmond.

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ABSTEMIOUSNESS AT CHRISTMAS.—The following circular was issued by the Cardinal Archbishop of Westminister:—A Plenary indulgence may be gained by all persons who—besides making a good Confession and received worthily the Holy Communion, and praying for the intention of his Holiness—shall, on Christmas Eve, on Christmas Day, and on the following day, abstain from all intoxicating drinks. The faithful are earnestly exhorted to endeavor to obtain the Plenary Indulgence; and to offer up this little self-denial as an act of intercession, reparation, and expiation for those who sin against God by drunkenness and intemperance especially at this time.

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We regret to learn from the Catholic Mirror that Mr. William Doherty, formerly of St. John, New Brunswick, is lying dangerously ill at his residence, No. 142 Edmondson Avenue. Mr. Doherty came to Baltimore about eleven years ago, in part on account of the climate. He has been suffering for years with heart disease. He has received the last Sacraments from the hands of his son, Rev. William J. Doherty, S.J., rector of the Church of Our Lady, at Guelph, Ontario, Canada, who reached Baltimore the day before. Mr. William Doherty was born in Ireland, June 8th, 1800, and went to New Brunswick when a young man. He was for many years one of the most prominent Catholics in St. John, and was president of St. Vincent de Paul Society in that city. He has two daughters with him, and two who are nuns. One of the latter is Madame Letitia Doherty, assistant superioress of the Convent of the Sacred Heart, Kenwood, Albany, N. Y.; the other is in the Elmhurst Convent of the Sacred Heart, at Providence, R.I.

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There are at present two hundred "widowed" parishes in the Diocese of Posen, Germany. Of these, only forty-five have any auxiliary supply, so that no less than one hundred and fifty-five parishes, with a population of 200,000 souls and more are without any priest at all.

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If the Associated Press may be trusted, Bishop O'Farrell has expressed the opinion that the two American cardinals will be the Archbishop of Baltimore and the Archbishop of New York.—Catholic Mirror.

The Associated Press is not to be credited on Catholic or Irish matters. It is more than probable that one of the hats will crown the head of the venerable Archbishop of Boston.

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NOTRE DAME UNIVERSITY has received ten thousand Rosaries from Belgium. They are blessed by the regular canons of the Holy Cross Order, and they have the extraordinary indulgence of five hundred days and the Bridgetine indulgence of one hundred days, together with the Holy Father's blessing, attached to the devout recital of every "Our Father" and "Hail Mary" upon them. Address Rev. A. Granger, C.S.C., Notre Dame, Ind.

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The Italian Government has just published the list of deaths from cholera during the years 1884 and 1885. In the former year, there were 27,000 cases, and 14,000 deaths. In the latter year there have been over 6,000 cases, and 3,000 deaths. Palermo was the great sufferer this year, as Naples was in 1884. Better nutrition during both epidemics caused a noted diminution in cases and in deaths.

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The Germania says that the Holy Father has expressed a wish to know the state of Catholic Missions in the German Colonies. He feels very keenly the arbitrary conduct of the Imperial Government, and has expressed to the Prussian Minister his astonishment at the prejudice exhibited in Berlin.

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Referring to the Letter of the Holy Father to Cardinal Manning and the Bishops of England, which we give elsewhere, the Moniteur de Rome says that it constitutes "the recompense and the consecration" of the noble and heroic efforts of his Eminence and the English Episcopate in the cause of Christian education.

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The 22nd of February is the anniversary of the birth of George Washington. We give many incidents of his life in this issue of our MAGAZINE.

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THE IRISH CONVENTION.—Patrick Egan, president of the Irish National League of America, has received a cablegram from T. M. Harrington, M.P., secretary of the National League in Ireland, in which he states that Mr. Parnell will not be able to attend the League convention intended to be held in Chicago in January next, and that he is "inclined to think it best to postpone the convention until after the meeting of parliament in February." It is, doubtless, the desire of the Irish party to know with some definiteness the probable outcome of the present situation before making any authoritative announcement of their plans, or before sending any message to their American brothers; and it also seems that they regard Mr. Parnell's constant presence on the scene of negotiations as indispensable. The convention, in accordance with this suggestion, is, therefore, postponed to a date to be determined upon hereafter between the executive of the American League and Mr. Parnell. Mr. Egan will call the National Committee of the American League together some day in January, by which time there may be information from Ireland enabling a definite date to be fixed for the convention.

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MUNSTER BANK.—In reply to a letter from Mr. T. N. Stack to the liquidators, inquiring when the sum of L500,000 now in their hands would be distributed amongst the creditors, the liquidators of the Munster Bank have written to say that there is L650,000 in hands, that the mere routine work of arranging for a dividend occupies a considerable time, but that they expect to pay an instalment in March.

PRIVILEGES FOR MAYNOOTH.—In reply to a petition from the Irish Episcopate, the Holy Father, through the Sacred Congregation of Propaganda, has granted to the Superiors of St. Patrick's College, Maynooth, the privilege of presenting students for ordination to the Diaconate and Subdiaconate on days which are ordinary doubles. This important concession, however, can be made use of only once in the year.

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GRANT'S EVIL GENIUS.—The enemies of the Catholic Church should get up a big purse of bright new dollars as a testimonial to Parson Newman, as—only for the influence of his evil genius—it is very likely that General Grant would have died a Catholic. The Saint Joseph's Advocate, in a brief notice of the death of General Grant, says that Grant was not a bigot—his Indian Agency policy and Des Moines speech to the apparent contrary notwithstanding. Parson Newman was, in matters of religion, his evil genius; and the evil genius had this apology (though no excuse) that he was pushed at him from behind. It is our sincere opinion that if the Catholic side of this great man's family had possessed a Newman in zeal, eloquence and polish, Mount McGregor would have witnessed its most historic Catholic death, July 22, 1885.

* * * * *

THE CHINESE MUST GO.—San Francisco Monitor: There seems to be a general determination among the people all over this coast that the Chinese must go. Already they have been forcibly expelled from several towns in Washington territory and Oregon, as well as from towns in this State. Self-preservation is the first law of nature, and the laboring portion of the white race will not suffer their right of life, liberty and happiness to be destroyed by the interference of Chinese coolies.

* * * * *

FOREIGN MISSIONS.—A large and commodious seminary for the Foreign Missions is about to be opened in Bavaria. In the latter country a grand old abbey has for years stood empty and deserted. Father Amhreim, a Benedictine, under the auspices of the Propaganda, and with the consent of the Bavarian Government, has restored the abbey, and is now fitting it up as a seminary. The students who will enter this new Missionary College will devote themselves to the African missions, as their brethren in the college of Steil give themselves wholly to the Chinese mission. German Catholics may be proud of their missionary enterprise.

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DYNAMITE!—Millionnaire Cyrus W. Field, of New York, raised a monument to Andre, the English spy, with great pains and expense. Some other party razed it, a few nights ago—with a dynamite cartridge. Robert Simons, while trying to kill fish at Little Rock, Ark., with dynamite, exploded some of the stuff in his pocket, and his right arm was blown off in a jiffy.

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ARCHBISHOP CROKE says: "Politics now simply means food and clothes and decent houses for Irishmen and women at home; they mean the three great corporal works of mercy; they mean the protection of the weak against the strong, and the soil of Ireland for the Irish race rather than for a select gang of strangers and spoliators."

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THE LANDLORD WAR is raging in Ireland. The Boycotting campaign is being pushed. This chorus is intoned by "T. D. S." and caught up throughout the land:

"Tis vain to think that all our lives We'll coin our sweat to gold, And let our children and our wives Feel want and wet and cold; We first must help ourselves, and then, If we have cash to spare, Let landlord, and such idle men, Come asking for a share; So landlords, and grandlords, We pledge our faith to-day— A low rent, or no rent, Is all the rent we'll pay."

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A CHEERFUL PROSPECT.—Sympathetic Friend: I say, Toombs, old man, you're not looking well. Want cheerful society, that's it! I shall come and spend the evening with you, and bring my new poem, "Ode to a Graveyard!"

* * * * *

THE ENGLISH ELECTIONS.—One of the unexpected effects of the public excitement consequent upon the general election has been the revelation of some of the most grotesque vagaries of Protestantism that have ever come under our notice. One clergyman told his parishioners not to scruple about telling lies as to the party for which they intended to vote. Another characterized the Liberals as "a set of devils." Archdeacon Denison, an octogenarian ecclesiastic, informed his audience at a public meeting that they "might as well cheer for the devil as for Mr. Gladstone."

* * * * *

Mgr. Seghers, who, imbued with apostolic zeal and self-sacrifice, resigned the archdiocese of Oregon, to dedicate himself to the conversion of the Indians, has arrived at Vancouver Island, and has already begun his holy work assisted by a party of devoted Belgian missionaries.

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The decree for the introduction of the cause for the beatification and canonization of Joan of Arc has been signed at last. The late Mgr. Dupanloup labored hard in this affair, and doubtless the progress made is partly owing to his unwearied efforts.

* * * * *

A Scotch Colony is about being planted in Florida. A man named Tait is the organizer of the projected settlement, and is expected to bring fifty families with him from Glasgow. These are only the pioneers, and it is expected that in two years one thousand families from Scotland will be located in Florida. We welcome every industrious emigrant who comes here to better his fortune, and hope the projected colony will be a success. But we also hope they will be more patriotic than were the Scotch in 1775, who raised the English flag at the Cross Roads in North Carolina, and fought against American Independence.

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THE LATE VICTOR HUGO.—Very noble, and certainly very true, was the appeal which Victor Hugo made for religious instruction in 1850: "God will be found at the end of all. Let us not forget Him, and let us teach Him to all. There would otherwise be no dignity in living, and it would be better to die entirely. What soothes suffering, what sanctifies labor, what makes man good, strong, wise, patient, benevolent, just, at the same time humble and great, worthy of liberty, is to have before him the perpetual vision of a better world, throwing its rays through the darkness of this life. As regards myself, I believe profoundly in this better world; and I declare it in this place to be a supreme certainty of my soul. I wish, then, sincerely, or, to speak strongly, I wish ardently for religious instruction."

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It is thought that the Parliament which has just been elected will be short-lived. In a comparatively brief space of time there will be another appeal to the constituencies.

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Reminiscences of Irish-American Regiments in the Union Army during the Rebellion, are spoken of in an article elsewhere. The article is furnished to us by the editor and proprietor of the Sandy Hill (N. Y.) Herald, John Dwyer, Esq.

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BANK OF IRELAND SHARES.—Shares of the Bank of Ireland, which a year ago were quoted at L340, are quoted at L274. This is a government Orange Bank. It refused to assist the Munster Bank, which was the principal cause of its failure.

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A Statue of the late Lord O'Hagan will shortly be placed in the hall of the Four Courts, Dublin.

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A Catholic ceases to be a Catholic the moment he becomes a Free Mason. He may continue to believe all articles of Catholic faith and even go to church; but he is cut off from the body of the faithful by the fact of excommunication, and cannot receive the Sacraments while living, nor sepulchre in consecrated ground when dead. By resigning from the lodge, and giving up the symbols,he can be restored to the communion of the Church.

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The Lady Mayoress of Dublin has been presented with a silver cradle, commemorative of the birth of a daughter during her official year. The gift was from the members of both parties in the Corporation and the citizens.

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T. P. O'Connor, M.P., says that Ireland will be satisfied with nothing less than the same amount of independence granted by England to Canada. Mr. Justin McCarthy, M.P., says that the same amount of independence as New York or Illinois has in the Federal Union would do. These two declarations may be regarded as the maximum and minimum of the present national demand. Mr. Parnell has, very wisely, made no sign. He lies in wait for future developments.



NOTICES OF RECENT PUBLICATIONS.

Lynch, Cole & Meehan, New York.

THE IRISH-AMERICAN ALMANAC FOR 1886. Price, 25 cents.

We refer the reader to the advertisement on another page for the contents, etc., of this Irish year book. It is indispensable in every Irish family at home and abroad, like our own MAGAZINE. The publishers are also the editors and proprietors of the Irish-American newspaper, which has stood the tug of war for nearly forty years. The price is only 25 cents. It is worth three times 25 cents. Address the publishers or any bookseller.

Fr. Pustet & Co., N. Y. and Cincinnati.

THE POPE: THE VICAR OF CHRIST; THE HEAD OF THE CHURCH. By Rt. Rev. Monseigneur Capel, D.D., Domestic Prelate of His Holiness, Pope Leo XIII. Price, 25 cents.

The preface explains the scope of the work, which we give:

Is the Pope possessor of supreme and universal authority over the whole of the Christian Church, is the Pope the Vicar of Christ: are questions of the greatest moment to all believers in Christianity. If the Pope holds such power and position, then is there the absolute need of subjection to him in things spiritual. The subject has been treated by me from different stand-points during my tour in the States. The substance of such discourses is now given to the public. To meet the demands on time made by the active, busy life in America, the matter is presented as concisely as possible, and in short chapters. The intelligence and general information displayed by the people in all parts of the States which I have visited permit me, while presenting a small book for popular use, to treat the subject for an educated people anxious for solid knowledge. To those who wish to prosecute the further study of this question I recommend the following works, to which I have to express my indebtedness: Archbishop Kenrick's "Primacy of S. Peter," Allies' "See of S. Peter," Wilberforce's "Principles of Church Authority," Allnatt's "Cathedra Petri," and "Faith of Catholics" (Vol. II.), containing the historical evidence of the first five centuries of the Christian era to the teaching concerning the Papacy.

T. J. Capel.

Feast of the Immaculate Conception, 1885.

McGowan & Young, Portland, Maine.

ECHOES FROM THE PINES. By Margaret E. Jordan.

Maine should be represented among the States which has a large Catholic population. The first, and the only, Catholic Governor of the New England States, was Governor Cavanagh in Maine. There were few Catholics in that State during his administration. To-day, Maine would not give her suffrages to a Catholic. Why? Because in Governor Cavanagh's days the Catholics were in a great minority, and the Puritans did not fear them. As the Catholic body increases, hatred springs up; but Maine is coming back to the old faith.

She has now a prelate who is alive to the necessities of his people, and is doing everything in his power to establish the Faith of Kale and the other martyrs who died for their religion.

Who would have thought in Governor Cavanagh's days (a half a century ago), that there would be a grand cathedral, convent, schools and a Catholic publishing house in Portland? But such is the fact. The house has issued an excellent book but a few months ago, and now we have some sweet poems from the genial pen of Miss Margaret E. Jordan. The authoress has not so many "flourish of trumpets" as some others, but her Muse is pathetic and heartfelt. The critics may not give her the meed of praise they would confer upon others, but her Catholic heart will endear her to the love she bears our Blessed Mother, and her devotion to the poetic visions of the "old land." We believe Miss Jordan hails from the beautiful vale of Avoca, where the poet Moore imbibed his inspirations.

Ave Maria Press, Notre Dame, Ind.

SCHOLASTIC ANNUAL FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1886. By Prof. J. A. Lyons, of the University of Notre Dame, Ia.

This is the eleventh year of this publication. Our good friend, Prof. Lyons, gives his readers an excellent New Year's dish. "Capital and Strikes," by our friend, Onahan, of Chicago, is timely. We wish it could be read by the strikers and the Knights of Labor, all over the country. There are also articles on the late Vice President, by William Hoynes, A. M. "A Nation's Favorite," by Rev. Thomas E. Walsh, C. S. C., and other excellent articles both in prose and verse.

John Murphy & Co., Baltimore, Md.

NOTED SANCTUARIES OF THE HOLY FACE; or, the Cultus of the Holy Face, as practised at St. Peter's of the Vatican and other celebrated shrines. By M. L'Abbe Jouvier. Translated from the French by P. P. S. With preface by Most Rev. W. H. Elder, D.D., Archbishop of Cincinnati.

The devotion to the Holy Face is spreading throughout the Catholic world. The Discalced Nuns are foremost in their efforts to spread this devotion. This little book is published at their urgent solicitations. We recommend to all devout Catholics the purchase of this book.

D. & J. Sadlier & Co., New York.

SADLIER'S CATHOLIC DIRECTORY, ALMANAC, AND ORDO, FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1886; with full official reports of all dioceses, vicariates, prefectures, etc., in the United States, Canada, British West Indies, Ireland, England and Scotland. Unbound, $1.25. Bound, $1.50. An edition comprising only the church in the United States, 50 cents.

This is the fifty-fourth annual publication. It composes a great body of information interesting to every Catholic. All families should have it in their houses.

All of the above books may be obtained of Messrs. Noonan and Co., as well as of the publishers.



MISCELLANEOUS.

THEFT OF A VALUABLE BOOK.—A valuable book has been stolen from the library of the Minerva, Rome. It is one of the very few copies of the works of Lactantius, which were printed at the Benedictine monastery of Santa Scholastica, near Subiaco, in the year 1465. So rare are the copies of this work, that the price of a single copy has reached 15,000 francs, or L600. The most minute inquiries have been made, but the missing volume has not been traced.

A Selection of the late Lord O'Hagan's speeches, as revised by himself, will very shortly be published by Messrs. Longmans & Co. The volume opens with a speech on the Legislative Union delivered at a meeting of the Repeal Association in 1843, and closes with Lord O'Hagan's speeches in the House of Lords in 1881-82 on the Irish Land Laws. The work is edited by Lord O'Hagan's nephew, Mr. George Teeling, and contains numerous biographical and historical notes.

THE ANGEL GUARDIAN ANNUAL FOR 1886.—Seventh year. Published by the House of the Angel Guardian; Boston, Mass. Price 10 cents. Besides the matter contained in Almanacs generally, this little annual has also a collection of interesting and instructive articles. There are several excellent engravings, prominent among which are portraits of Cardinal McCloskey, Archbishop Williams, Daniel O'Connell, Rev. G. F. Haskins, and Hon. Hugh O'Brien, Mayor of Boston, accompanying biographical sketches.

MR. T. P. O'CONNOR'S new book, Gladstone's House of Commons, will be issued by Messrs. Ward and Downey early next week. In the preface the author says:—"It would be too much to ask the reader to believe that these sketches betray none of the bias natural to one who took a somewhat active part in many of the scenes described. But an effort was made at impartiality." The volume is called Gladstone's House of Commons. The justification of the title is the commanding position held in the last Parliament by the overwhelming personality of Mr. Gladstone.



MUSIC.

From White, Smith & Co.

Vocal: "Trusting," Duet, by C. A. White.

Instrumental: "Only for Thee," Polka Mazurka, by Fliege. "Chant du Paysan," by Alfonso Rendando. "Silver Trumpets," by Viviani, viz.: No. 1, "Grand Processional March." No. 2, "Harmony in the Dome," as played at St. Peter's in Rome. "Gavotte," by Rudolph Niemann. "Potpourri," from "Mikado," for four hands, arranged by C. D. Blake. "Chimes of Spring," by H. Lichner. "Mikado," Galop by Geo. Thorne. "The Banjo Companion," viz.: "Nymphs' Dance," by Armstrong. "Rag Baby Jig," by same. "Gavotte du Pacha," by F. Von Suppe. "Always Gallant Polka," by Fahrbach. "Carlotta Walzer," by Millocker. "Happy Go Lucky, Schottische," by De Coen, and "O Restless Sea," by C. A. White, all arranged for Banjo. "Rosalie Waltz," by Pierre Duvernet. "Morning Prayer," by Strealboy. "La Gracieuse," by Ch. Wachtmann. "Mikado Waltzes," by Bucalossi.

Books: "The Folio," for January, 1886, brimful of good reading interspersed with excellent music. "Ferd. Beyers' Preliminary Method for Pianoforte." Part 2, "Melodies for Violin and Piano," and "Melodies for Flute and Piano." All these works issued in Messrs. White, Smith & Co's best style.



Obituary.

"After life's fitful fever they sleep well."

CARDINAL.

CARDINAL PANEBIANCA has lately died in Rome at the age of seventy-seven. He was not a society cardinal, as he lived a hard life, slept on the boards, his board being also simple bread and water, with a morsel of cheese now and then by way of a luxury. He despised riches, and has died rich.

BISHOPS.

RT. REV. F. X. KRAUTBAUER, bishop of Green Bay, Wis., for over ten years, was found dead in his bed at the Episcopal residence, morning of the 17th of December. He had recently been a sufferer from apoplexy, which finally took him off. The suddenness of his death has cast a gloom of sadness over the entire Catholic population. Bishop Krautbauer was born in the parish of Bruck, near Ratisbon, Bavaria, in 1824, being in his sixty-first year at the time of his death.

At half-past six o'clock Friday morning, December 4, Rt. Rev. Dominic Manucy, third bishop of Mobile, Ala., died after a lingering illness. He was born in St. Augustine, Fla., in the year 1823, and received his education in Mobile, at the College of St. Joseph, Spring Hill. On the 20th of January, 1884, he received his appointment from Rome to the bishopric of Mobile, and on March 30th, of the same year, was duly installed. In the July following his health failed, and he was compelled to send his resignation to the Pope. The Pope, however, took no action on the resignation until more than a year had passed. Then Bishop Jeremiah O'Sullivan was appointed as his successor to the Bishopric of Mobile, and to him Bishop Manucy delivered up the keys of the cathedral on the first day of November, 1885. Since the succession Bishop Manucy has remained at the episcopal residence, where he has been at all times carefully attended by the priests of the parish and the people of his congregation. Bishop Manucy was no ordinary person, but, on the contrary, his whole life and its actions stamped him as a man of more than usual ability. As a man he showed himself, when in health, to be of strong and decisive will, possessed of an open-hearted, frank nature, and charitable to the furtherest degree. He was a man of thorough education, a profound and able logician, and was reckoned as one of the best theologians of the Catholic Church. In his various offices as priest and bishop, he was at all times alive to the interest of his church and its people. The spiritual needs of his flocks never escaped his observation, and were never left unsupplied.

PRIESTS.

German literary papers report with regret the death at Kilchrath, in Holland, of one of the most learned Jesuits of our times, Father Schneemann, at the age of fifty-six. He was chief editor of the well-known periodical, "Stimmen von Maria Laach." When the Jesuits had to quit Germany in 1872 he came to reside in England, but the climate not agreeing with him, he went to Holland, where he taught divinity in a diocesan college.

Rev. George Ruland, C. SS. R., who died a few weeks ago in Baltimore, was provincial of the Redemptorists for many years. He was a fellow student of Archbishop Heis, of Milwaukee, and a pupil of Doctor Doellinger. He was a man of marked talent, and his influence will be greatly missed.

Rev. Philip J. McCabe, rector of the cathedral at Hartford, Conn., died in that city on the 9th of December, greatly regretted by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance.

Rev. Father Jamison, S. J., the well-known and highly esteemed Jesuit died at Georgetown College, D. C., on night of 8th December, after a very long illness. He was born in Frederick City, Md., on June 19, 1831; in 1860 he was ordained to the priesthood in the Eternal City, by Cardinal Franson. Then returning to the United States, he labored at different times, as assistant pastor in Georgetown, Md., Washington, D. C., Philadelphia, Pa., Boston, Mass., Troy, N. Y., and Alexandria, Va.

The Rev. John S. Flynn, pastor of St. Ann's Church, Cranston, R. I., died of pneumonia, at the parochial residence, on the 10th December, in the forty-ninth year of his age, and the eighteenth of his ordination. He was a native of the County Cavan, Ireland, and came to this country when eleven years of age. His early education was under the supervision of his uncle, the late Rev. John Smith, of Danbury, Conn., with whom he resided. He continued his studies at Mount St. Mary's, Emmittsburg, Md. After finishing his classical course, he spent some time at St. Sulpice Seminary, Baltimore, and completed his theological studies at the Provincial Seminary, Troy, N. Y.

The death, November 8, of Very Rev. Wm. J. Halley, V. G., Cincinnati, is greatly lamented. In him, for more than twenty years, we have personally known a noble, pure, devoted and beautiful character. Born at Tramore, Ireland, he was taken off at forty-eight.

* * * * *

PRESERVATION OF A SAINT'S BODY.—The body of the late venerable G. B. Vianney, Cure d'Ars, was exhumed in the presence of the Bishop of Belley and Mgr. Casorara, promotor fidei, and of all those interested in the cause of his beatification. The body was found entire, as it was buried, and was recognizable at the first glance. The flesh and hair still adhered to the upper part of the head; the hands, shrivelled, preserved their full form—the sacerdotal vestments had undergone no alteration. To give an idea of the enthusiasm displayed by the people, we may say that every object of devotion to be bought in the shops of Ars was sold, so that the people might bear away with them a relic that had touched the holy body. Ars seemed to have recovered its former happy days, when pilgrims flocked thither, and penitents thronged the venerable cure's confessional.

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LORD CHARLES THYNNE, second son of the Marquis of Bath, has during the week received the tonsure and three minor orders at the hands of the Cardinal Archbishop in the chapel of the archbishop's house, Westminster. Lord Charles is an ex-clergyman of the Church of England, and is close on seventy years of age.

* * * * *

An interesting ceremony took place in the Church of Piedad, Buenos Ayres, recently, when an entire Jewish family named Krausse, the parents and two children, abjured the Jewish religion and were baptized into the Catholic Church. They had been instructed in the catechism of Christian doctrine by a Jesuit Father. Senor Gallardo was godfather of the parents, and Senor Leguizamona and Miss Larosa godfather and godmother for the children.

* * * * *

The ideas of English noblemen upon the subject of national gratitude, and the causes of it, must be decidedly unique. In a speech, delivered in Glasgow, on Dec. 3d, Lord Roseberry declared that he thought "Ireland had shown great ingratitude toward Mr. Gladstone." Considering that, in addition to a worthless Land Bill, Mr. Gladstone's principal gifts to Ireland consisted of five years of the most grinding coercion government, under the operation of which some two thousand of the best and purest men and women in the country were thrust into jail like felons, we fail to see the particular claims that grand old fraud has upon the good-will of Ireland or her people, says the Irish-American.

* * * * *

Bishop Bowman, of St. Louis, in the annual conference of the Methodist missionary committee, says that it costs $208 to convert an Italian Catholic to Methodism. Yes; and he would be dear at half the price, says the Western Watchman.

* * * * *

In the British Empire there are 14 archiepiscopal and 81 episcopal sees; 35 vicariates and 10 prefectures; in all, 140; and the number of patriarchs, primates, archbishops and bishops throughout the world is 1,171, the residential sees being 909 in number.

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GREGORY'S PILE REMEDY.—It is not very often that we say anything in favor of advertised medicines. We cheerfully make an exception in the case of Gregory's Pile Remedy. It is so highly endorsed by some of the best known citizens in Boston and vicinity, who have been permanently cured by its use, that we recommend it to all sufferers. It is a distinctly Irish remedy, the formulae for its preparation having been left with Mr. Gregory by an esteemed old Irish lady, who died in August last, and who used it with the greatest success for many years among her friends and neighbors.

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