HotFreeBooks.com
A Selection from the Comedies of Marivaux
by Pierre Carlet de Chamblain de Marivaux
Previous Part     1  2  3  4  5  6     Next Part
Home - Random Browse

Le Legs, a comedy in one act, was produced at the Theatre-Francais, January 11, 1736. Its reception was rather cold the first night, but enthusiastic on subsequent performances. Lenient says of it: "Le Legs est entre toutes ses oeuvres le specimen de la bluette reduite a sa plus simple expression, joignant la finesse et la tenuite de la trame a l'exiguite de la donnee. Tout cela tiendrait dans une coquille de noix, et finit par remplir un acte. Les personnages, aussi legers, aussi volatils que le sujet lui-meme, s'appellent le Marquis, la Comtesse, le Chevalier; ils representent, comme nous l'avons dit, des especes plus encore que des individus."[120]

A relative has left the Marquis six hundred thousand francs on condition that he marry Hortense, and if not, that he pay over to her two hundred thousand. The Marquis, in love with the Comtesse, to whom, through excessive timidity,—and here we have the motive of the play,—he dares not declare his passion, although encouraged in every way, is in business matters of a decidedly less timid nature, and seeks to secure all of the property, and at the same time preserve his heart for the one he loves. Hortense, likewise in love with another, the Chevalier, whose fortune is not large, seeks naturally to come into her inheritance without sacrificing herself to an odious marriage. In order to deceive the other into renouncing his share of the property, each feigns willingness to enter into the marriage as stipulated in the will.

The servants, as is usually the case in Marivaux's comedies, play an important role, and seek to further their own selfish interests. Lepine, un Gascon froid, with a genius for intrigue, urges on the marriage of the Marquis with the Comtesse, the more readily to secure for himself the hand of Lisette, who, in turn, opposes artfully the marriage of her mistress to further her own interests and to retain her freedom.

The play ends with the renunciation of the two hundred thousand francs on the part of the Marquis, who has at last become bold enough to declare himself, after manifold hints on the part of the Comtesse; and love triumphs. Thus with apparently little to work upon has been wrought out an entire comedy, interesting from beginning to end. Alfred de Musset has made over this comedy in his l'Ane et le Ruisseau, but has come far short of the original.

Les Fausses Confidences, a comedy in three acts, was brought out at the Comedie-Italienne, March 16, 1737. This piece has sometimes vied with le Jeu de l'Amour et du Hasard for the title of Marivaux's chef-d'oeuvre. Without doubt, it is one of the most charming of the author's works. The Mercure for March, 1737, informs us that the play "was received with favor by the public." Although it may be fittingly classed in the number of the Surprises de l'amour, it contains as well elements of the Prejuge vaincu, the prejudice overcome being that of wealth and position, which held a place, not only in the foolish vanity of Madame Argante, but even in the tender reserve of Araminte.

Dorante, a young man of honorable extraction, but poor, finds himself reduced to the position of steward or director in the house of Araminte, a rich young widow, to whose hand he is induced to aspire by Dubois, his former servant, now in her employ, who, by his profound knowledge of the feminine heart, aided by his master's comeliness, succeeds in overcoming the prejudice of social standing in the mind of Araminte, and triumphantly marries her to Dorante, in spite of Madame Argante's horror at the match and her enthusiastic support of the Count's suit.

The intrigue is all to the credit of Dubois, who not only has to fan the flame of love in the heart of Araminte, but also finds himself obliged to rally his master's failing courage, as when Dorante objects that she is too much above him, since he has neither rank nor wealth, and the valet replies: "Point de bien! votre bonne mine est un Perou. Tournez-vous un peu, que je vous considere encore; allons, monsieur, vous vous moquez; il n'y a point de plus grand seigneur que vous a Paris; voila une taille qui vaut toutes les dignites possibles, et notre affaire est infaillible absolument infaillible." His genius for intrigue is certainly admirable, and, were that a sufficient claim for glory, we would chime in with him in his final cry of victory, as the piece closes: "Ouf! ma gloire m'accable. Je meriterais bien d'appeler cette femme-la ma bru." The plot is complicated by the role of Mlle. Marton, companion to Araminte, who is led by M. Remy, Dorante's uncle, to consider herself the object of the young man's affection, and thus to second his ambition. She is easily consoled for her disappointment, however, and all ends to the honor of Dorante, who frankly confesses to Araminte his share in the intrigue, but assures her that a desire for her hand and property has culminated in a more noble passion, and we have again the triumph of love.

Marivaux, made use of the same theme in a later comedy, le Prejuge vaincu, but the prejudice attacked was that of birth, instead of wealth, as here, where both parties belong to the world of the bourgeoisie.[121]

L'Epreuve has been called le chant du cygne of Marivaux. It was the last play he gave to the Theatre-Italien, and was performed November 19, 1740. It is a little comedy in one act, and belongs to the small number of those that were enthusiastically received on their "first night." Marivaux admits this characteristic of his plays in the Avertissement to les Serments indiscrets. "Presque aucune des miennes n'a bien pris d'abord; leur succes n'est venu que dans la suite, et je l'aime bien autant venu de cette maniere-la."

This time it is a question of a rich young man, Lucidor, who loses his heart to a poor girl, another Angelique, but, to test her love and to learn, if possible, whether her affection is for himself rather than for his wealth, he puts her to a cruel test. He informs her that he has in mind for her a wealthy party and an intimate friend of his. In her artlessness Angelique concludes from his description that he means himself. In her joy she confides the matter to Lisette.

LISETTE. He bien! Mademoiselle, etes-vous instruite? A qui vous marie-t-on?

ANGELIQUE. A lui, ma chere Lisette, a lui-meme, et je l'attends.

LISETTE. A lui, dites-vous? Et quel est donc cet homme qui s'appelle lui par excellence? Est-ce qu'il est ici?

A charming bit of dialogue, and but another proof of Marivaux's insight into a young girl's heart. What is her chagrin, therefore, when he presents his valet, Frontin, disguised as the rich Parisian! She refuses his offer, and in desperation is about to consent to marry the peasant farmer Blaise, who had long sighed for the five thousand livres which are her marriage portion. This character is the amusing factor of the play, Lucidor urges him to win her hand, but offers, as a compensation, if he loses, twelve thousand livres. This, of course, is sufficient to turn the tide and to enlist the interest of Blaise to fail, if possible, in his forced suit of Angelique. The trial proves Angelique superior to money considerations, and love triumphs.

Why does the money question occupy so important a place in the works of Marivaux? Is it not, as some one has suggested, because in his own life he constantly felt the lack of it? Lesage's Turcaret and Sedaine's le Philosophe sans le savoir indicate, likewise, the new importance of wealth in the eighteenth century, which Marivaux could not have failed to notice or to incorporate in his works.

I cannot pass over in silence la Mere confidente, which, as Sainte-Beuve claims, is of an "ordre a part" among his comedies, and in which "il a touche des cordes plus franches, plus sensibles et d'une nature meilleure."[122] Like so many of his best plays, it was first presented at the Comedie-Italienne, May 9, 1735. This too was one of the plays, the reception of which was favorable. The lesson that it intended to teach, for it has a lesson, was one that we have already seen emphasized, by Marivaux, the rights of children, the duty of parents to respect them, and the advisability of gaining their love and confidence.

In Madame Argante of la Mere confidente we have the counterpart of the arrogant mother of the same name of les Fausses Confidences, indifferent to her daughter's real welfare, but powerless to control her will. Madame Argante of la Mere confidente believes in gentle government by love. Her daughter Angelique is a charming girl, anxious to do the right, but deeply in love with, a young man, Dorante, unknown to her mother, and without fortune. Madame Argante has already made her choice of an older man, Ergaste, for whose wealth and respectability she has a natural admiration, but, with her characteristic kindliness, determines not to force her choice upon her daughter. "Vous ne l'epouserez pas malgre vous, ma chere enfant," she says, meeting the objection of Angelique, and then, seeing that there is some secret trouble, she seeks in the most graceful, tactful way to learn the truth.

MADAME ARGANTE. ... Parle-moi a coeur ouvert; fais-moi ta confidente.

ANGELIQUE. Vous, la confidente de votre fille?

MADAME ARGANTE. Oh! votre fille, et qui te parle d'elle? Ce n'est point ta mere qui veut etre ta confidente; c'est ton amie, encore une fois.

ANGELIQUE, riant. D'accord; mais mon amie redira tout a ma mere; l'une est inseparable de l'autre.

MADAME ARGANTE. Eh bien! je les separe, moi; je t'en fais serment. Oui, mets-toi dans l'esprit que ce que tu me confieras sur ce pied-la, c'est comme si ta mere ne l'entendait pas....

Little by little the mother gains the daughter's confidence, until at last, emboldened, Angelique confesses:

Vous m'avez demande si on avait attaque mon coeur? Que trop, puisque j'aime!

MADAME ARGANTE, d'un air serieux. Vous aimez?...

ANGELIQUE, riant. Eh bien! ne voila-t-il pas cette mere qui est absente? C'est pourtant elle qui me repond; mais rassurez-vous, car je badine.[123]

Nothing could be more graceful or more natural. This, then, is that marivaudage, against which so much has been said!

Madame Argante has discovered the secret, and, fearful for her daughter's welfare, she allows the mother nature to assume the upper hand, and points out the danger of her course to Angelique, who, at last, comprehends, and agrees to renounce her lover. This she attempts to do, but love will have its way, and will not be put down. An elopement is arranged, which is interrupted by the arrival of Madame Argante, who takes Dorante to task for his indifference to the real happiness of Angelique. He is covered with confusion, confesses his mistake, and by his manly attitude gains the mother's heart and the daughter's hand. Ergaste, the rejected suitor, proves to be an uncle of Dorante, and in a spirit of self-abnegation, well nigh superhuman, devotes himself to celibacy and his fortune to the lovers. Lisette plays the role of the intrigante and temptress of her mistress. The comic of the piece is in the hands of Lubin, a peasant in the service of the family, who is bribed by each party to spy upon the other.

Lack of space forbids more than a mere mention of the remaining plays, many of which are worthy of being compared favourably with those which have been outlined. We have seen enough to convince us that, although his drama may be classified in general as psychological and feminin there is great diversity in the individual plays, and never monotony.

It has been said by certain of his contemporaries that in all the characters of his comedies he has but embodied himself, that they all have "the imprint of the style precieux, for which he has been reproached with so much reason in his novels and in his comedies,"[124] and that all,—"masters, valets, courtiers, peasants, lovers, mistresses, old men, and young men have the esprit of Marivaux."[125] To this accusation he makes reply in these words, quoted by d'Alembert: "On croit voir partout le meme genre de style dans mes comedies, parce que le dialogue y est partout l'expression simple des mouvements du coeur: la verite de cette expression fait croire que je n'ai qu'un meme ton et qu'une meme langue; mais ce n'est pas moi que j'ai voulu copier, c'est la nature et c'est peut-etre parce que ce ton est naturel, qu'il a paru singulier."[126]

Both the accusation and the reply are somewhat justifiable. With all the diversity that may be found in his different characters, there is yet a similarity of sentiments and of expression, which is due, not to a desire of representing himself in his plays, but to looking for models to a society the very natural of which was artificial, and to looking always from one point of view. To the careful student of the human heart the infinite variety that Marivaux has known how to introduce into his characters, which are always clearly distinct from one another, even if by mere delicate shades of difference, is a greater cause for wonder than the general family resemblance that unites them all.[127]

The roles of women are the important ones in the works of this author. In this particular the comedies of Marivaux recall the tragedies of Racine. Brunetiere[128] goes so far as to claim that "the roles of women in Marivaux's drama are almost the only women's roles" in the whole repertory of French comedies. Of Moliere's drama he recognizes only three such roles as clearly individualized, those of Agnes, Elmire and Celimene. "The others, whatever their name—Marianne, Elise, Henriette —are about the same ingenue, or—Dorine, Nicole, Toinon— about the same soubrette." Marivaux excels in his portrayal of the ingenue and of the coquette, but perhaps no role is more sympathetically developed than that of the young widow, now tender and yielding like Araminte of the Fausses Confidences, now vivacious and positive, but no less kindly, like the countess of the Legs.

His soubrettes resemble closely their mistresses, to such a degree that by exchanging roles they may readily be mistaken for them, as we have seen in le Jeu de l'Amour et du Hasard. Unlike those of Moliere, they are always refined and graceful, and are none the less witty. Contrary to their more cautious mistresses, they all, or nearly all, believe in love, and seek to further the marriage of the former. Lisette of le Legs is an exception. In short, all of the younger women of Marivaux are the perfection of grace, beauty, delicacy, wit or artlessness, and are simply irresistible.

It is only the mothers that merit our aversion. With few exceptions, notably Mme. Argante in la Mere confidente, he paints them "laides, vaines, imperieuses, avares, entichees de prejuges." "Il ne pare pas du moindre rayon de coquetterie leurs maussades et acariatres personnes. Il a de la peine a ne pas ceder, quand il s'agit d'elles, a la tentation de la caricature. On dirait qu'il se venge."[129] The roles of fathers, on the other hand, are treated with great affection. They are always kind and indulgent, and exercise their authority as little as possible. Their motto is that of the good Monsieur Orgon of le Jeu de l'Amour et du Hasard: "Il faut etre un peu trop bon pour l'etre assez."

His amoureux are less varied and less attractive than his amoureuses, and, while no less refined and exquisite, are less sincere, more calculating and self-interested.

His valets, like his soubrettes, are more refined than those of Moliere, that is to say, are higher in the social scale, and are treated by their masters with more consideration. The changes, soon to be wrought in the old regime, are already germinating. While almost rivalling their masters in wit, they yet occupy a secondary place upon the stage, and rarely dwarf by their own cleverness, as do often those of Moliere, their master's roles.[130] "Three of these valets are real creations. Dubois of les Fausses Confidences, Trivelin, of la Fausse Suivante, Lepine of le Legs."[131] Trivelin is the ancestor of Beaumarchais' Figaro.[132]

Marivaux has introduced into a number of his plays peasants of the cunning, calculating, Norman type, who speak a Norman patois, which may be a souvenir of his own Norman origin.

Piron, who could not resist an occasional thrust at his rivals, was guilty of the following witticism: "Fontenelle a engendre Marivaux, Marivaux a engendre Moncrif, et Moncrif n'engendrera personne." The boutade is amusing, but not just. Moncrif can hardly be considered an offspring of Marivaux, although he imitated certain of his coquettish graces,[133] any more, or perhaps even much less, than the latter, may be considered an offspring of Fontenelle. Larroumet[134] mentions as true successors to Marivaux, in the line of proverbes and comedies de societe, Florian, in the eighteenth century, and in the nineteenth, Picard, Andrieux, Colin d'Harleville, Carmontelle, Theodore Leclercq, Alfred de Vigny and Alfred de Musset,[135] in the novel Paul Bourget and his school, and particularly Paul Hervieu, and in the journal, the masters of the modern chronique.

One feature common to all of the writings of our author, as to many of his contemporaries, is their lack of the sentiment of nature. There are no streams, no flowers, no birds throughout his works. The two slight exceptions, mentioned by Larroumet,[136] show so evident a lack of interest in the beauties of nature that they offer the strongest proof in support of the rule. Here they are, the first from the eighth and the second from the eleventh part of Marianne: "Pendant qu'on etait la- dessus, je feignis quelque curiosite de voir un cabinet de verdure qui etait au bout de la terrasse. Il me parait fort joli, dis-je a Valville, pour l'engager a m'y mener." [137] —"Il faisait un fort beau jour, et il y avait dans l'hotellerie un jardin qui me parut assez joli. Je fus curieuse de le voir, et j'y entrai. Je m'y promenai meme quelques instants."[138] This passage, from the sixth part of the same work, shows a somewhat greater appreciation: " Ah, ca! vous n'avez pas vu notre jardin; il est fort beau; madame nous a dit de vous y mener; venez y faire un tour; la promenade dissipe, cela rejouit. Nous avons les plus belles allees du monde!"[139] There is one passage, however, in the fifth part, in which Marivaux gives evidence of a frank and simple enjoyment of nature: "Nous nous promenions tous trois dans le bois de la maison;... et comme les tendresses de Valvilie interrompaient ce que nous disions, cette aimable fille et moi, nous nous avisames, par un mouvement de gaite, de le fuir, de l'ecarter d'aupres de nous, et de lui jeter des feuilles que nous arrachions des bosquets."[140]

Marivaux has had the singular honor of causing the creation of a new word in the French literary vocabulary, to designate his peculiar style, le marivaudage, a term which has had in the past rather more of discredit than of esteem in its general acceptation. Sainte-Beuve thus defines it: "Qui dit marivaudage, dit plus ou moins badinage a froid, espieglerie compassee et prolongee, petillement redouble et pretentieux, enfin une sorte de pedantisme semillant et joli; mais l'homme, considere dans l'ensemble, vaut mieux que la definition a laquelle il a fourni occasion et sujet."[141] With the increasing popularity of Marivaux, there has gradually arisen a different and more complimentary idea of the term. Deschamps, in his excellent work on the author, thus defines it: "Cet examen de conscience, dicte par une probite inquiete,—cette application a eviter les illusions qui trompent, a dejouer les pieges du caprice et de la fantaisie, a mettre au service du sentiment les plus subtiles lumieres de la raison,...—l'esprit de finesse employe a decouvrir les plus secrets mouvements de notre sensibilite,—par consequent l'usage conscient d'un style ajuste a la tenuite de ces enquetes, style qui n'est pas exempt de recherche, mais qui abonde en trouvailles decisives,—voila precisement le marivaudage."[142]

Marivaux has been blamed for an affectation, an ingenuity, a delicacy of style, together with a diffuseness, which led him to turn a thought in so many different ways as to weary the reader, a habit of clothing in popular expressions subtle and over-refined ideas, and, finally, a studied and far-fetched neologism.[143]

His ideas on style may be found in the sixth leaflet of the Cabinet du Philosophe, in which he answers the accusations of his critics. With him the idea is primary and the word used to express it but secondary. Wherefore, an author should be judged rather by the thoughts which the words express than by the words themselves. If, moreover, the finesse of the writer is such that he can perceive certain shades of meaning, not evident to the more commonplace beholder, how can he make them clear without deviating from the regular forms of expression? A man who understands his language may have poor thoughts, but cannot express his thoughts poorly. "Venons maintenant a l'application de tout ce que j'ai dit. Vous accusez un auteur d'avoir un style precieux. Qu'est-ce que cela signifie?... Ce style peut-etre bien n'est accuse d'etre mauvais, precieux, guinde, recherche, que parce que les pensees qu'il exprime sont extremement fines, et ont du se former d'une liaison d'idees singulieres, lesquelles idees ont du a leur tour etre exprimees par le rapprochement de mots et de signes qu'on a rarement vus aller ensemble." We should have to tell him to think less, or else urge the others to allow him to use the only expressions possible of conveying his thoughts, even should they appear precieuses. If, then, his thoughts are understood, the next question is whether they could be formed with fewer ideas, and consequently fewer words, and still convey to the hearer all the necessary finesse, all of the delicate shades of meaning. "Il y a des gens qui, en faisant un ouvrage d'esprit, ne saisissent pas toujours precisement une certaine idee qu'ils voudraient joindre a une autre. Ils la cherchent; ils l'ont dans l'instinct, dans le fond de l'ame; mais ils ne sauraient la developper. Par paresse, ou par necessite, ou par lassitude. ils s'en tiennent a une autre qui en approche, mais qui n'est pas la veritable: et ils l'expriment pourtant bien, parce qu'ils prennent le mot propre de cette idee a peu pres ressemblante a l'autre, et en meme temps inferieure." Montaigne, La Bruyere, Pascal, and all great writers, have had individual ideas, hence a singular style, as it is termed.

In the seventh leaflet of the Spectateur he replies to the accusation that he attempted in his writings to display his wit at the expense of naturalness. "Combien croit-on, par exemple, qu'il y ait d'ecrivains, qui, pour eviter le reproche de n'etre pas naturels font justement tout ce qu'il faut pour ne l'etre pas, et d'autres qui se rendent fades, de crainte qu'on ne leur dise qu'ils courent apres l'esprit! Courir apres l'esprit, et n'etre point naturel, voila les reproches a la mode." What Marivaux sought, above everything else, was naturalness, and he prided himself upon employing more nearly than most writers the language of conversation. Summing up the whole matter, he declares: "J'ajouterai seulement, la-dessus, qu'entre gens d'esprit, les conversations dans le monde sont plus vives qu'on ne pense, et que tout ce qu'un auteur pourrait faire pour les imiter, n'approchera jamais du feu et de la naivete fine et subite qu'ils y mettent."[144]

Although the term of neologue was applied to Marivaux by Voltaire, and has been repeated ever since, he was less of a neologist than a precieux in language.[145] That is to say, he was less inclined to coin new words, or even to use old words with new meanings, than he was to employ unusual and peculiar turns of expression.[146] Marivaux was not the only writer of the time to make use of expressions precieuses, and, although he figures rather more prominently than most of the authors ridiculed by Desfontaines in his Dictionnaire neologique,[147] he has the company of many others, and among them, of his friends La Motte, Fontenelle, de Houtteville, and even Montesquieu. Some of the expressions which were considered reprehensible by Desfontaines have since been received into common parlance, and so do not appear unnatural or unusual: sortir de sa coquille, etc.

Fleury[148] gives six divisions of the peculiar turns of expression employed by Marivaux, which constitute that part of the marivaudage most condemned by his critics:

1. The use of a common expression, in which a word is first taken in a figurative sense, to be followed by its literal sense:

Il ne veut que vous donner la main.—Eh! que veut-il que je fasse de cette main, si je n'ai pas envie de la prendre?

Son coeur ne se marie pas, il reste garcon.

2. The use of a metaphor unexpectedly carried out:

Un amour de votre facon ne reste pas longtemps au berceau: votre premier coup d'oeil a fait naitre le mien; le second lui a donne la facon; le troisieme l'a rendu grand garcon. Tachons de l'etablir au plus vite; ayez soin de lui, puisque vous etes sa mere.

Monsieur a couru apres moi, je m'enfuyais, mais il m'a jete de l'or, des nippes et une maison fournie de tous ses ustensiles a la tete; cela m'a etourdie, je me suis arretee.

3. A metaphor piquant by its oddity:

_Je crois que j'ai laisse ma respiration en chemin.

La vie que je mene aujourd'hui n'est point batarde, elle vient bien en ligne droite de celle que je menais._

4. A phrase ending in a surprise:

Je gage que tu m'aimes.—Je ne parie jamais, je perds toujours.

5. A metonymy put into action:

Voyez-vous cette figure tendre et solitaire qui se promene la-bas en attendant la mienne?

6. A rough comparison, which will not admit of examination:

Si j'etais roi, nous verrions qui serait reine, et comme ce ne serait pas moi, il faudrait que ce fut vous.

Although these divisions are not altogether satisfactory, they, with the examples cited, will serve to convey an accurate enough idea of this side of the marivaudage. Such expressions, or, at least, those in which the exaggeration of the figure is most apparent, are usually found in the mouths of servants and peasants, to which class such complicated language is not unnatural.[149]

A very minor phase of the literary activity of Marivaux remains to be considered, and that is his work in criticism. Eulogiums of the tragedies of Crebillon pere,[150] of the Romulus[151] and the Ines de Castro[152] of La Motte, and of the Lettres persanes[153] of Montesquieu constitute almost his entire equipment in this line.

That he was not an unbiased critic, this unwarranted praise of his friend La Motte is enough to prove: "Je sortais, il y a quelques jours, de la comedie, ou j'etais alle voir Romulus, qui m'avait charme, et je disais en moi-meme: on dit communement l'elegant Racine, et le sublime Corneille; quelle epithete donnera-t-on a cet homme-ci, je n'en sais rien; mais il est beau de les avoir meritees toutes les deux." His criticism of the Lettres persanes is, after all, the only one worthy of praise. In it he has shown himself a fair and competent judge of this first celebrated work of Montesquieu. I realize that, in thus restricting the critical works of Marivaux, it is taking a narrow view of criticism, and that his works ridiculing the classics, l'Iliade travestie and le Telemaque travesti, together with his ideas upon the quarrel of the ancients and moderns, as seen throughout certain of his works, and particularly in le Miroir, and lastly his opinion of criticism in general, and his defense of his own style, as embodied in works already mentioned, should be taken into consideration, if we had the time to study him as critic in this broader sense.

If Marivaux, yielding to his sense of etiquette and good breeding, was sparing in his criticism of his contemporaries, he was certainly not spared by them. The circle of his friends was small, but intimate, and his timidity with men, his suspiciousness, his lack of self-assertion, made him an easy prey to such unscrupulous opponents as Voltaire. Fond of the refined society of the salons, and repelled by the less feeling and more boisterous set of the cafes, which he avoided, Marivaux became a convenient object of attack for the cabals set in motion by the latter, and, although, in spite of his general suspiciousness, he refused to give credence[154] to an idea so obnoxious to him, it is not unlikely that the frequent failure of his comedies on their "first night" may be most satisfactorily explained in this way.

Marivaux was ever ready to accept a criticism that seemed to him deserved. "J'ai eu tort de donner cette comedie-ci au theatre," he says in the preface to his Ile de la Raison: "Elle n'etait pas bonne a etre representee, et le public lui a fait justice en la condamnant. Point d'intrigue, peu d'action, peu d'interet; ce sujet, tel que je l'avais concu, n'etait point susceptible de tout cela...." At another time, having been present at the first performance of one of his comedies, and noticing the undissimulated yawns of the parterre, he confessed, upon leaving the theatre, that no one had been more bored than he.[155] However, notwithstanding his readiness to acknowledge his own defects, and to defer to the opinions of others, Marivaux required the criticism to be fair- minded and impersonal.

The seventh leaflet of the Spectateur contains his ideas upon this matter of criticism, which a few selections will suffice to illustrate: "A l'egard de ces critiques qui ne sont que des expressions meprisantes, et qui, sans autre examen, se terminent a dire crument d'un ouvrage cela ne vaut rien, cela est detestable, nous serons bientot d'accord la-dessus, et je vous ferai convenir sur-le-champ que ces sortes de raisonnements a leur tour ne valent rien et sont detestables.... Ah! que nous irions loin, qu'il naitrait de beaux ouvrages, si la plupart des gens d'esprit qui en sont les juges, tatonnaient un peu avant de dire, cela est mauvais ou cela est bon! ... mais je voudrais des critiques qui pussent corriger et non pas gater, qui reformassent ce qu'il y aurait de defectueux dans le caractere d'esprit d'un auteur, et qui ne lui fissent pas quitter ce caractere. Il faudrait aussi pour cela, s'il etait possible, que la malice ou l'inimitie des partis n'alterat pas les lumieres de la plupart des hommes, ne leur derobat point l'honneur de se juger equitablement, n'employat pas toute leur attention a s'humilier les uns les autres, a deshonorer ce que leur talents peuvent avoir d'heureux, a se ruiner reciproquement dans l'esprit du public...."[156] When obliged to endure unfair and personal criticism, as he often was, Marivaux met it invariably with contemptuous silence,[157] saying to his friends: "J'aime mon repos et je ne veux point troubler celui des autres."[158]

Among those most bitter and most constant in their attacks upon him was Voltaire, some of whose remarks have come down to us. "C'est un homme," says Voltaire, "qui passe sa vie a peser des riens dans des balances de toile d'araignee" ... or again: "C'est un homme qui sait tous les sentiers du coeur humain, mais qui n'en connait pas la grande route." On June 8, 1732, writing to M. de Fourmont, Voltaire declares: "Nous allons avoir cet ete une comedie en prose du sieur Marivaux, sous le titre les Serments indiscrets. Vous comptez bien qu'il y aura beaucoup de metaphysique et peu de naturel."

The strong antipathy felt by Marivaux for Voltaire forced him at times, in the presence of friends, to give vent to his feelings in words quite as spiteful as those of his enemy: "M. de Voltaire est le premier homme du monde pour ecrire ce que les autres ont pense.... M. de Voltaire est la perfection des idees communes.... Ce coquin-la a un vice de plus que les autres; il a quelquefois des vertus." But his retorts never went so far as publication, and when, in 1735, the Lettres philosophiques of Voltaire were condemned to be burned by Parliament, and Marivaux was urged by a publishing house, offering a good round sum, to make the most of Voltaire's discomfiture and write a refutation of the same, he refused, with his characteristic nobility of soul, to advance his own interests at the expense of those of his enemy. As much cannot be said of the latter, who, in letters written at this time, shows a cowardly fear of Marivaux's acceptance of the offer.

Voltaire was not the only rival to show hostility. Destouches, in the Envieux, ou la Critique du Philosophe marie (XII), Le Sage, in Gil Blas (Book VII, chapter XIII), as well as Crebillon fils, in the work already mentioned, were among the number.

Marivaux's admission to the French Academy had long been a matter of grave doubt to his friends, for he was too honest for intrigue and too proud to sue for favours, and there was much opposition on the part of many members, who declared that their purposes were at war, as they had assumed the task of composing the language, while he seemed to aim at its decomposition; but Mme. de Tencin had set her mind upon making of him an academician, and spared no pains to accomplish her purpose. The influence of this brilliant, scheming, unprincipled, and headstrong woman, aided by Bouhier, president of the parliament of Dijon, and likewise a warm supporter of Marivaux, gained the day, and she had the pleasure of seeing her old friend, upon his fifty-fifth birthday, February 4, 1743, received within the ranks of the forty Immortals. Voltaire, although a dangerous competitor, was not received until three years later; Piron, Le Sage, and Crebillon fils, never.

Strangely enough, this painter of gay and brilliant society succeeded to the fauteuil of an ecclesiastic, l'abbe d'Houtteville, and was welcomed by another, Languet de Gergy, archbishop of Sens. At his death his place was filled by still another, a certain abbe de Radonvilliers. The task of the archbishop was not one of the easiest, for it devolved upon him to eulogize an author, many of whose works, by reason of his ecclesiastical position, he was not supposed to have read. The acquaintance that he shows with them, however, is rather too intimate to credit his assertion that his judgment is drawn from hearsay: but with due deference to public opinion and his supposed position, the archbishop lauds rather the character of the man than the excellence of the author, declaring that it is not so much for the multitude of his books, though welcomed by the public with avidity, that Marivaux owes his election, as it is to "l'estime que nous avons faite de vos moeurs, de votre bon coeur, de la douceur de votre societe, et, si j'ose le dire, de l'amabilite de votre caractere."[159]

Along with much praise of the author's ability, with flattering comparisons such as these: "Theophraste moderne, rien n'a echappe a vos portraits critiques.... Le celebre La Bruyere parait, dit-on, ressusciter en vous..." are criticisms upon the immoral influence of certain of his works, particularly the Paysan parvenu, which claim to have a moral aim. The archbishop suggests that his descriptions of licentious love are painted in such "naive and tender colors" that they must create upon the reader an impression other than that intended by the author, and that the young may be led to follow the example of the "paysan, parvenu a la fortune par des intrigues galantes," in spite of his recommendations of sobriety.[160]

Nothing, perhaps, could have so wounded Marivaux as this imputation, for few writers have been actuated by purer and more noble motives, and it was with difficulty that he restrained his impulse to call upon the assembled company for justification.[161] This is but another instance of his extreme sensibility, for, despite the criticism more or less just, the spirit of the discourse was both kindly and complimentary, as may be seen from these closing words: "J'ai rendu justice, monsieur, a la beaute de votre genie, a sa fecondite, a ses agrements: rendez-la, je vous prie, de votre part, au ministere saint dont je suis charge; et en sa faveur, pardonnez-moi une critique qui ne deroge point, ni a ce qui est du d'estime a votre aimable caractere, ni a ce qui est du d'eloge a la multitude, a la variete, a la gentillesse de vos ouvrages."[162]

No sooner was Marivaux a member of the French Academy than epigrams, such as this, began to be showered upon him: "Il eut ete mieux place a l'Academie des Sciences, comme inventeur d'un idiome nouveau, qu'a l'Academie Francaise, dont assurement il ne connaissait pas la langue."[163]

From the time of his admission to the French Academy until his death he wrote little of value. A Lettre a une dame sur la perte d'un perroquet, in verse, may serve to represent the decline of his genius. His popularity waned and was eclipsed by that of the vigorous writers and philosophical thinkers that followed him. His graceful sketches were soon to be forgotten in those terrible scenes that closed the century, which the most morbid and foreboding mind could scarcely have foreseen or pictured in the lurid colourings that history has painted them. His closing years were embittered by a knowledge of his failing powers and a growing suspiciousness of those about him, and his increasing poverty would have made his sufferings more keen, had it not been for the generous devotion of a friend, Mlle. de Saint-Jean, with whom he lived for the last few years of his life, in her apartments, rue de Richelieu, and whose modest fortune he shared. He died on February 12,[164] "after a rather long illness,"[165] which he bore with fortitude, and "with all the tranquillity of a Christian philosopher"[166] saw the inevitable end approach. His death passed almost unnoticed by his contemporaries.

Although at the time of his death he was seventy-five years of age, as Colle records in his journal, "he did not seem to be fifty-eight."[167] He had that gift, which none but his own light-hearted time has known, of warding off, if not old age itself, at least the appearance of it. And from that first half of the eighteenth century, that period of perennial youth, have come down to us those ever fresh and rose-hued creations, which are our charm to-day, recalling, as they do, a society long past, a brilliancy of wit, of conversation well-nigh forgotten, a gayety, a thoughtlessness, which we of the money-loving, practical, and scientific twentieth century may long for, but not know.



CHRONOLOGY OF THE WORKS OF MARIVAUX.

(Taken from the third appendix of Larroumet's "Marivaux", edition of 1882, pp. 592-596.)

[Note: T.I. indicates the Theatre-Italien and T.F. the Theatre- Francais.]

1706. Le Pere prudent et equitable, ou Crispin l'heureux fourbe, comedy in one act, in verse, printed in 1712.

1712. Pharsamon, ou les Folies romanesques, novel in ten parts, printed in 1737.

1713-1714. Les Aventures de..., ou les Effets surprenants de la sympathie, novel in five volumes. La Voiture embourbee, novel in one volume.

1715. Le Triomphe du Bilboquet, ou la Defaite de l'Esprit, de l'Amour et de la Raison.

1717. L'Iliade travestie, in twelve books and in verse, Le Telemaque travesti, in three books, printed in 1736.

1717-1718. Five Lettres contenant une aventure, four Lettres a madame..., contenant des reflexions sur la populace, les bourgeois et les marchands, les hommes et les femmes de qualite,—et les beaux esprits, in le Mercure for August, September and October, 1717, March and June, 1718.

1717. Portrait de Climene, ode anacreontique in le Mercure for September, Lettre ecrite a l'auteur du Mercure (October), to object to the agnomen of Theophraste moderne.

1719. Pensees sur divers sujets: sur la clarte du discours, sur la pensee sublime, in le Mercure for March.

1720. March 4. L'Amour et la Verite, comedy in three acts, in collaboration with the Chevalier de Saint-Jory. T.I. Prologue inserted in le Mercure for March. October 19. Annibal, tragedy in five acts and in verse, T.F. Four representations, one of which at the court. October 20. Arlequin poli par l'Amour, comedy in one act. T.I. Twelve representations.

1722. May 3. The first Surprise de l'Amour, comedy in three acts. T.I. Sixteen representations. Compliment, in prose and verse, to Mlle. Sylvia. Reflexions sur le Romulus de la Motte, pamphlet.

1722-1723. Le Spectateur francais, journal in twenty-five leaflets.

1723. April 6. La Double Inconstance, comedy in three acts. T.I. Number of representations unknown: break in the registers of the theatre, from March to June.

1724. February 5. Le Prince travesti, comedy in three acts. T.I. Sixteen representations. July 8. La Fausse Suivante, comedy in three acts. T.I. Thirteen representations. December 2. Le Denouement imprevu, comedy in one act. T.F. Six representations.

1725. March 5. L'Ile des Esclaves, comedy in one act. T.I. Twenty-one representations. August 19. L'Heritier de Village, comedy in one act. T.I. Six representations.

1727. September 11. Les Petits Hommes, ou l'Ile de la Raison, comedy in three acts. T.F. Four representations. Received August 3. December 31. The second Surprise de l'Amour, comedy in three acts. T.F. Fourteen representations. Received January 30.

1728. April 22. Le Triomphe de Plutus, comedy in one act. T.I. Twelve representations. L'Indigent philosophe ou l'Homme sans souci, journal in seven leaflets.

1729. April 18. La Nouvelle Colonie, ou la Ligue des Femmes, comedy in three acts. T.I. Number of representations unknown. Reduced later to one act, to be played in the theatres de societe; published in this form in le Mercure for December, 1750.

1730. January 23. Le Jeu de l'Amour et du Hasard, comedy in three acts. T.I. Fourteen representations.

1731-1741. La Vie de Marianne, ou les Aventures de Madame la comtesse de..., novel in eleven parts.

1731. November 5. La Reunion des Amours, comedy in one act, T.F. Nine representations. Received October 4.

1732. May 12. Le Triomphe de l'Amour, comedy in three acts. T.I. Number of representations unknown. June 8. Les Serments indiscrets, comedy in five acts. T.F. Nine representations. Received March 9, 1731. July 26. L'Ecole des Meres, comedy in one act. T.I. Fourteen representations.

1733. June 6. L'Heureux Stratageme, comedy in three acts. T.I. Eighteen representations.

1734. Le Cabinet du Philosophe, journal in eleven leaflets. August 6. La Meprise, comedy in one act. T.I. Three representations. November 6. Le Petit-Maitre corrige, comedy in three acts. T.F. Two representations. Received September 21.

1735. May 9. La Mere confidente, comedy in three acts, T.I. Seventeen representations.

1735. Le Paysan parvenu, novel in five parts.

1736. January 11. Le Legs, comedy in one act. T.F. Seven representations. Received April 20, 1735.

1737. March 16. Les Fausses Confidences, comedy in three acts. T.I. Number of representations unknown.

1738. July 7. La Joie imprevue, comedy in one act. T.I. Number of representations unknown.

1739. January 13. Les Sinceres, comedy in one act. T.I. Number of representations unknown.

1740. November 19. L'Epreuve, comedy in one act. T.I. Twenty representations.

1743. February 4. Discours de reception to the French Academy.

1744. August 24. Reflexions sur les progres de l'esprit humain, read before the French Academy; inserted in le Mercure for June, 1755, under the title of Reflexions sur Thucydide. October 19. La Dispute, comedy in one act. T.F. One representation. December 29. Reflexions sur les differentes sortes de gloire, read before the French Academy; printed in le Mercure for March, 1751, under the title of Reflexions sur les hommes.

1746. August 6. Le Prejuge vaincu, comedy in one act. T.F. Seven representations.

1748. April 4. Reflexions sur l'esprit humain, in the form of a letter read before the French Academy.

1749. August 24. Reflexions sur Corneille et sur Racine, read before the French Academy; inserted in le Mercure for April, 1755, under the title of Reflexions sur l'esprit humain a l'occasion de Corneille et de Racine. September 24. Continuation of the same reading.

1750. August 25. Continuation of the same reading. December 27. Compliment addressed in the name of the French Academy to the Chancellor de Lamoignon; inserted in le Mercure for March, 1751.

1751. January 8. Compliment addressed in the name of the French Academy to the garde des sceaux. August 24. Reflexions sur les Romains et sur les anciens Perses, read before the French Academy; inserted in le Mercure for October, 1751.

1754. L'Education d'un prince, dialogue, in le Mercure, first volume for December.

1757. Les Acteurs de bonne foi, comedy in one act, published in le Conservateur for November, 1757. March 5. Reading and reception at the Comedie-Francaise of Felicie, comedy in one act, not played; published in le Mercure for March, 1757. Date unknown. Lettre a une dame sur la perte d'un perroquet (in verse).



BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE.

[Footnote: The first biographical and literary study upon Marivaux is that of the Abbe de la Porte, published four years before the former's death in the Observateur litteraire of 1759, vol. 1, p. 73, etc., reprinted with additional details in the edition of the Oeuvres diverses de Marivaux, published in 1765 by Duchesne, and again in the edition of the Oeuvres completes, published in 1781 by the widow Duchesne. It is to this last- named text that I refer in the introduction. This essay by De la Porte is quite fair and trustworthy. It is particularly interesting as being the first. It is followed by an Eloge, or, rather, a contemptuous sketch, for it is anything but a eulogy, published by Palissot (and de Sivry) in the Necrologe des hommes celebres of 1764. In 1769 Lesbros de la Versane published l'Esprit de Marivaux ou Analectes de ses ouvrages, preceded by an Eloge historique de cet auteur, "a panegyric without reservation upon the man and the writer." It is to a reprint of this Eloge, published by Gogue et Nee de la Rochelle, Paris, 1782, that I make my references. These are the sources from which d'Alembert drew most of the matter for his Eloge, which is characterized by a kindly criticism, that, though sometimes too severe, does not offend. These four are the principal early sources from which Marivaux's biographers have drawn, and, if we add Desfontaines' Dictionnaire neologique, published in 1726 (and several times reprinted), Grimm's Correspondance litteraire (1753-1790), Colle's Journal et memoires (1748-1772), Marmontel's Memoires, published in 1804, those of the President Henault, published by the Baron de Vigan, Paris, 1854, those of the Abbe de Trublet, published in Amsterdam, 1759, and La Harpe's Cours de litterature ancienne et moderne (see edition by Buchon, Paris, 1825-1826), we shall have almost covered the ground of early sources. Much of the first part of this note is taken from Larroumet's Marivaux, p. 14, note 2.]



COLLECTIVE EDITIONS.

MARIVAUX: Les Comedies de Monsieur de Marivaux, jouees sur le Theatre de l'Hotel de Bourgogne, par les Comediens Italiens ordinaires du Roy. Paris, Briasson, 2 vol. in-12, 1732.

MARIVAUX: Oeuvres de theatre de M. de Marivaux. A Paris, chez Prault pere, 4 vol. in-12, 1740.

MARIVAUX: Oeuvres de theatre de M. de Marivaux, de l'Academie francoise. Nouvelle edition. A Paris, chez N.B. Duchesne, rue S. Jacques, au-dessous de la Fontaine S. Benoit, au Temple du Gout; 5 vol. in-12, avec portrait grave par Chenu d'apres Garand, 1758.

MARIVAUX: Oeuvres completes. Paris, chez Gogue et Nee de la Rochelle, 12 vol. in-8, 1781-1782.

MARIVAUX: Oeuvres completes de Marivaux de l'Academie Francaise (Duviquet). Paris, Haut-Coeur et Gayet jeune, P.J. Gayet et Dauthereau, 10 vol. in-8, 1825-1830.

WORKS CONSULTED OR REFERRED TO IN THE INTRODUCTION.

BIBLIOTHEQUE FRANCAISE, ou Histoire litteraire de la France. Tome XXII, derniere partie. Amsterdam, H. du Sauzet, 1736.

FERDINAND BRUNETIERE: Nouvelles critiques sur l'histoire de la litterature francaise. Paris, Hachette et Cie., 1882.

CHARLES COLLE: Journal et memoires sur les hommes de lettres, les ouvrages dramatiques et les evenements les plus memorables du regne de Louis XV (1748-1772), (edition Honore Bonhomme). Tome II. Paris, Firmin-Didot Freres, Fils et Cie., 1868.

D'ALEMBERT (Jean Le Rond, dit): Eloge de Marivaux. Contained in his Oeuvres philosophiques, historiques et litteraires. Tome X. Paris, Jean-Francois Bastien, An XIII (1805).

GASTON DESCHAMPS: Marivaux (in les Grands ecrivains de la France). Paris, Hachette et Cie., 1897.

L'ABBE PIERRE-FRANCOIS GUYOT DESFONTAINES: Dictionnaire neologique a l'usage des beaux esprits du siecle. Amsterdam, Michel-Charles le Cene, 1731.

JEAN FLEURY: Marivaux et le marivaudage. Paris, E. Pion et Cie., 1881.

LEON FONTAINE: Le Theatre et la philosophie au XVIIIe siecle. Versailles, Cerf et Fils, 1879.

BERNARD LE BOVIER DE FONTANELLE: Eloge de Mme. de Lambert. Contained in his Oeuvres. Tome VII. Paris, J.F. Bastien et J. Serviere, 1792.

EDOUARD FOURNIER: Etude sur la vie et les oeuvres de l'auteur. Preceding the Theatre complet de Marivaux. Laplace et Sanchez, 1878.

EMILE GOSSOT: Marivaux moraliste. Paris, Didier et Cie., 1881.

FREDERIC-MELCHIOR GRIMM ET DENIS DIDEROT: Correspondance litteraire, philosophique et critique ... depuis 1753 jusqu'en 1790. Tomes I (1753-1756), III (1761-1764), and IV (1764-1765). Paris, Furne et Ladrange, 1829.

LE PRESIDENT CHARLES-J.-F. HENAULT: Memoires (edition Le Baron de Vigan). Paris, 1854.

ARSENE HOUSSAYE: Galerie du XVIIIe siecle. Premiere serie. Paris, Hachette et Cie., 1858.

JEAN-FRANCOIS DE LA HARPE: Cours de litterature ancienne et moderne. Tomes XIII, XIV, XVI. Paris, P. Dupont et Ledentu, 1825.

L'ABBE JOSEPH DE LA PORTE: Essai sur la vie et sur les ouvrages de M. de Marivaux. Contained in the Oeuvres completes de M. de Marivaux. Tome I. Paris, la Veuve Duchesne, 1781. [References in the introduction are to this edition of De la Porte, unless otherwise stated.]

L'ABBE JOSEPH DE LA PORTE: Lettre IV, concerning the Nouvelle edition du Theatre de M. de Marivaux. In the Observateur litteraire for 1759. Tome I. Amsterdam, 1759.

GUSTAVE LARROUMET: Marivaux, sa vie et ses oeuvres d'apres de nouveaux documents. Paris, Hachette et Cie. The editions of 1882 and 1894. [References in the introduction are to the former, unless otherwise stated.]

LESBROS DE LA VERSANE: Eloge historique. In the Esprit de Marivaux. Paris, Gogue et Nee de la Rochelle, 1782.

RENE LAVOLLEE: Marivaux inconnu (extrait de la Revue de France). Paris, Imprimerie de la societe anonyme de publication, periodiques, 1880.

JULES LEMAITRE: Impressions de theatre. Deuxieme et quatrieme series. Paris, H. Lecene et H. Oudin, 1888 and 1890.

CHARLES LENIENT: La Comedie en France au XVIIIe siecle. Tome I. Paris, Hachette et Cie., 1888.

M. DE LESCURE: Eloge de Marivaux. In the Theatre choisi de Marivaux. Paris, Firmin-Didot et Cie., 1894.

HENRI LION: La comedie "metaphysique" de Marivaux. In the Histoire de la langue et de la litterature francaise, under the direction of Petit de Julleville. Tome VI. Paris, Armand Colin et Cie., 1900.

JEAN-FRANCOIS MARMONTEL: Memoires (edition Maurice Tourneux). Tomes I and II. Paris, Librairie des Bibliophiles, 1891.

CHARLES PALISSOT: Eloge de Marivaux. In le Necrologe des hommes celebres de France, par une societe de gens de lettres. Paris, Moreau, 1767.

PAUL-E.-A. POULET-MALASSIS: Theatre de Marivaux. Bibliographie des editions originales et des editions collectives donnees par l'auteur. Paris, P. Rouquette, 1876.

WILHELM PRINTZEN: Marivaux, sein Leben, seine Werke und seine litterarische Bedeutung. Muenster, 1885.

CHARLES-AUGUSTIN SAINTE-BEUVE: Causeries du lundi. Tome IX. Paris, Garnier Freres, 1854.

FRANCISQUE SARCEY: Quarante ans de theatre. Tome II. Bibliotheque des annales politiques et litteraires, Paris, 1900.

FRANCISQUE SARCEY: Preface to vol. 1 of the Theatre choisi de Marivaux. Paris, Librairie des Bibliophiles, E. Flammarion successeur. 1892.

L'ABBE NICOLAS-CHARLES-JOSEPH DE TRUBLET: Memoires. Amsterdam, 1739.

* * * * *

LE JEU DE L'AMOUR ET DU HASARD

COMEDIE EN TROIS ACTES

Representee pour la premiere fois par les Comediens Italiens ordinaires du Roi, le 23 janvier 1730.

ACTEURS.

M. ORGON. MARIO. SILVIA.[1] DORANTE. LISETTE, femme de chambre de Silvia. ARLEQUIN,[2] valet de Dorante. UN LAQUAIS.

* * * * *

La scene est a Paris.



ACTE I

SCENE PREMIERE.

SILVIA, LISETTE.

SILVIA.

Mais, encore une fois, de quoi vous melez-vous? Pourquoi repondre de mes sentiments?

LISETTE.

C'est que j'ai cru que, dans cette occasion-ci, vos sentiments ressembleroient a ceux de tout le monde. Monsieur votre pere me demande si vous etes bien aise qu'il vous marie, si vous en avez quelque joie. Moi, je lui reponds qu'oui[3]; cela va tout de suite;[4] et il n'y a peut-etre que vous de fille[5] au monde pour qui ce oui-la ne soit pas vrai. Le non n'est pas naturel.

SILVIA.

Le non n'est pas naturel? Quelle sotte naivete! Le mariage auroit donc de grands charmes pour vous?

LISETTE.

Eh bien! c'est encore oui, par exemple.

SILVIA.

Taisez-vous; allez repondre vos impertinences ailleurs,[6] et sachez que ce n'est pas a vous a juger[7] de mon coeur par le votre.

LISETTE.

Mon coeur est fait comme celui de tout le monde. De quoi le votre s'avise- t-il de n'etre fait comme celui de personne?

SILVIA.

Je vous dis que, si elle osoit, elle m'appellerait une originale.[8]

LISETTE.

Si j'etois votre egale, nous verrions.

SILVIA.

Vous travaillez a me facher. Lisette.

LISETTE.

Ce n'est pas mon dessein. Mais, dans le fond, voyons, quel mal ai-je fait de dire a monsieur Orgon que vous etiez bien aise d'etre mariee?

SILVIA.

Premierement, c'est que tu n'as pas dit vrai: je ne m'ennuie pas d'etre fille.

LISETTE.

Cela est encore tout neuf.[9]

SILVIA.

C'est qu'il n'est pas necessaire que mon pere croie me faire tant de plaisir en me mariant, parce que cela le fait agir avec une confiance qui ne servira peut-etre de rien.

LISETTE.

Quoi! vous n'epouserez pas celui qu'il vous destine?

SILVIA.

Que sais-je? Peut-etre ne me conviendra-t-il point, et cela m'inquiete.

LISETTE.

On dit que votre futur est un des plus honnetes hommes du monde; qu'il est bien fait, aimable,[10] de bonne mine; qu'on ne peut pas avoir plus d'esprit; qu'on ne sauroit etre d'un meilleur caractere. Que voulez-vous de plus? Peut-on se figurer de mariage plus doux, d'union[11] plus delicieuse?[12]

SILVIA.

Delicieuse? Que tu es folle, avec tes expressions!

LISETTE.

Ma foi! Madame, c'est qu'il est heureux qu'un amant de cette espece-la veuille se marier dans les formes;[13] il n'y a presque point de fille, s'il lui faisoit la cour, qui ne fut en danger de l'epouser sans ceremonie. Aimable, bien fait, voila de quoi vivre[14] pour l'amour; sociable et spirituel, voila pour l'entretien de la societe. Pardi![15] tout en sera bon[16] dans cet homme-la; l'utile et l'agreable, tout s'y trouve.[17]

SILVIA.

Oui, dans le portrait que tu en fais, et on dit qu'il y ressemble; mais c'est un on dit, et je pourrais bien n'etre pas de ce sentiment-la, moi. Il est bel homme, dit-on, et c'est presque tant pis.

LISETTE.

Tant pis! tant pis! mais voila une pensee bien heteroclite![18]

SILVIA.

C'est une pensee de tres bon sens.[19] Volontiers un bel homme est fat; je l'ai remarque.

LISETTE.

Oh! il a tort d'etre fat, mais il a raison d'etre beau.

SILVIA.

On ajoute qu'il est bien fait; passe.[20]

LISETTE.

Oui-da,[21] cela est pardonnable.

SILVIA.

De beaute[22] et de bonne mine, je l'en dispense; ce sont la des agrements superflus.

LISETTE.

Vertuchoux![23] si je me marie jamais, ce superflu-la sera mon necessaire.[24]

SILVIA.

Tu ne sais ce que tu dis. Dans le mariage, on a plus souvent affaire a l'homme raisonnable qu'a l'aimable homme: en un mot, je ne lui demande qu'un bon caractere, et cela est plus difficile a trouver qu'on ne pense. On loue beaucoup le sien; mais qui est-ce qui a vecu avec lui? Les hommes ne se contrefont-ils[25] pas, surtout quand ils ont de l'esprit? N'en ai- je pas vu, moi, qui paroissoient, avec leurs amis, les meilleures gens du monde? C'est la douceur, la raison, l'enjouement meme; il n'y a pas jusqu'a leur physionomie qui ne soit garante de toutes les bonnes qualites qu'on leur trouve. Monsieur un tel a l'air d'un galant homme, d'un homme bien raisonnable, disoit-on tous les jours d'Ergaste. Aussi l'est-il[26] repondoit-on; je l'ai repondu moi-meme. Sa physionomie ne vous ment pas d'un mot.[27] Oui, fiez-vous y a cette physionomie si douce, si prevenante, qui disparoit un quart d'heure apres, pour faire place a un visage sombre, brutal, farouche, qui devient l'effroi de toute une maison. Ergaste s'est marie; sa femme, ses enfants, son domestique, ne lui connoissent encore que ce visage-la, pendant qu'il promene partout ailleurs cette physionomie si aimable que nous lui voyons, et qui n'est qu'un masque qu'il prend au sortir de chez lui.

LISETTE.

Quel fantasque avec ses deux visages!

SILVIA.

N'est-on pas content de Leandre, quand on le voit? Eh bien! chez lui, c'est un homme qui ne dit mot, qui ne rit ni qui ne gronde:[28] c'est une ame[29] glacee, solitaire, inaccessible. Sa femme ne la connoit point, n'a point de commerce avec elle; elle n'est mariee qu'avec une figure qui sort d'un cabinet, qui vient a table, et qui fait expirer de langueur, de froid et d'ennui tout ce qui l'environne. N'est-ce pas la un mari bien amusant?

LISETTE.

Je gele au recit que vous m'en faites. Mais Tersandre, par exemple?

SILVIA.

Oui, Tersandre! il venoit l'autre jour de s'emporter contre sa femme. J'arrive, on m'annonce: je vois un homme qui vient a moi les bras ouverts, d'un air serein, degage; vous auriez dit qu'il sortait de la conversation la plus badine; sa bouche et ses yeux rioient encore. Le fourbe! Voila ce que c'est que les hommes. Qui est-ce qui croit que sa femme est a plaindre avec lui? Je la trouvai toute abattue, le teint plombe, avec des yeux qui venoient de pleurer; je la trouvai comme je serai peut-etre: voila mon portrait a venir; je vais du moins risquer d'en etre une copie. Elle me fit pitie, Lisette; si j'allois te faire pitie aussi? Cela est terrible! qu'en dis-tu? Songe a ce que c'est qu'un mari.

LISETTE.

Un mari? c'est un mari. Vous ne deviez pas finir par ce mot-la; il me raccommode avec tout le reste.[30]

SCENE II.

M, ORGON, SILVIA, LISETTE.

M. ORGON.

Eh! bonjour, ma fille. La nouvelle que je viens t'annoncer te fera-t-elle plaisir? Ton pretendu arrive aujourd'hui; son pere me l'apprend par cette lettre-ci. Tu ne me reponds rien; tu me parois triste. Lisette de son cote baisse les yeux. Qu'est-ce que cela signifie? Parle donc, toi; de quoi s'agit-il?

LISETTE.

Monsieur, un visage qui fait trembler, un autre qui fait mourir de froid, une ame gelee qui se tient a l'ecart; et puis le portrait d'une femme qui a le visage abattu, un teint plombe, des yeux bouffis et qui viennent de pleurer; voila, Monsieur, tout ce que nous considerons avec tant de recueillement.

M. ORGON.

Que veut dire ce galimatias? Une ame, un portrait! Explique-toi donc: je n'y entends rien.

SILVIA.

C'est que j'entretenois Lisette du malheur d'une femme maltraitee par son mari; je lui citois celle de Tersandre, que je trouvai l'autre jour fort abattue, parce que son mari venoit de la quereller; et je faisois la- dessus mes reflexions.

LISETTE.

Oui, nous parlions d'une physionomie qui va et qui vient; nous disions qu'un mari porte un masque avec le monde, et une grimace[31] avec sa femme.

M. ORGON.

De tout cela,[32] ma fille, je comprends que le mariage t'alarme, d'autant plus que tu ne connois point Dorante.

LISETTE.

Premierement, il est beau; et c'est presque tant pis.

M. ORGON.

Tant pis! Reves-tu, avec ton tant pis?

LISETTE.

Moi, je dis ce qu'on m'apprend: c'est la doctrine de Madame; j'etudie sous elle.

M. ORGON.

Allons, allons, il n'est pas question de tout cela. Tiens, ma chere enfant, tu sais combien je t'aime. Dorante vient pour t'epouser. Dans le dernier voyage que je fis en province, j'arretai ce mariage-la avec son pere, qui est mon intime et mon ancien ami; mais ce fut a condition que[33] vous vous plairiez a tous deux et que vous auriez entiere liberte de vous expliquer la-dessus. Je te defends toute complaisance a mon egard. Si Dorante ne te convient point, tu n'as qu'a le dire, et il repart; si tu ne lui convenois pas, il repart de meme,

LISETTE.

Un duo de tendresse en decidera, comme a l'Opera: "Vous me voulez, je vous veux; vite un notaire[34]!" ou bien: "M'aimez-vous? non; ni moi non plus, vite a cheval!"

M. ORGON.

Pour moi, je n'ai jamais vu Dorante: il etoit absent quand j'etois chez son pere; mais, sur tout le bien[35] qu'on m'en a dit, je ne saurois craindre que vous vous remerciiez[36] ni l'un ni l'autre.

SILVIA.

Je suis penetree de vos bontes, mon pere. Vous me defendez toute complaisance, et je vous obeirai.

M. ORGON.

Je te l'ordonne.

SILVIA.

Mais, si j'osois, je vous proposerois, sur une idee qui me vient, de m'accorder une grace qui me tranquilliseroit tout a fait.

M. ORGON.

Parle ... Si la chose est faisable, je te l'accorde.

SILVIA.

Elle est tres faisable; mais je crains que ce ne soit abuser de vos bontes.

M. ORGON.

Eh bien! abuse. Va, dans ce monde, il faut etre un peu trop bon pour l'etre assez.

LISETTE.

Il n'y a que le meilleur de tous les hommes qui puisse dire cela.

M. ORGON.

Explique-toi, ma fille.

SILVIA.

Dorante arrive ici aujourd'hui.... Si je pouvois le voir, l'examiner un peu sans qu'il me connut! Lisette a de l'esprit, Monsieur; elle pourroit prendre ma place pour un peu de temps, et je prendrois la sienne.

M. ORGON, a part.

Son idee est plaisante.[37] (Haut.) Laisse-moi rever un peu a ce que tu me dis la. (A part.) Si je la laisse faire, il doit arriver quelque chose de bien singulier. Elle ne s'y attend pas elle-meme.... (Haut.) Soit, ma fille, je te permets le deguisement. Es-tu bien sure de soutenir le tien, Lisette?

LISETTE.

Moi, Monsieur? Vous savez qui je suis; essayez de m'en conter,[38] et manquez de respect, si vous l'osez, a cette contenance-ci. Voila un echantillon des bons airs[39] avec lesquels je vous attends. Qu'en dites- vous? Hem? retrouvez-vous Lisette?

M. ORGON.

Comment donc! je m'y trompe actuellement moi-meme. Mais il n'y a point de temps a perdre: va t'ajuster suivant ton role. Dorante peut nous surprendre. Hatez-vous, et qu'on donne le mot a toute la maison.

SILVIA.

Il ne me faut presque qu'un tablier.[40]

LISETTE.

Et moi, je vais a ma toilette. Venez m'y coiffer, Lisette, pour vous accoutumer a vos fonctions.... Un peu d'attention a votre service, s'il vous plait.

SILVIA.

Vous serez contente, marquise. Marchons!

SCENE III.

MARIO, M. ORGON, SILVIA.

MARIO.

Ma soeur, je te felicite de la nouvelle que j'apprends.... Nous allons voir ton amant, dit-on.

SILVIA.

Oui, mon frere, mais je n'ai pas le temps de m'arreter: j'ai des affaires serieuses, et mon pere vous les dira. Je vous quitte.

SCENE IV.

M. ORGON, MARIO.

M. ORGON.

Ne l'amusez pas,[41] Mario; venez, vous saurez de quoi il s'agit.

MARIO.

Qu'y a-t-il de nouveau, Monsieur?

M. ORGON.

Je commence par vous recommander d'etre discret sur ce que je vais vous dire, au moins.

MARIO.

Je suivrai vos ordres.

M. ORGON.

Nous verrons Dorante aujourd'hui; mais nous ne le verrons que deguise.

MARIO.

Deguise! Viendra-t-il en partie de masque?[42] lui donnerez-vous le bal?

M. ORGON.

Ecoutez l'article[43] de la lettre du pere. Hum!... _Je ne sais, au reste, ce que vous penserez d'une imagination[44] qui est venue a mon fils: elle est bizarre, il en convient lui-meme; mais le motif est pardonnable et meme delicat: c'est qu'il m'a prie de lui permettre de n'arriver d'abord chez vous que sous la figure[45] de son valet, qui, de son cote, fera le personnage de son maitre.

MARIO.

Ah! ah! cela sera plaisant.[46]

M. ORGON.

Ecoutez le reste: Mon fils sait combien l'engagement qu'il va prendre est serieux, et il espere, dit-il, sous ce deguisement de peu de duree, saisir quelques traits du caractere de notre future[47] et la mieux connaitre, pour se regler ensuite sur ce qu'il doit faire, suivant la liberte que nous sommes convenus de leur laisser. Pour moi, qui m'en fie bien a ce que vous m'avez dit de votre aimable fille, j'ai consenti a tout, en prenant la precaution de vous avertir, quoiqu'il m'ait demande le secret de votre cote. Vous en userez la-dessus avec la future comme vous le jugerez a propos.... Voila ce que le pere m'ecrit. Ce n'est pas le tout;[48] voici ce qui arrive: c'est que votre soeur, inquiete de son cote sur le chapitre[49] de Dorante, dont elle ignore le secret, m'a demande de jouer ici la meme comedie, et cela, precisement pour observer Dorante, comme Dorante veut l'observer. Qu'en dites-vous? Savez-vous rien de plus particulier que cela? Actuellement la maitresse et la suivante se travestissent. Que me conseillez-vous, Mario? Avertirai-je votre soeur, ou non?

MARIO.

Ma foi, Monsieur, puisque les choses prennent ce train-la, je ne voudrois pas les deranger, et je respecterois l'idee qui leur est inspiree[50] a l'un et a l'autre. Il faudra bien qu'ils se parlent souvent tous deux sous ce deguisement. Voyons si leur coeur ne les avertiroit[51] pas de ce qu'ils valent. Peut-etre que Dorante prendra du gout pour ma soeur, toute soubrette qu'elle sera, et cela seroit charmant pour elle.

M. ORGON.

Nous verrons un peu comment elle se tirera d'intrigue.[52]

MARIO.

C'est une aventure qui ne sauroit manquer de nous divertir. Je veux me trouver au debut et les agacer[53] tous deux.

SCENE V.

SILVIA, M. ORGON, MARIO.

SILVIA.

Me voila, Monsieur: ai-je mauvaise grace en femme de chambre? Et vous, mon frere, vous savez de quoi il s'agit, apparemment... Comment me trouvez- vous?

MARIO.

Ma foi, ma soeur, c'est autant de pris que le valet;[54] mais tu pourrois bien aussi escamoter Dorante a ta maitresse.

SILVIA.

Franchement, je ne hairois pas de lui plaire sous le personnage que je joue; je ne serois pas fachee de subjuguer sa raison, de l'etourdir[55] un peu sur la distance qu'il y aura de lui a moi. Si mes charmes font ce coup-la, ils me feront plaisir; je les estimerai. D'ailleurs, cela m'aiderait a demeler Dorante. A l'egard de son valet, je ne crains pas ses soupirs; ils n'oseront m'aborder; il y aura quelque chose dans ma physionomie qui inspirera plus de respect que d'amour a ce faquin-la.

MARIO.

Allons, doucement, ma soeur: ce faquin-la sera votre egal...

M. ORGON.

Et ne manquera pas de t'aimer.

SILVIA.

Eh bien! l'honneur de lui plaire ne me sera pas inutile. Les valets sont naturellement indiscrets; l'amour est babillard, et j'en ferai l'historien de son maitre.

UN VALET.

Monsieur, il vient d'arriver un domestique qui demande a vous parler; il est suivi d'un crocheteur[56] qui porte une valise.

M. ORGON.

Qu'il entre: c'est sans doute le valet de Dorante. Son maitre peut etre reste au bureau pour affaires. Ou est Lisette?

SILVIA.

Lisette s'habille, et dans son miroir[57] nous trouve tres imprudents de lui livrer Dorante; elle aura bientot fait.

M. ORGON. Doucement! on vient.

SCENE VI.

DORANTE en valet, M. ORGON, SILVIA, MARIO.

DORANTE.

Je cherche M. Orgon: n'est-ce pas a lui que j'ai l'honneur de faire la reverence?

M. ORGON.

Oui, mon ami, c'est a lui-meme.

DORANTE.

Monsieur, vous avez sans doute recu de nos nouvelles; j'appartiens a monsieur Dorante, qui me suit, et qui m'envoie toujours[58] devant, vous assurer de ses respects, en attendant qu'il vous en assure lui-meme.

M. ORGON.

Tu fais ta commission de fort bonne grace. Lisette, que dis-tu de ce garcon-la?

SILVIA.

Moi, Monsieur, je dis qu'il est bien venu,[59] et qu'il promet.

DORANTE.

Vous avez bien de la bonte; je fais du mieux qu'il m'est possible.

MARIO.

Il n'est pas mal tourne, au moins: ton coeur n'a qu'a se bien tenir,[60] Lisette.

SILVIA.

Mon coeur! c'est bien des affaires.[61]

DORANTE.

Ne vous fachez pas, Mademoiselle; ce que dit Monsieur ne m'en fait point accroire.[62]

SILVIA.

Cette modestie-la me plait; continuez de meme.

MARIO.

Fort bien! Mais il me semble que ce nom de Mademoiselle qu'il te donne est bien serieux.[63] Entre gens comme vous, le style des compliments ne doit pas etre si grave; vous seriez toujours sur le qui-vive:[64] allons, traitez-vous plus commodement.[65] Tu as nom[66] Lisette; et toi, mon garcon, comment t'appelles-tu?

DORANTE.

Bourguignon, Monsieur, pour vous servir.

SILVIA.

Eh bien! Bourguignon, soit.

DORANTE.

Va donc pour Lisette;[67] je n'en serai pas moins votre serviteur.

MARIO.

Votre serviteur! Ce n'est point encore la votre jargon: c'est "ton serviteur" qu'il faut dire.

M. ORGON.

Ah! ah! ah! ah!

SILVIA, bas a Mario.

Vous me jouez, mon frere.

DORANTE.

A l'egard du tutoiement, j'attends les ordres de Lisette.

SILVIA.

Fais comme tu voudras, Bourguignon; voila la glace rompue, puisque cela divertit ces messieurs.

DORANTE.

Je t'en remercie, Lisette; et je reponds sur le champ a l'honneur que tu me fais.

M. ORGON.

Courage, mes enfants! Si vous commencez a vous aimer vous voila debarrasses des ceremonies.

MARIO.

Oh! doucement! S'aimer, c'est une autre affaire: vous ne savez peut-etre pas que j'en veux au coeur de Lisette,[68] moi qui vous parle. 11 est vrai qu'il m'est cruel; mais je ne veux pas que Bourguignon aille sur mes brisees.[69]

SILVIA.

Oui! le prenez-vous sur ce ton-la? Et moi, je veux que Bourguignon m'aime.

DORANTE.

Tu te fais tort de dire "je veux," belle Lisette; tu n'as pas besoin d'ordonner pour etre servie.

MARIO.

Monsieur Bourguignon, vous avez pille cette galanterie-la quelque part.

DORANTE.

Vous avez raison, Monsieur, c'est dans ses yeux que je l'ai prise.

MARIO.

Tais-toi, c'est encore pis: je te defends d'avoir tant d'esprit.

SILVIA.

Il ne l'a pas a vos depens, et, s'il en trouve dans mes yeux, il n'a qu'a prendre.

M. ORGON.

Mon fils, vous perdrez votre proces;[70] retirons-nous. Dorante va venir, allons le dire a ma fille; et vous, Lisette, montrez a ce garcon l'appartement de son maitre. Adieu, Bourguignon.

DORANTE.

Monsieur, vous me faites trop d'honneur.

SCENE VII.

SILVIA, DORANTE.

SILVIA, a part.

Ils se donnent la comedie;[71] n'importe, mettons tout a profit. Ce garcon-ci n'est pas sot, et je ne plains pas la soubrette qui l'aura.[72] II va m'en conter:[73] laissons-le dire, pourvu qu'il m'instruise.

DORANTE, a part.

Cette fille-ci m'etonne! Il n'y a point de femme au monde a qui sa physionomie ne fit honneur: lions connoissance avec elle.... (Haut.) Puisque nous sommes dans le style amical,[74] et que nous avons abjure les facons, dis-moi, Lisette, ta maitresse te vaut-elle? Elle est bien hardie d'oser avoir une femme de chambre comme toi!

SILVIA.

Bourguignon, cette question-la m'annonce que, suivant la coutume, tu arrives avec l'intention de me dire des douceurs: n'est-il pas vrai?

DORANTE.

Ma foi, je n'etois pas venu dans ce dessein-la, je te l'avoue; tout valet que je suis, je n'ai jamais eu de grande liaison avec les soubrettes: je n'aime pas l'esprit domestique; mais, a ton egard, c'est une autre affaire. Comment donc! tu me soumets; je suis presque timide; ma familiarite n'oseroit s'apprivoiser avec toi; j'ai toujours envie d'oter mon chapeau[75] de dessus ma tete, et, quand je te tutoie, il me semble que je joue:[76] enfin j'ai un penchant a te traiter avec des respects qui te feroient rire. Quelle espece de suivante es-tu donc, avec ton air de princesse?

SILVIA.

Tiens, tout ce que tu dis avoir senti en me voyant est precisement l'histoire de tous les valets qui m'ont vue.

DORANTE.

Ma foi, je ne serois pas surpris quand ce seroit aussi l'histoire de tous les maitres.

SILVIA.

Le trait est joli, assurement; mais, je te le repete encore, je ne suis pas faite aux cajoleries de ceux dont la garde-robe ressemble a la tienne.

DORANTE.

C'est-a-dire que ma parure ne te plait pas?

SILVIA.

Non, Bourguignon; laissons-la l'amour, et soyons bons amis.

DORANTE.

Rien que cela? Ton petit traite n'est compose que de deux clauses impossibles.

SILVIA, a part.

Quel homme pour un valet! (Haut.) Il faut pourtant qu'il s'execute; on m'a predit que je n'epouserai jamais qu'un homme de condition, et j'ai jure depuis de n'en ecouter jamais d'autres.

DORANTE.

Parbleu! cela est plaisant![77] Ce que tu as jure pour homme, je l'ai jure pour femme, moi: j'ai fait serment de n'aimer serieusement qu'une fille de condition.

SILVIA.

Ne t'ecarte donc pas de ton projet.

DORANTE.

Je ne m'en ecarte peut-etre pas tant que nous le croyons: tu as l'air bien distingue, et l'on est quelquefois fille de condition sans le savoir.

SILVIA.

Ah! ha! ha! Je te remercierois de ton eloge si ma mere n'en faisoit pas les frais.

DORANTE.

Eh bien! venge-t-en sur la mienne, si tu me trouves assez bonne mine pour cela.

SILVIA, a part.

Il le meriteroit. (Haut.) Mais ce n'est pas la de quoi il est question: treve de badinage. C'est un homme de condition qui m'est predit pour epoux, et je n'en rabattrai rien.

DORANTE.

Parbleu! si j'etois tel, la prediction me menacerait; j'aurois peur de la verifier. Je n'ai pas de foi a l'astrologie, mais j'en ai beaucoup a ton visage.

SILVIA, a part.

Il ne tarit point. (Haut.) Finiras-tu? Que t'importe la prediction, puisqu'elle t'exclut?

DORANTE.

Elle n'a pas predit que je ne t'aimerois point.

SILVIA.

Non, mais elle a dit que tu n'y gagnerois rien; et moi, je te le confirme.

DORANTE.

Tu fais fort bien, Lisette: cette fierte-la te va a merveille, et, quoiqu'elle me fasse mon proces,[78] je suis pourtant bien aise de te la voir; je te l'ai souhaitee d'abord que[79] je t'ai vue: il te falloit encore cette grace-la, et je me console d'y perdre, parce que tu y gagnes.

SILVIA, a part.

Mais, en verite, voila un garcon qui me surprend, malgre que j'en aie...[80] (Haut.) Dis-moi, qui es-tu, toi qui me parles ainsi?

DORANTE.

Le fils d'honnetes gens qui n'etoient pas riches.

SILVIA.

Va, je te souhaite de bon coeur une meilleure situation que la tienne, et je voudrois pouvoir y contribuer; la fortune a tort avec toi.[81]

DORANTE.

Ma foi! l'amour a plus de tort[82] qu'elle: j'aimerois mieux qu'il me fut permis de te demander ton coeur que d'avoir tous les biens du monde.

SILVIA, a part.

Nous voila, grace au Ciel, en conversation reglee. (Haut.) Bourguignon, je ne saurois me facher des discours que tu me tiens; mais, je t'en prie, changeons d'entretien. Venons a ton maitre. Tu peux te passer de me parler d'amour, je pense?

DORANTE.

Tu pourrais bien te passer de m'en faire sentir, toi.

SILVIA.

Ahi! je me facherai; tu m'impatientes. Encore une fois, laisse la ton amour.

DORANTE.

Quitte donc ta figure.

SILVIA, a part.

A la fin, je crois qu'il m'amuse...[83] (Haut.) Eh bien! Bourguignon, tu ne veux donc pas finir? Faudra-t-il que je te quitte? (A part.) Je devrois deja l'avoir fait.

DORANTE.

Attends, Lisette, je voulois moi-meme te parler d'autre chose; mais je ne sais plus ce que c'est.

SILVIA.

J'avois de mon cote quelque chose a te dire, mais tu m'as fait perdre mes idees aussi, a moi.

DORANTE.

Je me rappelle de[84] t'avoir demande si ta maitresse te valoit.

SILVIA.

Tu reviens a ton chemin par un detour: adieu.

DORANTE.

Et non, te dis-je, Lisette; il ne s'agit ici que de mon maitre.

SILVIA.

Eh bien! soit: je voulois te parler de lui aussi, et j'espere que tu voudras bien me dire confidemment[85] ce qu'il est. Ton attachement pour lui m'en donne bonne opinion: il faut qu'il ait du merite, puisque tu le sers.

DORANTE.

Tu me permettras peut-etre bien de te remercier de ce que tu me dis la, par exemple?

SILVIA.

Veux-tu bien ne prendre pas garde[86] a l'imprudence que j'ai eue de le dire?

DORANTE.

Voila encore de ces reponses qui m'emportent! Fais comme tu voudras, je n'y resiste point, et je suis bien malheureux de me trouver arrete par tout ce qu'il y a de plus aimable au monde.

SILVIA.

Et moi je voudrois bien savoir comment il se fait que j'ai la bonte de t'ecouter, car, assurement, cela est singulier!

DORANTE.

Tu as raison, notre aventure est unique.

SILVIA, a part.

Malgre tout ce qu'il m'a dit, je ne suis point partie, je ne pars point, me voila encore, et je reponds! En verite, cela passe la raillerie. (Haut.) Adieu.

DORANTE.

Achevons donc ce que nous voulions dire.

SILVIA.

Adieu, te dis-je; plus de quartier. Quand ton maitre sera venu, je tacherai, en faveur de[87] ma maitresse, de le connoitre par moi-meme, s'il en vaut la peine. En attendant, tu vois cet appartement: c'est le votre.

DORANTE.

Tiens! voici mon maitre.

SCENE VIII.

DORANTE, SILVIA, ARLEQUIN.

ARLEQUIN.

Ah! te voila, Bourguignon? Mon porte-manteau[88] et toi, avez-vous ete bien recus ici?

DORANTE.

Il n'etoit pas possible qu'on nous recut mal, Monsieur.

ARLEQUIN.

Un domestique la-bas m'a dit d'entrer ici, et qu'on alloit avertir mon beau-pere, qui etoit avec ma femme.

SILVIA.

Vous voulez dire monsieur Orgon et sa fille, sans doute, Monsieur?

ARLEQUIN.

Et oui, mon beau-pere et ma femme, autant vaut.[89] Je viens pour epouser, et ils m'attendent pour etre maries; cela est convenu; il ne manque plus que la ceremonie, qui est une bagatelle.

SILVIA.

C'est une bagatelle qui vaut bien la peine qu'on y pense.

ARLEQUIN.

Oui; mais, quand on y a pense, on n'y pense plus.

SILVIA, bas a Dorante.

Bourguignon, on est homme de merite a bon marche chez vous, ce me semble.

ARLEQUIN.

Que dites-vous la a mon valet, la belle?[90]

SILVIA.

Rien: je lui dis seulement que je vais faire descendre[91] monsieur Orgon.

ARLEQUIN.

Et pourquoi ne pas dire mon beau-pere, comme moi?

SILVIA.

C'est qu'il ne l'est pas encore.

DORANTE.

Elle a raison, Monsieur: le mariage n'est pas fait.

ARLEQUIN.

Eh bien! me voila pour le faire.

DORANTE.

Attendez donc qu'il soit fait.

ARLEQUIN.

Pardi! voila bien des facons pour un beau-pere de la veille ou du lendemain![92]

SILVIA.

En effet, quelle si grande difference y a-t-il entre etre mariee ou ne l'etre pas? Oui, Monsieur, nous avons tort, et je cours informer votre beau-pere de votre arrivee.

ARLEQUIN.

Et ma femme aussi, je vous prie. Mais, avant que de[93] partir, dites-moi une chose: vous qui etes si jolie, n'etes-vous pas la soubrette de l'hotel?[94]

SILVIA.

Vous l'avez dit.

ARLEQUIN.

C'est fort bien fait; je m'en rejouis. Croyez-vous que je plaise ici? Comment me trouvez-vous?

SILVIA.

Je vous trouve ... plaisant[95].

ARLEQUIN.

Bon, tant mieux; entretenez-vous dans ce sentiment-la, il pourra trouver sa place.

SILVIA.

Vous etes bien modeste de vous en contenter. Mais je vous quitte; il faut qu'on ait oublie d'avertir votre beau-pere, car assurement il seroit venu; et j'y vais.

ARLEQUIN.

Dites-lui que je l'attends avec affection.

SILVIA, a part.

Que le sort est bizarre! Aucun de ces deux hommes n'est a sa place.

SCENE IX.

DORANTE, ARLEQUIN.

ARLEQUIN.

Eh bien! Monsieur, mon commencement va bien: je plais deja a la soubrette.

DORANTE.

Butor que tu es!

ARLEQUIN.

Pourquoi donc? Mon entree est si gentille!

DORANTE.

Tu m'avois tant promis de laisser la tes facons de parler sottes et triviales! Je t'avois donne de si bonnes instructions! Je ne t'avois recommande que d'etre serieux. Va, je vois bien que je suis un etourdi de m'en etre fie a toi.[96]

ARLEQUIN.

Je ferai encore mieux dans les suites,[97] et, puisque le serieux n'est pas suffisant, je donnerai du melancolique;[98] je pleurerai, s'il le faut.

DORANTE.

Je ne sais plus ou j'en suis; cette aventure-ci m'etourdit. Que faut-il que je fasse?

ARLEQUIN.

Est-ce que la fille n'est pas plaisante?[99]

DORANTE.

Tais-toi; voici monsieur Orgon qui vient.

SCENE X.

M. ORGON, DORANTE, ARLEQUIN.

M. ORGON.

Mon cher Monsieur, je vous demande mille pardons de vous avoir fait attendre; mais ce n'est que de cet instant[100] que j'apprends que vous etes ici.

ARLEQUIN.

Monsieur, mille pardons, c'est beaucoup trop, et il n'en faut qu'un quand on n'a fait qu'une faute: au surplus, tous mes pardons sont a votre service.

M. ORGON.

Je tacherai de n'en avoir pas besoin.

ARLEQUIN.

Vous etes le maitre, et moi votre serviteur.

M. ORGON.

Je suis, je vous assure, charme de vous voir, et je vous attendois avec impatience.

ARLEQUIN.

Je serois d'abord venu ici avec Bourguignon; mais, quand on arrive de voyage, vous savez qu'on est si mal bati![101] et j'etois bien aise de me presenter dans un etat plus ragoutant.[102]

M. ORGON.

Vous y avez fort bien reussi. Ma fille s'habille; elle a ete un peu indisposee. En attendant qu'elle descende, voulez-vous vous rafraichir?

ARLEQUIN.

Oh! je n'ai jamais refuse de trinquer[103] avec personne.

M. ORGON.

Bourguignon, ayez soin de vous, mon garcon.

ARLEQUIN.

Le gaillard est gourmet: il boira du meilleur.

M. ORGON.

Qu'il ne l'epargne pas.

ACTE II.

SCENE PREMIERE.

LISETTE, M. ORGON.

M. ORGON.

Eh bien! que me veux-tu, Lisette?

LISETTE.

J'ai a vous entretenir un moment.

M. ORGON.

De quoi s'agit-il?

LISETTE.

De vous dire l'etat ou sont les choses, parce qu'il est important que vous en soyez eclairci, afin que vous n'ayez point a vous plaindre de moi.

M. ORGON.

Ceci est donc bien serieux?

LISETTE.

Oui, tres serieux. Vous avez consenti au deguisement de mademoiselle Silvia; moi-meme je l'ai trouve d'abord sans consequence, mais je me suis trompee.

M. ORGON.

Et de quelle consequence est-il donc?

LISETTE.

Monsieur, on a de la peine a se louer soi-meme; mais, malgre toutes les regles de la modestie, il faut pourtant que je vous dise que, si vous ne mettez ordre[104] a ce qui arrive, votre pretendu gendre[105] n'aura plus de coeur a donner a mademoiselle votre fille. Il est temps qu'elle se declare, cela presse: car, un jour plus tard, je n'en reponds plus.

M. ORGON.

Eh! d'ou vient qu'il ne voudra plus de ma fille? Quand il la connoitra, te defies-tu de ses charmes?

LISETTE.

Non; mais vous ne vous mefiez pas assez des miens. Je vous avertis qu'ils vont leur train,[106] et que je ne vous conseille pas de les laisser faire.

M. ORGON.

Je vous en fais mes compliments Lisette. (Il rit.) Ah! ah! ah!

LISETTE.

Nous y voila:[107] vous plaisantez, Monsieur, vous vous moquez de moi. J'en suis fachee, car vous y serez pris.

M. ORGON.

Ne t'en embarrasse pas, Lisette; va ton chemin.

LISETTE.

Je vous le repete encore, le coeur de Dorante va bien vite. Tenez, actuellement je lui plais beaucoup, ce soir il m'aimera, il m'adorera demain. Je ne le merite pas, il est de mauvais gout,[108] vous en direz ce qu'il vous plaira; mais cela ne laissera pas que d'etre.[109] Voyez-vous, demain je me garantis adoree.

M. ORGON.

Eh bien! que vous importe? S'il vous aime tant, qu'il vous epouse.

LISETTE.

Quoi! vous ne l'en empecheriez pas?

M. ORGON.

Non, d'homme d'honneur,[110] si tu le menes jusque la.

LISETTE.

Monsieur, prenez-y garde. Jusqu'ici je n'ai pas aide a mes appats, je les ai laisse faire tout seuls, j'ai menage sa tete:[111] si je m'en mele, je la renverse, il n'y aura plus de remede.

M. ORGON.

Renverse, ravage, brule, enfin epouse, je te le permets, si tu le peux.

LISETTE.

Sur ce pied-la, je compte ma fortune faite.

M. ORGON.

Mais, dis-moi, ma fille t'a-t-elle parle? Que pense-t-elle de son pretendu?

LISETTE.

Nous n'avons encore guere trouve le moment[112] de nous parler, car ce pretendu m'obsede; mais, a vue de pays,[113] je ne la crois pas contente; je la trouve triste, reveuse, et je m'attends bien qu'elle me priera de le rebuter.

M. ORGON.

Et moi, je te le defends. J'evite de m'expliquer avec elle; j'ai mes raisons pour faire durer ce deguisement: je veux qu'elle examine son futur plus a loisir. Mais le valet, comment se gouberne-t-il? ne se mele-t-il pas d'aimer ma fille?

LISETTE.

C'est un original: j'ai remarque qu'il fait l'homme de consequence avec elle, parce qu'il est bien fait;[114] il la regarde, et soupire.

M. ORGON.

Et cela la fache.

LISETTE.

Mais... elle rougit.

M. ORGON.

Bon, tu te trompes: les regards d'un valet ne l'embarrassent pas jusque la.[115]

LISETTE.

Monsieur, elle rougit.

M. ORGON.

C'est donc d'indignation.

LISETTE.

A la bonne heure.[116]

M. ORGON.

Eh bien! quand tu lui parleras, dis-lui que tu soupconnes ce valet de la prevenir contre son maitre; et, si elle se fache, ne t'en inquiete point: ce sont mes affaires. Mais voici Dorante, qui te cherche apparemment.

SCENE II.

LISETTE, ARLEQUIN, M. ORGON.

ARLEQUIN.

Ah! je vous trouve, merveilleuse dame! je vous demandois a tout le monde. Serviteur, cher beau-pere, ou peu s'en faut.

M. ORGON.

Serviteur. Adieu, mes enfants: je vous laisse ensemble; il est bon que vous vous aimiez un peu avant que de[117] vous marier.

ARLEQUIN.

Je ferois bien ces deux besognes-la a la fois, moi.

M. ORGON.

Point d'impatience. Adieu.

SCENE III.

LISETTE, ARLEQUIN.

ARLEQUIN.

Madame, il dit que je ne m'impatiente pas; il en parle bien a son aise, le bonhomme!

LISETTE.

J'ai de la peine a croire qu'il vous en coute tant d'attendre, Monsieur; c'est par galanterie que vous faites l'impatient: a peine etes-vous arrive. Votre amour ne sauroit etre bien fort: ce n'est tout au plus qu'un amour naissant.

ARLEQUIN.

Vous vous trompez, prodige de nos jours: un amour de votre facon[118] ne reste pas longtemps au berceau; votre premier coup d'oeil a fait naitre le mien, le second lui a donne des forces, et le troisieme l'a rendu grand garcon. Tachons de l'etablir au plus vite; ayez soin de lui, puisque vous etes sa mere.

LISETTE.

Trouvez-vous qu'on le maltraite? est-il si abandonne?

ARLEQUIN.

En attendant qu'il soit pourvu, donnez-lui seulement votre belle main blanche pour l'amuser un peu.

LISETTE.

Tenez donc, petit importun, puisqu'on ne sauroit avoir la paix qu'en vous amusant.

ARLEQUIN, lui baisant la main.

Cher joujou de mon ame! cela me rejouit comme du vin delicieux. Quel dommage de n'en avoir que roquille![119]

LISETTE.

Allons, arretez-vous; vous etes trop avide.

ARLEQUIN.

Je ne demande qu'a me soutenir, en attendant que je vive.

LISETTE.

Ne faut-il pas avoir de la raison?

ARLEQUIN.

De la raison! Helas! je l'ai perdue; vos beaux yeux sont les filous qui me l'ont volee.

LISETTE.

Mais est-il possible que vous m'aimiez tant? Je ne saurois me le persuader.

ARLEQUIN.

Je ne me soucie pas de ce qui est possible, moi, mais je vous aime comme un perdu,[120] et vous verrez bien dans votre miroir que cela est juste.

LISETTE.

Mon miroir ne servirait qu'a me rendre plus incredule.

ARLEQUIN.

Ah! mignonne, adorable! votre humilite ne seroit donc qu'une hypocrite!

LISETTE.

Quelqu'un vient a nous: c'est votre valet.

SCENE IV.

DORANTE, ARLEQUIN, LISETTE.

DORANTE.

Monsieur, pourrois-je vous entretenir un moment?

ARLEQUIN.

Non: maudite soit la valetaille[121] qui ne sauroit nous laisser en repos!

LISETTE.

Voyez ce qu'il vous veut, Monsieur.

DORANTE.

Je n'ai qu'un mot a vous dire.

ARLEQUIN.

Madame, s'il en dit deux, son conge sera[122] le troisieme. Voyons!

DORANTE, bas a Arlequin.

Viens donc, impertinent![123]

ARLEQUIN, bas a Dorante.

Ce sont des injures, et non pas des mots, cela... (A Lisette) Ma reine, excusez.

LISETTE.

Faites, faites.

DORANTE.

Debarrasse-moi de tout ceci.[124] Ne te livre point;[125] parois serieux et reveur, et meme mecontent: entends-tu?

ARLEQUIN.

Oui, mon ami; ne vous inquietez pas, et retirez-vous.

SCENE V.

ARLEQUIN, LISETTE.

ARLEQUIN.

Ah! Madame! sans lui j'allois vous dire de belles choses, et je n'en trouverai plus que de communes a cette heure, hormis mon amour, qui est extraordinaire. Mais, a propos de mon amour, quand est-ce que le votre lui tiendra compagnie?

LISETTE.

Il faut esperer que cela viendra.

ARLEQUIN.

Et croyez-vous que cela vienne?

LISETTE.

La question est vive:[126] savez-vous bien que vous m'embarrassez?

ARLEQUIN.

Que voulez-vous? je brule, et je crie au feu.

LISETTE.

S'il m'etoit permis de m'expliquer si vite...

ARLEQUIN.

Je suis du sentiment que vous le pouvez en conscience.

LISETTE.

La retenue de mon sexe ne le veut pas.

ARLEQUIN.

Ce n'est donc pas la retenue d'a present, qui donne bien d'autres permissions.

LISETTE.

Mais que me demandez-vous?

ARLEQUIN.

Dites-moi un petit brin[127] que vous m'aimez. Tenez, je vous aime, moi. Faites l'echo: repetez, Princesse.

LISETTE.

Quel insatiable! Eh bien! Monsieur, je vous aime.

ARLEQUIN.

Eh bien! Madame, je me meurs, mon bonheur me confond, j'ai peur d'en courir les champs.[128] Vous m'aimez! cela est admirable!

LISETTE.

J'aurois lieu, a mon tour, d'etre etonnee de la promptitude de votre hommage. Peut-etre m'aimerez-vous moins quand nous nous connoitrons mieux.

Previous Part     1  2  3  4  5  6     Next Part
Home - Random Browse