HotFreeBooks.com
The Essays of Montaigne, Complete
by Michel de Montaigne
Previous Part     1 ... 10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29
Home - Random Browse

medical care Strong memory is commonly coupled with infirm judgment Studied, when young, for ostentation, now for diversion Studies, to teach me to do, and not to write Study makes me sensible how much I have to learn Study of books is a languishing and feeble motion Study to declare what is justice, but never took care to do it Stumble upon a truth amongst an infinite number of lies Stupidity and facility natural to the common people Style wherewith men establish religions and laws Subdividing these subtilties we teach men to increase their doub Such a recipe as they will not take themselves Suffer my judgment to be made captive by prepossession Suffer those inconveniences which are not possibly to be avoided Sufficiently covered by their virtue without any other robe Suicide: a morsel that is to be swallowed without chewing Superstitiously to seek out in the stars the ancient causes Swell and puff up their souls, and their natural way of speaking Swim in troubled waters without fishing in them Take a pleasure in being uninterested in other men's affairs Take all things at the worst, and to resolve to bear that worst Take my last leave of every place I depart from Take two sorts of grist out of the same sack Taking things upon trust from vulgar opinion Taught to be afraid of professing our ignorance Taught to consider sleep as a resemblance of death Tearing a body limb from limb by racks and torments Testimony of the truth from minds prepossessed by custom? That he could neither read nor swim That looks a nice well-made shoe to you That we may live, we cease to live That which cowardice itself has chosen for its refuge The action is commendable, not the man The age we live in produces but very indifferent things The authors, with whom I converse The Babylonians carried their sick into the public square The best authors too much humble and discourage me The Bible: the wicked and ignorant grow worse by it The cause of truth ought to be the common cause The conduct of our lives is the true mirror of our doctrine The consequence of common examples The day of your birth is one day's advance towards the grave The deadest deaths are the best The event often justifies a very foolish conduct The faintness that surprises in the exercises of Venus The gods sell us all the goods they give us The good opinion of the vulgar is injurious The honour we receive from those that fear us is not honour The ignorant return from the combat full of joy and triumph The impulse of nature, which is a rough counsellor The last informed is better persuaded than the first The mean is best The mind grows costive and thick in growing old The most manifest sign of wisdom is a continual cheerfulness The most voluntary death is the finest The particular error first makes the public error The pedestal is no part of the statue The privilege of the mind to rescue itself from old age The reward of a thing well done is to have done it The satiety of living, inclines a man to desire to die The sick man has not to complain who has his cure in his sleeve The storm is only begot by a concurrence of angers The thing in the world I am most afraid of is fear The very name Liberality sounds of Liberty The vice opposite to curiosity is negligence The virtue of the soul does not consist in flying high Their disguises and figures only serve to cosen fools Their labour is not to delivery, but about conception Their pictures are not here who were cast away Their souls seek repose in agitation There are defeats more triumphant than victories There are some upon whom their rich clothes weep There can be no pleasure to me without communication There is more trouble in keeping money than in getting it There is no allurement like modesty, if it be not rude There is no long, nor short, to things that are no more There is no merchant that always gains There is no reason that has not its contrary There is no recompense becomes virtue There is none of us who would not be worse than kings There is nothing I hate so much as driving a bargain There is nothing like alluring the appetite and affections There is nothing single and rare in respect of nature These sleepy, sluggish sort of men are often the most dangerous They (good women) are not by the dozen, as every one knows They begin to teach us to live when we have almost done living They better conquer us by flying They buy a cat in a sack They can neither lend nor give anything to one another They do not see my heart, they see but my countenance They err as much who too much forbear Venus They gently name them, so they patiently endure them (diseases) They have heard, they have seen, they have done so and so They have not one more invention left wherewith to amuse us They have not the courage to suffer themselves to be corrected They have yet touched nothing of that which is mine They juggle and trifle in all their discourses at our expense They must be very hard to please, if they are not contented They must become insensible and invisible to satisfy us They neither instruct us to think well nor to do well They never loved them till dead They who would fight custom with grammar are triflers Thing at which we all aim, even in virtue is pleasure Things grow familiar to men's minds by being often seen Things I say are better than those I write Things often appear greater to us at distance than near at hand Things seem greater by imagination than they are in effect Things that engage us elsewhere and separate us from ourselves Think myself no longer worth my own care Think of physic as much good or ill as any one would have me Thinking nothing done, if anything remained to be done Thinks nothing profitable that is not painful This decay of nature which renders him useless, burdensome This plodding occupation of bookes is as painfull as any other Those immodest and debauched tricks and postures Those oppressed with sorrow sometimes surprised by a smile Those which we fear the least are, peradventure, most to be fear Those who can please and hug themselves in what they do Those within (marriage) despair of getting out Thou diest because thou art living Thou wilt not feel it long if thou feelest it too much Though I be engaged to one forme, I do not tie the world unto it Though nobody should read me, have I wasted time Threats of the day of judgment Thucydides: which was the better wrestler Thy own cowardice is the cause, if thou livest in pain Tis all swine's flesh, varied by sauces Tis an exact life that maintains itself in due order in private Tis better to lean towards doubt than assurance—Augustine Tis evil counsel that will admit no change Tis far beyond not fearing death to taste and relish it Tis for youth to subject itself to common opinions Tis impossible to deal fairly with a fool Tis in some sort a kind of dying to avoid the pain of living well Tis more laudable to obey the bad than the good Tis no matter; it may be of use to some others Tis not the cause, but their interest, that inflames them Tis not the number of men, but the number of good men Tis said of Epimenides, that he always prophesied backward Tis so I melt and steal away from myself Tis the sharpnss of our mind that gives the edge to our pains Tis then no longer correction, but revenge Tis there she talks plain French Titillation of ill-natured pleasure in seeing others suffer Title of barbarism to everything that is not familiar Titles being so dearly bought Titles of my chapters do not always comprehend the whole matter To be a slave, incessantly to be led by the nose by one's self To be, not to seem To condemn them as impossible, is by a temerarious presumption To contemn what we do not comprehend To die of old age is a death rare, extraordinary, and singular To do well where there was danger was the proper office To forbear doing is often as generous as to do To forbid us anything is to make us have a mind to't To fret and vex at folly, as I do, is folly itself To give a currency to his little pittance of learning To go a mile out of their way to hook in a fine word To keep me from dying is not in your power To kill men, a clear and strong light is required To know by rote, is no knowledge To make little things appear great was his profession To make their private advantage at the public expense To smell, though well, is to stink To study philosophy is nothing but to prepare one's self to die To what friend dare you intrust your griefs To whom no one is ill who can be good? Tongue will grow too stiff to bend Too contemptible to be punished Torture: rather a trial of patience than of truth Totally brutified by an immoderate thirst after knowledge Transferring of money from the right owners to strangers Travel with not only a necessary, but a handsome equipage True liberty is to be able to do what a man will with himself Truly he, with a great effort will shortly say a mighty trifle Truth itself has not the privilege to be spoken at all times Truth, that for being older it is none the wiser Turks have alms and hospitals for beasts Turn up my eyes to heaven to return thanks, than to crave Tutor to the ignorance and folly of the first we meet Twas a happy marriage betwixt a blind wife and a deaf husband Twenty people prating about him when he is at stool Two opinions alike, no more than two hairs Two principal guiding reins are reward and punishment Tyrannic sourness not to endure a form contrary to one's own Tyrannical authority physicians usurp over poor creatures Unbecoming rudeness to carp at everything Under fortune's favour, to prepare myself for her disgrace Universal judgments that I see so common, signify nothing Unjust judges of their actions, as they are of ours Unjust to exact from me what I do not owe Upon the precipice, 'tis no matter who gave you the push Use veils from us the true aspect of things Utility of living consists not in the length of days Valour has its bounds as well as other virtues Valour whetted and enraged by mischance Valour will cause a trembling in the limbs as well as fear Valuing the interest of discipline Vast distinction betwixt devotion and conscience Venture it upon his neighbour, if he will let him venture the making ourselves better without any danger Very idea we invent for their chastity is ridiculous Vice of confining their belief to their own capacity Vices will cling together, if a man have not a care Victorious envied the conquered Virtue and ambition, unfortunately, seldom lodge together Virtue is a pleasant and gay quality Virtue is much strengthened by combats Virtue refuses facility for a companion Viscid melting kisses of youthful ardour in my wanton age Voice and determination of the rabble, the mother of ignorance Vulgar reports and opinions that drive us on We are masters of nothing but the will We are not to judge of counsels by events We ask most when we bring least We believe we do not believe We can never be despised according to our full desert We cannot be bound beyond what we are able to perform We confess our ignorance in many things We consider our death as a very great thing We do not correct the man we hang; we correct others by him We do not easily accept the medicine we understand We do not go, we are driven We do not so much forsake vices as we change them We have lived enough for others We have more curiosity than capacity We have naturally a fear of pain, but not of death We have not the thousandth part of ancient writings We have taught the ladies to blush We much more aptly imagine an artisan upon his close-stool We must learn to suffer what we cannot evade We neither see far forward nor far backward We only labour to stuff the memory We ought to grant free passage to diseases We say a good marriage because no one says to the contrary We set too much value upon ourselves We still carry our fetters along with us We take other men's knowledge and opinions upon trust Weakness and instability of a private and particular fancy Weigh, as wise: men should, the burden of obligation Well, and what if it had been death itself? Were more ambitious of a great reputation than of a good one What a man says should be what he thinks What are become of all our brave philosophical precepts? What can they not do, what do they fear to do (for beauty) What can they suffer who do not fear to die? What did I say? that I have? no, Chremes, I had What he did by nature and accident, he cannot do by design What is more accidental than reputation? What may be done to-morrow, may be done to-day What more? they lie with their lovers learnedly What need have they of anything but to live beloved and honoured What sort of wine he liked the best: "That of another" What step ends the near and what step begins the remote What they ought to do when they come to be men What we have not seen, we are forced to receive from other hands What, shall so much knowledge be lost Whatever was not ordinary diet, was instead of a drug When I travel I have nothing to care for but myself When jealousy seizes these poor souls When their eyes give the lie to their tongue When time begins to wear things out of memory When we have got it, we want something else "When will this man be wise," said he, "if he is yet learning?" When you see me moved first, let me alone, right or wrong Where the lion's skin is too short Where their profit is, let them there have their pleasure too Wherever the mind is perplexed, it is in an entire disorder Whilst thou wast silent, thou seemedst to be some great thing Whimpering is offensive to the living and vain to the dead Who by their fondness of some fine sounding word Who can flee from himself Who discern no riches but in pomp and show Who does not boast of some rare recipe Who escapes being talked of at the same rate Who ever saw one physician approve of another's prescription Who has once been a very fool, will never after be very wise Who would weigh him without the honour and grandeur of his end Whoever expects punishment already suffers it Whoever will be cured of ignorance must confess it Whoever will call to mind the excess of his past anger Whosoever despises his own life, is always master Why do we not imitate the Roman architecture? Wide of the mark in judging of their own works Willingly give them leave to laugh after we are dead Willingly slip the collar of command upon any pretence whatever Wisdom has its excesses, and has no less need of moderation Wisdom is folly that does not accommodate itself to the common Wise man lives as long as he ought, not so long as he can Wise man never loses anything if he have himself Wise man to keep a curbing hand upon the impetus of friendship Wise may learn more of fools, than fools can of the wise Wise whose invested money is visible in beautiful villas Wiser who only know what is needful for them to know With being too well I am about to die Woman who goes to bed to a man, must put off her modesty Women who paint, pounce, and plaster up their ruins Wont to give others their life, and not to receive it World where loyalty of one's own children is unknown Worse endure an ill-contrived robe than an ill-contrived mind Would have every one in his party blind or a blockhead Would in this affair have a man a little play the servant Wrangling arrogance, wholly believing and trusting in itself Wretched and dangerous thing to depend upon others Write what he knows, and as much as he knows, but no more Wrong the just side when they go about to assist it with fraud Yet at least for ambition's sake, let us reject ambition Yet do we find any end of the need of interpretating? You and companion are theatre enough to one another You have lost a good captain, to make of him a bad general You may indeed make me die an ill death You must first see us die You must let yourself down to those with whom you converse Young and old die upon the same terms Young are to make their preparations, the old to enjoy them

Previous Part     1 ... 10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29
Home - Random Browse