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My Pet Recipes, Tried and True - Contributed by the Ladies and Friends of St. Andrew's Church, Quebec
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FIG PUDDING.

MRS. THOM.

One cup suet, one half pound figs cut fine, two cups bread-crumbs, one cup flour, one half cup brown sugar, one egg, one cup of milk, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, steam three hours.

GELATINE PUDDING (Pink.)

MRS. W. R. DEAN.

Put one ounce pink gelatine and one quart of milk in a bowl on the stove where it will not get hot; when dissolved add yolks of four eggs, beaten with four tablespoons sugar, stir well, let it just come to the boil, then add the whites well beaten, with four tablespoons of sugar and a dessert spoon vanilla. Turn into a mould and let it cool, then turn out and garnish with whipped cream. This is a very pretty dish.

GRAHAM PUDDING.

MRS. W. W. HENRY.

One and one half cups of graham flour, one cup of milk, one half cup of molasses, one cup chopped raisins, one half teaspoonful salt, one teaspoonful of soda. Sift the graham in order to make it light, but return the bran to the sifted mixture, dissolve the soda in one tablespoon of milk and add the remainder of milk with the molasses and salt, pour this mixture upon the graham and beat well, add the raisins and pour the pudding into a mould. Steam four hours, turn out and serve with sauce.

HONEY COMB PUDDING.

MISS BICKELL.

One cup flour mixed with one cup sugar, one half cup butter and one of milk melted, together, five eggs well beaten; last of all put in two teaspoons soda and one of salt. Steam one hour and a half.

MEDLEY PUDDING.

MRS. THEOPHILUS H. OLIVER.

Three eggs, the weight of three eggs in butter, in sugar, and in flour, beat the butter to a cream. Add the eggs well beaten to the sugar and flour. Put into small teacups. Bake for twenty minutes.

MANITOBA PUDDING.

MRS. STRANG.

Four cups flour, two cups of suet, two cups raisins, one cup currants, two cups sugar (brown), a little baking powder, a little essence of lemon, a little allspice, a chopped apple, a little salt, wet with a small quantity of water, boil four hours.

FOAMING SAUCE.

One half teacup butter, ditto of sugar, beat to a froth, put in a dish and set in a pan of hot water, add one tablespoon of hot water, if liked a little vanilla. Stir one way until it comes to a very light foam.

MARMALADE PUDDING.

MRS. W. R. DEAN.

Two dessertspoons marmalade, two cups bread crumbs, butter size of two walnuts, one half pint of milk, two eggs, two ounces of sugar. Melt the butter and mix with the bread crumbs, marmalade and sugar, add the eggs well beaten and the milk, pour into a well buttered mould, tie a cloth closely over it and boil one and one half hours. Serve with sauce.

CHRISTMAS PLUM PUDDING.

MRS. W. THOM.

One pound each of raisins, currants and suet, three quarters of a pound of bread crumbs, one quarter pound flour, one half pound candied peel, one half pint brandy, one half nutmeg, one quarter pound brown sugar and six eggs. Boil six hours and steam two or three more when required. Caramel sauce. One cup brown sugar, one ounce of butter, and dessertspoon cornstarch, stirred till brown, add boiling water and one wine glass of brandy.

OLD ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING.

MRS. JOHN JACK.

One pound each of stoned raisins, currants, beef kidney suet, granulated sugar, bread crumbs, and flour, one half pound candied lemon and citron peel mixed; one tablespoon salt, one teaspoonful each of finely ground nutmeg, cinnamon and cloves, eight fresh eggs, one half ounce bitter almonds chopped fine, the red part of three large carrots grated, breakfast cupful of strong coffee, strained at breakfast, cupful of molasses, and enough pure apple cider to make the whole of the proper consistency. Mix thoroughly and stand in a warm place over night, put into mould or pudding bag, tie tightly and boil gently for twelve hours. In serving make a sauce of flour, water, butter, and sugar flavored with brandy. Place the pudding on a hot dish, stick a sprig of berried holly in the centre, pour a wineglassful of brandy around it and set fire to it.

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING.

MRS. BLAIR.

Two pounds and a half raisins, three quarters of currants, two pounds finest moist sugar, two pounds bread crumbs, sixteen eggs, two pounds finely chopped suet, six ounces mixed candied peel, juice and rind of two lemons, one ounce of ground nutmeg, one ounce of cinnamon, half ounce pounded bitter almonds, gill of brandy or if objected to, any flavoring at hand. Stone and cut up the raisins do not chop them; wash and dry the currants; cut the candied peel into thin slices; mix all the dry ingredients well together and moisten with the eggs, which should be well beaten; then stir in the flavoring, and when all is thoroughly mixed, add about half a pound of flour and put the pudding into a stout new cloth; or boil in two moulds for twelve hours and serve with rich sauce.

PLUM PUDDING WITHOUT EGGS.

MRS. DAVID BELL.

Two cups of flour, two cups of raisins, two of currants, two cups of suet, one tablespoon sugar, enough water to make a stiff batter, colour with burnt sugar, spice to taste, salt, and lemon peel. Just before putting on to boil stir in a couple of tablespoonfuls of raw sago; boil in a cloth, not a shape.

PLUM PUDDING.

MADAME J. T.

Four eggs, yolks and whites beaten together, one half cup brown sugar, one cup molasses, one cup stoned raisins, two cups currants, one cup bread crumbs, two cups chopped suet, three quarters of a nutmeg, grated, the grated rind of a large lemon, one cup flour and one teaspoon baking powder. Steam for three and a half hours in a tightly closed pudding mould well buttered, keeping the water boiling constantly. Before serving sprinkle thickly with sugar and pour over this one half cup brandy, and light. Serve with this a sauce made with the juice and rind (grated) of one lemon, put over to boil with one half cup sugar, one half cup water, add one tablespoon cornstarch, one half cup sherry, one half cup brandy. This quantity will serve sixteen people.

PALACE PUDDING.

MRS. SMYTHE.

Two eggs, one cup of flour, one half cup sugar, one quarter cup butter, one teaspoon baking powder, one half teaspoon nutmeg, cream butter, add sugar, eggs, the flour sifted with baking powder, also nutmeg. Grease tin and bake half an hour.

Sauce.—One dessertspoon butter, one dessertspoon of flour, rub well together, add slowly about one cup boiling water, three dessertspoons brown sugar, one teaspoon of molasses. Boil slowly until it thickens and flavor as desired.

QUAY PUDDING.

One cup flour, one half cup sugar, one quarter cup butter one teaspoon soda, one tablespoon jam, two eggs. Cream butter with sugar, add to this the eggs and jam, the flour sifted with the soda. Put into a buttered mould and steam for two hours and serve with lemon sauce.

RAILROAD PUDDING.

MRS. GEORGE ELLIOTT.

Four eggs, beat whites and yolks separately, a cup of sugar to the whites, beat again, then add the yolks, mix a teaspoon of baking powder in a cup of flour and mix the flour and eggs and beat again. Put a sheet of buttered paper in a square pan and bake. When done turn it on a heated towel, the buttered side up and take off the paper and spread with a thick jam or marmalade, roll up quickly and pour sweetened whipped cream over, flavor with vanilla.

RICE PUDDING.

MRS. W. W. HENRY.

One cup of rice boiled soft in water, add a pint of cold milk, and a piece of butter size of an egg, salt to taste, yolks of four eggs, rind of lemon grated. Mix and bake one half hour. Beat the whites of four eggs, stir in a pint of sugar, juice of one good sized lemon. After the pudding is baked and cooled a little pour this over and brown in the oven. Eat cold; this will keep for several days.

SUET PUDDING. (Plain.)

MRS STUART OLIVER.

Three quarters of a pound of flour, one quarter of a pound suet chopped fine; mix with an egg and milk.

VICTORIA PUDDING.

MRS. ARCHIBALD LAURIE.

The weight of two eggs in butter, sugar, and flour. Butter and sugar to be beaten to a cream, add the well beaten eggs, two tablespoons of marmalade, then the sifted flour, one half teaspoon soda, dissolved in boiling water. Steam for three hours, not less.

STRAWBERRY SAUCE FOR PLAIN BLANC MANGE.

The whites of two eggs, one cup pulverized sugar, one cup strawberries. Mix all together and whip until stiff.

STRAWBERRY SAUCE FOR PUDDINGS.

MRS. W. W. HENRY.

One cupful of fine granulated sugar, one-half cupful of butter boiled together until it creams, (a wooden spoon best for this), beat the white of an egg until stiff, then add one cup of mashed strawberries, and beat again; add to the mixture, stir well together.

HARD SAUCE.

MRS. GAUDET.

1. One cup of brown sugar, one tablespoon of butter, three drops of vanilla, half a glass of sherry, whipped lightly.

2. One glass of sherry, a tablespoon of molasses, and a tablespoon of sugar.



DESSERTS.

"Custards for supper and an endless host of other such lady-like luxuries."—SHELLEY.

ORANGE FLOAT.

MRS. ERNEST F. WURTELE.

One quart of water, the juice and pulp of two lemons, one coffee cup of sugar. When boiling add four tablespoons of cornstarch; let it boil fifteen minutes stirring all the time, when cold pour over the top of four or five peeled and sliced oranges. Over this spread beaten whites of three eggs. Sweeten and add a few drops of vanilla.

VELVET CREAM.

A large teacupful of white wine, the juice of a nice lemon, one half ounce of isinglass, sugar to taste, let boil together, till nearly all the isinglass is dissolved, then strain and add one pint of cream. Let it stand until nearly cold and then put it into the mould. It requires to be made some hours before it is turned out.

PRUNE JELLY.

Put about three dozen prunes into one quart of boiling water and let them boil for one hour, take out the prunes and stone them making use of half the kernels as a flavoring. Put the prunes back into the water, with the blanched kernels, adding one cup of sugar and let boil half an hour more. Dissolve half a box of Cox's gelatine in water and add to the above and boil ten minutes longer. Put into a mould and serve cold with whipped cream.

FROZEN PUDDING.

Make a custard with three eggs and about one pint of milk, flavor with vanilla and a small cup of white sugar. Put four tablespoons of brown sugar in a frying pan and brown it well. Take from the stove and stir till off the boil, then stir into the custard. Put all in a dipper or deep dish; take a large dish full of snow and coarse salt, put the dipper into this and stir the custard until it is quite thick. Put into a mould and leave in a cool place. Serve with whipped cream.

ARROWROOT WINE JELLY.

Wet two heaping teaspoons of arrowroot with a little cold water, stir it into a cup of boiling water in which has been dissolved 2 teaspoons of white sugar. Stir while it boils ten minutes. Add one tablespoon of brandy, or three of sherry. Put into a mould and serve cold with custard as a sauce. This is very nice for invalids, omitting the sauce.

RICE BLANC MANGE.

One half pound ground rice, one quart of milk, three ounces of sugar, the rind of half a lemon, one half teaspoonful of vanilla. Boil the rice in the milk for twenty minutes with the sugar and rind of lemon, then remove the rind and add the vanilla. Put it into a wet mould.

LEMON JELLY.

MISS CLINT.

Dissolve one package or twelve sheets of gelatine in a little warm water. Then add three and one half pints of boiling water, one pound of sugar and the juice of four lemons. Cool in a mould.

COFFEE JELLY.

MRS. GAUDET.

Two tablespoons of coffee, one package of gelatine, one glass of sherry boiled down to one pint.

ICED APPLES WITH CREAM.

MRS. W. W. WELCH.

Pare and core six apples; cook them in a syrup made of one cup of sugar, and two of water; drop the apples into the boiling syrup; when they are tender put them on a platter, when cool cover with a thin layer of meringue and brown. Let the syrup boil until reduced to one half cupful, when cold, will form a jelly, cut into squares and place over and around the apples. Serve cold with sugar and cream.

FRUIT JELLY.

MISS FRY.

To one large box of gelatine add one half pint cold water. When dissolved add juice of three lemons, two cups sugar, one pint of boiling water. Arrange in layers in a mould. Four bananas and two or more oranges (sliced) six castane nuts chopped fine, six figs, one quarter lb. dates cut into small pieces. Strain jelly over this and cool. Serve with whipped cream. A lining of ladies fingers is an improvement.

COMPOTE OF APPLES.

MISS SEPTIMUS BARROW.

Take five apples, wipe, but do not peel them, take the cores out of four of them and put them in a deep dish. Slice the fifth apple and put the slices and a small lemon sliced with the four apples. One quarter lb. brown sugar to be sprinkled over apples. One half pint of water. Bake until perfectly soft but do not let them lose their shape. Put them in a dish, press and strain the cut up pieces over the cooked apples. To be eaten cold.

POMMES A LA VESUVE.

MISS LAMPSON.

Pile some apple marmalade high in a dish; get ready some macaroni boiled in water well drained, and afterwards sweetened with white sugar, and flavored with brandy; cut it into short lengths, lay it as a bordering round the mountains of marmalade; dust the whole over with powdered sugar, and on the apex form a crater with half a dozen nubs of sugar; pour a gill of brandy over the top, and just before serving set fire to it and place it on the table flaming.

LEMON SPONGE.

MISS BEEMER.

One half box gelatine, juice of three lemons, one pint of cold water, one half pint of hot water, two teacups of sugar, whites of three eggs. Soak one-half box of gelatine in the pint of cold water ten minutes; then dissolve on the fire adding the juice of the lemons with the hot water and sugar. Boil all together two or three minutes; pour into a dish, and let it remain until nearly cold and beginning to set; then add the whites of eggs well beaten and whisk ten minutes. When it becomes the consistency of sponge, wet the inside of cups with the white of eggs, pour in the sponge and set in a cold place. Serve with thin custard, made with the yolks of four eggs, one tablespoonful of cornstarch, one-half teacup of sugar, one pint of milk, teaspoonful of vanilla. Boil until sufficiently thick and serve cold over the sponge. The sponge should be allowed to stand twenty-four hours.

ORANGE SOUFFLE.

Pare and slice six oranges, boil one cup sugar, one pint of milk, the yolks of three eggs, one tablespoon of cornstarch. As soon as thick, pour over the oranges; beat the whites of eggs to a stiff froth; sweeten: put on top and brown in oven. Serve cold. Bananas may be used instead of oranges and are far more wholesome from contact with the heat.

GELATINE, WITH FRUIT.

Take one ounce box of gelatine; put to soak in a pint of cold water for an hour. Take the juice of three lemons and one orange, with three cups of sugar; add this to the gelatine, and pour over all three pints of boiling water: let this boil up once, stirring all the time. Take two moulds of the same size, and pour half your jelly into each. Stir into one mould half a cup of candied cherries, and into the other one pound of blanched almonds. The almonds will rise to the top. Let these moulds stand on ice, or in a cool place until thoroughly set, twenty-four hours is best. When ready to serve loosen the sides, and place the almond jelly on top the other, on a fruit platter. Slice down and serve with whipped cream.

EASY ICE CREAM.

One pint of cream, half a pint of milk, teacupful of sugar, two eggs beaten separately, the whites being added last, a teaspoonful of vanilla extract. Stir thoroughly but do not cook, it is quite as nice without. This will be sufficient for six persons. Dissolve half a pound of macaroons in the above mixture before it is frozen and a delicious ice cream may be had.

TRIFLE.

MISS RUTH SCOTT.

One pint of cream well beaten, sugar and flavoring to taste. One quarter of a pound of macaroons which have soaked in sherry for a few minutes. Put in a deep dish alternate layers of macaroons and cream. Preserved cherries and almonds (whole) are a great improvement.

CARAMEL CREAM.

MRS. BENSON BENNETT.

Boil two coffee cups of dark brown sugar, butter the size of an egg and two thirds of a cup of thin sweet cream. Twelve minutes after it commences to boil dissolve half a cup of gelatine in a little cold water, add this to the boiling mixture and nearly a pint of sweet cream all but the two thirds of a cup used in the beginning. Strain and flavor with a tablespoonful of vanilla; pour into a pudding mould and let it stand over night on the ice. Serve with whipped cream.

CLARET JELLY.

MRS. GILMOUR.

One ounce of gelatine, one cup of sugar, the rind and juice of two lemons, two or three pieces of cinnamon, one and one half pints of water, one half pint of claret, one glass of brandy. If Cox's gelatine or Lady Charlotte, is used it will have to be soaked first in a little of the cold water, if the leaf gelatine, boiling water can be poured on it. Put all together into a saucepan with whites of three eggs, put on the fire until it boils and then strain through a flannel bag.

CUP CUSTARD.

MR. JOSEPH FLEIG. (Baker to Grenoble Hotel, N. Y.)

Five eggs, six ounces of sugar, one quart of milk, extract to flavor, spread cups or moulds with unsalted butter, fill up with the custard, and place in pan filled with one inch water in good oven.

SPANISH CREAM.

MRS. W. R. DEAN.

Yolks of two eggs, two tablespoons sugar, two tablespoons ground rice, one pint of milk. Beat the eggs a little. Put all together on the fire and stir constantly until it thickens. Pour into glass dish and garnish with blanched almonds and strips of citron.

SPANISH CREAM.

MISS GREEN.

Soak one half package of gelatine in one pint of milk for half an hour; while this is soaking take two eggs (separate them) beating the yolks with one half a cup of white sugar, till light, and whip the whites to a stiff froth: when the gelatine is soaked, put the sauce pan on the fire and let gelatine and milk come to the boil: then add the yolks and remove from fire, add the whites and one teaspoon of vanilla. Put in a wet mould and cool.

CHARLOTTE RUSSE.

MISS EDITH HENRY.

To make the jelly for bottom of mould one half a package of gelatine soaked in a little over a tumbler of water, sugar to taste, one half a small cup of cooking wine and enough cochineal to color. Let this stand until stiff. One pint of sweet cream, one half a box of gelatine dissolved, wine to taste, one teaspoon of vanilla, a little over half a cup of sugar: whip cream stiff, then add sugar, wine, vanilla and lastly the gelatine. Beat well together and pour into your mould lined with ladies fingers and jelly.

WINE CREAM.

MRS. W. CRAWFORD.

Two cups of cream, half a cup of sugar, one box of gelatine dissolved in half a cup of sherry over a steamer, when dissolved, strain into cream, and put in a mould and in a cool place.

PINEAPPLE WATER ICE.

MRS. HARRY LAURIE.

Two large juicy pineapples, one and one half pounds of sugar, one quart of water, juice of two lemons. Pare the pineapples, grate them and add the juice of the lemons. Boil the sugar and water together for five minutes. When cold add the pineapple and strain through a sieve. Turn into freezer and freeze.

LEMON WATER ICE.

Four large juicy lemons, one quart of water, one orange, one and one quarter pounds of sugar. Put the sugar and water over to boil. Chip the yellow rind from three lemons and the orange, add to the syrup, boil five minutes and stand away to cool. Square the juice from the orange and lemon add it to the cold syrup, strain it through a cloth and freeze.

ROLLED JELLY.

MRS. W. W. WELCH.

Two eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately. Take the yolks and beat to a cream with one cup of sugar, three tablespoonfuls of milk, then add one cup of flour, one heaping teaspoon of baking powder and the well beaten whites last, also extract as fancied. When baked place on a wet cloth and trim outside edges, cover with preserves, roll in the cloth and let it stand for ten minutes, eat with whipped cream.

JUNKET.

MRS. STUART OLIVER.

Slightly warm one quart milk, add junket tablet dissolved, and two or three tablespoonfuls sugar. Keep in a warm place near fire till solid. Then remove to a cool place till served. Serve with cream and maple sugar or preserves.



CAKES.

"With weights and measures just and true, Oven of even heat, Well buttered tins and quiet nerves, Success will be complete."

"In making cake, the ingredients should be of the first quality—the flour super-fine, and always sifted; the butter fresh and sweet and not too much salted. Coffee A, or granulated sugar is best for cakes. Much care should be taken in breaking and separating the eggs, and equal care taken as regards their freshness. Break each egg separately in a teacup; then into the vessels in which they are to be beaten. Never use an egg when the white is the least discolored. Before beating the whites remove every particle of yolk. If any is allowed to remain, it will prevent them becoming as stiff and dry as required. Deep earthen bowls are best for mixing cake, and a wooden spoon or paddle is best for beating batter. Before commencing to make your cake, see that all the ingredients required are at hand. By so doing the work may be done in much less time.

"The lightness of a cake depends not only upon the making, but the baking also. It is highly important to exercise judgment respecting the heat of the oven, which must be regulated according to the cake you bake, and the stove you use. Solid cake requires sufficient heat to cause it to rise and brown nicely without scorching. If it should brown too fast cover with thick brown paper. All light cakes require quick heat and are not good if baked in a cool oven. Those having molasses as an ingredient scorch more quickly, consequently should be baked in a moderate oven. Every cook should use her own judgment, and by frequent baking she will in a very short time be able to tell by the appearance of either bread or cake whether it is sufficiently done."

SCRIPTURE CAKE.

MRS. STOCKING.

One cup butter Judges V. 25 Four cups flour I. Kings IV. 22 Three cups sugar Jeremiah VI. 20 Two cups raisins I. Samuel XXX. 12 Two cups figs I. Samuel XXX. 12 One cup water Genesis XXIV. 17 One cup almonds Jeremiah I. 11 Six eggs Isaiah X. 14 One tablespoon honey Exodus XVI. 21 One teaspoon cream Exodus XII. 19 Baking powder three teaspoonfuls a pinch of salt Job VI. 6 Spices to taste I. Kings X. 10

Follow Solomon's advice for making good boys and you will have a good cake.—Proverbs XXIII. 13.

CHRISTMAS FRUIT CAKE.

MRS. THOM.

One pound of flour, one pound of butter beaten to a cream, six eggs beaten separately, two wineglasses of brandy, one pound sugar, one pound of raisins, one pound of currants, one pound of prunes, one pound figs chopped, one half pound mixed candied peel, one half pound almonds, one half teaspoon mixed spice or nutmeg.

FRUITCAKE.

Two pounds of raisins, two pounds of currants, one half pound of citron, one pound of sugar, one pound of flour, eight ounces of butter, ten eggs, two nutmegs, one half ounce of mace, one tablespoon of cloves, same of cinnamon, one glass of brandy, one tablespoon of baking powder, one cup of molasses. Stir butter and sugar together until very light, beat whites and yolks separately and bake in a slow oven.

ORANGE FROSTING.

One pound of frosting sugar, juice of one lemon and one orange, grate rind of orange.

CARAMEL CAKE.

One tablespoon of butter, one cup of sugar, three eggs, one half cup of milk, one and one half cups of flour, two teaspoons of baking powder.

FILLING.—Two cups of sugar, two thirds cup of milk, boil thirteen minutes, add butter the size of a small egg, one good teaspoon of vanilla, when done stir till thick enough to spread and not to run, bake in three, spread between and on top.

CHARLOTTE RUSSE CAKE.

MRS. RICHARD TURNER.

One cup of flour, one cup of sugar, three eggs, two teaspoons baking powder, three tablespoons boiling water. Bake same as sandwich cake.

THE FILLING.—One large cup of cream, one fourth package gelatine, dissolved in a little milk; whip cream to a stiff froth, then add gelatine, sugar, flavoring to taste. Ice the top.

CORNSTARCH CAKE.

MRS. JAMES LAURIE.

One half pound of butter and two cups white sugar stirred together, add the yolks of four eggs, one cup of milk, two cups of cornstarch and one of flour sifted well, one heaping teaspoonful of baking powder and add the whites of the four eggs last. Flavor a little and line tins with buttered paper.

SPONGECAKE. (Splendid.)

MRS. ERSKINE SCOTT.

Beat four eggs, over one cup of white sugar, for half an hour, then mix one cup of flour, after it is in the pan pour some essence of lemon on the top and bake immediately.

SPONGE CAKE.

MISS K. H. MARSH.

Beat seven eggs together with their weight in white sugar for half an hour, then sift in the weight of four eggs in flour. Add a little lemon to flavor and bake twenty minutes in a quick oven.

SPONGE CAKE.

MRS. FARQUHARSON SMITH.

Ten eggs; very fresh, one pound fine sugar, the weight of five eggs in flour, the rind of two lemons and juice of one. Break the eggs on the sugar and beat them twenty minutes with two pronged steel carving fork until in a lovely light cream, then grate the lemon rind into it with the juice of one lemon. Sift the flour several times and next mix in the flour most carefully barely stirring to mix it in, if stirred too much it will make the cake heavy. Beat it with the back of the fork towards you. The oven should be a little quick at first until the cake rises, if baking too quickly place a piece of white paper over it and buttered paper should be placed in the pans. N. B.—Delicious if properly made.

SPONGE CAKE.

MRS. ANDREW T. LOVE.

Six eggs, the weight of five in sugar, and three in flour, beat the whites and yolks separately, lemon flavoring.

EASY SPONGE CAKE.

MRS. BLAIR.

Four eggs, two even cups of sugar, three-fourth's cup hot water, one and three fourth's cups of flour, even measure, two teaspoonfuls baking powder, salt, flavor with lemon. Beat the eggs separately. To the yolks gradually add the sugar. Mix well. Then add hot water. Mix the baking powder with the flour and add a portion, then part of the well beaten whites, and so on until all is used. Flavor. It will be thin but do not add any more flour, for it is all right. Bake in a moderate oven. It may be baked very thin, cut into shapes like dominos; frost, and mark the lines and dots with a camel's hair brush dipped in chocolate.

CACOUNA CAKE.

MISS K. H. MARSH.

Three cups of sugar, two cups of butter, seven eggs, one pound of raisins, wineglass of wine, one nutmeg, one cup sour milk and one teaspoon soda, five cups of flour. Beat the butter to a cream, then add the sugar and the eggs (well beaten), the fruit, spice and wine, then the flour and lastly the soda dissolved in a cup of sour milk.

DELICIOUS ANGEL'S FOOD.

MISS RITCHIE.

Beat the whites of eleven eggs to a stiff froth, then stir in carefully a cup and a half of sifted granulated sugar, (or better still of castor sugar,) a teaspoonful of vanilla and one cup of flour that has been sifted with a teaspoonful of cream of tartar five times; add this very carefully and mix thoroughly, turn into an ungreased pan and bake in a moderate oven for about fifty-five minutes. When done turn upside down and when cool it will either drop out or it may be easily removed from the pan with a knife.

CHOCOLATE CAKE.

MISS M. A. RITCHIE.

Dissolve two ounces of chocolate in five tablespoonfuls boiling water. Cream half a cup of butter adding gradually one and a half cups of sugar; add the yolks of four eggs, beat thoroughly; then add the chocolate, half a cup of cream or milk, a cup and three quarters of flour, two rounding teaspoonfuls of baking powder, a teaspoonful of vanilla. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, stir them carefully into the mixture, and it is ready to bake either in a loaf-pan or in three layer cake pans. Frost with boiled icing flavored with chocolate.

CHOCOLATE CAKE.

MRS. G. CRESSMAN.

One and one half squares of chocolate melted in one half cup of milk, two eggs, reserving white of one egg for frosting, one cup sugar, one teaspoonful soda in one half cup of milk, and one and one quarter cups of flour. Bake in dripping pan. Boiled frosting, one cup of sugar and white of one egg.

MAPLE CREAM CAKE.

One cup of sugar, two eggs, two tablespoonfuls butter, a little less than two cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls baking powder. Bake in two tins. Frosting, one cup and a half of maple sugar, one half cup cream, boil until quite thick then beat until it creams, add the white of one egg, keep beating until thick.

COCOA CAKE.

MISS MAUD THOMSON.

Rub one half cup butter to a cream, with one cup of sugar, add the beaten yolks of two eggs, and beat well. Mix one and one half cups of flour, one teaspoonful baking powder and two teaspoonfuls cocoa, thoroughly beat the whites of eggs stiff, measure one-half cup of milk, and then add a little milk and flour alternately to the egg mixture, lastly add the whites of eggs and one teaspoonful of lemon or vanilla. Bake in a shallow pan about twenty minutes and then frost with plain cocoa frosting.

ICING.—Mix one half teaspoonful cocoa with one cup powdered sugar, add one tablespoonful lemon juice and one tablespoonful boiling water or enough to make the sugar into a paste that settles to a level the moment you stop stirring. Spread at once on the hot cake.

CORN CAKE.

MRS. W. W. HENRY.

One cup of corn meal, one cup of flour, two teaspoons baking powder, sifted with the flour, one egg, two tablespoons melted butter, two tablespoons sugar, little salt, one and one fourth cups of sweet milk, bake in quick oven.

CREWE CAKE.

MISS M. C.

One pound of sugar, one pound of flour, three teaspoons of baking powder, five eggs, one half pound of butter, a little milk, vanilla or lemon flavoring.

CHRISTMAS CAKE.

MRS. GEORGE M. CRAIG.

One cup melted butter, one cup milk, one cup sugar, one cup molasses, six eggs, six cups of flour, two pounds of currants, two pounds raisins, two ounces peel, one teaspoonful of Durkee's baking powder to every cup of flour.

COCOANUT CAKE. (Splendid.)

MISS. BEEMER.

Two cups of sugar and one half cup of butter beaten to a cream, slowly add one cup of milk; mix two teaspoonfuls of baking powder with three cups of flour, add this gradually, mixing and then beating, finally the whites of six eggs beaten to a stiff froth and one teaspoonful of lemon extract. This can be made in layers (three) or baked in a square pan.

ICING.

Whites of two eggs, one half pound of cocoanut, and enough powdered sugar to make it sufficiently stiff, one teaspoonful lemon extract.

CREAM CAKE.

MRS. W. R. DEAN.

One cup of butter, one cup of cream or sour milk, two cups of sugar, three cups of flour, four eggs, one teaspoon soda mixed in vinegar and stirred in at the last. Bake in shallow tins.

RAILROAD CAKE.

One tea-cup flour, one ditto of sugar, two teaspoons cream of tartar, one half teaspoon of soda, four eggs. This will form a thick batter. Butter pan and bake about ten minutes.

MOUNTAIN CAKE.

One pound of sugar, one pound of flour, one half pound well beaten butter, one cup sweet milk, six eggs, one teaspoon cream of tartar, one half teaspoon soda dissolved in the milk.

MOUNTAIN CAKE.

MRS. BENSON BENNETT.

Three fourths cup of butter and two cups of sugar beaten to a cream, four eggs beaten very light, three cups of flour with two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, one half cup of sweet milk with one teaspoonful of baking soda, bake about twenty-five minutes.

MARBLE CAKE.

MRS. W. R. DEAN.

One cup white sugar, one fourth cup butter, three eggs (whites and yolks beaten separately) one half cup milk, two cups of flour, two teaspoons baking powder. Separate this batter into three parts. In one part put a square of chocolate dissolved in a little hot water, in another part put one teaspoon cochineal to color it. Take a spoonful of each color (white, brown, pink) alternately and bake in long tin pan.

ICING.

White of one egg well beaten, one teaspoon of vanilla, and pulverized sugar.

MARBLE CAKE.

MISS MILDRED POWIS.

(Light Part.)

One fourth cup butter, three fourths cup white sugar, one fourth cup milk, one cup flour, whites of two eggs, one teaspoon of baking powder.

DARK PART.

One fourth cup butter, one half cup brown sugar, one fourth cup molasses, one fourth cup milk, one and one fourth cups of flour, yolks of two eggs, one good teaspoon baking powder, one half a teaspoon (good) each of cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg and mace. Put into the pan a spoonful at a time of each part.

MACAROON TART.

MR. JOSEPH FLEIG. (Baker, Grenoble Hotel, N. Y.)

Make a paste of three quarters of a pound flour, five ounces of sugar, one half pound butter and two eggs. Roll part of this out to one fourth inch thick layer and spread over a round shallow cake pan about one half inch deep. Bake very slightly. When cold spread with thin layer of jam or jelly, then put with bag and star tube, stripes of macaroon over and bake in a slow oven nice and brown. Put some icing between the stripes after tart is baked.

PASTE FOR MACAROONS AND MACAROON TART.

Take one pound Hoide's Almond paste and mix fine with one pound powdered sugar then add gradually the whites of about eight eggs until the paste gets smooth and soft enough to pass through the bag and tube. For macaroons make paste softer and use round tube or teaspoon. Bake on paper in slow oven.

BUCKEYE CAKE.

MRS. POLLEY.

Two cups sugar, two thirds cup of butter, three eggs beaten separately, one cup of sweet milk, two teaspoons of baking powder sifted with three cups of flour, one teaspoon extract of lemon.

HARRISON CAKE.

One cup of sugar, one cup of butter, four eggs well beaten, one cup molasses, one pound stoned raisins, one teaspoonful each of saleratus, cloves, cinnamon and allspice, one nutmeg and four cups of flour.

ORANGE CAKE.

MRS. A. J. ELLIOTT.

Two cups of flour, one scant cup of milk, one cup of sugar, half a cup of butter, two eggs, one teaspoon soda and two of cream of tartar. Divided in six parts and spread as thin as possible in pans of uniform size. Bake about three minutes: when done lay together with layers of orange filling between. Method: cream sugar and butter together, then add milk in which the soda and cream of tartar has been dissolved, then the eggs well beaten and lastly the flour into which drop a pinch of salt. Beat well and don't scrimp the butter.

ORANGE FILLING.—The juice and part of the grated rind of two oranges, then add one cup of sugar. One tablespoon of flour dissolved in cup of water which is gradually added, then beat the yolk of the egg well, and mix well together, and boil in a steamer until it is as thick as custard or boil about three quarters of an hour. The steamer is the safest as the flour is liable to stick to the pan otherwise.

ORANGE CAKE.

MISS FRY.

Two cups of flour, one cup of sugar, one half cup milk, two teaspoons baking powder, one tablespoon butter, one tablespoon orange juice, two eggs. Beat eggs and sugar, add butter (melted), orange juice and rind of one orange, then milk. Add flour and powder and bake one half hour. Filling:—juice and rind of one orange, one tablespoon each of lemon juice and cornstarch, two tablespoons sugar, one teaspoon butter, one egg. Put orange juice rind, and lemon juice into a cup, then fill with cold water. When it boils, add cornstarch with cold water. Beat yolk of egg with sugar, add this, then butter. When cold spread between layers. Icing. Beat whites of two eggs, add three fourths cup powdered sugar.

LADY CAKE.

MRS. GEORGE LAWRENCE.

One half cup butter, one and one half cups granulated sugar, one cup lukewarm water, two and one half cups of sifted flour, four eggs, whites only, one lemon juice and grated rind, two teaspoons of vanilla extract, two teaspoons of baking powder. Cream the butter in an earthen dish with silver spoon, stirring till light cream color, add sugar beating thoroughly. Sift the flour, add one half of it and the cup of water a little of each, till cup is finished. Beat whites of eggs stiff and dry, add one half, beat, then the rest of the flour. Beat well, add the juice, and grated rind of lemon or vanilla as preferred, next the baking powder and the balance of the beaten eggs. Turn quickly into a deep, well buttered tin, and bake for three quarters of an hour. The tin should be ready for use immediately the baking powder is added. When cold, frost with white icing.

LEMON CAKE.

MISS BEEMER.

One half cup of butter creamed well with one and a half cups of sugar, stir in the yolks of three eggs and one cup of milk; two teaspoonfuls of baking powder sifted with three cups of flour and added alternately with the whites of the three eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Bake in rather a quick oven in three tins of uniform size, and place, between layers, a frosting made of the grated rind of one, and juice of two lemons, and three fourths cup of sugar. Let boil and throw it over the well beaten whites of two eggs. This cake is one that keeps well for five or six days.

NUT CAKE.

MRS. GEORGE M. CRAIG.

One cup sugar, half a cup of butter whipped to a cream with sugar, four eggs, one tablespoonful of milk if needed, quarter of pound of almond nuts chopped fine, two ounces lemon peel, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder and one cup of flour.

NEW PORT CAKE.

MRS. THEOPHILUS OLIVER.

Two eggs, one half cup of white sugar, one half cup of butter, (melted) one quart of flour, two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, one cup sweet milk, one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water. Bake in a deep pan (eaten hot).

PLAIN CAKE.

MRS. GILMOUR.

One half cup butter, one cup sugar, three eggs, two cups of flour, two and one half teaspoons baking powder, one cup of milk.

SANDWICH CAKE.

MRS. FRANK LAURIE.

Four eggs, one cup sugar, one cup flour, one teaspoonful of baking powder; mix the yolks and the sugar together, then whip up the whites, mix in with the yolks and sugar, then add the flour and the baking powder putting the latter into the flour. Bake in a hot oven.

SANDWICH CAKE.

MISS M. SAMPSON.

Two thirds cup sugar, one egg, two thirds cup milk, butter the size of an egg, one and one half cupfuls of flour, two teaspoonfuls baking powder. Bake in a quick oven.

SPANISH BUN.

MRS. THOM.

One and one half cups sugar, four eggs, leave out the whites of three for icing, three fourths cup butter, one cup milk, one tablespoonful cinnamon, one teaspoon ginger, one half nutmeg, two cups flour, three spoonfuls baking powder. Bake in flat tin well greased.

ICING.

Take the whites of three eggs, beat to a stiff froth then add a cup of light brown sugar; while the cake is hot, spread this over, return to the oven and brown.

WHITE CAKE. (Delicious.)

MRS. STOCKING.

One cup sugar, one half cup butter, whites of two eggs, one cup of milk or water, two cups of flour, two teaspoons baking powder, cream the butter, stir in sugar, then add milk or water, beaten whites, flour, and lastly the extract.

NUT FILLING.—One cup milk, one cup nut meats, one tablespoon flour, one egg, one half cup sugar, salt. Heat milk sugar and nuts, add egg and flour stirred together; cook until thick.

WALNUT CAKE.

MRS. PEIFFER.

Cream one cup granulated sugar and one fourth of butter, and two eggs, then two heaping cups flour, two heaping teaspoons baking powder sifted four times: while your flour is still heaped in the mixing bowl on top of the butter, etc., add one heaping saucer chopped walnuts, then use as much as you need of one cup sweet milk to make a nice stiff batter, not too thin.



ICINGS FOR CAKES.

APPLE FILLING FOR CAKE.

MRS. W. W. HENRY.

One apple grated, one cup of sugar, one teaspoonful of vanilla, the white of one egg beaten stiff.

CHOCOLATE FROSTING.

MISS MAUD THOMSON.

White of one egg, eight tablespoons powdered sugar, one inch square of chocolate, one half teaspoon vanilla. Do not whip the egg but stir the sugar into it beating until smooth. Place the chocolate in a teacup, float the latter in a saucepan full of boiling water. Cover the pan and when the chocolate melts stir into the frosting and add vanilla and spread upon the cake.

CHOCOLATE ICING (Original).

MRS. E. A. PFEIFFER.

One cup granulated sugar, two squares of chocolate, boil till thick (do not stir) then turn into beaten white of one egg.

BOILED ICING.

One cup granulated sugar, boiled till it threads, then turned into the beaten whites of two eggs, and whip till cold.

CHOCOLATE PASTE.

MRS. BENSON BENNETT.

Melt two ounces Baker's chocolate, add one tablespoonful of water, and three of milk, one piece of butter, one egg well beaten, one cup of sugar, make as in lemon marmalade.

FIG CAKE FILLING.

MRS. STOCKING.

One pound figs, one half cup sugar, two thirds cup of water. Boil figs after being chopped fine with sugar and water until thick.

MAPLE SYRUP ICING.

MISS M. W. HOME.

One cup maple syrup, boil until it will harden slightly when dropped in cold water, then pour on the stiffly beaten white of an egg and stir constantly until it thickens, then spread on cake.

MAPLE SUGAR ICING.

MRS. ALBERT CLINT.

One cup of maple sugar, six teaspoonsful water, boiled till thick. White of one egg beaten crisp to be stirred in with the syrup until cool, then spread on the cake. Stir quickly when mixing the syrup and egg.

ORANGE JELLY ICING.

Two oranges, one lemon, one cup of sugar, one cup of water, one tablespoonful of cornstarch. Grate the rinds, add the juice of oranges and lemon; mix the cornstarch with a little water, put in a saucepan and let it come to the boil until thick and clear, stir constantly. When cool enough spread between cakes.

SOFT ICING FOR CAKES.

Two cups of white sugar (teacups), three fourths cup of sweet milk, one half a tablespoonful of washed butter. Boil for ten minutes, take off and stir constantly till it begins to thicken, then spread immediately over cakes. Put in flavoring to taste when you begin to stir.

CREAM ICING.

MRS. RATTRAY.

Take a piece of butter about one half the size of an almond, wash thoroughly to remove salt, beat it to a cream with one tablespoonful of rich cream, flavor with a few drops of lemon, vanilla or any flavoring preferred, then thicken with powdered sugar and spread on cake with a knife dipped in cold water. Let stand before using an hour or longer.



GINGERBREAD AND SMALL CAKES.

GINGERBREAD.

MRS. FARQUHARSON SMITH.

Three fourths pound of butter, two cups of milk, five cups of flour, two cups of molasses, two cups of sugar, five eggs, four tablespoons of ginger. Mix butter and sugar together. Mix the molasses and milk and flour, then the eggs, whip the latter well but not separately, the risings put in last, one teaspoonful of baking soda, and two of cream tartar; if sour milk or cream is used the latter need not be used; a large flat pan with well buttered paper. Cooked in a moderate oven it takes about three quarters of an hour to bake. Sour cream makes it much richer and not quite so much butter required.

SPONGE GINGERCAKE.

MRS. ANDREW T. LOVE.

Four eggs, three cups molasses, one cup sugar, one half cup of milk or water, one half cup butter, three small tablespoons ginger, one half teaspoon nutmeg, cloves, cinnamon, one and one half pounds flour light weight, three teaspoon baking powder, lemon or vanilla flavoring.

SOFT GINGERBREAD.

MRS. W. R. DEAN.

One quart of flour, rub in it one half cup butter, one pint of molasses, two eggs, one tablespoon ginger, two teaspoons soda dissolved in a tumbler of milk. About forty minutes to bake.

SOFT GINGERBREAD.

MISS BEEMER.

Two cups molasses, one half cup of shortening (lard), three fourths cup boiling water, one tablespoon each of ginger, cinnamon and saleratus, (soda) two tablespoonfuls vinegar, three and one half cups of flour, one teaspoon salt (even), melt the molasses and shortening on the stove slowly, mix the saleratus with the boiling water and add it to the above, then add the vinegar; mix the ginger, cinnamon and salt with the flour and stir in slowly. Bake in a long flat tin in a moderate oven about half an hour.

COOKIES.

MRS. W. H. POLLEY.

Three eggs, three cups sugar, one and one half cups of butter, one half cup sweet milk, one teaspoonful saleratus, one tablespoonful of caraway seeds and enough flour to roll out.

MOLASSES COOKIES.

One cup molasses boiled, one half cup lard, one half cup of butter, one teaspoonful each of ginger and saleratus, flour enough to roll out.

OATMEAL COOKIES.

MRS. WADDLE.

One cup hot water, one cup butter and lard mixed, one cup of sugar, two cups of oatmeal, two cups of flour, one teaspoon soda in a little boiling water, roll thin and bake in a hot oven.

COOKIES. (Splendid).

MRS. FRANK GLASS.

One cup sugar, one cup butter, two eggs, three teaspoons baking powder, one tablespoon water, flour to roll, one teaspoon vanilla, roll out but a little of the dough at a time.

GINGER SNAPS.

One and one half cups molasses, one cup brown sugar, pinch of ginger, one teaspoon soda, one half cup sour milk, one half cup of butter, one half cup lard, flour to roll.

DOUGHNUTS.

One half cup butter and one cup sugar beaten together, three eggs beaten light, one half cup sour milk, one teaspoon soda, flour enough to roll fry in hot lard.

FRIED CAKES.

MRS. HENRY THOMSON.

One cup sugar, butter size of an egg, one cup milk, two eggs, one quart of flour, two teaspoons cream of tartar, one half teaspoon of soda, spice to taste.

CRULLERS.

MRS. ARCHIBALD LAURIE.

One cup sour cream, two eggs beaten separately, three fourths of a cup sugar, one half teaspoon soda dissolved in boiling water, one teaspoon cream of tartar sifted with flour, flour enough to roll rather soft, and boil in fresh lard.

CRULLERS.

MISS GREEN.

One pint of cream, four eggs, one cup of sugar, three teaspoonfuls of baking powder, flour enough to make a batter fit for rolling.

CROQUIGNOLES.

MADAME A. GRENIER.

One half pint of cream, one half pint of milk, four eggs well beaten, three quarters of a pound of granulated sugar, one quarter of a pound of butter blended with the flour, one teaspoon of soda dissolved in vinegar, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, flour enough to roll out.

CROQUIGNOLES.

MRS. ARCHIE COOK.

Three eggs, one cup of milk, one quarter of a pound of butter, one and one half cups of sugar, three teaspoons of baking powder, flour enough to roll out and a little essence of lemon.

DOUGHNUTS.

MR. JOSEPH FLEIG. (Baker, Grenoble Hotel, N. Y.)

One half pound sugar, three oz. butter, four eggs, one pint of milk, a little essence of lemon and two pounds of flour with one ounce of baking powder.

WAFER JUMBLES.

One half pound sugar, one half pound butter and one half pound flour, three eggs and vanilla flavoring. Place on a long flat pan using bag and tube, bake in good oven.

PUFFETS. (Hot tea cake.)

MRS. BENSON BENNETT.

One and one half pints of flour, three eggs, one half cup of butter, one half cup of powdered sugar, two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, one ditto of carbonate of soda, one half pint of milk.

BOSTON CREAM CAKE.

MRS. JOHN MACNAUGHTON.

Boil one quarter pound butter in one half pint of water. Stir in while boiling six ounces of flour. Take from the fire and stir in gradually (when it has cooled a few minutes) five eggs well beaten. Add one quarter teaspoon soda and a little salt. Above recipe makes about two dozens cakes. They must be baked from twenty minutes to half an hour. Be sure to let them bake enough. Do not think them burning unless you see them doing so.

CREAM FOR FILLING.

Boil three quarters of a pint of milk, and stir in while boiling two eggs, one cup of sugar, and one half a cup of flour beaten together very smoothly. Flavor to taste, and when cool fill the cake through a small slit made in the side of each with a sharp knife. The cakes must also be cool before they are filled.

DOMINO CAKES.

Mix together as quickly as possible two cupfuls of sugar with one of butter, then the beaten yolks and lastly the stiffly whipped whites of three eggs, and a teaspoonful extract of lemon. Mix in just enough flour to roll the mass out very thin and cut it into domino shape. After the cakes are in the pan, brush with the white of an egg, using a feather, and sprinkle them with comfits. Bake a light brown. These are delicious and pretty, and will keep fresh a long time.

QUEEN CAKES.

MRS. SMYTHE.

One cup of flour, four tablespoons of sugar, two tablespoons butter, one half teaspoon baking powder, ditto of lemon extract, two eggs and a few currants. Beat eggs with sugar, add butter melted, then the flour and essence of lemon, sprinkle a few currants at the bottom of small moulds. Bake about fifteen minutes.

SHREWSBURY CAKES.

MISS HENRY.

Rub to a cream six ounces of sugar, with six ounces of butter, add two well beaten eggs and work in twelve ounces flour, adding a teaspoonful of rose water. Roll out thin and cut into small cakes.



CONFECTIONS.

"Sweet meats, messengers of strong prevailment in an unhardened youth."—SHAKESPEARE.

SALTED ALMONDS.

MRS. BENSON BENNETT.

Blanch, put into a baking pan, and to each pound allow a tablespoonful of butter, stand them in the oven, watch and shake until all are nicely browned; take out and lift carefully from the grease, dust thickly with salt, and put in a cool place at once.

BUTTER SCOTCH. (Original.)

MRS. E. A. PFEIFFER.

One pint of maple syrup, butter size of an egg, boil till stiff when dropped in cold water.

CHOCOLATE CREAMS.

MRS. EDWARD C. POWERS.

Two pounds confectioner's sugar, one fourth pound grated cocoa-nut, one tablespoonful vanilla, a pinch of salt, whites of three eggs (beaten very stiff); mix all together, and roll into small balls; let stand one-half hour; then dip into the chocolate prepared thus: One half cake Baker's chocolate (grated fine), two tablespoonfuls butter. Warm the butter; mix in the chocolate. When cool dip the creams in, and set on a buttered plate to harden.

VANILLA TAFFY.

Three cups of granulated sugar, one cup of cold water, three tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Cook without stirring until it threads; add one tablespoonful of vanilla; let cool; pull until white; cut into small squares.

EVERTON TOFFEE.

MRS. FRANK LAURIE.

Put one pound of brown sugar, a breakfast cupful of cold water, eight ounces of unsalted butter, mix well together in a small preserving pan, stir till quite through the boil. Test the strength of the toffee as you do barley sugar.

BUTTER SCOTCH.

MRS. W. R. DEAN.

Two cups brown sugar, one tablespoon water, butter size of an egg. Boil without stirring. Try it in cold water, and it is done when it hardens on the spoon. (Add one teaspoon vanilla if preferred). Pour on buttered plates. Mark into squares before it hardens, and when it is cool it will break off neatly.

CHOCOLATE FUDGE.

Four cups sugar (white), two cups milk, one pound butter, one cup grated chocolate, vanilla to taste. Nuts may be added. Boil and beat thoroughly (as for sucre a la creme) pour on buttered plates and cut into squares.

NUT CANDY.

Two cups white granulated sugar, one half cup sweet milk. Boil for about ten minutes, and add three quarters cup cut up walnuts. Remove from stove and beat thoroughly and when it thickens pour out on buttered plates. Cocoanut candy may be made same way. If the candy does not thicken after being beaten, it is not boiled sufficiently and can be put back on stove. Stir constantly through, if the nuts are in.



PICKLES.

"Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers."—MOTHER GOOSE.

CANADIAN TOMATO CHUTNEY. (Splendid.)

MRS. RATTRAY.

One peck green tomatoes, twelve large red onions, one large cauliflower, two heads celery, two heads garlic, six red peppers. Wash tomatoes and dry them; peel the onions, cut the cauliflower into small pieces, also the celery and peppers and scald and separate the garlic. When all are prepared slice the tomatoes and onions, and put a deep layer into your preserving pan mixing some of the other ingredients with them, then sprinkle with coarse salt, and continue layer by layer until all are in the pan. Let this stand twenty-four hours, then drain the liquor off and add the following, placing all on the fire to boil at least two hours, or until soft; three pints of vinegar, three pounds brown sugar, one tablespoonful of cloves (ground), and ditto of cinnamon, allspice and pepper, one ounce of turmeric powder. Stir all from the bottom frequently lest it should stick and scorch.

TOMATO CHUTNEY.

MRS. J. MACNAUGHTON.

Slice one peck of green tomatoes into a jar, sprinkle a little salt over each layer and let stand for twenty-four hours, drain off the liquor; put the tomatoes into a kettle with a teaspoonful each of the following spices: ground ginger, allspice, cloves, mace, cinnamon, a teaspoonful of scraped horse-radish, twelve small or three large red peppers, three onions, a cup full of brown sugar, cover all with vinegar; boil slowly for three hours.

CRAB APPLE PICKLE.

MRS. J. MACNAUGHTON.

One quart good vinegar, six cups brown or maple sugar, one teaspoonful each cloves, cinnamon and allspice. Boil vinegar and sugar together, skim and add spices. Take the blossom end from the apples and put as many in at a time as will lie on the top of the vinegar without crowding and cook until easily pierced with a straw. Seal in glass fruit jars.

CHILI SAUCE.

MRS. WADDLE.

Six large tomatoes, three small green peppers, one onion, two large tablespoons sugar, salt to taste, one and one half cups vinegar, tomatoes peeled, peppers and onions chopped fine and all boiled one hour.

CHOW CHOW.

MRS. SEPTIMUS BARROW.

One peck green tomatoes chopped fine, one dozen good large onions chopped fine, two quarts vinegar, two pounds brown sugar, one tablespoon each of allspice and cloves, two tablespoons each of ground mustard, black pepper and salt, one half teacup grated horse-radish. Mix all together and stew until perfectly tender, stirring often to prevent burning. Seal in glass jars while hot.

CHOW CHOW. (Original.)

MRS. E. A. PFEIFFER.

Two gallon tomatoes, twelve onions, two quarts vinegar (malt), one quart of sugar (brown), two tablespoons of coarse salt, ditto of mustard, and black pepper, one tablespoon of allspice and ditto of cloves.

CELERY SAUCE.

MRS. THEOPHILUS OLIVER.

Fifteen ripe tomatoes, two peppers, five large onions, seven and a half tablespoonfuls of white sugar, two and one half tablespoonfuls of salt, three cups of vinegar, two heads of celery, chop celery onions, and peppers, and boil all together an hour and a half.

MUSTARD PICKLE.

MRS. J. MACNAUGHTON.

Six ounces ground mustard, two ounces corn starch, one and one half ounces of turmeric, one ounce curry powder, two quarts white wine vinegar. Mix the ingredients in cold vinegar and stir into the rest of the vinegar when boiling. Stir half an hour and pour over the pickles which have been covered with a strong brine of salt and boiled for three minutes, then strained and put in bottles or jars. This is nice for cauliflower and is sufficient for one large head which must be cut into small pieces. Other vegetables such as gherkins may be used.

PICKLE FOR CORN BEEF.

MRS. HENRY THOMSON.

Two gallons of water (soft the best), two and one half pounds salt, one half pound sugar, two ounces of salt petre.

PICKLED PEACHES.

MISS EDITH HENRY.

Eight pounds of peaches, four pounds of white sugar, one quart of vinegar, one ounce of cinnamon, one ounce of cloves. Select large firm freestone peaches, remove the skins and put into a jar. Put the sugar, vinegar, and spices into a kettle, let it come to a boil, skim, and pour over the fruit. The next day pour off the syrup and boil again and pour over the peaches. Then the third day, put the fruit and all into the kettle and boil until tender, or about ten minutes. If you use ground spices put in cheese cloth bag.

SWEET TOMATO PICKLE.

MRS. JOHN JACK.

One peck of green tomatoes sliced, six large onions sliced, strew a teacupful of salt over them, let them remain over night, drain off in the morning, then take two quarts of water and one of vinegar, boil them in it fifteen or twenty minutes, put them in a sieve to drain, then take four quarts vinegar, two pounds brown sugar, half pound white mustard seed, two tablespoonfuls ground allspice, same of cloves, cinnamon, ginger, and mustard and one teaspoonful cayenne pepper. Put all in a kettle and cook fifteen minutes slowly. Follow directions, and you will pronounce them capital.

TOMATO CATSUP.

MISS GREEN.

One peck of ripe tomatoes, one quart onions in an enamel kettle: boil till soft, mash and strain through a coarse sieve. One quart or more vinegar and from two to three tablespoons of salt, one ounce of mace and one tablespoon each of black pepper, cayenne pepper, and ground cloves, one and one half pounds brown sugar. Mix and boil slowly for two hours. Bottle and seal.



PRESERVES.

"Will't please your honor taste of these conserves." —SHAKESPEARE.

CANNING FRUIT.

MISS M. SAMPSON.

To can strawberries, raspberries or plums: to each pound of sugar add one half pint of water, boil till you have a rich syrup, let stand till cold; have your jars packed full of raw fruit (not crushed) and fill with the cold syrup, put on the covers and screws, (not the rubber rings,) and place in cold water up to the neck of the jars, you will need straw or chips between the jars to prevent them touching each other or burning on the bottom, let the water boil for fifteen minutes, have some hot syrup to fill jars, put on rubber rings, screw up tightly and keep in a cool dark place.

CANNED FRUIT JUICES.

MRS. FARQUHARSON SMITH.

Fruit juice may be kept for a long time by canning the same as whole fruit. They are convenient for water ices and summer beverages. Mash the fruit and rub the pulp through a fine sieve. Mix about three pounds of sugar with one quart of fruit juice and pulp. Fill Mason's jars with the syrup, cover and place in a heater with cold water to cover nearly to the top of the jar. Let the water boil half an hour, then fill each jar to the brim, seal and cool in the water.

TO BRANDY PEACHES.

To three pounds of sugar add a pint and a half water; boil and skim it; prepare eight pounds of ripe clingstone peaches: wash and rub with a coarse towel until all the down is off, then pierce them with a fork and throw them into the syrup and boil them until a sharp straw can punctuate them: as they soften put them into your jar, which must be kept closely covered. Boil your syrup until it thickens, while hot, add a quart of the best brandy and throw it over your peaches, tie the jar down closely.

CURRANT JELLY.

Currants should not be over ripe. Equal parts of red and white currants or currants and raspberries make a delicately colored and flavored jelly. Pick over and remove the leaves and poor fruit, and if filthy wash and drain them but do not stem them. Mash them in a porcelain kettle, with wooden pestle without heating as that makes the jelly dark. Let them drain in a flannel bag over night. Do not squeeze them, or the jelly will be cloudy. In the morning measure a bowl of sugar for each bowl of juice, and heat the sugar carefully in an earthern dish in the oven. Stir it often to prevent burning: boil the juice twenty minutes and skim thoroughly. Add the hot sugar and boil from three to five minutes or till it thickens on a spoon when exposed to the air. Turn at once into glasses and let them remain in the sun several days then cover with paper dipped in brandy and paste paper over the tops of the glasses. One who is authority on this subject recommends covering with melted paraffine, or putting a lump of paraffine in the jelly while still hot. After draining the juice, the currants may be squeezed and a second quality of jelly made, it may not be clear but will answer for some purposes.

CANDIED PEEL.

MRS. DAVID BELL.

Put the lemon or orange skins, in strong salt and water, when they are soft enough to pass a straw through, take them out and soak them changing the water till all the salt taste is gone, then simmer them in thin brown sugar syrup till clear; take them out, place on a dish, and let them remain for a day or two. Boil the syrup till thick, then fill the skins with it and put away to dry.

LEMON HONEY. (Filling.)

MRS. FRANK GLASS.

One pound of butter, four pounds of sugar, two dozen eggs leaving out eight whites, rind and juice of one dozen lemons. Put all together, and let simmer until it thickens like honey. Put into jars, can be kept for years.

PUMPKIN JAM.

MRS. HENRY THOMSON.

Peel and seed, then, cut into pieces two or three inches square, lay on a dish to dry till next day, then put into the preserving pan and barely cover with molasses. To a medium sized pumpkin put one ounce cloves and about a dessertspoon of ginger or as much as will taste; let it boil until the pumpkin is quite soft. One half dozen apples (sour) just cored not peeled is a great improvement. The molasses must only come to the top of your pieces, not nearly cover them.

FRUIT JELLY.

MRS. DUNCAN LAURIE.

Dissolve two ounces of tartaric acid in one quart of cold water, pour it on to five pounds of strawberries, currants, or raspberries. Let it stand twenty-four hours. Then strain it without pressing or bruising the fruit. To every pint of clear juice add one and one half pounds of white sugar. Stir frequently till the sugar is dissolved. Then bottle and cork air tight. Keep in a cool, dark place. When required for use dissolve one ounce gelatine in one half pint boiling water, add one and one half pints syrup. Pour in a mould and set away to stiffen. Serve with whipped cream.

GRAPE JELLY.

MRS. GEORGE ELLIOTT.

Mash the grapes in a preserving pan, put them over the fire and cook until thoroughly done. Strain through a jelly bag and to each pint of juice allow one pound of sugar. Boil the juice rapidly for ten minutes, add the sugar made hot in the pan in the oven, and boil rapidly three minutes more. Excellent.

MARMALADE.

MRS. FARQUHARSON SMITH.

Cut the oranges in half and work in a spoon to remove the inside. Slice the peel very fine. Take the skin and seeds from the pulp and mix peel and pulp together and weigh them. For every pound of fruit, pour three pints of cold water over it and let stand twenty four hours. Boil till chips are tender (about an hour and a half). This absorbs a great deal of the fluid. Let it stand another twenty-four hours. To every pound of boiled fruit, put one and one quarter pounds of sugar. Boil till syrup jellies, and chips are transparent. Boil pippins and skins in a gallon of water, and strain.

BITTER ORANGE MARMALADE.

MRS. R. STEWART.

One dozen bitter oranges, three sweet oranges, three lemons. Slice or shave the bitter oranges and lemons very thin laying aside the pips in a bowl; pare or slice the sweet oranges. To every pint of fruit add four pints cold water, cover the pips with water, let stand for twenty-four hours, boil till quite tender putting the pips in a muslin bag when ready: to every pound of fruit add one and one half pounds white sugar and boil till it jellies, from twenty to thirty minutes.

CURRANT MARMALADE.

MRS. W. W. HENRY.

Seven pounds of currants, six pounds of sugar, two pounds of raisins, two oranges. Cook one and one half hours. Strain out the juice of currants, seed the raisins, and chop fine. Use all of the orange but the seeds, chop fine.

RHUBARB MARMALADE.

MRS. THEOPHILUS OLIVER.

Peel and cut the rhubarb into small pieces, take the rind of one lemon, cut into chips; to each two pounds of the rhubarb then weigh three quarters of a pound of white sugar to each pound of the fruit. Put the fruit and sugar in a basin in layers and let it stand all night. Pour off the syrup and boil it for twenty minutes, add the fruit and boil for twenty minutes more, when the marmalade should be ready to put in pots.

PRESERVED RAW PINEAPPLE.

MRS. W. COOK.

Pare the pineapples and take out all the eyes. With a sharp knife, cut the pineapple in thin slices cutting down sides until the heart is reached, this is to be discarded. Weigh the sliced pineapple and put in a large earthen dish. Add to it as many pounds of granulated sugar as there are pounds of fruit and stir well. Pack this mixture in quart or pint jars: cover tightly and put away. The pineapple will keep a year or more and be perfectly tender and fine flavored. It is best to choose fruit not over ripe.

PRESERVED TOMATOES. (Original).

MRS. E. A. PFEIFFER.

Take two gallons large smooth green tomatoes, make a pickle of three pints of vinegar, and one quart of water, two tablespoons salt, one tablespoon each, spice, cloves and cinnamon, one pound of sugar: scald spices ten minutes in vinegar and water, then add tomatoes and scald till tender, slice for table, pour sauce over. N. B. Strain spices, over the tomatoes, and seal while warm; some prefer without salt.

TO PRESERVE TOMATOES FOR WINTER USE.

MRS. ERNEST F. WURTELE.

To fifteen pounds tomatoes, put three ounces of white sugar, and three ounces of salt, boil very hard for twenty minutes. Fill up pint jars to overflowing and screw down tight; as they cool off, screw them again so as to be sure they are quite tight. This quantity fills ten pint jars. Skin the tomatoes before boiling, this is quickly done by pouring boiling water over them.



BEVERAGES.

BOSTON CREAM. (A summer drink).

MRS. W. FRASER.

Make a syrup of four pounds of white sugar, with four quarts of water; boil; when cold add four ounces of tartaric acid, one and one half ounce of essence of lemon, and the whites of six eggs beaten to a stiff froth; bottle. A wineglass of the cream to a tumbler of water, with sufficient carbonate of soda to make it effervesce.

CLARET CUP.

MRS. HENRY THOMSON.

Six bottles of claret, one of sherry, three wine glasses of brandy, five bottles of soda water, sugar to taste.

GINGER BEER.

MRS. DUNCAN LAURIE.

One quarter pound white ginger, two ounces cream tartar, two pounds white sugar, juice of two lemons, three gallons of hot water; boil one hour, cork while hot.

GINGERETTE.

MRS. ALBERT CLINT.

Four and one half pounds of loaf sugar, one and one half ounce tartaric acid, four ounces tincture of ginger, one ounce essence of capsicum, two drops of cassia. Put the above ingredients into a crock that will hold two gallons of boiling water; one pound of brown sugar to be burnt in a pan till it is the color of coffee, then add to it the other ingredients. The boiling water is the last thing to be poured on the ingredients. Stir until the sugar is dissolved. When cold, bottle, cork tight and put away for use. The burnt sugar gives it a pretty colour.

GINGER CORDIAL.

MRS. ERSKINE SCOTT.

Ten lemons, one gallon of whisky, six ounces of root ginger, (to be bruised) and put with the whiskey on the lemons, after cutting them up in slices, and left for three weeks. Then take five pounds of white sugar, and pour over it three pints of boiling water, and put on the fire until it is melted. When it is cold, pour over the lemons, having first strained them, bottle and cork tight.

GRAPE JUICE.

MRS. GEORGE LAWRENCE.

To ten pounds grapes (Concord), two pounds white sugar, wash grapes, cover them with water in preserving kettle, and boil for thirty minutes, strain through coarse cheese cloth, let cool, add sugar, boil twenty minutes longer, and bottle while boiling hot, and cork and seal with sealing wax.

GRAPE WINE.

MRS. E. A. PFEIFFER.

Take fresh blue grapes, stems must be green, mash well, put in preserving pan, and warm, not boiling heat, strain, first through cheese cloth, then through flannel, return to pan, sugar to taste, bring to boiling heat, bottle while hot, cork well and seal. Have kept it over a year without any fermentation. Original.

GRAPE JUICE.

MRS. J. MACNAUGHTON.

Pick over and wash your grapes. Concords are said to be preferable. Put them in your porcelain kettle with just enough water to prevent sticking. When the skins crack remove from fire, pour into a flannel bag, not more than a quart at once, and press out the juice. Add nearly half as much sugar as juice and return to the kettle. When the sugar is all dissolved and the juice boiling, pour into cans and seal. Pint cans are preferable; when opened this can be diluted with water to suit the taste, and will keep perfectly sweet for several days if kept in a cool place.

RASPBERRY ACID.

MRS. GEORGE M. CRAIG.

Dissolve five ounces of tartaric acid in two quarts of water, pour it on twelve pounds of red raspberries in a large bowl, let it stand twenty-four hours, strain it without pressing: to a pint of this liquor, add one and a half pounds of white sugar, stir until dissolved, bottle but do not cork for several days, when it is ready for use two or three tablespoons in a glass of ice water will make a delicious drink.

RASPBERRY VINEGAR.

MRS. STUART OLIVER.

Cover with vinegar and let them stand about a week, stirring every day, then strain the fruit and to each pint add a pound of sugar. Boil till it seems as a syrup about one half an hour, bottle, cork when cold.

LEMON SYRUP.

MRS. THOM.

One pound powdered frosting sugar, one quarter pound tartaric acid, one quarter pound carbonate of soda, forty drops essence of lemon. Add the latter to the sugar, mix well. Having dried it well pass it through a sieve, and keep in a closely corked bottle. A teaspoonful will suffice for a tumbler of water.

LEMON SYRUP.

MRS. FARQUHARSON SMITH.

Two ounces citric acid, one ounce tartaric acid, one half ounce epsom salts, five pounds white sugar. Grate the rind of three lemons, juice of six lemons, three pints boiling water, when cold add the whites of two eggs well beaten, strain through muslin, and then bottle.

LEMON SYRUP.

MRS. ARCHIBALD LAURIE.

One quart juice of fresh lemons, the yellow skin only of six lemons, one quart boiling water, four pounds white sugar. Let it stand for twenty-four hours. If not quite dissolved melt over a gentle heat. Filter through a jelly bag and bottle tightly corked, will keep for three months in a cool place.



COOKING FOR THE SICK.

NOURISHING CREAM FOR CONVALESCENTS.

MRS. BLAIR.

Beat the yolks of four eggs, three tablespoonfuls of sugar, and the rind (grated lightly), and juice of an orange, or lemon. Add a teaspoonful of powdered sugar to the whites of the eggs and beat until stiff. Place the vessel containing the beaten yolks in a pot of boiling water, cook gently, stirring all the time. When it begins to thicken stir in the whites of the eggs until thoroughly mixed, then put it to cool. Serve in small glasses.

BEEF TEA FOR INVALIDS.

MRS. W. COOK.

One pound lean beef and one pound veal, cut up small, and put in a wide mouthed jar. Pour two wineglasses of cold water or wine on it, one teaspoon salt, and a little mace if liked. Cork the jar well and tie a bladder over it. Place the jar in a deep saucepan of cold water which must not be allowed to cover the cork. Let it boil slowly four hours or more and strain through a sieve. One tablespoonful of this is equal to a cup of ordinary beef tea.

CALF'S FOOT JELLY.

Make your stock of calves feet and two ox feet. Add to it if very firm a pint of water, juice of four lemons and rind of two, five eggs, shells and all, whites beaten well, one ounce cinnamon, one ounce cloves, sugar to taste, about one and one half pounds and one bottle of sherry. Put all into the pan and stir well. Let it boil a minute or two and then throw in a cup of cold water, cover closely for ten minutes, skim and run through the bag.

GRUEL.

MRS. SMYTH.

One large cup oatmeal, cover with cold water, stir well and let stand a few minutes. Strain, adding a little more boiling water or half milk, to the water strained. Stir it until it comes to the boil. Cook five minutes or longer. When ready for serving, add a little salt, sugar and nutmeg.

BAKED LEMON FOR A COLD.

MRS. SEPTIMUS BARROW.

Dose a teaspoonful. Bake a lemon till soft, take out all the inside, and mix with as much sugar as it will hold, strain and stand till cold when it will jelly.



BREAD, BUNS, FRITTERS.

BOSTON BROWN BREAD.

MRS. RICHARD TURNER.

One cup Graham flour, one cup corn meal, one cup wheat flour, one large cup raisins, one teaspoon baking soda, one half cup warm water, one pinch of salt. Steam four hours: nice sliced and steamed for breakfast.

BROWN BREAD.

MRS. R. STEWART.

One cup Graham flour, one cup wheat, one cup yellow corn meal, one cup sweet milk, one half cup molasses. Pinch of salt and a teaspoon baking soda dissolved in milk. Mix the flour, stir in the molasses, then the milk and soda. Steam three hours.

HOME MADE BREAD.

MRS. FRANK GLASS.

Soak a cake of yeast in one quart of water, then add six pints of flour and two teaspoons of salt. Let it stand over night in a rather warm place. In the morning make it up with another pint of water and three pints of flour. Let stand for an hour or so, then knead it well and make into loaves, letting them stand another hour, or until well risen. (Buns made from part of the sponge.) Take a part of the sponge and add two teaspoonfuls of butter and one egg.

TEA BISCUIT.

MRS. HYDE.

One pint of flour (sifted three times,) one teaspoon cream of tartar, one half teaspoon of soda, two teaspoons of sugar, pinch of salt, one dessert spoon of lard or butter, moisten with milk, and yolk of beaten egg.

TAFFY BUNS.

MISS M. W. HOME.

Make a good biscuit crust, roll out rather thin spread with the following mixture. Three quarters of a cup brown sugar, one quarter of a cup of butter mixed together until smooth, roll as you would a roly-poly, cut in slices about an inch thick, and bake in rather a hot oven.

SPANISH BUN.

MRS. THOM.

One and one half cups sugar, four eggs, leave out the whites of three for icing, three quarters of a cup of butter, one cup milk, one tablespoonful cinnamon, one teaspoon ginger, one half nutmeg, two cups flour, three teaspoonfuls baking powder. Bake in flat tin well greased. Icing. Take three whites of three eggs and beat to a stiff froth, then add a cup of light brown sugar, while the cake is hot spread this over, return to the oven and brown.

FRENCH ROLLS OR TWISTS.

MISS LAMPSON.

One quart of milk, one teaspoonful of salt, one small cup brewer's yeast, flour enough to make a stiff batter. Let it rise, and when very light, work in one egg and two spoonfuls of butter, and knead in flour till stiff enough to roll. Let it rise again, and when very light, roll out, cut in round or braids or any shape preferred. N. B. The egg and butter may be omitted.

BUTTER-MILK SCONES.

MRS. FRANK LAURIE.

One quart of flour, two teaspoonfuls cream of tartar and one of baking soda, a little piece of butter the size of an egg and one teaspoonful of salt; mix the butter well in the flour with the hands, put the salt, baking powder into the flour when sifting, add enough butter-milk to thicken. Bake in a moderate oven.

GRAHAM MUFFINS.

MADAME J. T.

One cup Graham flour, one half cup ordinary flour, three quarters cup milk two tablespoons sugar, one large teaspoon baking powder, one large tablespoon butter, one beaten up egg and salt.

MUFFINS.

MRS. GILMOUR.

Butter the size of an egg, one tablespoonful of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt, two mashed potatoes, one and one half cups of tepid water or milk, one cake of yeast, flour enough to make a stiff batter. Put to rise over night, and in the morning put into buttered rings; put to rise again until rings are full, then bake in a slow oven.

MUFFINS.

MRS. HENRY THOMSON.

Two cups sweet milk, four cups of flour, two eggs, two tablespoons of melted butter, four teaspoons baking powder and pinch of salt.

POP OVERS.

MRS. FARQUHARSON SMITH.

A breakfast cup of flour, a cup of milk, three eggs and a pinch of salt: beat the eggs very well, add them to the milk and beat in the flour; the mixture ought to be the consistency of good custard. Butter the moulds very well before putting in the batter; don't put more than a tablespoonful in each. The oven should be very hot and the pop-overs will only take ten minutes to bake.

POP OVERS.

MISS M'GEE.

Three eggs well beaten, add a tablespoon of melted butter and a little salt, pour this mixture over one cup of flour and add milk enough to make a thin batter.

JOHNNY CAKE.

MRS. STUART OLIVER.

One pint of sour milk, one teaspoonful of soda, (good) one egg, butter size of an egg, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, about two small cups each of Indian meal and flour (to make a thin batter.)

SHORT-CAKE.

MRS. R. M. STOCKING.

One pint of flour, one cup of sour cream, one small teaspoon soda, three eggs.

SHORTBREAD.

MRS. W. REID.

Place on a bake-board two pounds of sifted flour, one pound butter (if salt, wash,) and half a pound of sugar; this quantity will make four cakes. Knead all altogether and when well mixed form into cakes half an inch thick, pinch round the edge, and probe all over with a fork, place some confits in the centre, then a sheet of stiff paper under each cake, place on the baking sheet and bake in an oven of moderate heat.

ALMOND SHORTBREAD.

MRS. W. COOK.

One pound ground sweet almonds, eight ounces sugar, eight ounces sifted flour, eight ounces good butter. The yolks of eight eggs, about eight drops of essence of ratafia. First see that the ground almonds are fresh. Mix them with the flour and sugar and then very, very carefully add a few drops of ratafia. Mix everything thoroughly. Make a space in centre, and in this drop the yolks of the eggs. Then melt the butter, add that and mix up the whole together until it is a nice firm stiff paste. This should now be rolled a great many times; cannot be rolled too much. When sufficiently rolled to appear like a strip of cream coloured satin a quarter of an inch thick, cut in small squares with a sharp knife. Pinch the edges of each square and in centre of each cake, put a split half of blanched almond. Butter baking tins and bake in a moderate oven to a fine pale yellow tint. These are delicious and are particularly good in summer eaten with fruit.

SCOTCH SHORT BREAD.

MRS. BLAIR.

One pound of flour, one half pound butter, six ounces sugar; cream butter and sugar, add flour. Roll into a smooth ball and work down until half an inch in thickness, an operation which is rather difficult for a novice, as it is apt to crack at the edges; but the knack is soon learned, and the more it is worked the better. Prick with a small skewer, strew with large carraway comfits, and bake slowly, a pale brown.

BANANA FRITTERS.

MRS. GEORGE ELLIOTT.

Take six bananas, peel and dip in beaten white of egg, then roll in bread crumbs. Fry in butter a golden brown. Put them on a dish, squeeze lemon juice over them, also a little sifted sugar.

APPLE FRITTERS.

MRS. HARRY LAURIE.

Three tart apples, two eggs; one cup milk; one teaspoonful salt; about one and one half cups of flour; one teaspoonful baking powder. Pare and core the apples; cut them into rings; dust with sugar and cinnamon; stand aside to use. Beat eggs without separating until light; add milk, salt and sufficient flour to make a soft batter; beat well and add the baking powder; beat again; Have ready very hot a deep pan of lard, dip each ring of apple in the batter, drop it in the fat and fry until brown. Serve hot, dusted with powdered sugar.

FRENCH PANCAKES.

MRS. BENSON BENNETT.

Four eggs, weight of four eggs in butter, sugar and flour, one half a teaspoonful of soda, one half teaspoonful of cream of tartar. As much milk as will make a batter. Beat the butter and sugar to a cream, add the four eggs well beaten stir in all the other ingredients. Bake in tin plates.

SCOTCH HAGGIS.

MRS. ANDREW T. LOVE.

Boil a sheep's draught for three quarters of an hour in as much water as will cover it. Grate down the liver and mince the heart and lights very fine. Mince two pounds of onions, and two pounds of beef suet, put in three or four handsful of oatmeal with pepper and salt to taste. Having these ingredients very well mixed, put them into the bag with a little of the boilings of the draught. Pick the bag well to prevent its bursting. It requires from three to four hours boiling, so if you make it a day or two before you intend using it, it is better to boil it two hours after it is made, and two hours when going to use it. Great care must be taken in having the bag very particularly scraped and cleansed by frequent washings in salt and water. The liver and heart, etc., are better, to be boiled before, then they can be grated down easily. Half of this receipt makes a very good sized Haggis.



INDEX.

PAGES. Soups 1 to 13 Fish and Oysters 14 to 21 Meats 22 to 29 Game 30 to 33 Vegetables 34 to 42 Entrees and Meats Rechauffe 43 to 52 Salads and Salad Dressing 53 to 58 Eggs 59 to 62 Cheese Dishes 63 The Chafing Dish 64 to 66 Pies 67 to 71 Puddings 72 to 86 Desserts 87 to 97 Cakes 98 to 115 Icings for Cakes 116 to 118 Gingerbread and Small Cakes 119 to 125 Confections 126 to 128 Pickles 129 to 133 Preserves 134 to 140 Beverages 141 to 145 Cooking for the Sick 146 to 147 Bread, Buns, Fritters 148 to 155 Scotch Haggis 156

* * * * * *

YOU WILL FIND IT TO YOUR INTEREST TO MAKE INQUIRIES ABOUT THE

Quebec & Lake St. John Ry.

THE NEW ROUTE TO THE FAR-FAMED SAGUENAY

And the ONLY RAIL LINE to the Delightful SUMMER RESORTS and FISHING GROUNDS north of Quebec and to Lake St. John and Chicoutimi, through the

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HOTEL ROBERVAL, Lake St. John, has first class accommodation for 300 guests, and is run in connection with the ISLAND HOUSE, at GRAND DISCHARGE, of Lake St. John, the Centre of the OUANANICHE Fishing Grounds.

PARLOR AND SLEEPING CARS

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ALEX. HARDY, J. G. SCOTT, Gen. Pass. Agent, Quebec. Secy. & Manager.



The Quebec Railway, Light & Power Co.

Operate a CONSTANT SERVICE OF ELECTRIC CARS from all points of the City to Montmorency Falls, Ste. Anne de Beaupre and intermediate Stations at popular fares. They also supply incandescent and arc lighting to residences and stores at extremely low prices.

Any information can be obtained from the General Manager or Superintendent.

EDWARD A. EVANS, General Manager.

OFFICE AT THE RAILWAY STATION. CORNER OF ST. PAUL AND RAMSAY STS.

Telephone No. 42.



LADIES ..

When you desire a most up-to-date JOB IN THE PRINTING LINE, remember we have the largest and most complete JOB OFFICE in town.

.. THE DAILY TELEGRAPH ..

VICTOR LAFRANCE. BOOKBINDER. No. 4 Buade Street, Opposite Post Office.

GENERAL JOB ESTABLISHMENT

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Largest and Most Complete Plant in this City.





There's Durability

An well as elegance about our furniture that makes it attractive to all—if you doubt it, come and see.

Furniture

Bought of us, while not intended for rough usage, will stand it all right. The children can play on it, though you'll be just as well pleased if it is used for comfort rather than for playing.

JAMES PERRY,

323 St. Paul Street, QUEBEC.



..FINE.. FLAVORING EXTRACTS

BEST GOODS —— BEST PRICES!

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CHICAGO.

...SOLE AGENT FOR QUEBEC...

..The Red Cross Pharmacy..

CORNER ST. JOHN and PALACE STS.



THE CHINIC HARDWARE Co

BRANCH STORE:

Fabrique Street, - Quebec.

Make a Specialty of House Furnishing Hardware —— AND —— - - Kitchen Utensils - -

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Dealers in Provisions

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UP-TO-DATE PEOPLE PATRONIZE PFEIFFER'S DYE WORKS AND LAUNDRY.

Shirt, Collars and Cuffs Laundered in the newest style of finish. "The DOMESTIC FINISH." No high gloss to look like Celluloid or Paper Collars, but a nice medium finish that has all the appearance of new work. High gloss finish is all out of style. Gentlemen these times always ask for the "Domestic Finish." We have equipped ourselves with the latest machines for this high grade of work.

KID GLOVES cleaned by a new process, giving them the same soft finish as new kid. Try us and be convinced.

FALL IS APPROACHING—Our Dyeing Departments are equipped in the same manner as the Laundry, with all the latest and most up-to-date machinery and appliances for the handling of all grades of work, from the most delicate fabrics to the heaviest and coarsest material. Fine Lace, Ladies Dresses, Gents' Suits, Curtains, Portieres, Rugs, etc. CARPETS CLEANED in a superior manner; all moths removed by our process of cleaning.

All the orders entrusted to the Pfeiffer Dye Works and Laundry are under the personal supervision of the proprietors. All our work returned with the quickest despatch. Customers have not to wait until near midnight to have their goods returned. All orders returned early Saturday afternoon.

BRANCH OFFICE, Phone 54. MAIN OFFICE, Phone 524.

88 Cote du Passage, Levis. 2, 4, 6 McMahon St., Quebec.



The...

CHAFING DISH.



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G. SEIFERT & SONS,

16 Fabrique Street, Quebec.

THE END

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