HotFreeBooks.com
Traditions of the Tinguian: A Study in Philippine Folk-Lore
by Fay-Cooper Cole
Previous Part     1  2  3  4  5  6  7     Next Part
Home - Random Browse

As soon as they arrived in Kadalayapan Aponibolinayen said to Ginalingan, "What is best for us to do for Aponitolau's finger?" Ginalingan said, "We cannot do anything. I told Indiapan that Kabkabaga-an loves Aponitolau and even if I make dawak we can do nothing, for Kabkabaga-an is one of the greatest spirits." Not long after Aponitolau had become a very little man and Ginalingan stopped making dawak, and she went home to Pindayan. Aponitolau became like a hair. Not long after he disappeared. "You are good, Indiapan, for Aponitolau disappeared in your house." So they cried together.

Not long after Aponibolinayen went back home and Aponitolau was up in the air. He sat below a tree in a wide field, and he looked around the field. Not long after he saw some smoke, so he went. As soon as he came near to the smoke he saw that there was a house there. "I am going to get a drink," he said. As soon as he arrived in the yard he said, "Wes," for he was tired, and Kabkabaga-an saw, from the window of her house, that it was Aponitolau. "Come up," she said. "No, I am ashamed to go up. Will you give me water to drink, for I am thirsty." Kabkabaga-an gave him a drink of water. As soon as he had drunk he sat down in the yard, for Kabkabaga-an could not make him go up. Not long after she went to cook. As soon as she cooked she called Aponitolau and he said to her, "You eat first. I will eat with your husband when he arrives." "No, come up. I think he will arrive very late." Not long after he went up, for he was hungry, and they ate. While they were eating Kabkabaga-an said to him, "I have no husband and I live alone; that is why I brought you up here, for I love you." Not long after she became pregnant and she gave birth. "What shall we call the baby?" said Ligi [241] "Tabyayen." Not long after the baby began to grow, for Kabkabaga-an used magic, so that he grew all the time, and every time she bathed him he grew.

When the baby had become a young boy Kabkabaga-an said, "You can go home now, Aponitolau, for our son Tabyayen is a companion for me." "If you say that I must go home, I will take Tabyayen with me," said Aponitolau. She said, "We will tell my brother Daldalipato, [242] who lives above, if you wish to take him." So they went truly. As soon as they arrived where Daldalipato lived, he said, "How are you, Kabkabaga-an? What do you want?" "What do you want, you say. We came to tell you that Aponitolau wants to take Tabyayen." "Do you want to give him up to Aponitolau? If you let him go, it is all right," said Daldalipato, and Kabkabaga-an said, "All right." So they went home. As soon as they arrived where Kabkabaga-an lived she commanded some one to make something of gold to hold milk for the boy to drink and she filled it with the milk from her breasts. In the early morning she lowered her golden house by cords to the earth.

When it became morning Aponitolau awoke and he was surprised to see that they were in Kadalayapan. "Why, here is Kadalayapan." He went outdoors and Aponibolinayen also went outdoors. "Why, there is Aponitolau. I think he has returned from the home of Kabkabaga-an." Aponibolinayen went to him and was glad to see him, and she took her son Kanag who looked the same as Tabyayen, and they went to play in the yard. Aponibolinayen and Aponitolau did not know that they had gone to play. Not long after Tabyayen cried, for the tears of Kabkabaga-an fell on him and hurt him, so Aponibolinayen went down to the yard and took them up into the house.

Not long after Aponitolau said to Aponibolinayen, "We will make balaua and we will invite Kabkabaga-an. I think that is why the boy cried." Aponibolinayen said, "Yes," and they truly made Sayang. Not long after they made Libon [243] in the evening, and they commanded the spirit helpers to go and get betel-nuts. As soon as they arrived with the betel-nuts Aponitolau and Aponibolinayen commanded, "You betel-nuts go and invite all our relatives and Kabkabaga-an." So one of the betel-nuts went to the place where Kabkabaga-an lived. As soon as it arrived up above it said, "Aponitolau and Aponibolinayen of Kadalayapan want you to attend their balaua. That is why I came here." Kabkabaga-an said, "Yes, I will follow you. You go first." When it became afternoon all the people from the other towns had arrived in Kadalayapan. When they looked under the talagan [244] they saw Kabkabaga-an, and Aponibolinayen went to take her hand, and they made her dance. As soon as she finished dancing she told Aponibolinayen and Aponitolau that she would go back home. "No, do not go yet, for we will make pakalon for Tabyayen first," said Aponibolinayen. "No, you care for him. I must go home now, for no one watches my house." Not long after she went, for they could not detain her, and they did not see her when she went. As soon as the Sayang was over they made pakalon for Kanag and Tabyayen, and Kanag married Dapilisan, and Tabyayen married Binaklingan, and the marriage price was the balaua about nine times full for each of them. As soon as they both were married Tabyayen staid in his house which had been up in the air before. Kanag staid in another house which Aponitolau and Aponibolinayen had.

(Told by Angtan of Lagangilang.)



16

"Look out for our children, Ligi, while I wash my hair," said Ayo. "Yes," said Ligi. As soon as Ayo reached the spring Ligi went to make a basket, in which he put the three little pigs which had little beads around their necks. As soon as he made the basket he put the three little pigs in it, and he climbed a tree and he hung the basket in it. Not long after he went down and Ayo went back home from the well. "Where are our children—the little pigs—?" [245] said Ayo to him. As soon as Ligi said he did not know, Ayo began to search for them, but she did not find them.

The little pigs which Ligi hung in the tree grunted, "Gek, gek, gek," and the old woman, Alokotan of Nagbotobotan, went to take a walk. While she was walking she stopped under the tree where the pigs hung. She heard them grunting and she looked up at them and saw that the basket contained three pigs. "What man hung those little pigs in the basket in the tree? Perhaps he does not like them. I am going to get them and take them home, so that I will have something to feed." So she got them. She took them home, and she named the older one Kanag, the second one Dumalawi, the third was Ogogibeng.

Not long after the three little pigs, which had the beads about their necks, became boys, and Ogogibeng was naughty. When the old woman Alokotan gave them blankets, he was the first to choose the one he wished. "Shame, Ogogibeng, why are you always the naughtiest and are always selfish." "Yes, I always want the best, so that the girls will want me," said Ogogibeng. When Alokotan gave the belts, and clouts, and coats, he always took the best, and Kanag and Dumalawi were jealous of him, and they said bad things. Ogogibeng said to them, "I am not ashamed, for she is my mother, so I will take the best."

Not long after they were young men. "Mother Alokotan, will you let us go to walk? Do not worry while we are gone, for we will return soon," said the three young men. The old woman said "yes" and they went. They agreed on the place they should go, and Ogogibeng said to them, "We will go where the young girls spin." Kanag and Dumalawi agreed, so they went. Not long after they arrived where the young girls were spinning. "Good evening, girls," they said. "Good evening," they replied. "This is the first time you have been here, rich young men. Why do you come here?" "We came to join you and get acquainted," they said, and they talked. They waited for the girls to go home, but they did not go. Not long after it became morning, and they did not wait any longer for the girls to go home, so they went away. As soon as the three boys went home the young girls went to their homes also. Not long after they arrived where Alokotan was and they ate breakfast. As soon as they finished eating they went to take a walk again. Not long after they arrived in Kaodanan, in the middle of the day. "Good morning, Aunt," they said to Aponigawani. "Good morning, my sons," she replied. "What do you come here for, boys?" "What do you come here for, you say, Aunt; we come to take a walk, for we are anxious to see you," they said. "That is good. Where did you come from?" said Aponigawani. "We came from Nagbotobotan where our mother Alokotan lives." Not long after Aponigawani went to cook for them to eat. As soon as she cooked she fed them. So they ate. Not long after they finished eating and they talked. After that it became night. When they had finished eating in the night they said, "We are going back home, Aunt, but first we are going to the place where those young girls spin." "No, I will not let you go back to Nagbotobotan now, for it is dark. If you are going to the place where the girls are spinning it is all right, but if you are going home I will not let you go down from the house, for I fear you will be lost." So the three young boys said to her, "If you will not let us go back home tonight we will go tomorrow, but we will go where the young girls spin." So Aponigawani and Aponibalagen let them go to where the girls were spinning.

Not long after they arrived at the place where the young girls were and they said, "Good evening, young girls." "Good evening," answered the girls who were spinning. "Why do you come here, rich young men?" "'Why do you come here,' you say, we come to see you spin and to talk with you." Not long after they talked together, and the young men did not wait until the girls went home, for it became morning, so they went back home. As soon as they went away, the young girls went home. When the boys reached the house of Aponigawani and Aponibalagen they told them they were going home to Nagbotobotan. Aponigawani and Aponibalagen did not want to let them go until they had eaten breakfast. The three boys went even though they did not want them to go. As soon as they reached Nagbotobotan the old woman Alokotan asked them where they had been, and she was very angry with them. "Do not be angry with us, mother, for we want to take a walk; we were not lost." "Where did you go, then?" "We went to Kaodanan to see the pretty girls who never go out doors, but we did not find any. We found some young girls spinning at night, but they were not as pretty as we wished, and we talked with them until morning, for we wanted to see where they lived, but we could not wait for them to go back home."

Not long after the old woman Alokotan went to cook. As soon as she finished cooking they ate. Not long after they finished eating and they agreed to go at once to Kadalayapan. The old woman Alokotan would not let them go, so when they finished eating at night they went to Kadalayapan without her consent. As soon as they arrived at the place where the young girls were spinning they said, "Good evening, young girls." "Good evening," the girls answered. "How are you? What do you want here?" "'What do you want here,' you say, and we came to watch you spin and we want to talk with you." So they talked until morning, but the young boys could not wait until the girls went to their homes.

Ayo was still searching for the pigs who had become boys. She heard somebody say that three young boys were talking with the girls last night and they said to her that they were pretty young boys. Ayo said, "Those were my sons. I think they have become men." So she went around the town looking for them. Not long after she met them and she saw that they were no longer little pigs. "Where did you come from, my dear sons?" "We came from Nagbotobotan, Aunt," they answered. "Do not call me aunt, call me mother," said Apon=lbolinayen. The young boys would not call her mother. So Aponibolinayen pressed her breasts and the milk from her breasts went into Kanag's mouth, and when she pressed again the milk went into the mouth of Dumalawi, and when she pressed her breasts the third time the milk went to the mouth of Ogogibeng. So Aponibolinayen was sure that they were her sons. The little boys asked her why it was that the milk from her breasts went into their mouths. "I pressed my breasts to make sure that you are my sons. I am surprised that you have become men, for you were little pigs. That is why you must call me mother, not aunt. For a long time I have searched for you, and when I heard that you were talking with the young girls last night, I came to look for you." So the boys believed that she was their mother. "Why did we grow up in Nagbotobotan with our mother Alokotan, if you are truly our mother?" "I think she found you and took you away, for she is a good woman. She thought you were lost and took you to Nagbotobotan." So Aponibolinayen took them home.

As soon as they arrived home Aponibolinayen said to Aponitolau, "Here are our sons whom I found. They said that they came from Nagbotobotan and that Alokotan was their mother. I told them that I was their mother, but they did not believe me." "I do not believe that they are our sons, for our children were three little pigs." "I also had doubts when I met them, but I pressed my breasts and the milk went to their mouths, so I am sure that they are our sons." Aponitolau was glad that they were men, for he did not want them when they were pigs.

Not long after Aponitolau said to Aponibolinayen, "We are going to make balaua, so that we can invite all our relations in the other towns, especially Alokotan." Aponibolinayen used magic, so that when she put a grain of rice in each of twelve big jars they were filled. [246] Not long after Aponitolau commanded his spirit helpers to go and get betel-nuts, to send to the relatives who lived in other places, to invite them. As soon as one of the betel-nuts arrived in Nagbotobotan it said, "Good afternoon, old woman Alokotan. I cannot stay long. Aponibolinayen and Aponitolau sent me to invite you to attend their Sayang". "I cannot go, for I am searching for my three sons." "If you do not come I will grow on your knee." "You go first and I will follow, but I cannot stay there long." Not long after all the people from the other towns arrived and they danced until the old woman Alokotan arrived. The three young boys went to hide when Alokotan arrived. Not long after when the batana was nearly finished, "I cannot wait until your balaua is finished, for I am searching for my three boys." "Do not go home yet, for we will see if they will come here to see the young girls. Perhaps they are near here," said Aponitolau. Not long after the three boys appeared to her and Alokotan was glad to see them. "Where have you been, my sons?" "We came to this town and we intended to go back to Nagbotobotan, but our mother Aponibolinayen saw us and she detained us, for she was sure that we are her sons. She pressed her breasts and the milk came into our mouths." The old woman Alokotan was surprised and she went to Aponibolinayen and Aponitolau and talked with them. "Are you sure those boys are your sons? They are my sons. They grew up with me." "Yes, we are sure that they are my sons, for the milk from my breasts went to their mouths. I am surprised that they have become men, for they were three pigs. I searched for them a long time. That is why I was surprised when I saw them, so I pressed my breasts." "Why were you searching for them? Did someone else hang them in the tree?" said Alokotan. Aponibolinayen was surprised and she asked Aponitolau if he saw someone hang the little pigs in the tree while she was washing her hair. Aponitolau laughed, "I did not see anyone get them." One of the women had seen Aponitolau hang them in the tree and she told Alokotan that Aponitolau had hung them up. Alokotan hated Aponitolau and she asked why he had hung them in the tree. "I went to hang them up for I was ashamed, because they were not men but pigs." "That is why you hung them up. You have power. If you did not want them to be pigs you could change them to men. If I had not found them, perhaps they would have died." Not long after the balaua was finished, and the people went home, and the old woman Alokotan went home after the others. She gave all her things to the three boys. This is all.

(Told by Angtan of Langangilang).



17

Aponibolinayen and Aponitolau had a son and they called him Kanag Kabagbagowan, who was Dumalawi every afternoon. Soon he became a young man and he went to make love to Aponitolau's concubines. When Aponitolau went where his concubines were he said, "Open the door." The women did not open the door, but answered, "We do not want to open the door unless you are Dumalawi." "Please open the door," said Ligi [247] to them. The women did not open the door, so he went back home and he was very angry. In the second night Aponitolau went again. "Good evening, women," he said. "Good evening," said the women, and Aponitolau asked them to open the door. "You put your hands into the door and let us see if the marks on the wrist are the marks on Kanag Kabagbagowan." Aponitolau showed them his hands and they said, "You are not Kanag, but you are Ligi, and we do not wish you." Ligi was very angry and he went back home.

Five days later he said, "Sharpen your knife, Kanag, and we will go to cut bamboo." So Kanag sharpened his knife. Not long after they went where many bamboo grew. As soon as they reached the place Ligi said, "You go up and cut the bamboo and sharpen the ends." Ligi cut the bamboo below him. As soon as Ligi had cut many bamboo he asked Kanag if he had cut many, and Kanag said, "Yes." "Did you sharpen the ends? If you pointed them, put them in one place." Kanag soon put them in one place. After that Aponitolau said to him, "Ala, my son, throw them at me so that we can see which is the braver of us." "Ala, you are the first if you want to kill me," Not long after Aponitolau threw all the bamboo at Kanag, but did not hit him. "Ala, you are the next, my son," said Aponitolau. Kanag said, "No, I do not want to throw any at you, for you are my father and I am ashamed." Aponitolau said, "If you do not wish to throw at me we will go back home." As soon as they arrived in Kadalayapan Kanag laid down in their balaua. When they called him at meal time he did not wish to go.

When Aponitolau and Apo=nibolinayen finished eating they said, "If you do not wish to eat we will go to see our little house in the fields." "We will go and fix it so we will have some protection during the rainy season," said Aponitolau. So they went truly. As soon as they arrived at the little house in their farm, "Dig up the jar of basi [248] which I buried when I was a boy." So Kanag dug up the basi which Aponitolau had made when he was a little boy. As soon as he had dug it up they drank it, and they put the basi in a big coconut shell. Aponitolau made his son drink a shell full of basi, so Kanag truly drank all of it. "Ala, dip again and I will drink next," said Ligi to him, and Ligi drank a shell cup of basi. "Ala, dip again, we will drink three shell cups of this basi," said Ligi. When Kanag had drunk the three shells of wine he was drunk and he slept. As soon as he was asleep, "What shall I do now," said Ligi to himself. "The best thing for me to do is to send him away with the storm." So he used his magical power and soon the big storm came and took Kanag to Kalaskigan while he was sleeping.

Not long after Aponitolau went back home to Kadalayapan. Aponibolinayen asked him where Kanag was. "I thought he came ahead of me," Ligi said. "I think you have killed him," said Aponibolinayen, "for you think he loves your concubines." Aponitolau went to lie down in their balaua and Aponibolinayen laid down in the house and their hair grew long along the floor, they laid so long.

Not long after Kanag awoke and he saw that he was in the middle of a field so wide that he could not see the edges of it. "How bad my father is to me, for he sent me here," he said. "The best thing for me to do is to create people so that I will have neighbors. I will use magic so that many betel-nut trees will grow in the middle of the field." Not long after the betel-nut trees bore fruit which was covered with gold. He took the betel-nuts and cut them in many pieces. In the middle of the night he used his power and he said, "I will use magic and when I scatter all the betel-nuts which I have cut, they will become women and men, who will be my neighbors tomorrow."

Not long after it became morning and he saw that he had many neighbors and he heard many people talking near to his house and many roosters crowing. So Kanag was glad, for he had many companions. He went down the ladder, and he went where the people were burning fires in the yards of their houses, and he went to see all of them. While he was visiting them he saw Dapilisan in the yard of her house and Kanag said to Bangan and Dalonagan, "My Aunt Bangan and my Uncle Dalonagan, do not be surprised, for I want to marry your daughter Dapilisan." "If you marry our daughter, your father and mother will be greatly ashamed," said Dalonagan. Kanag said to them, "My father and mother did not want me and they will not interfere." So they were married.

"The best way for us to do, Dapilisan, is for us to make Sayang" said Kanag. So Dapilisan commanded someone to go and get the betel-nut fruit which was covered with gold. Not long after, "Ala, you betel-nuts which are covered with gold come here and oil yourselves, and go and invite all the people to come and attend our Sayang." So the betel-nuts oiled themselves and they went to invite the people in the different towns. Not long after they went. One of the betel-nuts went to Kadalayapan, and one went where Kanag's sweetheart lived. Some of them went to Pindayan and Donglayan, which is the home of Iwaginan and Gimbangonan.

Not long after Aponibolinayen was anxious to chew betel-nut. "I am going to chew. What ails me, for I am so anxious to chew? I had not intended to eat anything while Kanag is away." She looked up at her basket, and she saw that an oiled betel-nut, which was covered with gold, was in it. She picked it up and tried to cut it. "Do not cut me, for I came to invite you, for Kanag and his wife Dapilisan sent me to summon you to their Sayang in Kalaskigan," said the betel-nut. Aponibolinayen was glad when she heard that Kanag was alive. So she got up and told all the people of Kadalayapan to wash their hair so that they might attend the Sayang in Kalaskigan. The people asked who was making Sayang in Kalaskigan, and she replied that it was Kanag and his wife Dapilisan. Not long after they washed their clothes and hair, and took a bath. When it became afternoon they went and Aponitolau followed them, and he looked as if he was crazy. As soon as they arrived at the river near the town of Kalaskigan, Kanag saw them and there were many of them by the river. He sent crocodiles and they went to take the people across the river. Aponitolau was the first who rode on one of the crocodiles and the crocodile dived, so Aponitolau went back again to the bank of the river. Not long after Aponitolau's companions were all on the other side of the river, and he was alone, for the crocodiles would not carry him across. He shouted as if crazy, and Kanag sent one of the crocodiles to get him. Not long after one crocodile went where Aponitolau was, and he stood on its back and it took him to the other side of the river.

When they all sat down beside the river, Dalonagan said, "What shall we use for the alawig, [249] for your father and mother?" "The singed pig, for it is the custom of the people in Kadalayapan," said Kanag to his mother-in-law. "Go and get some of the pigs and singe them," said Dalonagan to him. Not long after he singed the pigs and he carried them to the people, and his wife Dapilisan carried one little jar which looked like a fist, filled with basi. As soon as the woman who was making Sayang had finished the diam [250] near by the well, Dapilisan made the people drink the basi which she carried. Each person drank from a golden cup filled with basi from out of the little jar which looked like a fist, and one third of the basi in the jar was still left. [251] As soon as the people drank they took them up to the town.

When they arrived in the town Aponibolinayen was anxious for them to chew betel-nut. So she gave some to Kanag and his wife Dapilisan and to some others. So they chewed and Kanag said to them, "You are first to tell your names." "My name is Aponitolau of Kadalayapan," said the man who looked like he was crazy. "My name is Aponibolinayen." As soon as they had told their names Kanag was the next and he said, "My name is Kanag Kabagbagowan who was carried by the big storm." "My name is Dapilisan, who is the daughter of Bangan and Dalonagan, who is the wife of your son Kanag, for whom you did not make pakalon. It is bad if you do not like the marriage." "Our daughter, Dapilisan, we like you, for Kanag wanted to marry you," said Aponibolinayen. Not long after the balaua was nearly finished, but the people were still dancing. "Now my abalayan [252] Dalonagan, we are going to pay the marriage price according to the custom," said Aponibolinayen. "Our custom is to fill the balaua nine times with the different kind of jars." So Aponibolinayen said, "Ala, you alan [253] who live in the different springs and bananayo of Kaodanan and you liblibayan, go and get the jars, malayo and tadogan, sumadag and ginlasan and addeban and gumtan, which Kanag must pay as the marriage price for Dapilisan." As soon as she had commanded they went, and they filled the balaua nine times, and Aponibolinayen said to Dalonagan, "I think now that we have paid the marriage price," and Dolonagan said, "No, there is more still to pay." "All right, if we still owe, tell us and we will pay." So Dalonagan called her big pet spider and said, "You, my pet spider, go around the town of Kalaskigan and spin a thread as you go, on which Aponibolinayen must string golden beads."

When the spider had put a thread around the town Dalonagan said to Aponibolinayen, "Now, you put golden beads on the spider's thread which surrounds the town." Aponibolinayen again commanded the liblibayan, alan, and the other spirits to go and get the golden beads. As soon as they secured the beads they put them on the thread which surrounded the town. Not long after they arrived and they strung the beads on the thread. As soon as they finished, Dalonagan hung on the thread to see if it would break. Dapilisan said, "Ala, you thread of the spider be strong and do not break, or I shall be ashamed." Truly, the thread did not break when Dalonagan hung on it. "Ala, my abalayan, is there any other debt?" asked Aponibolinayen, and Dalonagan said, "No more." When the balaua was over the people who went to attend the Sayang went home, and Aponibolinayen said to Kanag, "Now, we will take you back to Kadalayapan," and he replied, "No, for I wish to live here." When they could not take him to Kadalayapan, Aponibolinayen said to Aponitolau, "I am going to stay here with him," but Aponitolau would not let her stay, but took her back.

(Told by Angtan of Lagangilang).



18

Aponibolinayen went to the spring. As soon as she arrived there she washed her hair. When she washed her hair she dived into the water, and she did not know that blood from her body was being washed away by the water.

"I am going to the spring," said the alan, who was Inil-lagen. As soon as she arrived at the river she took her headaxe and scooped up the blood which was carried by the stream and she went back to Dagapan. As soon as she reached her house she put the blood on a big plate which was inherited through nine generations, and she covered it.

"I am going to the well," said Aponigawani of Natpangan. As soon as she arrived she burned rice straw, which had been inherited nine times, and she put it in the pot with water. After that she took the water from the jar and put it in the coconut shell and she washed her hair. As soon as she washed her hair she dived in the river, and she washed her arm beads which twinkled in the evening, and she did not know that her blood was flowing and was being carried away by the stream.

"I am going to the well," said the alan Apinganan who lived in Bagonan, and she saw the blood of Aponigawani, and she secured it on her headaxe, and she put it inside of her belt. After that she went home. As soon as she arrived in her house she put the blood in the big dish, which had been nine times inherited, and she covered it.

"I am going to uncover my toy," said the alan Inil-lagen. "No do not uncover me, grandmother; I have no clout and belt," said the little boy. So she gave him a clout and belt and after that she uncovered it. "Ala, we will give him the name of Ilwisan of Dagapan," said all the alan.

"I am going to uncover my toy," said the alan Apinganan. "No, do not uncover me, because I have no clout and belt," said the little boy. So Apinganan gave him a clout and belt and uncovered him. "Ala, there is no other good name, but Dondonyan of Bagonan.

"I am going to fight," said Dondonyan of Bagonan. He took his headaxe, which was one span long, and he went to get Ilwisan of Dagapan, and so Ilwisan took his headaxe, which was one span long, and they went. As soon as they got out of the town they began to strike their shields with a stick. The sound of the beating was as great as that made by one hundred. As soon as Aponibolinayen heard the noise of the shields she shouted and Danay of Kabisilan shouted also, and those who shouted were the ladies who always staid in the house. [254] When they passed by the spring of Natpangan Aponigawani shouted. When they passed by Pindayan, Gimbagonan shouted and the world trembled while she shouted.

While they were walking they arrived at the spring of Giambolan of Kaboyboyan, who was an alzado. [255] Not long after they reached the alzado woman at the spring, for she was still making Sayang. Not long after Ilwisan of Dagapan killed the tattooed alzados, who were more than one hundred, who were dipping water from the spring. "We go to the town," said Ilwisan of Dagapan to Dondonyan. "Yes," he said, and they went. As soon as they arrived in the town, Giambolan saw them and he was surprised, for they were two boys who entered the town. "You little boys who come in my town, you are the first who ever came here," said Giambolan, who had ten heads. He went up into the house and the little boys said, "Take your headaxe and spear Giambolan; although we are little boys we are not afraid of you, for we came here to fight with you. It is the last of your life now." "Giambolan, you first fight against us," said Ilwisan. He used his power. "You headaxe and spear of Giambolan, if he throws you against us, do not strike us." When all the spears and headaxes of Giambolan were lost, the boys truly were not hurt. "Now we are next to throw our spears. You, our headaxes, when we strike and throw the spear you pierce the side of Giambolan," they said. Not long after Giambolan laid down. "You, my headaxe, cut off the heads of Giambolan at one blow," they said. So the ten heads were cut off. "You, my spear and headaxe, go and kill all the people in the houses of the town, who live with Giambolan," they said. The spears and headaxes went and killed all the people in the town, and the pig troughs were floating in blood toward the river. "You, heads, gather together in the yard of Giambolan. You, heads of the women, separate, and you, heads of Giambolan, go first, and you, storm, carry the house of Giambolan. You go near to our house in Dagapan."

"I will tramp on the town of Giambolan so it will be like the ocean," they said. Not long after the town was like the ocean. They went home and they followed after the heads, which they sent first to their town. Not long after, "I use my power so that we arrive at once in Dagapan," said Ilwisan. So they arrived truly.

"All the heads of Giambolan stay by the gate of the town; all the heads of the people who live with him stay around the town."

"You alan who look like me, we will go and see Ilwisan and make him go into the house, for he has returned from fighting." Not long after they made him climb the sangap [256] so he could talk with the star, it was so high. Ilwisan did not climb, but he jumped over the ladder and he did not touch it. "You, alan, take down the gansas for we are going to have a big party, for we have come back from fighting." So the alan took down the gansas and they danced. "You send your people to go and invite our relatives," said Ilwisan, "so that they will come to attend my big party, for I have returned from the fight." So they sent the messengers to the towns where the relatives lived.

When the spirit messengers arrived by the balaua where Aponitolau of Kadalayapan was lying down, "Good morning," they said. "How are you," said Aponitolau. "I came here because Ilwisan of Dagapan sent me to get you, for they make a big party, for they have returned from fighting." "This is the first time I have heard of a town called Dagapan," said Aponitolau. "You people who live with me, come with me and we all will go to Dagapan, because Ilwisan will make a big party, for he has returned from fighting; all you ladies who stay in the house come also."

Not long after they went and Aponitolau guided them, and they met the people who live in Natpangan and Pindayan in the way. Gimbagonan, who was the wife of Iwaginan, and Danay of Kabisilan went to Dagapan. When they arrived at the spring of Ilwisan of Dagapan they all stopped. "We will all stop here and wait until someone comes to meet us," said Aponitolau. Not long after Ilwisan and Dondonyan saw all the visitors who were at the spring, so they went to meet them. Each of them took a glass of basi and gave the drink to them. When they had all drank they took them up to the town. Not long after, when they arrived in the town, they sat down, and Aponitolau and the other people took the gansa, and Iwaginan took the alap [257] and they danced first with Aponibolinayen. As soon as they finished dancing they took out of their belts the girls who never go out doors, and they joined the people. The girl whom Aponibolinayen took out of her belt was Daliknayan, and the girls whom Aponigawani took out of her belt were Indiapan, and Alama-an, and the girl whom Danay of Kabisilan took out of her belt was Asigtanan, and the girl whom Gimbagonan took out of her belt was Dalonagan. [258] As soon as they had taken the girls out they made them sit in one row and the circle of people was very bright, because of the girls, for they were all pretty. After that Iwaginan made Daliknayan and Dalonagan and Alama-an and Asigtanan dance with Ilwisan of Dagapan. When they had danced across the circle five times they stopped. As soon as they finished dancing Iwaginan made Aponitolau dance with Danay of Kabisilan. When Aponitolau stamped his feet as he was dancing all the fruit of the coconut trees fell down. After they finished Balogagayan and Gimbagonan danced. After they danced Kabin-na-ogan of Kabitaulan danced with Aponigawani. After they danced they went to eat. The food was of thirty different kinds, and they were abashed in the golden house of Ilwisan, which had many valuable jars in it, for the alan had given them to him.

As soon as they finished eating they gathered again, and the alan Kilagen told them that Ilwisan was the son of Aponibolinayen, and Dondonyan was the son of Aponigawani. She said, "The reason that we made your son come to life was that we might have someone to give our things to, for we have no children to inherit them." "If that is so we are going to change their names. Ilwisan will be Kanag Kabagbagowan," said Aponitolau. "Dondonyan will be Dagolayen, who is a rich man." "Now it is two months since we came here and we go home," they all said. As soon as they agreed, the alan gave them valuable things. Aponitolau used his power and the golden house of Kanag which the alan gave him was pulled up and went to Kadalayapan and the gold house of Dondonyan went to Natpangan. Aponigawani used her power, and when it became morning Kanag cried because his golden house of Dagapan, which was the alan's town, went to Kadalayapan. "Do not cry, Kanag; this is your town; we are your father and mother." So Kanag stopped crying.

The next month Kanag said to his father and mother, "The best thing for you to do is to engage me to Daliknayan, who never goes out doors, and there is no one to compare with her, who looks like the firefly in the evening, and her footprints are loved by all the men, for they look like the rainbow." Not long after Aponibolinayen took the golden beads, which look like the moon, to use as an engagement present. Not long after Aponibolinayen and Aponitolau arrived at Kabisilan. "Good morning, Aunt Danay," they said. "How are you?" said Danay. "Come up and we will eat." They went up the stairs, and Danay took the rice out of the jar and took out the meat, and they ate. As soon as they finished eating, "We cannot stop here long, for we are in a hurry," and they showed her the gold which was like the moon, for they wished to make the engagement. Danay of Kabisilan agreed, and they set a day for pakalon, and it was three days later. Not long after they went back home. As soon as they arrived they told their son Kanag and he was very happy.

When the day for pakalon came they summoned all the people, and so they went, and some of them went first. "You, my jar, bilibili, and my jar ginlasan, and you my jar malayo, go first." So all the jars preceded them, and they followed. Not long after they arrived. When all the people whom they invited arrived, they fed them all. When they had all finished eating, "Now that we have finished eating we are going to settle on the price. My balaua must be filled eighteen times with different jars before Kanag and Daliknayan can be married." So they filled the balaua eighteen times. "Now that the pakalon is finished and we have paid the price, we will take her home, and you prepare the food for her to take." So they started to fix a box for her with pillows, and they gave her a golden hat which looked like a bird, and she put her skirt on her head and it twinkled. Not long after they went. As soon as they arrived in Kadalayapan, they went upstairs, and they made her sit on the bamboo floor, and they counted the bamboo strips on which she sat, and it was an arm span long of agate beads. [259] Not long after they had a son and they named him Dumalawig. This is all.

(Told by Magwati of Lagangilang).



19

"I am going to hunt deer with the dogs, mother," said Kanag. "No, do not go, you will be lost," said Aponibolinayen. "No, I will not be lost. Give me provisions to take," he said, and he fretted so his mother let him go, and she gave provisions, for she could not prevent him from going. So he went.

"Ey-Ey-kota, my puppy, Ey-Ey, my fat dog, do not catch anything until we reach the middle of the wood, which is the place where the anteng tree grows." Not long after while he was walking the puppy went into the jungle and it barked in the wood. He went to reach it. When he arrived he saw that what the puppy barked at was a very small house by the resin tree. He went up to the house. Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen went to hide under the hearth and Kanag did not go out of the house until the girl appeared. One night had passed, then the girl who owned the house appeared. He saw that she was a beautiful girl and they talked. "It is not good for us to talk until we know our names," said Dumanau, [260] and he gave her betel-nut, and she did not receive it, so he made it very good so that she wanted it after two days. After that she received the betel-nut which was covered with gold. As soon as they chewed, "You first tell your name, for you live here; it is not good for me to tell first, for I come from another place," said Dumanau. "No, it is not good for a girl to tell her name first. You are a boy and even though you came from another place you tell your name first," said Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen. "My name is Dumanau, who is the son of Aponibolinayen and Aponitolau of Kadalayapan." "My name is Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen, who is the daughter of an alan in Matawatawen." When they put down their quids, they laid in good order as agates with no holes in them. "We are close relatives, and it is good for us to be married." So they married.

Three years passed. "The best thing is for us to take our house to Kadalayapan, and go there; perhaps my father and mother are searching for me." "No, we must not go, because I am ashamed, for they did not engage me to you," said Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen. "No, we go; we must not stay always in the jungle," he said. So in the middle of the night Dumanau used his power. "I use my magic so that this house we are in goes to Kadalayapan. You stand there by our house," he said; so the little house went there while they were asleep. The next morning Wanwanyen was surprised because many chickens were crowing and many people were talking, and when she went to look out of the window there were many houses. "Why, Dumanau, it is not the jungle where we are now; where are we?" she said. "It is the town of Kadalayapan."

Not long after their three children went to look out of the window and they saw the sugar cane, and they were anxious to chew it. "Father, go and get the sugar cane for us to chew," they said. Dumanau went, and he advised Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen to fasten the door while he was gone. "If anyone comes do not open the door." He went, and Dumanau's father and mother were frightened, because the little house was by their dwelling, for there was no little house there before. As soon as Dumanau arrived in the house of his father and mother they were surprised, for they had searched for him three years. They asked where he had been, and he said he had found a wife in the wood when he had staid for three years. He told his mother that she must not go to his house and say bad words to his wife. So Dumanau went to the place of the sugar cane, and his mother went to the house and said bad words to his wife. "Open the door, you bad woman, who has no shame. You are the cause of my son being lost, and we spent much time to find him. What did you come here for, worthless woman?" said Aponibolinayen. Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen did not answer her. Not long after Dumanau arrived at their house and Wanwanyen said to him, "It is true what I told you. I told you not to go and you did truly, and your mother came and said many bad words. I said it was best for us to stay always in Matawatawen, but you paid no heed. Now my stomach is sick, for your mother came here to say many bad things to us." Not long after she died. Dumanau sharpened his headaxe and spear, for he wanted to kill his mother, because she said bad things to his wife Wanwanyen, but he did not kill her, because she fastened the door.

As soon as Dumanau arrived in their house he made a tabalang [261] of gold, and put the body of Wanwanyen inside of it, and he put a golden rooster on top of it. As soon as he finished he put the body of Wanwanyen inside of it. As soon as he had done this he said, "If you pass many different towns where the people get water, you rooster crow." The rooster said, "Tatalao, I am tabalang of Kadalayapan; on top of me is a golden rooster." He pushed the tabalang into the river and so it floated away. When it passed by the springs in the other towns, the rooster said, "Tatalao, I am tabalang of Kadalayapan, and on top of me is a golden rooster." That is what the rooster always said when they passed the springs in the other towns.

Dumanau wandered about as if crazy, and his oldest son walked in front of him. He carried the next child on his back and carried the third on his hip. When the tabalang arrived in Nagbotobotan, "Tatalao, I am tabalang of Kadalayapan, and on me is a golden rooster," said the rooster on the tabalang which was made of gold. The old woman Alokotan was taking a bath by the river and she was in a hurry to put on her skirt and she followed the tabalang. "You tabalang, where did you come from? Are you the tabalang of Kapaolan? If you are not from Kapaolan, are you from Kanyogan?" The tabalang did not stop and it nearly went down into the hole where the stream goes. [262] So Alokotan ran very fast. "Are you tabalang from Kaodanan?" The tabalang hesitated a little. "Are you tabalang of Kadalayapan?" "Yes," said the tabalang and stopped; so she went inside of the tabalang and she took the body to her house. She was afraid of the tabalang, because it was made of gold and she was surprised because the woman who was inside was beautiful and there was no one to compare with her. As soon as they arrived to her house, "I whip perfume alikadakad and make her wake up directly." "I whip my perfume banaues and directly she will say, 'Wes,'" "I whip my perfume dagimonau and directly she will wake up entirely." [263] "How long I slept, grandmother," said Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen. The old woman Alokotan took her inside of the house. "'How long my sleep,' you say, and you were dead. There is the tabalang they put you in and I was surprised, for it was made of gold and has a golden rooster on top of it. They used it to send you down the river." Not long after the old woman Alokotan hid her, and Dumanau, who was always wandering about with his children, approached the place where the women were dipping water from the spring. All the women who were dipping water from the well said, "Here is a lone man who is carrying the babies. We agree that we all salute him at one time." As soon as they agreed Dumanau arrived to the place where they were dipping water and he said, "Good day, women." "Good day also," answered all the women in unison. "Where are you going, lone man who is carrying the babies?" "'Where are you going,' you say, women. I am following Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen whom I put inside the tabalang for she was dead. Did you see the tabalang pass here?" said Dumanau. "It passed by here long ago. Perhaps it is in Nagbotobotan now." "Ala, I leave you now, women, and I go and follow." "Yes," answered the women.

While they were walking they arrived in Nagbotobotan and Dumanau saw the tabalang in the yard by the house of Alokotan and they exchanged greetings. "Good afternoon," they said, and Alokotan took them upstairs; so they went up. Not long after while they were talking, "This was my tabalang, my grandmother old woman Alokotan; bring out of hiding Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen, so that I may take her home," said Dumanau, and the old woman Alokotan did not bring her out because she did not believe that he was the husband of Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen; so she used magic, and when she found that he was the husband of Wanwanyen she said, "She is over there. I hid her." So she went to get her and Dumanau, was joyful, for he saw Wanwanyen alive again. "Ala, now grandmother old woman Alokotan, how much must I pay, because you saved my wife Wanwanyen?" "That is all right, no pay at all. That is why I stay in this place so as to watch and see if any of my dead relatives pass by my house and I make them alive again. If you were not my relative I would have let her go." So Dumanau thanked her many times and they went back home.

Not long after they arrived in Kadalayapan. "The best for us to do, Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen, is for us to build balaua and invite all of our relatives; perhaps you are not the daughter of an alan," said Dumanau. "Why not? I am the daughter of the alan," said Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen. "Ala, let us build balaua anyway." Not long after they commanded people to pound rice, and as soon as Wanwanyen was ready she commanded someone to go and secure the betel-nuts which were covered with gold. As soon as they arrived they oiled them. When it became evening they made Libon. [264] The next morning they sent the betel-nuts to invite their relatives. So they went. Not long after, "I am anxious to chew betel-nut. What is the matter with me?" said Aponigawani, who was lying down on her bed. As soon as she got up she found an oiled betel-nut which was covered with gold beside her. "Do not cut me; I came to invite you to the balaua which Wanwanyen and Dumanau make," said the betel-nut, when she took it intending to cut it. So Aponigawani told the people of Kaodanan to start to attend balaua with Dumanau and Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen. She was surprised because Dumanau had arrived, for they had heard that he was lost when he went to hunt deer. She said, "Perhaps he met a lady who never goes outdoors, who has power, when he went to hunt deer." Not long after, "Ala, you people who live in the same town, let us go now to Kadalayapan for Dumanau's and Wanwanyen's balaua."

As soon as they arrived in the place where the people dipped water from the spring they asked where the ford was. "You look for the shallow place," said the people who were dipping the water. Not long after they went across the river and some of the people who were dipping water went to notify the people making balaua that the visitors were there, so Dumanau and Wanwanyen went to the gate of the town and met them there and made alawig. [265] Aponigawani and Aponibolinayen looked at the woman who was the wife of Dumanau and she was almost the same as Aponigawani. As soon as they finished alawig they took them up to the town. While they were sitting, Aponigawani was anxious to know who Dumanau's wife really was, so she went to Dumanau and said that they were going to chew betel-nut. "That is the best way to do so that we may know if we are related," said Dumanau. So they took the betel-nuts and divided them in pieces. "You tell your name first, because you are the people who live here." "No, my uncle, you old men are the first to tell your names." "My name is Aponibalagen, who is the son of Pagatipanan and Ebang of Natpangan, who is the brother of Aponibolinayen." "My name is Aponitolau, who is the son of Pagbokasan and Langa-an, who is the brother of Aponigawani, whose son is Dumnau." "My name is Dumanau, who is the son of Aponitolau and Aponibolinayen of Kadalayapan." "My name is Aponigawani of Kaodanan, who is the wife of Aponibalagen, who has no sister." "My name is Aponibolinayen of Kadalayapan, who is the wife of Aponitolau, whose son is Dumanau." "My name is Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen, who is the daughter of an alan of Matawatawen."

When they had told their names the quid of Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen went to the quid of Aponibalagen and Aponigawani and Dumanau laid down his quid. The quid of Dumanau went to those of Aponibolinayen and Aponitolau. "Now, Aponitolau, we know Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen is our daughter; it is best for you now to pay the marriage price, nine times full the balaua," said Aponigawani and Aponibalagen. Aponibolinayen, the mother of Dumanau, begged the pardon of Dumanau and his wife, for she did not know that his wife was the daughter of Aponigawani and Aponibalagen, who was her brother. Not long after they gave the marriage price. "I use my power so that the balaua of Wanwanyen and Dumanau is nine times filled," said Aponibolinayen, and it was nine times filled with different kinds of jars. Then Aponigawani raised her eyebrows and half disappeared, and Aponibolinayen used magic again and the balaua was full again. When they gave all the marriage price they danced. As soon as the dance was over they went to eat, all the people whom they invited.

When they finished eating Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen talked. "You, father and mother, you were not careful of your daughter. I would not have heard any bad words if you had been careful." "Ala, Wanwanyen-Aponibolinayen, that is our custom, because we are related to the Kaboniyan and the alan always picks up some of us," said her father and mother. "It is good that Dumanau found you, who is your husband. Aponibolinayen, who talked bad before, is our relative. She is my sister," said Aponibalagen. "It is true that I said bad words to her, because I did not know that we were related, though I am your relative; forgive me, daughter, your father is my brother," said Aponibolinayen to Wanwanyen. Not long after they drank basi, for they knew each other and made friends. As soon as they drank they danced during one month. When the balaua was finished all of the people went home and took some of the jars. As soon as they went home the father and mother-in-law of Dumanau took all the other jars to Kaodanan. It is said.

(Told by Madomar of Riang barrio Patok.)



20

"We are going away, Cousin Dagolayan," said Kanag. "If that is what you say we must go." Not long after they went. As soon as they reached the middle of the way they agreed upon their destination. "Where are we going?" they asked. "We are going to the place Ginayod of Binglayan," said Kanag. "Why are we going there?" said his cousin Dagolayan. "We are going because Ginayod of Binglayan has a pretty girl who never goes outdoors, and we are going to see her," said Kanag.

Not long after they arrived where the young girls spun at night. "Stay here, Cousin Dagolayan, and I will meet you here. I am going to see the daughter of Ginayod, who is Asimbayan of Ilang." "If that is what you say it is all right," said Dagolayan. Not long after Kanag reached the place where the girl was, and he talked with her. The girl who never goes outdoors said to him, "If you will get the perfume of Baliwan I will believe all you say." "If you will agree to my mission I will go and get whatever you want," said Kanag. "Ala, if you do not believe me, you take my arm beads from my left arm, for you are kind to go for me." So she gave him her arm beads, and Kanag started to go at once. As soon as he arrived at the place where the young girls spun and had joined his companion, his cousin asked, "What did she say?" "She told me that if I will secure the perfume of Baliwan she will do everything I ask of her. Let us both go." "No, I do not wish to go with you, for you will not go with me where I wish to go." "Please come with me and another time I will go with you," said Kanag.

Not long after they went and they met the doldoli [266] in the way. "Where are you going, rich young men?" it said to them. "Where are you going,' you say, and we are going to get the perfume of Baliwan, for though we are far from it still we can smell it now." "Ala, young men, you cannot go there, for when anyone goes there, only his name goes back to his town." But the boys replied, "We are going anyway. That is the reason we are already far from home, and it is the thing the pretty girl wants." "If you say that you are going anyway, you will repent when you reach there." "It is the thing which will make the girls love us." So they left the jar and walked on. When they reached the middle of the jungle they met a big frog, and it said, "Where are you going, young men?" "'Where are we going,' you say, and we are going to get the perfume of Baliwan, for that is what Asimbayan of Ilang desires." "No, do not go there, for everyone who has gone there has died." "We will go on anyway, for we are already far from our town and we cannot return without the perfume." So they left the frog and walked on. Not long after they approached the place where the perfume was, and while they were still a long way off they could smell its odor. "What a fine odor it has. That is why the young girl who never goes outdoors desires it so much." They walked on and in a short time they reached the place below the perfume. When they were there Dagolayan said to Kanag, "Take some from the lower branches." "No, it is better for me to climb and get some from the top, for I think they are better above than below." So Kanag climbed and as soon as he broke off the stem which held the perfume his legs became like part of a snake. Dagolayan looked up and he saw that the legs of his companion had changed to part of a snake. He said, "Now, my Cousin Kanag, I am going to leave you, for you are no longer a man, but you are a serpent." "Do not leave me even if I do become a serpent. I will not injure you. Do not be afraid." In a short time all his body had become a real serpent, and Dagolayan ran and went home, and the big serpent followed him.

Not long after Dagolayan arrived in Kadalayapan, and Aponitolau and Aponibolinayen asked where Kanag was. "Kanag has become a big serpent. As soon as he broke off the perfume of Baliwan which the young girl desired he became a serpent." Aponitolau and Aponibolinayen went around the town and told the people that they must accompany them, for they were going to see if Kanag had really become a serpent. When Aponitolau and Aponibolinayen had killed many animals and given much food to the searchers and they did not find him, they stopped searching.

Not long after Kanag thought he would go to the river where the people took their baths. So he went. Not long after Langa-ayan was anxious to wash her hair, so she went to the river and washed it, and Do-ansowan washed his hair first and Langa-ayan helped him, for he was her husband. As soon as she had washed his hair, he said to her, "I am going to the town." So he went and left Langa-ayan alone by the river washing her hair. When she had washed her hair she washed her arm beads. While she was washing her upper arm beads she heard a great commotion in the river, and soon after a big serpent appeared on the other bank. Langa-ayan saw that it was a big serpent and she was so frightened that she started to run, but the serpent said to her, "Do not run, my aunt, I am not a real serpent, for I was a young boy before." So Langa-ayan stopped and asked him why he had become a great serpent. "Because I went to Ilang to see the pretty girl, and she told me that if I could get the perfume of Baliwan she would do whatever I asked, so I went. I did not want to go, for I was not sure that she told the truth, but she gave me her left bracelet, so I went. When I was still far away from Baliwan I could smell the perfume, and when I reached the tree I climbed it and I tried to break the stem which held the perfume, and my companion saw that I was changing to a serpent and he ran away. I truly became a serpent and now I have come here and have met you. If you do not believe that I was truly a boy, I will show you the arm beads." So he lifted his head and Langa-ayan truly saw the arm beads around his neck. "My aunt, will you find out how I may become a man again?" She said, "If what you have said is true you follow me." So they went up to the town.

Do-ansowan said to his wife, "How long you have staid at the river, my wife." "I was there a long time, for I met a big serpent. If you wish to see it, it is in the yard. He says he was a young boy and he showed me the arm beads of a young girl, which he has about his neck. I believe that he is a young boy who has become a serpent. When he broke the stem of the perfume which the girl wanted he became a serpent. He wants to know how he can again become a boy." "Ala, if that is what he wants, you go and take him to my Uncle Ma-obagan." So they went and when they arrived where Ma-obagan lived she said, "Good morning, uncle." "Good morning," he answered. "The reason I came is because a young boy who became a big snake is here. Will you please put him in your magic well which changes everything which goes in it and make him a young boy again?" "If he will go into the water, even if it feels bad, you call him and let him go in." So they went and when they arrived at the well the serpent went into the water, and the serpent's skin began to crack and fall off and he became a boy again.

Not long after they went back to the house of Langa-ayan. As soon as they arrived there the boy went to the balaua and did not follow Langa-ayan to the house. Do-ansowan saw that he was a handsome young boy. As soon as Langa-ayan had finished cooking they called him to come and eat and he said to them, "I do not wish to eat if there are no girls to eat with me." "We are afraid if you do not eat, for you did not eat for a long time, while you were a serpent." The boy said, "Even though I did not eat while I was a serpent I will follow my custom, for I do not eat unless a pretty young girl who never goes outdoors eats with me." When they could not persuade him Do-ansowan said to his wife, "Go and call our daughter Amau." Not long after she went to call her. When she arrived where they had put her she said, "Come and eat with the rich young man." "How can I go? I do not know how to walk." "Take the big gold basket and hold on to it while you walk." Not long after she arrived where the food was, and Langa-ayan and Do-ansowan said to the boy who was still in the balaua, "Come and eat now, nephew, with our daughter who never goes outdoors." So the boy went quickly, and when he reached the place where the girl was, they ate. When they had finished eating he said that he was sick, but he was not. So they went to fix a place for him to lie and he said, "Perhaps I am sick because of the spirit of the young girl." So they went to call their daughter, for Kanag wanted her to touch him, and he wanted to see her. The girl went to touch his body and he was all right, for he wished her to touch him, and he said, "Now, my uncle and aunt, if you wish me for a son-in-law I wish to marry Amau. I will not go any further to find a wife." The father and mother of the girl agreed to what Kanag said, for the girl wanted to marry him, so they were married.

"Now, Kanag, we are going to make Sayang and invite your mother and father so that they can see that you are a young man again," said his father-in-law and mother-in-law. They made Sayang and they sent someone to invite their relatives, and someone went to Asimbayan of Ilang and told her that Kanag Kabagbagowan, who lived in Kalaskigan, and his wife Amau were making Sayang. Some of the betel-nuts which they sent arrived in Kadalayapan where Aponitolau and Aponibolinayen lived and they said, "Good morning," to Aponitolau who was lying down in the balaua. He felt badly because Kanag was a serpent and he said to the betel-nut, "Good morning. Come to Kalaskigan, for Kanag and Amau are making Sayang and they want you to come." So Aponitolau got up quickly and told Aponibolinayen who was lying down in the house that Kanag and his wife were making Sayang, and they were happy because Kanag was a boy again. They told all the people to prepare to go to the Sayang of Kanag and his wife. So they went, and when they arrived they saw that Kanag was handsomer than before, and Asimbayan went also, for they had invited her. Asimbayan saw that Kanag was the boy who had taken her bracelet and had gone to get the perfume for her, and while she was watching him Kanag went to talk with her. He told her what had happened when he went to get the perfume for her, and he told her how he had become a snake and his mother-in-law had met him by the river and had taken him to the old man who changed him again to a boy, and he had married the daughter of Do-ansowan and Langa-ayan. Kanag said, "Now, I cannot marry you, so I will give back your bracelet." So he gave it back.

Not long after Aponitolau and Aponibolinayen asked how much they must pay for the wife of Kanag, and Langa-ayan and Do-ansowan said, "Fill our balaua nine times with valuable things." When they had paid all, they said, "Now we are going to take them to Kadalayapan, for we have paid all you asked." "No, do not take them. They are going to stay here," said Do-ansowan and Langa-ayan. "They will come there bye and bye." "Ala, if that is what you say they must come and visit us, even if they stay here." Not long after Kanag and his wife went to Kadalayapan to visit his father and they staid there three months. Then Do-ansowan and his wife were anxious for them to return. When Kanag and his wife returned to Kalaskigan they said, "Why did you stay so long? We thought you were going to live in Kadalayapan and we intended to follow you." "We staid a long time, for my father and mother would not let us return when we wished," said Kanag.

(Told by Angtan of Lagangilang.)



21

"Goto watch our langpadan, [267] Kanag, because the wild pigs spoil it." Kanag went. When he arrived at the field he went around it and it was not injured, so he went to the little watch house and he was sorrowful, and he always hung his head. Not long after Aponitolau said to Aponibolinayen, "Cook some rice and meat for I am going to our field and carry the food to Kanag." So Aponibolinayen went to cook. As soon as she finished cooking they ate first. As soon as they finished eating Aponitolau took the rice and meat and started for the field where their son was. When Aponitolau appeared Kanag took his lipi nuts and he played, and the mountain rice which he went to watch was not injured. As soon as Aponitolau arrived to the place where he was playing, "Come to eat, Kanag," and Kanag said, "I am not hungry yet. Put the food in the house. I will play awhile first." When Aponitolau could not make him eat he put the provisions in the house, and he went home and left the boy. Kanag did not go and eat. The next morning Aponitolau went to take him food again and as soon as Kanag saw him he took his game and went to play. When Aponitolau arrived he called him to go and eat, but he did not go for he wished to play, and he asked his father to put the rice and meat in the house. Aponitolau was surprised, because he did not eat, and the provisions for the first day were still untouched. He asked, "Why do you not like to eat?" and he said, "I am not hungry yet." When Aponitolau could not make him eat he went home again, and Kanag used magic and he became a labeg. [268]

Aponitolau said to Aponibolinayen, "I wonder why Kanag does not like to eat." "I think he is sorrowful, because he was sent to watch the mountain rice." "What is the reason that you sent him to the field when the fences are strong and no wild pigs can get in," said Aponibolinayen. "You must cook and we will eat, and then I will go and get him." Aponibolinayen went to cook. As soon as she finished cooking they ate and after that Aponitolau took some rice and meat for Kanag to eat. Aponibolinayen said to him, "As soon as he finishes eating bring him home. Do not let him stay there alone. That is why he does not wish to eat." Aponitolau said, "Yes," and so he went. When he arrived at the field he could not see Kanag any more. He called to him, and the little boy answered him from the top of the bamboo tree. His father felt very sorry that he had become a little bird. "Why did you become a little bird, Kanag? Come and eat. I will not send you here any more." Kanag said, "I do not wish to eat and I would rather be a bird and carry the signs to everyone." So his father went back home and he was sorrowful. As soon as Aponitolau arrived in Kadalayapan he said to Aponibolinayen, "Kanag has become a bird. Perhaps he felt sorry because we sent him to watch the rice. He said that when I am going to war he will fly over me, and he will give me the good and bad signs." [269]

Not long after Aponitolau started out to fight. He took his spear, headaxe and shield, and he went. When he was near the gate of the town, Kanag gave the bad sign. "Go back, father, for you have a bad sign," said the little bird. So his father went back at once. The next morning he started again and he went. When he reached the gate of the town the little bird gave him a good sign, so he went. The little bird flew near to him and he always gave the good sign. Aponitolau was happy for he knew that nothing would injure him.

Not long after they arrived at the alzado [270] town, and the alzados were glad when they saw Aponitolau and they said to him, "You are the only man who ever came to our town. Now you cannot return home. We inherit you," said the bravest of them. "Ala, if you say that I cannot go back home, you summon all the people in your town, for we are going to fight," said Aponitolau, and the alzado said to him, "You are very brave if you wish to fight with all of us." So the bravest summoned all the people to prepare, for Aponitolau wished to fight all of them. The people were surprised that one man wished to fight with them, and they said to Aponitolau, "One of my fingers will fight with you. Don't say that you will fight with all of us." Aponitolau replied, "Do whatever you wish. I still want to fight you." The alzados were angry. The bravest of them ran toward Aponitolau, and he threw his spear and headaxe and Aponitolau jumped. The alzados were surprised, for he jumped very high, and they all began to throw their spears at him, and they ran and tried to cut his head off. Aponitolau jumped and he secured all their spears and headaxes, and he said to them, "Am I the next now?" "Yes, because we are now unarmed."

Aponitolau used magic so that when he threw his spear it would fly among them until they were all dead. When he threw his spear it flew to all the alzados and killed all of them; so Aponitolau again used magic, and his headaxe cut off the heads of the alzados, and Aponitolau sat by the gate of the town. The little bird flew by him and said, "The good sign which I gave to you, father, was all right and you have killed all the enemies." Aponitolau said, "Yes." As soon as the headaxe had cut off all the heads from the dead alzados, he used his power again so that all of the heads went to Kadalayapan. The heads went first and he followed them, and the little bird always followed him.

As soon as they arrived at the gate of the town the little bird flew away and Aponitolau used magic so that the heads were stuck around the town. As soon as the heads were placed around the town, Aponitolau commanded all the people in his town to go and invite the people who lived in different places to come and attend his big party. He told them to invite all the pretty girls who never go outdoors. So the people went all over the world to invite the people to attend the party. As soon as the people arrived in Kadalayapan they played the gansas and danced and Aponitolau said to Kanag, "Come down, Kanag. Do not stay always in the tops of trees. Come and see the pretty girls and see if you want to marry one of them. Come and get the golden cup and put basi in it, and make them drink." The little bird said, "I prefer to stay in the trees and make the signs when anyone goes to fight." When Aponitolau could not make him become a boy and come down he felt very sorry.

When the party was over all the people whom they invited went home and Kanag said to his father, "Now that your party is over and the people have gone, I will go down and get the fruit of the trees to eat." [271] Aponibolinayen said to him, "My dear little son, do not go down and eat the fruit of the trees; we have all we need here. Forgive your father and me, we will not send you again to the field." Kanag did not pay attention and he started to go down. So Aponibolinayen and Aponitolau commanded the spirit helpers. "Go and follow Kanag wherever he goes, so that he has companions; do not leave him. Find a pretty girl for him so that he will not go down." Not long after they overtook Kanag in the forest and they all sat down and they said to him, "Wait here for us a minute, Kanag, while we find a toy for you." "No, I do not wish a toy; I am going down and eat the fruit of the trees." "No, please wait for us. It is very near; we will be back soon. If you do not care for any, you will see. Wherever you go we shall accompany you." Kanag answered to them, "Yes," and they went. As soon as they arrived at the well they used their power so that all the pretty girls who never go outdoors felt very hot, so that they all came to the well to bathe.

Not long after the pretty girls went to the well in the early morning, and their parents did not know about it. As soon as the pretty girl arrived at the well the helpers saw the girl who appeared like the flame of fire about the betel-nut blossoms. As soon as they saw her washing her hair, they went back in a hurry where Kanag was waiting. "Kanag, come and hurry and see the pretty girl." Kanag said, "I do not wish to see her. I am going down to eat the fruit of the trees," and they said again, "Please come; it is very near. If you do not like her we will go wherever you wish." So Kanag went with them, and when they arrived he flew to the top of the betel-nut tree, and he saw the pretty girl, and he flew to another betel-nut tree above her. "What can I do, if I become a man now? I have no clothes and headband." The helpers said, "Do not worry about that. Your father and mother told us to give you whatever you wish, and we have everything here." So Kanag went down and took the clothes and headband and he became a man. He went and sat on the girl's skirt and she said, "Do not harm me. If you are going to cut me, do it only in one place so there will not be so much to heal." "If I was an enemy I would have killed you at once." Kanag went to her and handed the skirt to her. Not long after he gave her betel-nut and they chewed. As soon as they chewed they saw that it was good for them to marry, for they both had magical power and Kanag told his name first and said, "My name is Kanag Kabagbagowan, who is the son of Aponitolau and Aponibolinayen of Kadalayapan, who did not like him, and they sent him to watch their mountain rice, and he became a bird which is a labeg." "My name is Dapilisan, who is the daughter of Bangan and Dalonagan of Kabno-angan." After that the girl was in a hurry to go home, for she was afraid her father and mother would see her, for they did not know that she had gone to the well. She did not want Kanag to go with her to the town, but he did not want to leave her, and the sun shone in the east. The girl went home and Kanag followed her.

Not long after they approached the town and Bangan was in the yard of their house, and Dalonagan was looking out of the door. Not long after she saw them. "What is the matter with Dapilisan? A boy is with her as she returns from the well," said Dalonagan. Bangan was surprised and he did not believe it, for their daughter never went outdoors. "If you do not believe it, look at them; they are coming here," she said. So Bangan turned and saw them. As soon as they arrived where Bangan sat, "Good morning, uncle," said Kanag. "Do not be surprised because I am with your daughter, for I am to be married to her. My father and mother sent me to our rice field and left me there alone, and I was sorry that they did not like me, so I became a bird which gives the sign to those who go to war. When my father went to fight I went with him, and he killed all the alzados in one town and he invited all the people in the world to his party to see if any of the young girls pleased me, but I do not think they came here. I did not like to go to the pretty girls who attended the party, so I started to go down to eat the fruit of the trees, but they sent their spirit helpers to follow and take care of me. When I was in the wood the helpers met me and said 'Wait for us here while we go to find you a toy,' and I scarcely waited, but finally waited, and they made all the pretty girls go to the well, for they felt hot, so your daughter Dapilisan went to take a bath. When the helpers saw her they came to tell me and I did not wish to go, but they compelled me. As soon as I saw her I thought it was good for me to marry her, so I became a man and came home with her. If you wish me for a son-in-law I will be very happy." Bangan and Dalonagan said to him, "I wondered why my daughter went to the well. I did not believe that Dapilisan was there, and I am afraid that your father and mother will not like our daughter Dapilisan, for they did not send an engagement present to us." Kanag said to him, "This is why I came here, and they sent their spirit helpers with me to find a pretty girl to marry, so I will not go down. They will be glad when they know that I am here and want to marry your daughter." So Bangan and his wife sent someone to call Aponitolau and Aponibolinayen, and to tell them that Kanag was in Kabno-angan. Before the messenger arrived in Kadalayapan Aponitolau and Aponibolinayen knew that Kanag was in Kabno-angan, for the spirit helpers went to them when Kanag went with the girl to the town. Aponibolinayen and Aponitolau were ready to go to Kabno-angan before the messenger arrived in Kadalayapan. They went there directly, and they took many things to be used in the wedding.

As soon as they arrived in Kabno-angan they were glad to see that Kanag was a man again. Bangan and his wife asked if they liked Dapilisan as a daughter-in-law, and they replied, "It is all right for Kanag to marry Dapilisan. We are glad he found her and did not go down, and remain always a bird." So they agreed on the marriage price, and Bangan and his wife said, "The balaua nine times full of different kinds of jars." As soon as the balaua was filled nine times Dalonagan raised her eyebrows and half of the jars vanished, and Aponibolinayen used her power and the balaua was filled again, so it was full truly and Dalonagan said to Aponibolinayen, "The web of the spider will be put around the town and you put golden beads on it, and if it does not break Kanag can marry Dapilisan." When Aponibolinayen had put the golden beads on the web, Dalonagan said again, "I am going to hang on the thread and if I do not break it the sign is good and Kanag and his wife will not separate." When she hung on the thread and it did not break they allowed Kanag to marry Dapilisan. After that they played on the gansas and they danced. When they had danced all the guests took some jars before they went home. As soon as the people went home, Aponitolau and Aponibolinayen took Kanag and his wife to Kadalayapan. This is all.

(Told by Magwati of Lagangilang.)



22

"I am going to take a bath," said Ligi, so he went. "I am going to take a bath," said Gamayawan also. As soon as she arrived in the river she went to bathe and Ligi took a bath further down the stream, and he put his balangat [272] on the bank, and it flew and alighted on the skirt of Gamayawan. Not long after Gamayawan went in a hurry to seize it. "Here is my toy," she said, and she put on her skirt, and Ligi was sorrowful, and he went home.

As soon as Ligi arrived by his house he went at once to the balaua and laid down in it and his mother saw him from the window. "What are you so downcast for? Why do you lie on your stomach?" said his mother. "Why are you downcast for, you say, my mother; my balangat is lost," he said. "Do not grieve; it will appear bye and bye," said his mother.

When Gamayawan arrived in her town of Magsiliwan: "You alan who live with me, look at my toy which I found by the river," she said, and was very happy, and the alan truly looked at it and it was the balangat of Ligi, and they all laughed. "What are you laughing for?" said Gamayawan to them? "We laugh because we are happy, because it is beautiful," said the alan. Not long after Gamayawan had a baby. Not long after she gave birth. "What are we going to do? I am about to give birth to a child," she said. "The best thing for us to do is for us to get a thorn and stick your little finger." So they truly stuck her finger, and the little baby popped out like popped corn. [273] "What are we going to name it?" they said. "The best name is Galinginayen, for it is the name of the ancestor of the people who live in Kadalayapan," said the alan. Gamayawan gave him a bath and he grew about one span, for she used her magic. Not long after the baby was large, for she always used her magic when she bathed him. [274] Not long after the baby could fly.

"What can I do for this baby? I cannot work so well," said Gamayawan. "The best thing for you to do, so you can do much work, is for you to carry him to Kadalayapan and give him to his father," said the alan. "That is good, I think; we will go and take him to Kadalayapan tomorrow." When it became early morning she truly prepared cakes to use as food for the boy on the way. When it became day they started. As soon as they arrived at the spring of Kadalayapan she used her power so that all the people in the town and all who were dipping water at the well went to sleep; so all the people who were pounding rice and working slept truly. Not long after they went up to the town. When they were approaching the balaua of Ligi they saw him there asleep. As soon as they reached the balaua they put the boy beside the man who was sleeping. "Stay here and wait, do not fall down," they said to him. "Yes, mother," said the boy. They advised him not to tell who was his mother or where he came from, and they went home. As soon as they reached the edge of the town, she used her power again and all the people who were asleep woke up.

Ligi was surprised when he saw the boy beside him when he woke up. "Why here is a boy by me, with my balangat which I lost when I went to take a bath," said Ligi, and he asked where the boy came from and the name of his mother and how he came. "Who are you talking to," said his mother Langa-an. "'Who are you talking to,' you say mother, here is a boy with my balangat," said Ligi. Langa-an was in a hurry and she went down from the house and she went down two rounds of the ladder at one step. As soon as she got down she took the boy to their house, where she was cooking and they asked him many questions. "My mother is an alan" said Galinginayen. "What is your name then?" "My name is Galinginayen who is the son of an alan of Kabinbinlan," [275] said the boy. "No you are not the son of an alan," they said. When Langa-an finished cooking they tried to feed him, but he would not eat. "If you eat my cake I will eat with you," said the boy. So they ate truly of the boy's provisions and he ate also with them.

When it became afternoon Gamayawan went to get the boy. As soon as she arrived at the edge of the town of Kadalayapan she used her power again and all the people who were working and dipping water slept. She went to the town and Ligi slept again, and she took the boy. As soon as she reached the edge of the town she used her power again and all the people who slept woke up. As soon as Ligi woke up he saw that the boy was not by him. "What has happened to the boy? Perhaps his mother came to steal him while I was sleeping," said Ligi. Langa-an was surprised and sorry because the boy was gone.

As soon as the boy and his mother arrived in their house, he asked his mother how many blankets she had woven while he was in Kadalayapan. "Ala, tomorrow you send me again to Kadalayapan." "Yes," said Gamayawan. When it became early morning she made cakes for his provisions. When it became day they took the boy to Kadalayapan. When they approached the town Gamayawan used her power again so that all the people, even though they were working, slept again, and so they slept truly; then they went to the town and they left the boy beside Ligi who was sleeping in the balaua. As soon as they were far away from the town Gamayawan used her magic, and all the people who slept awoke. As soon as Ligi woke up he saw the boy by him again, and they at once hid him.

When it became afternoon Gamayawan and her companions went to Kadalayapan to get the boy and as soon as they arrived she used magic again so that all the people slept, then they went up to the town. They looked for the boy, but they could not find him, and they were troubled. They went back home crying. As soon as Ligi woke up he went outdoors.

Five days later Ligi told his mother he thought they should build balaua. "We are going to make Sayang, mother, for we want to find the mother of this boy." Langa-an said, "Yes." Not long after they made balaua and when it became afternoon they made Libon [276] and they commanded someone to go and get the betel-nuts which were covered with gold, so that they might send them to invite all the people in the world. As soon as the people whom they sent arrived they oiled the betel-nuts, and sent them to all parts of the world to invite all the people.

Not long after the betel-nut which went to the town of Gamayawan arrived, "Good afternoon, lady. I cannot tarry, I came to invite you, for Ligi and his mother and father of Kadalayapan make Sayang," said the betel-nut. "I cannot come for there is no one to watch the house," said Gamayawan. "If you do not wish to come I will grow on your knee," said the betel-nut. "Grow on my big pig, for I cannot go," she said, so it went on to her big pig and the pig squealed very much. "You get off and come on my knee," said Gamayawan to the betel-nut, for she was sorry for her pig. So the betel-nut went on her knee, and it grew high so that it hurt her. "Ala, you betel-nut, I am going now to take a bath, and then I will come." So the betel-nut got off and she went to take a bath. When she arrived at the river she was in no hurry, for she did not wish to go, and the people from Pindayan, who were Iwaginan and his wife Gimbagonan, and the other people passed by the place where she was bathing, when they were going to attend the Sayang in Kadalayapan. They saw the pretty lady taking her bath by the river. "Ala, you Gimbagonan, give me some betel-nut so that I can give that lady a chew," said Iwaginan. "No, do not lose any time, we are in a hurry," said Gimbagonan. He compelled her to give it to him, so he went to give the lady the betel-nut and Gimbagonan was angry. As soon as Iwaginan reached the lady and offered her the betel-nut to chew she refused it, but he compelled her to chew it with him. As soon as he gave the betel-nut to her he urged her to go with them to attend the Sayang. The lady did not want to go, but he urged her very long, until she went with them. She said, "Wait for me here while I go to change my clothes, if you want me to accompany you, but it is shameful for me to go, for they did not invite me." She went slowly to their house and when Iwaginan and the others waited a long time for her Gimbagonan was angry with Iwaginan and said bad words to him.

Not long after an Agta [277] woman passed by them at the river. "Ay, Agta, did you not see the lady for whom we are waiting?" said Iwaginan. "No, I did not see her," said the Agta. "If you did not see her you come with us and we will go to attend Sayang" said Iwaginan to her. "I am ashamed to go, for I have no clothes," said the Agta. "No, if I wish it, do not be ashamed," said Iwaginan. Not long after they went. As soon as they arrived in Kadalayapan the Agta went to sit down behind a rice winnower, and Galinginayen was carried by his father and he took him past all the people and he noticed none of them, and when they were in front of the Agta he wanted to go to her, but the Agta winked at him and he did not go to her though he recognized her as his mother. Not long after the Agta became drunk, for they gave her much basi to drink. While she was drunk Iwaginan called Ligi. "Now, cousin Ligi, my companion the Agta is drunk and she has laid down on the ground. I want you to take her into the house and give her a mat."

Ligi took her into the house and he held her by the little finger for he did not want to touch her. As soon as they were in the house he put her by the door and he put some old clothes over her, and the boy said, when he saw his mother, "How bad my father is, for he gave my mother the old blankets which the dogs lie on." As soon as his father was among the people the boy changed the blankets on his mother, and he sucked milk from her breasts. As soon as he had sucked the milk from her breasts he went to play by the window, and the guests went below him, for they feared that he would fall. When they were there all the time Ligi went to the house. Not long after he arrived in the house he saw the breasts of the Agta twinkle like stars, and Ligi took the sharp knife and cut the skin off from the Agta. As soon as he had cut off all of the black skin, he threw it out of the window. He lifted her up and put her on a good mat, and all the people who went to attend balaua went to where the skin had fallen, for they thought it was the child who had fallen, and they saw it was the skin of the Agta. They were surprised.

Not long after Iwaginan was anxious to go home. "Ala, now, cousin Ligi, I want to go home, for we have been here so long a time, do not detain us. Go and get my Agta companion so that we can go home." "I don't know where your Agta companion is now, for I did not see where she went." Iwaginan was sorry and he went to look for her. Not long after he saw her on the mat. "She is on the mat, my cousin Iwaginan, but I do not like to let her go with you, for she is the cause of my making Sayang, for I wanted to find out who was the mother of the boy. Now she is his mother. The best thing for you to do is to marry Aponibolinayen and I am going to marry this woman," said Ligi.

Not long after Iwaginan went back home. As soon as they arrived in Pindayan he divorced Gimbagonan, and he went to marry Aponibolinayen. So truly he married Gamayawan. As soon as the pakalon was over, he paid the marriage price. Next evening Iwaginan and Aponibolinayen lived together. Next morning they went to wash their hair. "Wait for me here for I am going to dive in the river," said Iwaginan. So he dived, and he went to the place where the alan lived under the water and the alan said, "Eb we have something to eat for breakfast, it is a man." "No, do not eat me, I came to change my clothes," said Iwaginan. "Is Aponibolinayen here?" they said. "No," he said, and the alan covered each hair of his head with golden beads, and they gave clothes to him. After that when he went back home, they went to guide him. As soon as they arrived by the river they saw Aponibolinayen. "How cunning you are, Iwaginan! You told us she was not here, and she is here," said the alan. "If we had known that Aponibolinayen was by the river we would have eaten you, for we wanted to take her," they said. "No," said Iwaginan, and they went home. A day later he took Aponibolinayen to Pindayan and Gimbagonan prepared the baladon poison, because she wanted to kill Iwaginan. As soon as he and Aponibolinayen arrived in Pindayan, Gimbagonan went to their house, and she took betel-nuts. As soon as she reached the house she gave the nut to Aponibolinayen, and it had baladon poison on it. She gave also to Iwaginan, but it had no poison on it. As soon as they chewed the betel-nut Aponibolinayen died. Not long after Iwaginan sharpened his headaxe and spear, for he intended to cut off Gimbagonan's head. They went to get a medium [278] to make the ceremony for Aponibolinayen, and when the medium was making the ceremony she said, "Aponibolinayen cannot be cured unless Gimbagonan comes to cure her, for she used the poison which is baladon." Not long after they went to get Gimbagonan and Iwaginan was anxious to get her head, but she asked his pardon and she went to cure Aponibolinayen. As soon as she made Aponibolinayen drink of her medicine, she was at once alive again. Not long after Gimbagonan went back to her house, and when she went back Iwaginan said to her, "Do not do that." "You are not good, Iwaginan. I do not know why you divorced me," she said.

Previous Part     1  2  3  4  5  6  7     Next Part
Home - Random Browse