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The World's Fair
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In many parts of the Highlands, the natives are employed in feeding sheep and cattle, for the markets; and in the valleys, and other sheltered places, hemp, barley, flax, and potatoes, are cultivated, though unfortunately most of the barley is made into whiskey. In the more northernly parts the general employment is fishing.



Ireland is a much warmer and more fertile island; it is celebrated, in point of industry, for its wool, butter, beef, hides, tallow, cows, horses, pigs, sheep, potatoes, wheat, barley, oats, and linen. Linen is the chief manufacture. There are numerous mines, from which are obtained gold, silver, iron, copper, and lead; all very useful metals, I think.

There are also quarries of marble, slate, and freestone; and in various parts are found coal and turf. In Ireland, turf is the principal fuel used. The brewing of stout, and a strong bittered beer, for exportation; and the distilling of whiskey, another strong but spirituous drink, are other branches of Irish industry.

Fishing is an important occupation with those peasants who live on the sea-shore, and near the rivers or lakes. The making of roads, draining bogs, and improving the land, now employ thousands of poor labourers, who formerly used to be without any occupation.

The Irish dairies are well-managed and are generally extensive; many counties in the south part of the island are occupied almost entirely by dairy farms. As many as thirty or forty cows are kept on some of them, for butter is the chief produce, and this is sent into England, Portugal, and the East and West Indies. Some of the nice butter you eat on your bread and rolls comes from Ireland. Sheep and cattle are fed in great quantities on large pieces of land devoted to the purpose the sheep are large, and have fine wool.

The mud cabin of the Irish peasant is the most miserable cottage you can imagine; the walls are formed of clay, which hardens in the sunshine, the roof is made of sticks and straw, and the floor is the mere damp earth. It has frequently neither door, nor chimney, and consists of only one room; the furniture is rarely more than a stump bedstead, two or three stools, an iron pot, to boil the potatoes in, and a table to eat them from. Generally, there is a small piece of land attached to the dwelling, and in this potatoes are grown; the peasants of Ireland hardly ever eat anything besides potatoes. When they have enough of them to eat, and a little whiskey to drink, the poor people are exceedingly jovial and merry; they laugh, sing, and joke; and go to weddings, fairs, dances, and what are called in Ireland "wakes," which, among the poor, is a kind of laying in state before funerals;—but sometimes the crops of potatoes fail, and then the unfortunate peasants die by hundreds from hunger. The favourite dance of the common people is called a jig.

Dublin, which, I dare say, you know is the capital of Ireland, is an elegant city, with fine houses and good streets. The churches, the castle, the linen hall, exchange, bank, custom-house, and post-office, are all very noble buildings. There are also parks, gardens, theatres, canals, and other ornamental places throughout the city. From Dublin have been sent models of carriages, specimens of metals, slates, and linens, and a model of a house made in granite.



I have now told you, my dear little friends, a great many stories about the industry of all nations, and we have gone through the World's Show together. We have seen nearly all the useful and splendid things sent to the Great Exhibition from all parts of the world. I have told you about Europe, and Asia, Africa, and America; and I must soon leave you. But before I go, we must have another look at the Exhibition, and one more glance at those few things which we have not as yet seen.

We forgot to examine this magnificent chess-board, worth one thousand two hundred guineas. You will doubtless wonder why it is such a dear board, but your surprise will cease when you observe that the "checks," as they are called, are of mother-of-pearl and tortoiseshell, while the rim is of beautifully burnished gold, and the chessmen are of gold and silver, elaborately wrought, and ornamented with the portraits of celebrated historical characters; one of them represents the Emperor, Charles the Fifth. I dare say you would like to play a game with me on this chess-board. As a companion to this beautiful chess-board, is a very elegant colour box, fit for the Queen, or the most noble young lady in the land, to use for painting with. And here is a model of the town of Liverpool, with several thousand little people in the streets; and these figures are so exceedingly small, that a thousand of them would fit into an ordinary sized pill box.

In contrast to this specimen of a great town in a minute space, we have in front of the transept a wonderful clock, which is kept in motion by a set of powerful electro magnets, eight in number, on which is wound a length of twenty-five thousand feet of copper wire. This gigantic time-keeper sets in motion the immense hands on the principal dial, which is twenty-four feet in diameter, besides two smaller ones which are fixed in front of the galleries, at the east and west ends of the building. I am afraid that it would tire you, were I to attempt to tell you exactly what electricity is, and must therefore satisfy your curiosity, for the present, by letting you know that it is caused by the coming in contact of different substances possessing peculiar properties, which cause them to vibrate, when they touch.

There is another very curious clock in the Exhibition, which will go for a hundred years before requiring to be wound up again; and there is one wheel in it which is said would take ten thousand years to go round once.

Next there is a case of stuffed birds, which came from Scotland, and which we cannot help admiring. There are in this case specimens of all the various kinds of birds which are peculiar to Scotland, neatly and carefully stuffed; and really they almost look as if they were alive. Ah, ah! Mister Eagle, you are not so much to be feared now, I think, as you were when you lived in your lofty home in the Highland mountains.

And here is another case in which are all the different sorts of mother-of-pearl buttons that can be imagined; there is every variety of ornament on the buttons, which look exceedingly brilliant.

This immense block of granite, from Scotland, is not quite so pretty, though it is, perhaps, more useful; it is twenty feet long, and is a piece of the finest kind and colour that could be found. Another very useful thing, also from Scotland, is a large lighthouse bell, managed so as to ring very loud, to warn any ship that is going too near a dangerous rock or shoal, near the lighthouse where the bell may be.

Among the more beautiful specimens of industry, there are several elegant vases made of silver, and of a delicate material called Parian, which is an imitation of Parian marble; some of them are ornamented with blue and gold, and others are ornamented with silver. There is also a splendid tea-service, adorned with charming pictures of the dear old fables we all know so well,—the "Lion and the Mouse," the "Wolf and the Lamb," the "Dog and the Shadow," and others.

Near the very middle of the building, close by the crystal fountain, there are the splendid iron gates from Coalbrookdale, which look very magnificent. I fancy Samson would find it rather a difficult matter trying to bear off these gates on his back, strong as he was. Close by these gates there is a gigantic statue of our good Queen, on horseback, which towers high over our heads; and she sits smiling at us as if she could see us looking so delighted.

There are several gigantic things at the Exhibition. Here, for one, is a monster cake, covered with the most superb ornaments; it is four feet high, and weighs about two-hundred and twenty-five pounds. Yonder is another monster contribution, an immense map of the busy city of Manchester; and there is a huge railway carriage; and still further on, there is an iron wire, one mile long. At a little distance stands a magnificent bed and bedstead, fit for the Queen to sleep in. It came from Edinburgh, and is made mostly of materials which can be produced in Scotland. And in this direction, we can see a set of beautiful mantelpieces and fenders, from Sheffield, all decorated in the most elegant manner. The first mantelpiece we must look at is made of cast-iron; the mouldings of the cornice are richly ornamented, and supported by little pillars covered with graceful wreaths of oak-leaves, while the freize is adorned with a cluster of rich fruit. The next mantelpiece is painted white and gold, and has a burnished steel grate; while the third is painted blue and gold, and has a stove made on a new plan, for it is managed so that its own brightness shall help to throw out the heat of the fire in an equal and agreeable manner. The fourth and last mantelpiece is painted black, and ornamented with ormolu; it contains a polished steel stove. Three ormolu fenders, and five bright ones are placed together with the mantelpieces; and they certainly make a goodly show. But we must now leave them, and go on to see some other wonders.

Here are several most beautiful loo-tables inlaid, and they seem to attract a good deal of attention from more than us. You look a little puzzled at the word inlaid; I think I must explain it to you, by telling you that it means pieces of different material let into a piece of furniture to ornament it.

There are numerous models of various buildings in the Crystal Palace; those of York Cathedral, and Chance's Lighthouse, are particularly well made. There is also a model of the Britannia Tubular Bridge; and there are models of many of the fine public works of London.

Here is a pair of scissors made in Sheffield, and ornamented in the most beautiful way, with a crown for a handle; and yonder are a pair of cotton stockings from Ireland, spun so fine that they look exactly like silk, and indeed you would be likely to mistake them for silk, if you were not told they were merely cotton.

How brilliant this collection of gems looks; how the stones sparkle! they have been sent as specimens of the jewels which Ireland produces. But here are some pretty English agates; and a huge mass of Irish rock crystal, which is very bright and clear. In a compartment, at a little distance, we may see a book, bound according to a new method, by which the leaves are so firmly placed together, that they would not loosen in ten years' time, no matter how the book was tossed about, unless they were purposely taken out.

We must now have a look at the machinery department. Firstly, there is the great steam-engine that works all the other steam-engines in the Exhibition, though, of course, you cannot understand it by looking at it; neither can I, although I know so much more than you do. Near it is a model of a new agricultural machine for cutting, turning up, and making into light mould, the clay of fields, so as to make it ready to receive the seeds to be set, without the farmers being obliged to plough the earth. There is a machine for making bricks and tiles, so that people may, if they like, form those materials for building houses cheaper and better than in the usual way. But here is a useful machine. It is a measuring machine, by which you could measure to the smallest size, even to the hundred-thousandth part of an inch!

Here is a very pretty contribution; it is a model of the house of the great play-writer, Shakspeare,—of whom, perhaps, you may have heard,—and it is surrounded by figures representing different beautiful scenes from Shakspeare's plays. It was made by a workman in his leisure time: and it certainly does him credit. It is called the Shakspeare Jubilee.

Yonder is another piece of ingenious industry; it is a group of figures showing all the various Scotch games; there is one figure dancing the Highland fling, another throwing the beam, and all the others engaged in similar sports. That came from Scotland, of course.

Let us now go on to look at that splendid design embroidered in gold, and intended for a communion cloth. Oh! here it is; does it not look beautiful? But here are several lovely specimens of china, and earthenware, which would grace the sideboards of the richest house in the land, I think. Here is a fine marble font, made of Devonshire marble, which is very nicely carved, as well as I can judge. Further on, we have some less showy, but more solidly useful articles. Various kinds of iron, copper, zinc, lead, silver, and gold ores are displayed, with oils, quartz, stones, coal, &c. There are lanterns on a new plan, microscopes, barometers, optical and philosophical instruments, farming implements, machines for melting metals;—besides hundreds of other articles which we cannot stop to notice more particularly. There are two or three very interesting models of mines, with mining machinery, and plans for improving the air of the mines, so as to make the poor miners more comfortable. And there are other models of ships, printing presses, looms, and machines for making gas, which deserve some degree of attention. There is also a new machine for printing cotton on both sides, which will be very useful, as the cotton printed with it will be as ornamental on one side as the other.

There are four splendid and very powerful organs, and several beautiful piano fortes, in the Exhibition; and there is an accurate model of Plymouth Breakwater, with a very very little ship attached to it, and all complete, even to the smallest rope ladder. Plymouth Breakwater is a vast heap of stones built across the entrance of the Sound, so as to leave a passage for ships at each end, but preventing the heavy waves of the Atlantic Ocean from dashing into the harbour. It has cost more than a million of pounds in money.

Here we have a beautiful writing table for ladies, which is one of the most splendid things in the Exhibition, and which came from that land of ingenuity and industry, Switzerland. It is made of two kinds of wood, white and red, the Swiss national colours; and is cleverly managed by machinery, so that by merely pressing a spring, the whole contents of the desk is laid before the spectator, while, at the same time, a stand for writing on, and a seat, are produced. It is covered with figures of men and animals, and with ornaments most exquisitely carved; and it is a writing table which the greatest lady in England might use.

Along the centre of the aisle, or chief walk, are arranged colossal statues, pillars of marble, beautiful fountains, magnificent feathers, crystals of alum, crystals of spermaceti oil, specimens of silk manufactures, from Spitalfields; and fine cutlery, from Sheffield. There is also an immense dome of iron and glass, forty feet high which looks very astonishing; and a curious Russian chain bridge, which is very ingeniously made. Besides these, we have a gigantic telescope, which attracts a great deal of attention from the crowd of people who are walking down the aisle.

In the nave there are several beautiful pieces of sculpture. One is a colossal group, representing St. Michael conquering Satan; another is a figure of the celebrated warrior, Godfrey of Bouillon, mounted on horseback; and a third, is an Amazon, who is just about to hurl her javelin at a ferocious tiger, who has fastened on the neck and shoulders of her frightened horse. Here is also a figure of Mazeppa on the wild horse, which is extremely well made, and, perhaps, reminds those of my little friends who have seen the play of "Mazeppa" at Astley's Amphitheatre, of the scenes where poor Mazeppa was carried along on the terrible horse's back, through brambles, thorns, and crashing boughs. But what have we here? A grim-looking growling bronze lion, from Bavaria, who glares at us as if he would be only too glad to eat us up if he were alive, and does not seem at all the kind of beast one would like to shake hands, or rather paws, with.

We have a charming representation of Reinecke Fox's adventures, by means of stuffed animals, in the German portion of the Exhibition. The expression of the different animals is very funny, and makes us laugh to almost an inconvenient degree. The first group represents the fox, with his rosary in his hand, confessing his sins to the cock, who is listening very gravely, and reading him a sermon on his wickedness.

The next group shows the tom-cat, coming to summon Master Reinecke to court, to answer the accusations brought against him; the fox sets out, and on his way wounds a poor hare, whom he carries with him. But we cannot stay to notice all the groups now; only we must just glance at the fox lying on the sheep's skin, after his repast, for here Master Reinecke's expression shows him to be so well satisfied and comfortable that it is very droll.

In the Russian division we may observe a most magnificent pair of candlesticks of bronze, gilt, which look exceedingly sparkling and brilliant, and are the first objects that meet our eyes as we enter the department.

In the transept, at the opposite end to where the gates from Coalbrookdale are situated, are another beautiful specimen of ornamented gates for a park, in the style of the elegantly wrought iron work, made about a hundred and fifty years since, and which adorn the entrances to many of the old mansions of England. Some parts of these are tastefully gilt, and produce a remarkably pretty effect.

It would take us more than a month to see everything in the Crystal Palace, and those who wish to examine all the wonders, must pay several visits. But we have, I think, seen enough for the present, and will now leave the Exhibition, if you are satisfied. Perhaps, before I go, you would like me to describe the ceremony of the opening of our Palace of Wonders, by our good Queen? If so, I shall be very happy indeed to oblige you, by telling you all I saw on the first of May.

Early in the morning of that day,—soon after dawn,—thousands of people in London were wending their way towards Hyde Park; horses feet, and carriage-wheels clattered through the streets, and strange looking foreigners passed along among the crowd, all eager to see the procession.

I dare say you would have been delighted with the grand sight:—first there came a long line of splendid carriages, containing various lords and ladies, in gorgeous costumes;—diamonds flashing, and feathers waving; next came a troop of Life Guards in scarlet coats, bright cuirasses, and glittering helmets: they were escorting the Queen's carriage, which was followed by a goodly number of other carriages. You should have heard how the crowds huzzaed and shouted when they saw the Queen, who looked very much pleased, bowing and smiling to her people. She entered the building amid the loud cheers and hurras, followed by Prince Albert, the Prince of Wales, and the Princess Royal. After staying a short time in the elegant robing-room, which was fitted up in a single night, her Majesty proceeded to her throne, between flower stands, and tropical plants, past the Coalbrookdale gates, and the fountains and statues with which the centre of the palace is adorned. When she appeared, the twenty-five thousand people, who were present, rose to welcome her.—Ladies waving their handkerchiefs, the gentlemen their hats;—and you may readily guess how splendid the scene looked. Even the sun popped out his head from the clouds, and poured a flood of golden light in through the glittering dome of the transept, to illuminate the brilliant spectacle.

As soon as Her Majesty was seated on her throne, one of the organs commenced pealing forth the notes of the National Anthem, the choir, which was collected for the occasion, singing to the music. After this, Prince Albert joined those gentlemen who have directed the affairs of the Great Exhibition, and going near to the Queen, read to her an account of the Exhibition from the commencement; to which Her Majesty answered, when the Prince had finished, that she was much pleased with the description of the proceedings, and that she hoped the World's Fair would do good to all mankind, by encouraging the arts of peace and industry, strengthening the bonds of love between all the nations of the earth, and promoting a friendly rivalry among our fellow creatures, in the useful exercise of those faculties which have been given by GOD for the good and happiness of all mankind.

The Queen having read this answer, the Archbishop of Canterbury approached the throne, and offered up a prayer to Heaven, intreating the Lord's blessing on the Exhibition; that it might benefit every body on earth, making them love and help each other. I hope all that heard the prayer, joined in it with heart and soul: and I hope, too, that my dear little readers will think of it when they go to the Crystal Palace.

At the close of the prayer, the choir sang the Hallelujah chorus, and you may form some idea of the effect of this performance, when I tell you that all the persons who sing at the Queen's Chapel, at St. Paul's Cathedral, Westminster Abbey, and St. George's Chapel, Windsor, were all singing together, besides part of the band of the Sacred Harmonic Society, pupils of the Royal Academy of Music, and many other songsters, both foreign and English.

The immensity of the building left scope for the rich volume of sound poured forth; and you may imagine what an effect the splendid strains had on the feelings of the multitude of spectators. Indeed, one of the audience,—a Chinaman, was so excited by the grandeur of the scene, and the triumphant music, that he rushed forwards, made his way through the crowd of nobles and ladies that surrounded the Queen, and, advancing close to Her Majesty, saluted her by a grand salaam, which she graciously acknowledged with a smile and a bow. A salaam, you must know, is the eastern way of bowing, and consists in bending the head until it almost touches the ground.

When the Hallelujah chorus ceased, the procession was formed for the Queen to go round the building. First went the heralds, in their splendid costumes; then a great number of gentlemen, who were more immediately concerned with the Exhibition; after them, the Duke of Wellington,—of whom, I dare say you know,—with more gentlemen, and the Archbishop of Canterbury; and then the Queen and Prince Albert, with the Prince of Wales, and the Princess Royal, both of whom looked extremely delighted and astonished with the gorgeous spectacle they were viewing. The Royal Family was followed by a number of lords, ladies, and attendants, the procession being concluded by heralds.

The train first went to the west end of the nave, on the north side, everybody cheering loudly as it passed. The view varied every minute, but was always picturesque, and beautiful. Even those persons who were most acquainted with the wondrous objects that lay on every side, were surprised by the new and charming attractions displayed. The Indian collection, and the compartment filled with specimens from the colonies, were left behind; the department devoted to sculpture, and other finer products of industry, was passed, and the procession moved into that portion of the palace which contains the English manufacturing products. You might then have caught a glimpse, over the heads of the spectators, of the Furniture Court, where the furniture is placed; and of the fixed machinery beyond it, the massive iron form of each machine looking as much as to say "move me, if you can." Then the procession passed the enormous dome of iron and glass, the two gigantic statues, the figure of Shakspeare, and the many other objects which adorn the centre aisle; leaving behind the furs of bears, and other wild animals, hung beneath the galleries, and the carpets which lent their brilliant colours to finish the decorations; it reached the western entrance, where it was reflected in the immense mirror, exhibited at that point. Then, turning round by the model of the Liverpool Docks, it was returning on the south side of the nave, when the gigantic organ placed there, suddenly hurled forth an immense volume of music, which sounded extremely fine: but every one was already so much astonished, that I do not think anything more could surprise them. At length the procession reached the transept, round the south end of which it proceeded, and then swept into the Foreign Department of the Exhibition, where great efforts had been made to receive it properly. The French had collected together all the choicest specimens of their manufactures to grace the foremost part of their division; and I am sure you would have admired the tasteful manner in which the contributors decorated the collection. Some of the other countries, as their exhibitors had sent in their contributions sooner than the French, were of course able to make a more satisfactory appearance. The two organs, from France and Germany, each, in turn, poured forth their music as the procession passed; and two or three of the Queen's bands played a march as the pageat moved round the eastern end of the building.

At last the procession returned along the north side of the nave, the cheering and waving of hats and handkerchiefs, which had continued all the time getting now more joyful than ever; and the Queen returned once more to her throne. One of the noblemen, named the Marquis of Breadalbane, then called out in a loud tone of voice, that Her Majesty declared the Exhibition open; a flourish of trumpets, and a roar of cannon, told the people outside that all was now concluded, and the Queen, with the royal family and other attendants, left the Crystal Palace, the choir again singing the National Anthem.

In order that the workmen and their families, who come to see the Exhibition, should live comfortably when they return home again, Prince Albert has had a model building erected, with four dwellings, or sets of rooms, each containing all the conveniences essential to a distinct family-house, with four distinct entrances for the four different families, such as he wishes every honest working couple in this country, and indeed every honest couple in all parts of the world, should possess. And, in order to shew to working men, and to builders, and to persons of property who desire to do good, how they can usefully assist their fellow creatures to comfortable habitations, for the same rent that they now pay for closely-built, unhealthy ones, he has erected these four model houses under one roof, each of them dry, warm, convenient, fire-proof, and healthy, and yet cheap. They are built of very hard hollow bricks, made by machinery, and are situate at the corner of the barrack yard, near to the Crystal Palace, and will be shown freely to all persons visiting the World's Fair.

Now, boys and girls, good-bye; I know you are sorry to see me going away, and you may be certain I am sorry to be obliged to leave you. But I hope we shall soon meet again, for I am thinking of coming to see you very shortly, to tell you more stories and have another talk with you. So, if you say you have been amused, and have learned something, by reading these stories, I will pay you another visit soon, and tell you something more about other things. But in the mean time, let us hope that the suggestions of Prince Albert, the husband of our gracious Queen, will do good; and that every body, and every nation, may become better, and learn more, and love each other more, in consequence of meeting together, in friendship and harmony, at

"THE WORLD'S FAIR."



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THE WORLD's FAIR; OR, CHILDREN'S PRIZE GIFT BOOK OF THE GREAT EXHIBITION OF 1851.

Describing the beautiful Inventions and Manufactures exhibited there; with pretty stories about the People who have made and sent those beautiful Articles to be exhibited, and how they live when at home.—Embellished with numerous elegant engravings, a frontispiece, and pictorial title-page.

2s. 6d. elegantly bound in cloth.

SUNSHINE AND SHOWERS; or, STORIES FOR THE CHILDREN OF ENGLAND; By M.E.T. author of "Silver Blossoms to produce Golden Fruit." Embellished with illustrative engravings, and eight pages of plates, beautifully printed in lithography.

2s. 6d. elegantly bound in cloth.

ILLUSTRATED JUVENILE KEEPSAKE OF AMUSEMENT AND INSTRUCTION. With upwards of sixty engravings.

1s. sewed,—or 1s. 6d. bound in cloth, lettered.

SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS; The Well-behaved Little Boy. The Attentive, Inattentive, Covetous Dilatory, Exact, Quarrelsome, and Good Little Boy. By S. Lovechild 1s. sewed,—Square size, with seven coloured engravings.

SKETCHES OF LITTLE GIRLS; The Good-natured Little Girl, the Thoughtless, the Vain, the Orderly, the Slovenly, the Snappish, the Persevering, the Forward, the Modest, and the Awkward, Little Girl. By Solomon Lovechild.

1s. sewed,—Square size, with seven coloured engravings.

THE THREE BASKETS, Or, THE LITTLE GARDENER, LITTLE PAINTER, AND LITTLE CARPENTER. Describing how, and in what manner, Henry, Richard, and Charles, were occupied during the absence of their Father. By Mrs. Burden.

1s. sewed,—Square size, with seven coloured engravings.

DAME WIGGINS OF LEE, AND HER WONDERFUL CATS; A humorous tale, about the worthy old Dame and her Seven whiskered favourites: written by a Lady of Ninety.

1s. sewed,—Square size, with fifteen coloured engravings.

EASY AND INTERESTING HISTORIES, FOR LITTLE FOLKS; BY MISS CORNER, Author of the Historical Library, &c.

Price sixpence each, printed in large type, and embellished with four pages of descriptive tinted plates, and sewed in fancy wrappers.

THE ANCIENT BRITONS. Describing their Manners and Customs; and how they were conquered, and Britain was governed by the Romans. 6d.

THE CONQUEST OF THE ROMANS AND BRITONS BY THE SAXONS; and an interesting Account of the Saxon Heptarchy, or the Seven Saxon Kingdoms in England at one time.

6d. With four pages of illustrations.

THE LIFE AND TIMES OF ALFRED THE GREAT. an interesting Narrative. 6d. Four pages of illustrations.

THE NORMAN CONQUEST; four pages of illustrations. And the manner in which the People of England lived during the Reign of William the Conqueror. An interesting Narrative. 6d.

ENGLAND, AND ITS PEOPLE IN THE FEUDAL TIMES.

6d. Four pages of Illustrations

THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND; WITH THE MANNERS AND CONDITION OF THE PEOPLE IN THE MIDDLE AGES.

6d. With four pages of illustrations.

AN INTERESTING DESCRIPTION OF ENGLAND IN THE SIXTEENTH AND SEVENTEENTH CENTURIES.

Showing the Condition of the People, and how they lived and dressed during the Reign of Henry the Seventh, to the death of William the Third. 6d. Four pages of illustrations.

AN INTERESTING DESCRIPTION OF ENGLAND IN THE EIGHTEENTH AND NINETEENTH CENTURIES.

Showing the Condition of the People, their modes of life, and how they lived and dressed from the Reign of James the Second, to that of Queen Victoria. 6d. Four pages of illustrations.

These Eight Histories may be had, bound in One Volume, in fancy cloth, gilt sides and edges, suitable for a present, price 8s. 6d.

* * * * *

PLEASANT TALES FOR LITTLE PEOPLE,

SIX-PENCE EACH,—SEWED IN FANCY COVERS, PRINTED IN COLORS,

Each embellished with numerous Engravings on wood.

SQUIRE GRAY'S FRUIT FEAST.

With an account of how he entertained his Young Friends; and some of the Pretty Tales he gave to them as Prizes.

6d. Fourteen engravings.

MIRTHFUL MOMENTS; or, HOW TO ENJOY HOLIDAYS.

A collection of Mirthful and Pleasing Games and Forfeits: with Plain Directions for Playing each Game, and how to Cry the Forfeits.

6d. with appropriate engravings.

ANNE AND JANE; or, GOOD ADVICE AND GOOD EXAMPLE.

A Tale for Young Children. By Miss J. STRICKLAND.

6d. Fifteen engravings.

SUNSHINE AND TWILIGHT; or, THE PROSPERITY AND ADVERSITY OF TWO COUSINS.

Exhibiting the sure reward of amiable manners and good conduct.

6d. Fifteen engravings.

TROUBLES ARISING FROM BEING TOO LATE; or THE TWO SISTERS.

6d. Nineteen engravings.

A PRINCE IN SEARCH OF A WIFE; or, ROSETTA AND THE FAIRY.—A Trial of Charity.

6d. Fifteen engravings.

CHARITY WOOD, THE LITTLE ORPHAN. A Tale for Young Children. By Miss Jane Strickland.

6d. Many engravings.

THE LITTLE TRAVELLER'S TRAVELLINGS IN EUROPE.

6d. Sixteen engravings.

* * * * *

NURSERY PICTURE BOOKS,—in illustrated covers. size 4to. royal,—five sheets of coloured plates in each book.

THE FIVE DIVISIONS OF THE GLOBE:—Europe, Asia, Africa, America, and Polynesia or Australia. Illustrated for Little Folks, on Five Large Plates: and done up in a fancy cover.

Price 1s. plain; or, 1s. 6d. coloured.

THE FOUR ELEMENTS:—or, Fire, Air, Earth, and Water. Illustrated for Little Folks. And the Old English Nursery Rhyme of Simple Simon, set to Music. On Five Large Plates; and done up in a fancy cover.

Price 1s. plain: or, 1s. 6d. coloured.

THE FIVE SENSES,—Hearing, Seeing, Smelling, Tasting, and Feeling. And the FOUR SEASONS,—Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter. Illustrated for Little Folks, on Five Large Plates; and done up in a fancy cover.

1s. plain; or, 1s. 6d. coloured

THE NURSERY RHYMES OF OLD ENGLAND, Set to Music, for Little Folks. Containing, The Queen of Hearts,—Bye! Baby Bunting,—Who comes here? a Grenadier!—Little Boy Blue,—and, The Lion and the Unicorn. Illustrated on Five Large Plates; and done up in Fancy cover.

Price 1s. plain; or, 1s. 6d. coloured.

THE ROYAL NURSERY PICTURE BOOK,—the Nursery Alphabet,—the Royal Family,—the comparative sizes of Animals,—and a "Morland."

1s. plain; or, 1s. 6d. coloured.

PLEASANT TALES FOR LITTLE PEOPLE.

An interesting collection of amusing and instructive Stories, for Young Persons.

With upwards of eighty superior engravings, 2s. 6d. bound in fancy Green cloth, with gilt edges and side.

VISIT TO THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS, REGENT'S PARK.

A pleasing description of this delightful place of fashionable resort, and of the nature and peculiar habits of the many rare and remarkable Animals contained therein. By J. BISHOP.

Square size, with 12 coloured engravings, and 31 cuts of the animals. 1s. bound in cloth.

A GIFT TO YOUNG FRIENDS; OR, THE GUIDE TO GOOD; About the Good Man of the Mill,—from whom all Good Things come—the Lost Purse,—Self-will,—the Careless Boy,—the Good Boy,—and the Way to Save. In words of One Syllable. By Miss Corner.

Square size, with seven coloured engravings.—1s, in cloth.

SHORT TALES IN SHORT WORDS,

About the Lame Boy,—the Sea Shore,—the Cross Boy,—and the Stray Child. By Mrs. Burden.

Square size, with seven coloured engravings.—1s. in cloth.

LITTLE CHILD'S ALPHABET OF NOUNS, or BOOK OF OBJECTS: the Letters in large and small characters; each Letter illustrated by a number of pleasing engravings of Objects expressive of the Letter.—

In large 4to., with the engravings neatly coloured.

GEOGRAPHICAL ALPHABET; a new and pleasing Introduction to a knowledge of some of the most celebrated places, or interesting countries, of the habitable world. By B. CLAYTON.

In large 4to., with twenty-six coloured engravings.

PETER PALLETTE's PICTURES FOR PAINTING: Thirteen Numbers, price 4d. each; or bound in 2 vols, 1st series, 2s. 6d. 2nd series, 3s. 6d.

WORRET's NEW OUTLINE DRAWING-BOOK;

A series of progressive lessons, by which the principles of the Art, as applied to figure, ornamental, and mechanical Drawing, may be easily and correctly acquired.—ON STONE, BY W. HEATH.

3s. the set of six numbers; or 3s. 6d. in cloth.

EVERY CHILD'S DRAWING-BOOK; Easy and familiar Subjects by HEATH and BARFOOT. In Seven Progressive Numbers.

1s. the set.

YOUNG ARTIST'S DRAWING-BOOK of EASY SUBJECTS, in Lithography and Ink. By BARFOOT and HEATH. In 13 Numbers.

1s. the set.

GRANDPAPA EASY'S COLOURED

ORIGINAL AND SPLENDID PICTORIAL TOY BOOKS,

SIX-PENCE EACH. SIZE, LARGE OCTAVO SUPER-ROYAL.

GRANDPAPA EASY'S LITTLE PIG'S RAMBLE FROM HOME. Embellished with eight coloured engravings.

GRANDPAPA EASY's LAUGHABLE STORY ABOUT TOM PEPPER. With twenty coloured engravings.

GRANDPAPA EASY's TWO SISTERS; OR, WHO WOULD NOT BE INDUSTRIOUS? Eight coloured engravings.

GRANDPAPA EASY's 'LITTLE GENTLEMAN,'—GENERAL TOM THUMB. With eight coloured engravings.

GRANDPAPA EASY's NEW MOTHER GOOSE AND THE GOLDEN EGGS. Eight coloured engravings.

GRANDPAPA EASY's LADY GOLIGHTLY AND HER COUSINS THE GRASSHOPPERS. With nine coloured engravings.

GRANDPAPA EASY's NEW STORY OF THE LION AND THE UNICORN FIGHTING FOR THE CROWN. Eight coloured engravings.

GRANDPAPA EASY's PRETTY POETRY, ABOUT TREES, FRUITS, and FLOWERS. With twenty-seven coloured engravings.

GRANDPAPA EASY's JACKO's MERRY METHOD OF LEARNING THE PENCE TABLE. Eight coloured engravings.

GRANDPAPA EASY's PRETTY POETICAL SPELLING BOOK. Twenty-eight coloured engravings.

GRANDPAPA EASY's COUNTRIES OF EUROPE. Embellished with fourteen coloured engravings.

GRANDPAPA EASY's MARQUIS OF CARABAS; OR, NEW PUSS IN BOOTS. With fifteen coloured engravings.

GRANDPAPA EASY's AMUSING ADDITION; A NEW POETICAL NUMBER BOOK. Sixteen coloured engravings.

GRANDPAPA EASY's COCK ROBIN ALIVE AND WELL AGAIN; with seven coloured engravings.

All Six-pence each,—with handsome Coloured Engravings.

GRANDMAMMA EASY'S COLOURED

ORIGINAL AND SPLENDID PICTORIAL TOY BOOKS,

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GRANDMAMMA EASY's NEW STORIES ABOUT THE ALPHABET. With twenty-six coloured engravings.

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GRANDMAMMA EASY's NEW STORY ABOUT OLD DADDY LONGLEGS. Illustrated with eight coloured engravings.

GRANDMAMMA EASY's NEW STORY ABOUT LITTLE JACK HORNER. With eight coloured engravings.

GRANDMAMMA EASY's MICHAELMAS DAY, OR, FATE OF POOR MOLLY GOOSEY. Eight coloured engravings.

GRANDMAMMA EASY's ALDERMAN's FEAST: A NEW ALPHABET. Illustrated with eight coloured engravings.

GRANDMAMMA EASY's ACCOUNT OF THE PUBLIC BUILDINGS OF LONDON. With twelve coloured engravings.

GRANDMAMMA EASY's WONDERS OF A TOY-SHOP. Embellished with eight coloured engravings.

GRANDMAMMA EASY's NEW STORY OF THE QUEEN OF HEARTS. With eight coloured engravings.

GRANDMAMMA EASY's NEW STORY ABOUT LITTLE TOM THUMB AND HIS MOTHER. Eight coloured plates.

GRANDMAMMA EASY's PRETTY STORIES ABOUT THE ELEPHANT. Embellished with eight coloured engravings.

GRANDMAMMA EASY's PRETTY STORIES ABOUT THE CAMEL. With nine coloured engravings.

GRANDMAMMA EASY's TRAVELS OF LITTLE MATTY MACARONI. With nine coloured engravings.

GRANDMAMMA EASY's DAME BANTRY AND HER CAT; A HUMOUROUS TALE; with seven coloured engravings.

All Six-pence each,—with handsome Coloured Engravings.

NEW SERIES OF ORIGINAL PICTORIAL TOY BOOKS.

SIX-PENCE EACH, WITH SPLENDID COLOURED ENGRAVINGS.

ENTITLED

COUSIN HONEYCOMB'S

AMUSING MULTIPLICATION; illustrated and explained, in twenty appropriate engravings.

AMUSING SUBSTRACTION; rendered easy and plain by twenty-three appropriate engravings.

AMUSING DIVISION, made familiar to the opening mind, by twenty-three appropriate engravings.

AMUSING PENCE TABLE; in a new, easy, and pleasing manner; with fifteen appropriate engravings.

RAILWAY ALPHABET, shewing all that can be seen in Railway travelling, exhibited in twenty-four engravings.

ALPHABET OF TRADES; exhibiting the working of the several trades, in forty-one descriptive engravings.

NEW ROYAL A, B, C, AND SPELLING-BOOK, in a new and familiar manner: with twenty-six pretty engravings, and twenty-six large ornamental coloured letters.

PLEASING POPULAR RHYMES FOR THE NURSERY, or, the sayings and singings of infancy, in a new dress; ornamented with twenty-six humourous engravings.

PLEASING POPULAR NURSERY RIDDLES, AND PUZZLES; upon the same plan as the above; thirty engravings.

MY AUNT'S BALL; an ALPHABET; shewing who were there,—what they had,—and how they behaved themselves,—with twenty-four engravings.

A PRINCE AND HIS THREE GIFTS; how he used his three gifts; and about a good and beautiful lady; with eight large engravings.

STORY OF LITTLE JOEY, who came up to London a poor little boy, and afterwards became a great man;—with ten engravings.

TALES OF THE MONTHS AND SEASONS: and what we see and enjoy all the year round; with twelve engravings.

THE MOUSE AND HER SONS; a rural tale;—with eight coloured engravings.



UNCLE BUNCLE'S ORIGINAL TOY BOOKS,

SIX-PENCE EACH.

EMBELLISHED WITH LARGE APPROPRIATE COLORED ENGRAVINGS, AND IN FANCY COVERS.

UNCLE BUNCLE's DEATH AND BURIAL OF POOR COCK ROBIN, AND THE TRIAL OF THE SPARROW FOR SHOOTING HIM. With seven coloured engravings.

UNCLE BUNCLE's NEW STORY ABOUT MASTER NOBODY, and his many wonderful exploits. 7 coloured engravings.

UNCLE BUNCLE's VISIT TO LITTLE JOHNNY GREEN, the best little Boy that ever was seen, with 7 coloured engravings.

UNCLE BUNCLE's TWO LITTLE COTTAGE CHILDREN, and the means by which they became rich. Seven coloured engravings.

UNCLE BUNCLE's ALPHABET OF OBJECTS. Embellished with many coloured plates.

UNCLE BUNCLE's NEW A, B, C. With fourteen pretty and appropriate coloured pictures.

UNCLE BUNCLE's NEW STORIES ABOUT ANIMALS. Seven coloured engravings.

UNCLE BUNCLE's COMICAL BOYS, With fourteen coloured plates.

UNCLE BUNCLE's NEW STORIES ABOUT BIRDS, Seven coloured pictures.

UNCLE BUNCLE's LORD MAYOR'S SHOW; A NEW AND POPULAR MULTIPLICATION TABLE: With fourteen coloured pictures of the Procession by Land and Water.

UNCLE BUNCLE's STORY ABOUT THE SICK LITTLE ROBIN, AND HIS KIND LITTLE NURSE JENNY WREN. With seven coloured engravings.

UNCLE BUNCLE's STORIES ABOUT LITTLE PETER's VISIT TO THE FARM. With seven coloured engravings.



CORNER'S HISTORICAL LIBRARY,

FOR

YOUTH, SCHOOLS, AND FAMILIES:

PUBLISHED BY DEAN & SON, 35, THREADNEEDLE-STREET, LONDON:

COMPRISING

A COMPLETE HISTORY OF EVERY NATION IN EUROPE,

Uniformly printed, each Country in a separate Volume; with Illustrations from Historical Subjects, elegantly engraven on Steel, from designs by Franklin, Jones, and Gilbert; and an Accurate Map to each Volume; well bound in cloth, lettered;

COMMENCING WITH THE EARLIEST PERIOD OF AUTHENTIC RECORD, AND BROUGHT DOWN TO THE PRESENT TIME:

ACCURATELY POURTRAYING THE NATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS, AND DOMESTIC HABITS, OF THE PEOPLE.

BY MISS CORNER,

Author of "Questions on the History of Europe," a Sequel to Mangnall's Historical Questions, &c. &c.

The object of these Works,—peculiarly suited to Schools and Families,—is to furnish the reader with a faithful History of each Nation, interspersing it with an accurate account of the religion, laws, customs, national characteristics, and domestic habits of the people, in the various periods of their History.

In writing these elementary treatises, one especial object has been kept in view—that of adapting them to the capacities of young people and occasional readers: by this means, while they embrace information and entertainment for all, they attract the rising generation, by simplicity of language, and clearness of detail, and render comparatively easy the attainment of a knowledge of the leading events of History.

The many high encomiums awarded to these works by the Public Press, and the very considerable acceptance they have met with in Schools and Families, are proofs that the efforts of the Author to render historical knowledge pleasing, and easy of attainment, are not unappreciated by those to whom the care of the rising generation is entrusted.

THESE SERIES OF HISTORIES, BY MISS CORNER, COMPRISE THE FOLLOWING:

THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND;

A New Edition; with Chronological Table; Twentieth Thousand; 3s. 6d. cloth, lettered; or bound up with Questions on the History, 4s.

Illustrated with a Map, and five Historical Engravings,—1. Rowena presenting wine to Vortigern. 2. King John signing Magna Charta. 3. Henry VII. proclaimed at the Battle of Bosworth Field. 4. Oliver Cromwell dissolving the long Parliament. 5. Coronation of Queen Victoria—the Peers rendering Homage.

"It is important that history meant for young Englishmen should be free from political poison, and this book will be found unexceptionable on this score."—British Banner.

"We have much pleasure in stating that this book is in another new edition, and its merits deserve it; it is well written, and admirably adapted for a school or reward book."—Academic and Collegiate Circular.

"Miss Corner's England and Wales, we perceive, has just reached another new edition, in which the addition of the chronological table will be a great desideratum; the work is well written, and is equally adapted for a school, or, indeed, a gift book."—Bent's Literary Advertiser.

"We know no histories more likely to prove useful and agreeable in the instruction of children."—Britannia.

"The style of the book throughout renders it worthy of the support it has secured."—Gospel Magazine.

"Miss Corner has chosen her epochs skilfully, and sketched them in a manner to make an adequate impression."—Literary Gazette.

THE HISTORY OF IRELAND;

New Edition; Seventh Thousand; 2s. 6d. cloth, lettered; or bound up with Questions on the History, 3s.

Illustrated with a Map, and three Historical Engravings.—1. St. Patrick preaching Christianity to the King and Nobles. 2. Lord Thomas Fitzgerald renouncing his allegiance to Henry VIII. 3. Entry of James II. into Dublin.

"The history before us is well executed."—Literary Gazette.

"Miss Corner's style of writing will produce habits of thinking."—Morning Advertiser.

"The Historical facts, always correct, are detailed in plain and concise language. This is one of the best class books on Ireland, for young people."—Limerick Standard.

The beauty of composition throughout the writings of Miss Corner is singular and fascinating.—Sun.

Miss Corner has acquired a deserved celebrity for the singularly-attractive and intelligible manner she has in narrating history.—Critic.

THE HISTORY OF SCOTLAND;

New edition; ninth thousand; 2s. 6d. cloth, lettered; or bound up with questions on the history, 3s.

Illustrated with a map, and three historical engravings.—1. Coronation of the infant King David II. and his Queen, at Scone, 2. James V. taking refuge at Sterling Castle. 3. Queen Mary's escape to England.

"We sincerely recommend this history as peculiarly suited to the meridian of schools."—Ayr Observer.

"This meritorious work is written in a very easy and agreeeble style, perfectly adapted to the capacities of the young persons for whom it is intended."—Times.

"We have perused this history with much interest, delighted with the ease and perspicuity of style, and with the clearness and force of the narrative."—Chronicle.

"Peculiarly adapted for instructive family reading."—Caledonian Mercury.

THE HISTORY OF ROME;

From accepted English and foreign authorities, as Macpherson's Annals of Commerce, Keightley's Roman History, Smith's and Adam's Greek and Roman Antiquities; Dr. Arnold, Niebuhr, &c. With questions to each chapter, a chronological table, and a map of the Roman Empire; 3s. 6d. bound in cloth, lettered.

"Miss Corner's History of Rome will assuredly ere long supersede all the Roman histories at present used in schools, it is well written, and the historical facts elicited by the learned labours of Niebuhr, Arnold, &c, are made to take the place of the fabulous accounts which have hitherto passed current as authentic history; at the same time the popular early legends are not omitted, but their doubtful nature pointed out."—Westmister Review.

"An excellent feature in this history is the continual effort to open out to the young reader the household life and social customs of the Romans, for without this, ancient history can have no reality for children."—Educational Times.

"Its contents form a correct history of the Roman empire, from its beginning."—Church of England Journal.

THE HISTORIES OF SPAIN AND PORTUGAL;

New Edition, Fifth Thousand; 2s. 6d. cloth, lettered; or bound up with questions on the histories, 3s.

Illustrated with a map, and three historical engravings,—1. Inez De Castro entreating the king to save her life. 2. Interview of Columbus with Queen Isabella. 3. The Cortez taking the oath of allegiance.

"Miss Corner gives a clear and striking account of the different kingdoms that at various times were founded in Spain."—Edinburgh Review.

"So concise and plain as to be at once adapted to the capacities and volatility of young people, while they are useful compendiums for adults."—Times.

THE HISTORY OF FRANCE;

Tenth Thousand, New Edition, with continuation of events to the Presidency of Louis Napoleon Bonaparte; 2s. 6d. cloth, lettered; or bound up with Questions on the History, 3s.

Illustrated with a Map, and three Historical Engravings,—1. The Coronation of Charles VII. 2. A French Tilt, or Tournament. 3. Bonaparte's Expedition across the Alps.

"The Writer has borne in mind throughout, that simplicity of style was essential to her purpose, and has selected those facts which are best adapted to give an idea of the events and the customs of the successive ages."—Baptist Magazine.

"Miss Corner appears to be an excellent historian for the school room. She narrates with fluency and clearness, and in a concise and lively manner, the leading facts, so as to convey the spirit of history, and indicate the characteristics of the people and the country, as well as the rulers and famous characters."—Spectator.

"We look upon Miss Corner's work with great interest, as being peculiarly adapted to the minds of young people, and being free from that inversion of facts by which history is so often made subservient to party purposes."—Nonconformist.

THE HISTORY OF DENMARK, SWEDEN, AND NORWAY;

2s. 6d. cloth, lettered; with a Map, and two elegant Historical Engravings.

1. A Norwegian Family listening to the Songs of their Scalds, 2. Submission of the Order of Nobles to Frederick III.

"The two chief qualities of a good book are usefulness of subject and cleverness of handling, and these requisites Miss Corner's histories exhibit in an eminent degree. The frequent intermixtures of government between the three countries have indeed tended materially to embarrass this portion of European history, but Miss Corner by an accurate arrangement of dates, and a judicious connection of events, has set every thing in a clear light."—Post Magazine.

THE HISTORY OF POLAND AND RUSSIA;

3s. 6d. cloth, lettered; with a Map, and three elegant Historical Engravings.

1. Assassination of Demetrius. 2. John Cassimer, worn out by misfortune, resigning his crown to the Diet. 3. Flight of the Inhabitants of Moscow at the approach of the French army.

"This volume forms one of a series of histories for the use of young persons; the present volume is, however, more descriptive than historical, which we consider an advantage; the living manners of the Poles and Russians being much more instructive and entertaining to young English readers."—Tait's Magazine.

"Miss Corner has succeeded in compressing into a small compass all the leading events of history, without the slightest obscurity, or without sinking her book into a dry chronicle of facts."—Britannia.

THE HISTORY OF TURKEY AND THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE; INCLUDING GREECE, SYRIA, AND THE HOLY LAND;

3s. 6d. cloth, lettered; with a Map, and three elegant Engravings.

1. Selim II., receiving the Ambassadors of Maximilian, Emperor of Germany. 2. Mahomet expounding the Koran at Medina. 5. Reschid Pacha reading the Hatti Scheriff of 1839 to the Ambassadors and Great Officers of State.

"The narrative is so well arranged and so agreeably diversified by occasional remarks on individual and national character, as to render history attractive even to the very young; and the information is conveyed in a style remarkable for its unaffected simplicity and clearness."—Morning Post.

"The leading features of Turkish manners, laws, and policy, are accurately and forcibly pourtrayed, while the narrative is distinguished for simplicity, perspicuity, and completeness."—Conservative Journal.

THE HISTORY OF ITALY AND SWITZERLAND;

3s. 6d. cloth, lettered; with a Map, and three elegant Historical Engravings.

1. Pope Martin V. riding through the streets of Rome, the Emperor and Elector leading his Horse. 2. Massaniello haranguing the Populace. 3. William Tell and the other Swiss Patriots holding their nightly meetings.

"Brief, clear, and correct; well adapted for young persons."—Leamington Spa Chronicle.

"Written with great care and ability."—John Bull.

"A very useful educational book."—Literary Gazette.

THE HISTORY OF HOLLAND AND BELGIUM;

2s. 6d. cloth, lettered, with a Map, and two elegant Historical Engravings.

1. Assassination of William of Orange. 2. Admiral Van Tromp shot whilst animating his sailors.

"The present, like the proceeding histories from the pen of this intelligent lady, is distinguished for its conciseness, elegance of expression, and clearness of detail."—Manchester Times.

"A condensed mass of knowledge, well put together, and prettily illustrated."—Church and State Gazette.

"To a pleasing, fluent, narrative style, Miss corner unites a nice discrimination, and never suffers matters which sully the mind to appear in her pages."—Surplice.

"We cannot too strongly recommend these admirable Histories, and we feel satisfied that no parent or preceptor can place better works in the hands of a youth."—Academic and Collegiate Circular.

"Altogether we do not know of a more agreeable or instructive present for youth; and each history is illustrated with a map and engravings, which considering the price of the work, are of a superior description."—Times.

"The authoress shows much discrimination in conveying in language suited to her readers the results of the laborious investigations of other scholars."—Educational Times.

AN ACCURATE HISTORY OF GREECE.

From accepted Authorities, English and Foreign; as Crete's and Chambers's Histories of Greece, Smith's Greek and Roman Antiquities, Thirlwall and Wordsworth's Greece, Smith's Mythology and Biography, Annals of Commerce, Library of Useful Knowledge, &c. With Questions to each Chapter, a Chronological Table, Index, and a coloured Map of the Greek States. Price 3s. bound in cloth, lettered.

We have not met with any History of Greece that contains, within the same compass, so large an amount of interesting and valuable information. Miss Corner writes concisely, perspicuously, and sensibly.—Westley Banner.

A concise History of Greece, well adapted for Schools.—Cambridge Independent Press.

This is a very excellent compendium of Grecian History, and such are the merits of the Work that we shall not be surprised at its becoming a popular educational book.—The British Mother's Magazine.

Remarkably clear in its arrangement, while the simple and easy style in which it is written, peculiarly fits it for popular use, it displays much careful research on the part of its Author.—Englishwoman's Magazine.

Miss Corner has the art of writing so as to be understood by youthful readers.—London Literary Journal.

By far the best introductory School History of Greece we have ever seen.—British Banner.

A combination of simplicity of narrative, with comprehensiveness of detail, admirably adapted for the use of the School-room.—Douglas Jerrald's Weekly News.

With feminine delicacy, Miss Corner omits what should be omitted, giving meanwhile a narrative of the broad character and features that mark the progress of a nation.—Express, Evening Paper.

The results of the best modern scholarship are here given.—Leader.

Miss Corner's Histories require no recommendation of ours to bring them into notice. This Volume, her History of Greece, is written with great clearness and fluency, the fabulous tales which disfigure so many professedly authentic histories of the Greeks are discarded. We cordially recommend this work for the School-room, or family circle.—Gospel Herald.



Religious Works

PUBLISHED BY THOMAS DEAN AND SON,

THREADNEEDLE-STREET.

* * * * *

DEDICATED (BY PERMISSION) TO THE LORD BISHOP OF LINCOLN. THE REV^D. EDWARD BICKERSTETH'S CHRISTIAN PSALMODY;

(of which upwards of One Hundred and Fifty Thousand have been used,)

Comprising a Collection of above Nine Hundred Psalms, Hymns, and Spiritual Songs, selected and arranged for public, social, family, and private worship, by the Rev. Edward Bickersteth, late Rector of Watton, Herts.

Sold at 2s. in cloth,—2s. 6d. in embossed roan,—and 3s. 6d. in calf,—12 copies, in cloth, L1,—25 for L2,—50 for L3 17s. or 100 for L7 10s.

A fine thin paper edition, 2s. 6d. in cloth, gilt edges;—3s. 6d. roan, gilt edges;—and 4s. 6d. morocco, gilt edges.

An edition, in large type, is also published, at 4s. 6d. cloth; 5s. 6d. roan; and 7s. in calf.

To meet the wants of poorer and village congregations,

THE CHURCH AND VILLAGE PSALMODY, has been prepared by the REV. EDWARD BICKERSTETH: consisting of three hundred and ninety of the above Psalms and Hymns most adapted to public worship; and so arranged as to be used at the same time with either of the larger editions of "Christian Psalmody."

It is published for one shilling, done up in cloth binding:—or 25 copies for L1;—50 copies for L1 18s. 6d.;—100 copies for L3 15s.

Clergymen and Congregations may also be supplied with an

ABRIDGED OR SUNDAY-SCHOOL EDITION; at 6d. in cloth;—25 copies for 10s;—50 copies for 19s;—or 100 for 37s. 6d. And bound in red sheep, at 8d;—25 copies for 13s. 6d;—50 copies for 26s;—or 100 copies for 50s.

ALSO, AN IMPROVED EDITION OF

WILLIAM HUTCHINS CALLCOTT'S

Arrangement of Ancient and Modern PSALM and HYMN TUNES, for the ORGAN and PIANO-FORTE, adapted to the above, and applicable to any other Selection of Psalms and Hymns.

In cloth, at 5s. 6d;—or, half Morocco, 6s. 6d.—25 copies in cloth for L5 10s.—and 25 in half morocco for L6 10s.

THE LIFE OF CHRIST, BY THE REV. T. TIMPSON, Illustrated by choice Passages from one hundred and thirty-eight eminent British and Foreign Divines, and embellished with seventy engravings after the best Masters.

10s. 6d. elegantly bound and embellished, and with gilt edges.

TALES OF THE REFORMATION; an account of the progress of that important Event; with some interesting tales of MARTIN LUTHER, and other eminent Men who were involved in its early development. By A.M. Sarjeant, author of Tales of the Early British Christians, &c.

2s. 6d. cloth, with frontispiece.

THE BIBLE AND THE PEOPLE; A SERIES OF PLATES, Exhibiting the INESTIMABLE BENEFITS OF THE BIBLE, and its great power as a means of effecting present and lasting good.—Lithographed by ROBINSON, and printed on plate paper,

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HIEROGLYPHICAL BIBLE; a pleasing Introduction to reading the Holy Scriptures, numerous words being depicted by engravings, to the number of Two Hundred and twenty.

6d. sewed.

THE BELIEVER's POCKET COMPANION:

Passages, (chiefly promises,) from the sacred writings; with appropriate observations, in prose and verse. By J. EVANS.

4d. sewed.



NEW SCRIPURAL SERIES OF COLOURED SUNDAY BOOKS:

SIX-PENCE EACH.

With coloured Engravings, correctly representing the Costumes of the People and the Scenery of the Countries in which the incidents described took place.

THE LIFE OF OUR SAVIOUR. Embellished with eight coloured engravings.

TWO BROTHERS; OR, HISTORY OF CAIN AND ABEL. Embellished with twelve coloured engravings.

THE HISTORY OF ISAAC AND REBEKAH. Embellished with ten coloured engravings.

THE HISTORY OF JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN. Embellished with nine coloured engravings.

RUTH AND NAOMI; OR, THE AFFECTIONATE DAUGHTER-IN-LAW. With twelve coloured engravings.

ELISHA, AND THE WIDOW'S CRUISE OF OIL. With fourteen coloured engravings.

THE DISOBEDIENT PROPHET; OR, WHAT HARM CAN THERE BE IN IT? With eleven coloured engravings.

THE SCRIPTURE HISTORICAL ALPHABET. Embellished with fifteen coloured engravings.

THE HISTORY OF ABRAHAM. Embellished with eight coloured engravings.

ESAU AND JACOB; OR, FORGET AND FORGIVE. Embellished with eight coloured engravings.

THE LIFE OF MOSES. Embellished with seven coloured engravings.

THE HISTORY OF SAMUEL; OR, CHILDREN MAY BE WISE. Embellished with seven coloured engravings.

THE SHEPHERD KING; OR, HISTORY OF DAVID. Embellished with eight coloured engravings.

THE PROPHET DANIEL; OR, THE CAPTIVES OF JUDAH. With eight coloured engravings.



NEW SERIES OF 13 SCRIPTURAL PRINTS, ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF OUR SAVIOUR.

Size, Nine Inches by Fourteen, price, 1s. each, full coloured; or, 6d. tinted.

1 ANGELS APPEARING TO THE SHEPHERDS. And the angel said unto them—Fear not; for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy. Luke, ii. 10.

2 ADORATION OF THE MAGI. And when they saw the young child with Mary his mother, they fell down, and worshipped him. Matthew, ii. 11.

3 CHRIST DISPUTING WITH THE DOCTORS. They found him in the temple, sitting in the midst of the doctors both hearing them, and asking them questions. Luke, ii, 46.

4 THE BAPTISM OF CHRIST. The heavens were opened unto him, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove, and lighting upon him, Matt. iii. 16.

5 CHRIST BLESSING LITTLE CHILDREN. Suffer the little children to come unto me, and forbid them not; for of such is the kingdom of Heaven. Mark, x, 14.

6 CHRIST HEALING THE BLIND. Jesus said unto him, Receive thy sight: thy faith hath saved thee. Luke, xviii. 42.

7 THE RAISING OF LAZARUS. He cried with a loud voice, Lazarus, come forth. And he that was dead came forth, bound head and foot. John, xi. 43.

8 THE WIDOW'S MITE. This poor widow hath cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury,—for she did cast in all that she had. Mark, xii. 43.

9 CHRIST'S ENTRY INTO JERUSALEM. Many spread their garments in the way; others cut down branches from the trees, and strewed them in the way. Mark, xi. 8.

10 THE LAST SUPPER. This do in remembrance of me. Luke, xxii. 19.

11 PETER DENYING CHRIST. And the Lord turned, and looked upon Peter, and Peter remembered the words of the Lord, Before the cock crows, thou shalt deny me thrice. And he wept bitterly Luke, xxii, 61.

12 CHRIST BEFORE PILATE. Pilate asked him, Answerest thou nothing? behold how many things they witness against thee. Mark, xv. 4.

13 TAKING DOWN FROM THE CROSS. When Joseph had taken the body, he wrapped it in a clean linen cloth, and laid it in his own new tomb. Matthew, xxvii. 59.

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AMUSING PANORAMAS OF ANIMALS,—with their uses and habits,—for Children.—Eight Animals, with characteristic coloured engravings, in each book.

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PETER PALETTE's COLOURED SCRAP BOOK; in six parts, each part comprising six leaves, and each leaf containing several interesting subjects.—Six-pence each Part;—or

The set, bound together, 3s. 6d.

THE CHILD's OWN SCRAP BOOK OF PICTURES, BY PETER PALETTE. Seven parts, coloured; 4to size. 6d. each; or The set, bound together, 4s.



JUVENILE WORKS.

PUBLISHED BY THOMAS DEAN AND SON, THREADNEEDLE-STREET.

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THE FIRST HISTORY OF ENGLAND THAT SHOULD BE PLACED IN THE HANDS OF A CHILD. By MISS CORNER, Author of the Play Grammar, Every Child's History of England, Scripture Parables, &c. Containing,

An interesting description of the Ancient Britons, and their civilization by the Romans; the Conquest of the Romans and Britons by the Saxons; the Life and Times of Alfred the Great; the Norman Conquest; the Feudal Times; the Manners and Condition of the People of England in the Middle Ages; in the Sixteenth, Seventeenth, Eighteenth, and Nineteenth Centuries, to the present time.

Printed in large type; with twenty-five pages of illustrations. 3s. 6d. bound, suitable for a present, in blue cloth, gilt edges; Or, in Eight Parts, 6d. each, stitched in fancy wrappers.

EVERY CHILD'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND: WITH A MAP, AND QUESTIONS TO EACH CHAPTER.

Particularly suited for Children, and for Home, or Infant School Reading. By Miss CORNER, Author of the Play Grammar,—Scripture Parables, &c.

1s. sewed; or with the map coloured, 1s. 6d. in cloth.

PAPA AND MAMMA'S EASY LESSONS IN GEOGRAPHY; OR, THE ELEMENTS OF GEOGRAPHY, IN A NEW AND ATTRACTIVE FORM.

By ANNE MARIA SARGEANT, Author of Bible Geography, &c. Embellished with many Illustrations: and intended as a companion to Miss Corner's Play Grammar.

Price 1s. stitched, or 1s. 6d. bound in cloth.

GUIDE TO USEFUL KNOWLEDGE: BY CHARLES BUTLER.

Containing, in the popular form of an easy and familiar Catechism, the newest and most useful information connected with the Arts, Sciences, and the various Phenomena of Nature. For the use of Schools and Families.

Fourth edition, corrected. 1s. 6d. bound in cloth.

GUIDE TO GEOGRAPHY: BY CHARLES BUTLER.

A new, pleasing, and concise description of the five great divisions of the globe: the empires, kingdoms, and states, into which they are divided; and the natural, mineral, and vegetable productions of the several countries; with the numbers, and the manners and customs of their inhabitants.

New edition, corrected, 1s. 6d. bound in cloth;—or, with Seven Glyphographic Maps, and the use of the globes, 2s. bound.

THE PLAY GRAMMAR; OR, THE ELEMENTS OF GRAMMAR EXPLAINED IN SHORT AND EASY GAMES. By MISS CORNER. 1s. 6d. cloth lettered, with richly coloured frontispiece, and numerous engravings on wood; or, 1s. sewed in fancy covers, with plain frontispiece.

CHRISTMAS BERRIES AND DAISY CHAINS, FOR THE YOUNG AND GOOD. A collection of pleasing and instructive tales in poetry and prose, adapted to the youthful mind. By the author of Spring Flowers and Summer Blossoms, &c.

Printed in large type; with eight pages of tinted illustrations. Price 2s. 6d. bound in fancy cloth, gilt edges and sides, suitable for a present.

SILVER BLOSSOMS TO PRODUCE GOLDEN FRUIT: Being golden keys to the good old proverbs, in interesting tales. By the author of Spring Flowers and Summer Blossoms, Christmas Berries, &c.

With eight pages of tinted illustrations. Price 2s. 6d. bound suitably for a present, in fancy cloth, with gilt edges and sides.

STORIES OF THE ELEMENTS: Or, the Old Man and his Four Servants; Volcanoes and Earthquakes; the Volcanic Island, and the Indian Family. By MRS. BAKER. With six pages of engravings printed in tint, 1s. 6d. cloth, lettered, with richly coloured frontispiece;—or, 1s. sewed, with plain frontispiece.

SCRIPTURE NATURAL HISTORY; BY THE REV. J. YOUNG, A.M. A pleasing description of the nature and habits of the most interesting and wonderful of the works of God, as exhibited in creation, and recorded in scripture. With numerous engravings, and eight pages of tinted illustrations; 2s. 6d. handsomely bound in cloth, gilt edges and sides.

THE ORPHAN CAPTIVE; OR, CHRISTIAN ENDURANCE; A tale of the shipwreck and captivity of an ambassador's daughter. By Miss J. Strickland. With seven pages of elegant plates, 1s. sewed, or Is. 6d. cloth.

SCRIPTURE PARABLES, in EASY VERSE, for CHILDREN; WITH AN EXPLANATION OF EACH PARABLE, IN PROSE.

By the Author of Ruth and Naomi,—the Widow's Cruise of Oil,—Isaac and Rebekah, &c. Illustrated with eight pages of beautiful plates, and twenty engravings on wood.

1s. 6d. cloth lettered, with richly coloured frontispiece; or, 1s. sewed, in fancy covers, with plain frontispiece.

TALES OF SPRING FLOWERS AND SUMMER BLOSSOMS; FOR THE YOUNG AND GOOD: About Snow-drops,—the Wall-flower,—and Cowslips and Primroses.

With six pages of illustrations, 1s. sewed—or 1s. 6d. bound in cloth, lettered, and coloured frontispiece.

MORE TALES OF SPRING FLOWERS AND SUMMER BLOSSOMS; FOR THE YOUNG AND GOOD:

About Hare Bells,—the Bee Orchis,—White Violets,—Water Lilies,—Wild Roses,—and Wood Anemonies.

With six pages of illustrations, 1s. sewed;—or 1s. 6d. in cloth, lettered, and coloured frontispiece.

THE TWO PARTS, elegantly bound in one handsome volume, gilt edges, with eleven pages of tinted illustrations, 2s. 6d.

THE VILLAGE SCHOOL: WITH THE HISTORY, AND WHAT BECAME OF, SOME OF ITS SCHOLARS.

1s. 6d. cloth, with many engravings, and richly coloured frontispiece; or, 1s. sewed, with plain frontispiece.

THE WIDOW AND ORPHANS; OR, CHANGES OF LIFE.

BY THE REV. J. YOUNG, M.A. Author of Perils of Paul Percival. Scripture Natural History, &c.

With seven pages of plates, and vignette title, 1s. sewed; or 1s. 6d. bound in cloth, with richly coloured frontispiece.

LITTLE STORIES ABOUT PRETTY LITTLE BIRDS.

BY THE AUTHOR OF KEEPER'S TRAVELS, &c.

With seven pages of plates, and vignette title, 1s. sewed; or, with coloured frontispiece, 1s. 6d. bound in cloth.

LITTLE TALES FOR THE NURSERY; AMUSING AND INSTRUCTIVE.

By the Author of 'Sketches of Little Girls,' 'Little Boys,' &c. With many illustrations.

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STORIES OF THE FIVE DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD;

descriptive of the peculiar habits and customs of the Inhabitants of Australia and Polynesia,—Omoko, King of Africa,—the Elephant, and the Little Dog of Siam,—the American Slave Trade,—and Europe, or, English Freedom.

With neat vignettes, and six tinted engravings 1s. sewed.

STORIES OF THE FIVE SENSES; OR, WHICH IS BEST?

An entertaining Little Book, for Little Ladies and Little Gentlemen. Vignette illustrations, and six tinted engravings, 1s. sewed.

WHICH IS BEST?

Or, Stories about the Five Senses, and the Five Divisions of the Globe With sixteen illustrations 2s. 6d. fancy cloth, gilt edges.

THE WORLD'S FAIR; OR, CHILDREN'S PRIZE GIFT BOOK OF THE GREAT EXHIBITION OF 1851.

Describing the beautiful Inventions and Manufactures exhibited there; with pretty stories about the People who have made and sent those beautiful Articles to be exhibited, and how they live when at home.—Embellished with numerous elegant engravings, a frontispiece, and pictorial title-page.

2s. 6d. elegantly bound in cloth.

SUNSHINE AND SHOWERS; or, STORIES FOR THE CHILDREN OF ENGLAND;

By M.E.T. author of "Silver Blossoms to produce Golden Fruit."—Embellished with illustrative engravings, and eight pages of plates, beautifully printed in lithography.

2s. 6d. elegantly bound in cloth.

ILLUSTRATED JUVENILE KEEPSAKE OF AMUSEMENT AND INSTRUCTION. With upwards of sixty engravings.

1s. sewed,—or 1s. 6d. bound in cloth, lettered.

SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS;

The Well-behaved Little Boy. The Attentive, Inattentive, Covetous Dilatory, Exact, Quarrelsome, and Good Little Boy. By S. Lovechild.

1s. sewed,—Square size, with seven coloured engravings.

SKETCHES OF LITTLE GIRLS;

The Good-natured Little Girl, the Thoughtless, the Vain, the Orderly, the Slovenly, the Snappish, the Persevering, the Forward, the Modest, and the Awkward, Little Girl. By Solomon Lovechild.

1s. sewed,—Square size, with seven coloured engravings.

THE THREE BASKETS, Or, THE LITTLE GARDENER, LITTLE PAINTER, AND LITTLE CARPENTER

Describing how, and in what manner, Henry, Richard, and Charles, were occupied during the absence of their Father. By Mrs. Burden.

1s. sewed,—Square size, with seven coloured engravings.

DAME WIGGINS OF LEE, AND HER WONDERFUL CATS;

A humorous tale, about the worthy old Dame and her Seven whiskered favourites: written by a Lady of Ninety.

1s. sewed,—Square size, with fifteen coloured engravings.

EASY AND INTERESTING HISTORIES, FOR LITTLE FOLKS;

BY MISS CORNER, Author of the Historical Library, &c.

Price sixpence each, printed in large type, and embellished with four pages of descriptive tinted plates, and sewed in fancy wrappers.

THE ANCIENT BRITONS.

Describing their Manners and Customs; and how they were conquered, and Britain was governed by the Romans. 6d.

THE CONQUEST OF THE ROMANS AND BRITONS BY THE SAXONS; and an interesting Account of the Saxon Heptarchy, or the Seven Saxon Kingdoms in England at one time.

6d. With four pages of illustrations.

THE LIFE AND TIMES OF ALFRED THE GREAT.

an interesting Narrative. 6d. Four pages of illustrations.

THE NORMAN CONQUEST; four pages of illustrations.

And the manner in which the People of England lived during the Reign of William the Conqueror. An interesting Narrative. 6d.

ENGLAND, AND ITS PEOPLE IN THE FEUDAL TIMES.

6d. Four pages of Illustrations

THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND; WITH THE MANNERS AND CONDITION OF THE PEOPLE IN THE MIDDLE AGES.

6d. With four pages of illustrations.

AN INTERESTING DESCRIPTION OF ENGLAND IN THE SIXTEENTH AND SEVENTEENTH CENTURIES.

Showing the Condition of the People, and how they lived and dressed during the Reign of Henry the Seventh, to the death of William the Third. 6d. Four pages of illustrations.

AN INTERESTING DESCRIPTION OF ENGLAND IN THE EIGHTEENTH AND NINETEENTH CENTURIES.

Showing the Condition of the People, their modes of life, and how they lived and dressed from the Reign of James the Second, to that of Queen Victoria. 6d. Four pages of illustrations.

These Eight Histories may be had, bound in One Volume, in fancy cloth, gilt sides and edges, suitable for a present, price 8s. 6d.

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PLEASANT TALES FOR LITTLE PEOPLE,

SIX-PENCE EACH,—SEWED IN FANCY COVERS, PRINTED IN COLORS,

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SQUIRE GRAY'S FRUIT FEAST.

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6d. Fourteen engravings.

MIRTHFUL MOMENTS; or, HOW TO ENJOY HOLIDAYS.

A collection of Mirthful and Pleasing Games and Forfeits: with Plain Directions for Playing each Game, and how to Cry the Forfeits.

6d. with appropriate engravings.

ANNE AND JANE; or, GOOD ADVICE AND GOOD EXAMPLE.

A Tale for Young Children. By Miss J. STRICKLAND.

6d. Fifteen engravings.

SUNSHINE AND TWILIGHT; or, THE PROSPERITY AND ADVERSITY OF TWO COUSINS.

Exhibiting the sure reward of amiable manners and good conduct.

6d. Fifteen engravings.

TROUBLES ARISING FROM BEING TOO LATE; or THE TWO SISTERS.

6d. Nineteen engravings.

A PRINCE IN SEARCH OF A WIFE; or, ROSETTA AND THE FAIRY.—A Trial of Charity.

6d. Fifteen engravings.

CHARITY WOOD, THE LITTLE ORPHAN.

A Tale for Young Children. By Miss Jane Strickland.

6d. Many engravings.

THE LITTLE TRAVELLER'S TRAVELLINGS IN EUROPE.

6d. Sixteen engravings.

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NURSERY PICTURE BOOKS,—in illustrated covers,

size 4to. royal,—five sheets of coloured plates in each book.

THE FIVE DIVISIONS OF THE GLOBE:—Europe, Asia, Africa, America, and Polynesia or Australia. Illustrated for Little Folks, on Five Large Plates: and done up in a fancy cover,

Price 1s. plain; or, 1s. 6d. coloured.

THE FOUR ELEMENTS:—or, Fire, Air, Earth, and Water.

Illustrated for Little Folks. And the Old English Nursery Rhyme of Simple Simon, set to Music. On Five Large Plates; and done up in a fancy cover.

Price 1s. plain; or, 1s. 6d. coloured.

THE FIVE SENSES,—Hearing, Seeing, Smelling, Tasting, and Feeling. And the FOUR SEASONS,—Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter. Illustrated for Little Folks, on Five Large Plates; and done up in a fancy cover.

1s. plain; or, 1s. 6d. coloured

THE NURSERY RHYMES OF OLD ENGLAND,

Set to Music, for Little Folks. Containing, The Queen of Hearts,—Bye! Baby Bunting,—Who comes here? a Grenadier!—Little Boy Blue,—and, The Lion and the Unicorn. Illustrated on Five Large Plates; and done up in Fancy cover.

Price 1s. plain; or, 1s. 6d. coloured.

THE ROYAL NURSERY PICTURE BOOK,—the Nursery Alphabet,—the Royal Family.—the comparative sizes of Animals,—and a "Morland."

1s. plain; or, 1s. 6d. coloured.

PLEASANT TALES FOR LITTLE PEOPLE.

An interesting collection of amusing and instructive Stories, for Young Persons.

With upwards of eighty superior engravings, 2s. 6d. bound in fancy Green cloth, with gilt edges and side.

VISIT TO THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS, REGENT'S PARK.

A pleasing description of this delightful place of fashionable resort, and of the nature and peculiar habits of the many rare and remarkable Animals contained therein. By J. BISHOP.

Square size, with 12 coloured engravings, and 31 cuts of the animals. 1s. bound in cloth.

A GIFT TO YOUNG FRIENDS; OR, THE GUIDE TO GOOD; About the Good Man of the Mill,—from whom all Good Things come—the Lost Purse,—Self-will,—the Careless Boy,—the Good Boy,—and the Way to Save. In words of One Syllable. By Miss Corner.

Square size, with seven coloured engravings.—1s. in cloth.

SHORT TALES IN SHORT WORDS,

About the Lame Boy,—the Sea Shore,—the Cross Boy,—and the Stray Child. By Mrs. Burden.

Square size, with seven coloured engravings.—1s. in cloth.

LITTLE CHILD'S ALPHABET OF NOUNS, or BOOK OF OBJECTS:

the Letters in large and small characters; each Letter illustrated by a number of pleasing engravings of Objects expressive of the Letter.—

In large 4to., with the engravings neatly coloured.

GEOGRAPHICAL ALPHABET; a new and pleasing Introduction to a knowledge of some of the most celebrated places, or interesting countries, of the habitable world. By B. CLAYTON.

In large 4to., with twenty-six coloured engravings.

PETER PALLETTE'S PICTURES FOR PAINTING:

Thirteen Numbers, price 4d. each; or bound in 2 vols, 1st series, 2s. 6d. 2nd series, 3s. 6d.

WORRET's NEW OUTLINE DRAWING-BOOK;

A series of progressive lessons, by which the principles of the Art, as applied to figure, ornamental, and mechanical Drawing, may be easily and correctly acquired.—ON STONE, BY W. HEATH.

3s. the set of six numbers; or 3s. 6d. in cloth.

EVERY CHILD'S DRAWING-BOOK; Easy and familiar Subjects by HEATH and BARFOOT. In Seven Progressive Numbers.

1s. the set.

YOUNG ARTIST'S DRAWING-BOOK of EASY SUBJECTS, in Lithography and Ink. By BARFOOT and HEATH. In 13 Numbers.

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