HotFreeBooks.com
The Whitehouse Cookbook (1887) - The Whole Comprising A Comprehensive Cyclopedia Of Information For - The Home
by Mrs. F.L. Gillette
Previous Part     1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14     Next Part
Home - Random Browse

MOLASSES CANDY.

Put one quart of West India molasses, one cupful of brown sugar, a piece of butter the size of half an egg, into a six-quart kettle. Let it boil over a slack fire until it begins to look thick, stirring it often to prevent burning. Test it by taking some out and dropping a few drops in a cup of cold water. If it hardens quickly and breaks short between the teeth it is boiled enough. Now put in half a teaspoonful of baking soda, and stir it well; then pour it out into well-buttered flat tins. When partly cooled, take up the candy with your hands well buttered then pull and double, and so on, until the candy is a whitish yellow. It may be cut in strips and rolled or twisted.

If flavoring is desired, drop the flavoring on the top as it begins to cool and when it is pulled, the whole will be flavored.

STRAWBERRY CONSERVE.

Prepare the fruit as for preserving, allowing half a pound of loaf sugar to one pound of fruit. Sprinkle the sugar over the fruit at night; in the morning, put it on the fire in a kettle and boil until the berries are clear. Spread on dishes and put in the sun until dry; after which roll the fruit in sugar and pack in jars.

PEACH CONSERVE.

Halve the peaches and take out the stones; pare. Have ready some powdered white sugar on a plate or dish. Roll the peaches in it several times, until they will not take up any more. Place them singly on a plate, with the cup or hollow side up, that the juices may not run out. Lay them in the sun. The next morning roll them again. As soon as the juice seems set in the peaches, turn the other side to the sun. When they are thoroughly dry, pack them in glass jars, or, what is still nicer, fig-drums. They make an excellent sweetmeat just as they are; or, if wanted for table use, put over the fire in porcelain, with a very little water, and stew a few minutes.

PEACH LEATHER.

Stew as many peaches as you choose, allowing a quarter of a pound of sugar to one of fruit; mash it up smooth as it cooks, and when it is dry enough to spread in a thin sheet on a board greased with butter, set it out in the sun to dry; when dry it can be rolled up like leather, wrapped up in a cloth, and will keep perfectly from season to season. School-children regard it as a delightful addition to their lunch of biscuit or cold bread. Apple and quince leather are made in the same fashion, only a little flavoring or spice is added to them.

COCOANUT CARAMELS.

Two cupfuls of grated cocoanut, one cupful of sugar, two tablespoonfuls of flour, the whites of three eggs, beaten stiff. Soak the cocoanut, if desiccated, in milk enough to cover it; then beat the whites of the eggs, add gradually the sugar, cocoanut and flour; with your fingers make, by rolling the mixture, into cone shapes. Place them on buttered sheets of tin covered with buttered letter paper and bake in a moderate heat about fifteen or twenty minutes. They should cool before removing from the tins.

DRIED PRESERVES.

Any of the fruits that have been preserved in syrup may be converted into dry preserves, by first draining them from the syrup and then drying them slowly on the stove, strewing them thickly with powdered sugar. They should be turned every few hours, sifting over them more sugar.

CANDIES WITHOUT COOKING.

Very many candies made by confectioners are made without boiling, which makes them very desirable, and they are equal to the best "French Creams." The secret lies in the sugar used, which is the XXX powdered or confectioners' sugar. Ordinary powdered sugar, when rubbed between the thumb and finger has a decided grain, but the confectioners' sugar is fine as flour. The candies made after this process are better the day after.

FRENCH VANILLA CREAM.

Break into a bowl the whites of one or more eggs, as the quantity you wish to make will require; add to it an equal quantity of cold water, then stir in XXX powdered or confectioners' sugar until you have it stiff enough to mold into shape with the fingers. Flavor with vanilla to taste. After it is formed in balls, cubes or lozenge shapes, lay them upon plates or waxed paper and set them aside to dry. This cream can be worked in candies similar to the French cooked cream.

CHOCOLATE CREAM DROPS.

These are made or molded into cone-shape forms with the fingers, from the uncooked "French Cream," similar to that which is cooked. After forming into these little balls or cones, lay them on oiled paper until the next day, to harden, or make them in the morning and leave them until afternoon. Then melt some chocolate (the best confectioners') in a basin set in another basin of boiling water; when melted, and the creams are hard enough to handle, take one at a time on a fork and drop into the melted chocolate, roll it until well covered, then slip from the fork upon oiled or waxed paper, and set them aside to harden.

FRUIT AND NUT CREAMS.

Raisins seeded, currants, figs and citron, chopped fine, and mixed with the uncooked "French Cream," while soft, before the sugar is all mixed in, makes a delicious variety. Nuts also may be mixed with this cream, stirring into it chopped almonds, hickory nuts, butternuts, or English walnuts, then forming them into balls, bars or squares. Several kinds of nuts may be mixed together.

ORANGE DROPS.

Grate the rind of one orange and squeeze the juice, taking care to reject the seeds; add to this a pinch of tartaric acid; then stir in confectioners' sugar until it is stiff enough to form into balls the size of a small marble. This is delicious candy.

The same process for lemon drops, using lemons in place of orange. Color a faint yellow.

COCOANUT CREAMS.

Make the uncooked cream as in the foregoing recipe. Take the cream while soft, add fresh grated cocoanut to taste; add sufficient confectioners' sugar to mold into balls and then roll the balls in the fresh grated cocoanut. These may be colored pink with a few drops of cochineal syrup, also brown by adding a few spoonfuls of grated chocolate; then rolling them in grated cocoanut; the three colors are very pretty together. The coconut cream may be made into a flat cake and cut into squares or strips.

With this uncooked cream, all the recipes given for the cooked "French Cream," may be used: English walnut creams, variegated creams, etc.



COFFEE, TEA, BEVERAGES.

Boiling water is a very important desideratum in the making of a cup of good coffee or tea, but the average housewife is very apt to overlook this fact. Do not boil the water more than three or four minutes; longer boiling ruins the water for coffee or tea making, as most of its natural properties escape by evaporation, leaving a very insipid liquid composed mostly of lime and iron, that would ruin the best coffee, and give the tea a dark, dead look, which ought to be the reverse.

Water left in the tea-kettle over night must never be used for preparing the breakfast coffee; no matter how excellent your coffee or tea may be, it will be ruined by the addition of water that has been boiled more than once.

THE HEALING PROPERTIES OF TEA AND COFFEE.

The medical properties of these two beverages are considerable. Tea is used advantageously in inflammatory diseases and as a cure for the headache. Coffee is supposed to act as a preventative of gravel and gout, and to its influence is ascribed the rarity of those diseases in Prance and Turkey. Both tea and coffee powerfully counteract the effects of opium and intoxicating liquors: though, when taken in excess, and without nourishing food, they themselves produce, temporarily at least, some of the more disagreeable consequences incident to the use of ardent spirits. In general, however, none but persons possessing great mobility of the nervous system, or enfeebled or effeminate constitutions, are injuriously affected by the moderate use of tea and coffee in connection with food.

COFFEE.

One full coffeecupful of ground coffee, stirred with one egg and part of the shell, adding a half cupful of cold water. Put it into the coffee boiler, and pour on to it a quart of boiling water; as it rises and begins to boil, stir it down with a silver spoon or fork. Boil hard for ten or twelve minutes. Remove from the fire and pour out a cupful of coffee, then pour back into the coffeepot. Place it on the back of the stove or range where it will keep hot (and not boil); it will settle in about five minutes. Send to the table hot. Serve with good cream and lump sugar. Three-quarters of a pound of Java and a quarter of a pound of Mocha make the best mixture of coffee.

VIENNA COFFEE.

Equal parts of Mocha and Java coffee; allow one heaping tablespoonful of coffee to each person and two extra to make good strength. Mix one egg with grounds; pour on coffee half as much boiling water as will be needed; let it froth, then stir down grounds, and let boil five minutes; then let it stand where it will keep hot, but not boil, for five or ten minutes, and add rest of water. To one pint of cream add the white of an egg, well beaten; this is to be put in cups with sugar, and hot coffee added.

FILTERED OR DRIP COFFEE.

For each person allow a large tablespoonful of finely ground coffee, and to every tablespoonful allow a cupful of boiling water; the coffee to be one part Mocha to two of Java.

Have a small iron ring made to fit the top of the coffeepot inside, and to this ring sew a small muslin bag (the muslin for the purpose must not be too thin). Fit the bag into the pot, pour some boiling water in it, and, when the pot is well warmed, put the ground coffee into the bag; pour over as much boiling water as is required, close the lid, and, when all the water has filtered through, remove the bag, and send the coffee to table. Making it in this manner prevents the necessity of pouring the coffee from one vessel to another, which cools and spoils it. The water should be poured on the coffee gradually so that the infusion may be stronger; and the bag must be well made that none of the grounds may escape through the seams and so make the coffee thick and muddy.

Patented coffeepots on this principle can be purchased at most house-furnishing stores.

ICED COFFEE.

Make more coffee than usual at breakfast time and stronger. When cold put on ice. Serve with cracked ice in each tumbler.

SUBSTITUTE FOR CREAM IN COFFEE.

Beat the white of an egg, put to it a small lump of butter and pour the coffee into it gradually, stirring it so that it will not curdle. It is difficult to distinguish this from fresh cream.

Many drop a tiny piece of sweet butter into their cup of hot coffee as a substitute for cream.

TO MAKE TEA.

Allow two teaspoonfuls of tea to one large cupful of boiling water. Scald the teapot, put in the tea, pour on about a cupful of boiling water, set it on the fire in a warm place, where it will not boil, but keep very hot, to almost boiling; let it steep or "draw" ten or twelve minutes. Now fill up with as much boiling water as is required. Send hot to the table. It is better to use a china or porcelain teapot, but if you do use metal let it be tin, new, bright and clean; never use it when the tin is worn off and the iron exposed. If you do you are drinking tea-ate of iron.

To make tea to perfection, boiling water must be poured on the leaves directly it boils. Water which has been boiling more than five minutes, or which has previously boiled, should on no account be used. If the water does not boil, or if it be allowed to overboil, the leaves of the tea will be only half-opened and the tea itself will be quite spoiled. The water should be allowed to remain on the leaves from ten to fifteen minutes.

A Chinese being interviewed for the Cook says: Drink your tea plain. Don't add milk or sugar. Tea-brokers and tea-tasters never do; epicures never do; the Chinese never do. Milk contains fibrin, albumen or some other stuff, and the tea a delicate amount of tannin. Mixing the two makes the liquid turbid. This turbidity, if I remember the cyclopaedia aright, is tannate of fibrin, or leather. People who put milk in tea are therefore drinking boots and shoes in mild disguise.

ICED TEA.

Is now served to a considerable extent during the summer months. It is of course used without milk, and the addition of sugar serves only to destroy the finer tea flavor. It may be prepared some hours in advance, and should be made stronger than when served hot. It is bottled and placed in the ice chest till required. Use the black or green teas, or both, mixed, as fancied.

CHOCOLATE.

Allow half a cupful of grated chocolate to a pint of water and a pint of milk. Rub the chocolate smooth in a little cold water and stir into the boiling water. Boil twenty minutes, add the milk and boil ten minutes more, stirring it often. Sweeten to your taste.

The French put two cupfuls of boiling water to each cupful of chocolate. They throw in the chocolate just as the water commences to boil. Stir it with a spoon as soon as it boils up, add two cupfuls of good milk, and when it has boiled sufficiently, serve a spoonful of thick whipped cream with each cup.

COCOA.

Six tablespoonfuls of cocoa to each pint of water, as much milk as water, sugar to taste. Rub cocoa smooth in a little cold water; have ready on the fire a pint of boiling water; stir in grated cocoa paste. Boil twenty minutes, add milk and boil five minutes more, stirring often. Sweeten in cups so as to suit different tastes.

BUTTERMILK AS A DRINK.

Buttermilk, so generally regarded as a waste product, has latterly been coming somewhat into vogue, not only as a nutrient, but as a therapeutic agent, and in an editorial article the Canada Lancet, some time ago, highly extolled its virtues. Buttermilk may be roughly described as milk which has lost most of its fat and a small percentage of casein, and which has become sour by fermentation. Long experience has demonstrated it to be an agent of superior digestibility. It is, indeed, a true milk peptone—that is, milk already partly digested, the coagulation of the coagulable portion being loose and flaky, and not of that firm indigestible nature which is the result of the action of the gastric juice upon cow's sweet milk. It resembles koumiss in its nature, and, with the exception of that article, it is the most grateful, refreshing and digestible of the products of milk. It is a decided laxative to the bowels, a fact which must be borne in mind in the treatment of typhoid fever, and which may be turned to advantage in the treatment of habitual constipation. It is a diuretic, and may be prescribed with advantage in some kidney troubles. Owing to its acidity, combined with its laxative properties, it is believed to exercise a general impression on the liver. It is well adapted to many cases where it is customary to recommend lime water and milk. It is invaluable in the treatment of diabetes, either exclusively, or alternating with skimmed milk. In some cases of gastric ulcer and cancer of the stomach, it is the only food that can be retained.

Medical journal.

CURRANT WINE. No. 1.

The currants should be quite ripe. Stem, mash and strain them, adding a half pint of water and less than a pound of sugar to a quart of the mashed fruit. Stir well up together and pour into a clean cask, leaving the bung-hole open, or covered with a piece of lace. It should stand for a month to ferment, when it will be ready for bottling; just before bottling you may add a small quantity of brandy or whisky.

CURRANT WINE. No. 2.

To each quart of currant juice, add two quarts of soft water and three pounds of brown sugar. Put into a jug or small keg, leaving the top open until fermentation ceases and it looks clear. Draw off and cork tightly.

Long Island Recipe.

BLACKBERRY WINE. No. 1.

Cover your blackberries with cold water; crush the berries well with a wooden masher; let them stand twenty-four hours; then strain, and to one gallon of juice put three pounds of common brown sugar; put into wide-mouthed jars for several days, carefully skimming off the scum that will rise to the top; put in several sheets of brown paper and let them remain in it three days; then skim again and pour through a funnel into your cask. There let it remain undisturbed till March; then strain again and bottle. These directions, if carefully followed out, will insure you excellent wine.

Orange County Recipe.

BLACKBERRY WINE NO. 2

Berries should be ripe and plump. Put into a large wood or stone vessel with a tap; pour on sufficient boiling water to cover them; when cool enough to bear your hand, bruise well until all the berries are broken; cover up, let stand until berries begin to rise to top, which will occur in three or four days. Then draw off the clear juice in another vessel, and add one pound of sugar to every ten quarts of the liquor, and stir thoroughly. Let stand six to ten days in first vessel with top; then draw off through a jelly-bag. Steep four ounces of isinglass in a pint of wine for twelve hours; boil it over a slow fire till all dissolved, then place dissolved isinglass in a gallon of blackberry juice, give them a boil together and pour all into the vessel. Let stand a few days to ferment and settle; draw off and keep in a cool place. Other berry wines may be made in the same manner.

GRAPE WINE.

Mash the grapes and strain them through a cloth; put the skins in a tub, after squeezing them, with barely enough water to cover them; strain the juice thus obtained into the first portion; put three pounds of sugar to one gallon of the mixture; let it stand in an open tub to ferment, covered with a cloth, for a period of from three to seven days; skim off what rises every morning. Put the juice in a cask and leave it open for twenty-four hours; then bung it up, and put clay over the bung to keep the air out. Let your wine remain in the cask until March, when it should be drawn off and bottled.

FLORIDA ORANGE WINE.

Wipe the oranges with a wet cloth, peel off the yellow rind very thin, squeeze the oranges, and strain the juice through a hair-sieve; measure the juice after it is strained and for each gallon allow three pounds of granulated sugar, the white and shell of one egg and one-third of a gallon of cold water; put the sugar, the white and shell of the egg (crushed small) and the water over the fire and stir them every two minutes until the eggs begin to harden; then boil the syrup until it looks clear under the froth, of egg which will form on the surface; strain the syrup, pour it upon the orange rind and let it stand over night; then next add the orange juice and again let it stand over night; strain it the second day, and put it into a tight cask with a small cake of compressed yeast to about ten gallons of wine, and leave the bung out of the cask until the wine ceases to ferment; the hissing noise continues so long as fermentation is in progress; when fermentation ceases, close the cask by driving in the bung, and let the wine stand about nine months before bottling it; three months after it is bottled, it can be used. A glass of brandy added to each gallon of wine after fermentation ceases is generally considered an improvement.

There are seasons of the year when Florida oranges by the box are very cheap, and this fine wine can be made at a small expense.

METHELIN, OR HONEY WINE.

This is a very ancient and popular drink in the north of Europe. To some new honey, strained, add spring water; put a whole egg into it; boil this liquor till the egg swims above the liquor; strain, pour it in a cask. To every fifteen gallons add two ounces of white Jamaica ginger, bruised, one ounce of cloves and mace, one and one-half ounces of cinnamon, all bruised together and tied up in a muslin bag; accelerate the fermentation with yeast; when worked sufficiently, bung up; in six weeks draw off into bottles.

Another Mead.—Boil the combs, from which the honey has been drained, with sufficient water to make a tolerably sweet liquor; ferment this with yeast and proceed as per previous formula.

Sack Mead is made by adding a handful of hops and sufficient brandy to the comb liquor.

BLACK CURRANT WINE.

Four quarts of whisky, four quarts of black currants, four pounds of brown or white sugar, one tablespoonful of cloves, one tablespoonful of cinnamon.

Crush the currants and let them stand in the whisky with the spices for three weeks; then strain and add the sugar; set away again for three weeks longer; then strain and bottle.

RAISIN WINE.

Take two pounds of raisins, seed and chop them, a lemon, a pound of white sugar and about two gallons of boiling water. Pour into a stone jar and stir daily for six or eight days. Strain, bottle and put in a cool place for ten days or so, when the wine will be ready for use.

CHERRY BOUNCE.

To one gallon of wild cherries add enough good whisky to cover the fruit. Let soak two or three weeks and then drain off the liquor. Mash the cherries without breaking the stones and strain through a jelly-bag; add this liquor to that already drained off. Make a with a gill of water and a pound of white sugar to every two of liquor thus prepared; stir in well and bottle, and tightly cork. A common way of making cherry bounce is to put wild cherries and whisky together in a jug and use the liquor as wanted.

BLACKBERRY CORDIAL.

Warm and squeeze the berries; add to one pint of juice one pound of white sugar, one-half ounce of powdered cinnamon, one-fourth ounce of mace, two teaspoonfuls of cloves. Boil all together for one-fourth of an hour; strain the syrup, and to each pint add a glass of French brandy. Two or three doses of a tablespoonful or less will check any slight diarrhoea. When the attack is violent, give a tablespoonful after each discharge until the complaint is in subjection. It will arrest dysentery if given in season, and is a pleasant and safe remedy. Excellent for children when teething.

HOP BEER.

Take five quarts of water, six ounces of hops, boil it three hours; then strain the liquor, add to it five quarts of water, four ounces of bruised ginger root; boil this again twenty minutes, strain and add four pounds of sugar. When luke-warm put in a pint of yeast. Let it ferment; in twenty-four hours it will be ready for bottling.

GINGER BEER.

Put into a kettle two ounces of powdered ginger root (or more if it is not very strong), half an ounce of cream of tartar, two large lemons, cut in slices, two pounds of broken loaf sugar and two gallons of soft boiling water. Simmer them over a slow fire for half an hour. When the liquor is nearly cold, stir into it a large tablespoonful of the best yeast. After it has fermented, which will be in about twenty-four hours, bottle for use.

SPRUCE BEER.

Allow an ounce of hops and a spoonful of ginger to a gallon of water. When well boiled, strain it and put in a pint of molasses, or a pound of brown sugar, and half an ounce or less of the essence of spruce; when cool, add a teacupful of yeast, and put into a clean tight cask, and let it ferment for a day or two, then bottle it for use. You can boil the sprigs of spruce fir in place of the essence.

ROMAN PUNCH. No. 1.

Grate the yellow rind of four lemons and two oranges upon two pounds of loaf sugar. Squeeze the juice of the lemons and oranges; cover it and let it stand until next day. Strain it through a sieve, mix with the sugar; add a bottle of champagne and the whites of eight eggs beaten to a stiff froth. It may be frozen or not, as desired. For winter use snow instead of ice.

ROMAN PUNCH. No. 2.

Make two quarts of lemonade, rich with pure juice lemon fruit; add one tablespoonful of extract of lemon. Work well and freeze; just before serving, add for each quart of ice half a pint of brandy and half a pint of Jamaica rum. Mix well and serve in high glasses, as this makes what is called a semi or half ice. It is usually served at dinners as a coup de milieu.

DELICIOUS JUNKET.

Take two quarts of new milk, warm it on the stove to about blood heat, pour it into a glass or china bowl and stir into it two tablespoonfuls of prepared rennet, two tablespoonfuls of powdered loaf sugar, and a small wine-glassful of pale brandy. Let it stand till cold and eat with sugar and rich cream. Half the quantity can be made.

RASPBERRY SHRUB.

One quart of raspberry juice, half a pound of loaf sugar, dissolved, a pint of Jamaica rum, or part rum and brandy. Mix thoroughly. Bottle for use.

SASSAFRAS MEAD.

Mix gradually with two quarts of boiling water three pounds and a half of the best brown sugar, a pint and a half of good West India molasses, and a quarter of a pound of tartaric acid. Stir it well and when cool, strain it into a large jug or pan, then mix in a teaspoonful (not more) of essence of sassafras. Transfer it to clean bottles (it will fill about half a dozen), cork it tightly and keep it in a cool place. It will be fit for use next day. Put into a box or boxes a quarter of a pound of carbonate of soda, to use with it. To prepare a glass of sassafras mead for drinking, put a large tablespoonful of the mead into half a tumbler full of ice-water, stir into it a half teaspoonful of the soda and it will immediately foam up to the top.

Sassafras mead will be found a cheap, wholesome and pleasant beverage for warm weather. The essence of sassafras, tartaric acid and carbonate of soda, can, of course, be obtained at the druggist's.

CREAM SODA WITHOUT THE FOUNTAIN.

Coffee-sugar, four pounds, three pints of water, three nutmegs, grated, the whites of ten eggs, well beaten, gum arabic, one ounce, twenty drops of oil of lemon, or extract equal to that amount. By using oils or other fruits, you can make as many flavors from this as you desire. Mix all and place over a gentle fire, and stir well about thirty minutes; remove from the fire and strain, and divide into two parts; into one-half put eight ounces of bicarbonate of soda, into the other half put six ounces of tartaric acid. Shake well, and when cold they are ready for use by pouring three or four spoonfuls from both parts into separate glasses, each one-third full of water. Stir each and pour together, and you have a nice glass of cream soda which you can drink at your leisure, as the gum and eggs hold the gas.

WINE WHEY.

Sweeten one pint of milk to taste, and when boiling, throw in two wine-glasses of sherry; when the curd forms, strain the whey through a muslin bag into tumblers.

LEMON SYRUP.

Take the juice of twelve lemons; grate the rind of six in it, let it stand over night; then take six pounds of white sugar and make a thick syrup. When it is quite cool, strain the juice into it, and squeeze as much oil from the grated rind as will suit the taste. Put in bottles, securely corked, for future use. A tablespoonful in a goblet of water will make a delicious drink on a hot day.

FOR A SUMMER DRAUGHT.

The juice of one lemon, a tumblerful of cold water, pounded sugar to taste, half a small teaspoonful of carbonate of soda. Squeeze the juice from the lemon; strain and add it to the water, with sufficient pounded sugar to sweeten the whole nicely. When well mixed, put in the soda, stir well and drink while the mixture is in an effervescing state.

NOYEAU CORDIAL.

To one gallon of proof spirit add three pounds of loaf sugar and a tablespoonful of extract of almonds. Mix well together and allow to stand forty-eight hours; covered closely; now strain through thick flannel and bottle. This liquor will be much improved by adding half a pint of apricot or peach juice.

EGG NOG.

Beat the yolks of twelve eggs very light, stir in as much white sugar as they will dissolve, pour in gradually one glass of brandy to cook the egg, one glass of old whisky, one grated nutmeg, and three pints of rich milk. Beat the whites to a froth and stir in last.

EGG FLIP, OR MULLED ALE.

Boil one quart of good ale with some nutmeg; beat up six eggs and mix them with a little cold ale; then pour the hot ale to it, pour it back and forth several times to prevent its curdling; warm and stir it till sufficiently thick; add a piece of butter or a glass of brandy and serve it with dry toast.

MILK PUNCH.

One pint of milk made very sweet; a wine-glassful of brandy or rum, well stirred together; grate a little nutmeg over the top of the glasses. Serve with a straw in each glass.

FINE MILK PUNCH.

PARE off the yellow rind of four large lemons and steep it for twenty-four hours in a quart of brandy or rum. Then mix with it the juice of the lemons, a pound and a half of loaf sugar, two grated nutmegs and a quart of water. Add a quart of rich unskimmed milk, made boiling hot, and strain the whole through a jelly-bag. You may either use it as soon as it is cold, or make a larger quantity (in the above proportions) and bottle it. It will keep several months.

TO MAKE HOT PUNCH.

Half a pint of rum, half a pint of brandy, quarter of a pound of sugar, one large lemon, half a teaspoonful of nutmeg, one pint of boiling water.

Rub the sugar over the lemon until it has absorbed all the yellow part of the skin, then put the sugar into a punch bowl; add the lemon juice (free from pips) and mix these two ingredients, well together. Pour over them the boiling water, stir well together, add the rum, brandy and nutmeg; mix thoroughly and the punch will be ready to serve. It is very important in making good punch that all the ingredients are thoroughly incorporated; and to insure success, the processes of mixing must be diligently attended to. (This is an old-style punch.)

LEMONADE.

Three lemons to a pint of water makes strong lemonade; sweeten to your taste.

STRAWBERRY WATER.

Take one cupful of ripe hulled berries; crush with a wooden spoon, mixing with the mass a quarter of a pound of pulverized sugar and half a pint of cold water. Pour the mixture into a fine sieve, rub through and filter till clear; add the strained juice, of one lemon and one and a half pints of cold water, mix thoroughly and set in ice chest till wanted.

This makes a nice, cool drink on a warm day and easily to be made in strawberry season.

STRAWBERRY AND RASPBERRY SYRUP.

Mash the fresh fruit, express the juice and to each quart add three and a half pounds of granulated sugar. The juice, heated to 180 deg. Fahrenheit, and strained or filtered previous to dissolving the sugar, will keep for an indefinite time, canned hot in glass jars.

The juice of soft fruits is best when allowed to drop therefrom by its own weight; lightly mash the fruit and then suspend in a cloth, allowing the juice to drop in a vessel beneath. Many housekeepers, after the bottles and jars are thoroughly washed and dried, smoke them with sulphur in this way: Take a piece of wire and bend it around a small piece of brimstone the size of a bean; set the brimstone on fire, put it in the jar or bottle, bending the other end over the mouth of the vessel, and cover with a cork; after the brimstone has burned away, fill the vessel with the syrup or preserves and cover tightly. There is no sulphurous taste left by the process.

KOUMISS.

Koumiss is prepared by dissolving four ounces of white sugar in one gallon of skimmed milk, and placing in bottles of the capacity of one quart; add two ounces of baker's yeast or a cake of compressed yeast to each bottle. Cork and tie securely, set in a warm place until fermentation is well under way, and lay the bottles on their sides in a cool cellar. In three days, fermentation will have progressed sufficiently to permit the koumiss to be in good condition.

PINEAPPLE VINEGAR.

Cover sliced pineapples with pure cider vinegar; let them stand three or four days, then mash and strain through a cloth as long as it runs clear; to every three quarts of juice add five pounds of sugar.

Boil it altogether about ten minutes, skim carefully until nothing rises to the surface, take from the fire; when cool, bottle it. Blackberries and raspberries, and, in fact, any kind of highly flavored fruit, is fine; a tablespoonful in a glass of ice-cold water, to drink in warm weather.

RASPBERRY VINEGAR. No. 1.

Put a quart of raspberries into a suitable dish, pour over them a quart of good vinegar, let it stand twenty-four hours, then strain through a flannel bag and pour this liquor on another quart of berries; do this for three or four days successively and strain it; make it very sweet with loaf sugar; bottle and seal it.

RASPBERRY VINEGAR. NO. 2.

Turn over a quart or ripe raspberries, mashed, a quart of good cider vinegar, add one pound of white sugar, mix well, then let stand in the sun four hours. Strain it, squeeze out the juice and put in a pint of good brandy. Seal it up in bottles, air-tight, and lay them on their sides in the cellar; cover them with sawdust. When used, pour two tablespoonfuls to a tumblerful of ice-water. Fine.

HOME-MADE TABLE VINEGAR.

Put in an open cask four gallons of warm rain-water, one gallon of common molasses and two quarts of yeast; cover the top with thin muslin and leave it in the sun, covering it up at night and when it rains. In three or four weeks it will be good vinegar. If cider can be used in place of rain-water the vinegar will make much sooner—will not take over a week to make a very sharp vinegar. Excellent for pickling purposes.

VERY STRONG TABLE VINEGAR.

Take two gallons of good cider and thoroughly mix it with two pounds of new honey, pour into your cask or bottle and let it stand from four to six months, when you will have vinegar so strong that it cannot be used at table without diluting with water. It is the best ever procured for pickling purposes.

PINEAPPLE-ADE.

Pare and slice some very ripe pineapples; then cut the slices into small pieces. Put them with all their juice into a large pitcher, and sprinkle among them plenty of powdered white sugar. Pour on boiling water, allowing a small half pint to each pineapple. Cover the pitcher and let it stand till quite cool, occasionally pressing down the pineapple with a spoon. Then set the pitcher for a while in ice. Lastly, strain the infusion into another vessel and transfer it to tumblers, putting into each glass some more sugar and a bit of ice. This beverage will be found delicious.

SEIDLITZ POWDERS.

Fold in a white paper a mixture of one drachm of Rochelle salts and twenty-five grains of carbonate of soda, in a blue paper twenty grains of tartaric acid. They should all be pulverized very finely. Put the contents of the white paper into a tumbler, not quite half full of cold water, and stir it till dissolved. Then put the mixture from the blue paper into another tumbler with the same quantity of water, and stir that also. When the powders are dissolved in both tumblers, pour the first into the other, and it will effervesce immediately. Drink it quickly, while foaming.

INEXPENSIVE DRINK.

A very nice, cheap drink which may take the place of lemonade and be found fully as healthful is made with one cupful of pure cider vinegar, half a cupful of good molasses, put into one quart pitcher of ice-water. A tablespoonful of ground ginger added makes a healthful beverage.



THE VARIETIES OF SEASONABLE FOOD TO BE OBTAINED IN OUR MARKETS DURING THE YEAR.

JANUARY.

MEATS.—Beef, mutton, pork, lamb.

POULTRY AND GAME.—Rabbits, hares, partridges, woodcocks, grouse or prairie chickens, snipes, antelope, quails, swans, geese, chickens, capons, tame pigeons, wild ducks, the canvas-back duck being the most popular and highly prized; turkeys.

FISH.—Haddock, fresh codfish, halibut, flounders, bass, fresh salmon, turbot. Frozen fresh mackerel is found in our large cities during this month; also frozen salmon, red-snapper, shad, frozen bluefish, pickerel, smelts, green turtle, diamond-back terrapin, prawns, oysters, scallops, hard crabs, white bait, finnan haddie, smoked halibut, smoked salmon.

VEGETABLES.—Cabbage, carrots, turnips, parsnips, beets, pumpkins, chives, celery, winter squash, onions, white and sweet potatoes, Jerusalem artichokes, chiccory, Brussels-sprouts, kale-sprouts, oyster plant, leeks, cress, cauliflower. Garden herbs, both dry and green, being chiefly used in stuffing and soups, and for flavoring and garnishing certain dishes, are always in season, such as sage, thyme, sweet basil, borage, dill, mint, parsley, lavender, summer savory, etc., may be procured green in the summer and dried in the winter.

FEBRUARY.

MEATS.—Beef, mutton, pork, lamb, antelope.

POULTRY AND GAME.—Partridges, hares, rabbits, snipes, capons, pheasants, fowls, pullets, geese, ducks, turkeys, wild ducks, swan, and pigeons.

FISH.—Halibut, haddock, fresh codfish, striped bass, eels, fresh salmon, live lobsters, pompano, sheep's-head, red-snapper, white perch, a panfish, smelts—green and frozen; shad, herring, salmon-trout, whitefish, pickerel, green turtle, flounders, scallops, prawns, oysters, soft-shell crabs—which are in excellent condition this month; hard crabs, white bait, boneless dried codfish, finnan haddie, smoked halibut, smoked salmon.

VEGETABLES.—White potatoes, sweet potatoes, cabbage, onions, parsnips, oyster plant, okra, celery, chiccory, carrots, turnips, Jerusalem artichokes, French artichokes, Brussels-sprouts, beets, mushrooms raised in hot houses, pumpkins, winter squash, dry shallots and garden herbs for seasoning put up in the dried state.

MARCH.

MEATS.—Beef, veal, mutton, lamb, pork.

POULTRY AND GAME.—Chickens, turkeys, ducks, rabbits, snipes, wild pigeons, capons.

FISH.—Striped bass, halibut, salmon, live codfish, chicken halibut, live lobster, Spanish mackerel, flounders, sheep's-head, pompano, grouper, red-snapper. Shad are plentiful this month. Herring, salmon-trout, sturgeon, whitefish, pickerel, yellow perch, catfish, green turtle, terrapin, scallops, soft-shell clams, oysters, prawns, smoked salmon, smoked halibut, smoked haddock, salt codfish.

VEGETABLES.—Cabbage, turnips, carrots, parsnips, artichokes, white potatoes, sweet potatoes, onions, leeks, radishes, Brussels-sprouts, celery, mushrooms, salsify-chives, cress, parsley and other garden herbs, greens, rhubarb and cucumbers raised in hot beds.

APRIL.

MEATS.—Beef, veal, pork, mutton, lamb.

POULTRY AND GAME.—Chickens, fowls, green geese, young ducks, capons, golden plover, squabs, wild ducks.

FISH.—Haddock, fresh cod, striped bass, halibut, eels, chicken halibut, live lobsters, salmon, white perch, flounders, fresh mackerel, sheep's-head, smelts, red-snapper, bluefish, skate or ray fish, shad, whitefish, brook trout, salmon-trout, pickerel, catfish, prawns, crayfish, green turtle, oysters, scallops, frogs' legs, clams, hard crabs, white bait, smoked halibut, smoked salmon, smoked haddock, salt mackerel, salt codfish.

VEGETABLES.—Onions, white and sweet potatoes, kale-sprouts, rhubarb, artichokes, turnips, radishes, Brussels-sprouts, okra, cabbage, parsnips, mushrooms, cress, carrots, beets, dandelion, egg plant, leeks, lettuce, cucumbers, asparagus, string beans, peas, chives.

MAY.

MEATS.—Beef, veal, mutton, lamb, pork.

POULTRY AND GAME.—Fowls, pigeons, spring chickens, young ducks, chickens, green geese, young turkeys.

FISH.—Halibut, haddock, striped bass, salmon, flounders, fresh mackerel, Spanish mackerel, blackfish, pompano, butterfish, weakfish, kingfish, porgies, shad, bluefish, clams, brook-trout, whitefish, carp, crayfish, prawns, green turtle, soft crabs, frogs' legs, smoked fish.

VEGETABLES.—New potatoes, sweet potatoes, cabbage, young onions, asparagus, beets, carrots, kidney beans, string beans, lettuce, tomatoes, cauliflower, peas, turnips, squash, rhubarb, spinach, radishes, artichokes, sorrel, egg-plant, cucumbers, salads generally.

JUNE.

MEATS.—Beef, veal, mutton, lamb.

POULTRY AND GAME.—Chickens, geese, ducks, young turkeys, plovers, Pigeons.

FISH.—Fresh salmon, striped bass, halibut, fresh mackerel, flounders, kingfish, blackfish, weakfish, butterfish, pompano, Spanish mackerel, porgies, sheeps-head, sturgeon, sea bass, bluefish, skate or rayfish, carp, black bass, crayfish, lobsters, eels, white bait, frogs' legs, soft crabs, clams.

VEGETABLES.—Potatoes, spinach, cauliflower, string beans, peas tomatoes, asparagus, carrots, artichokes, parsnips, onions, cucumbers, lettuce, radishes, cress, oyster plant, egg plant, rhubarb and all kinds of garden herbs, sorrel, horse-radish.

JULY.

MEATS.—Beef, veal, mutton, lamb, pork.

POULTRY AND GAME.—Fowls, chickens, pigeons, plovers, young geese, turkey-plouts, squabs, doe-birds,-tame rabbits.

FISH.—Spanish mackerel, striped bass, fresh mackerel, blackfish, kingfish, flounders, salmon, cod, haddock, halibut, pompano, butterfish, a sweet panfish, sheep's-head, porgies, sea bass, weakfish, swordfish, tantog, bluefish skate, brook trout, crayfish, black bass, moonfish—a fine baking or boiling fish; pickerel, perch, eels, green turtle, frogs' legs, soft crabs, white bait, prawns, lobsters, clams.

VEGETABLES.—Potatoes, asparagus, peas, green string beans, butter beans, artichokes, celery, lettuce, carrots, salsify, tomatoes, spinach, mushrooms, cabbage onions, endive, radishes, turnips, mint, various kinds of greens and salads.

AUGUST.

MEATS.—Beef, veal, mutton, lamb, pork.

POULTRY AND GAME.—Venison, young ducks, green geese, snipe, plover, turkeys, guinea-fowls, squabs, wild pigeons, woodcock, fowls.

FISH—Striped bass, cod, halibut, haddock, salmon, flounders, fresh mackerel, ponito, butterfish, sea bass, kingfish, sheep's-head, porgies, bluefish, moonfish, brook trout, eels, black bass, crayfish, skate or rayfish, catfish, green turtle, white bait, squid, frogs' legs, soft crabs, prawns, clams.

VEGETABLES.—Carrots, artichokes, onions, string beans, lima beans, cauliflower Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes, green corn, tomatoes, peas, summer squash, cucumbers, radishes, lettuce, celery, rhubarb, beets, greens, mushrooms, chives.

SEPTEMBER.

MEAT.—Beef, veal, mutton, lamb, pork, venison.

POULTRY AND GAME.—Larks, woodcock, snipe, wild pigeons, squabs, young geese, young turkeys, plover, wild ducks, wild geese, swans and brant fowls, reed-birds, grouse, doe-birds, partridges.

FISH.—Salmon, halibut codfish, pompano, striped bass, haddock, cero, a large fish similar to the Spanish mackerel; flounders, fresh mackerel, blackfish, Spanish mackerel, butterfish, whitefish, weakfish, smelts, porgies, squids, pickerel, crayfish, catfish, bluefish, wall-eyed pike, sea bass, skate, carp, prawns, white bait, frogs' legs, hard crabs, moonfish, soft crabs, herrings, lobsters, clams.

VEGETABLES.—Potatoes, cabbages, turnips, artichokes, peas, beans, carrots, onions, salsify, mushrooms, lettuce, sorrel, celery, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, sweet potatoes, squash, rhubarb, green-peppers, parsnips, beets, green corn, tomatoes, cress.

OCTOBER.

MEATS.—Beef, veal, mutton, lamb, pork, venison, antelope.

POULTRY AND GAME.—Turkeys, geese, fowls, pullets, chickens, wild ducks, the canvas-back duck being the most highly prized, for its delicate flavor; woodcock, grouse, pheasants, pigeons, partridges, snipes, reed-birds, golden plover, gray plover, squabs.

FISH.—Striped bass, fresh cod, halibut, haddock, Spanish mackerel, fresh mackerel, cero, flounders, pompano, weakfish, white perch, grouper, sheep's-head, whitefish, bluefish, pickerel, red-snapper, yellow perch, smelts, sea bass, black bass, cisco, wall-eyed pike, crayfish, carp, salmon-trout, spotted bass, terrapin, frogs' legs, hard crabs, soft crabs, white bait, green turtle, scallops, eels, lobsters, oysters.

VEGETABLES.—Potatoes, cabbages, turnips, carrots, cauliflowers, parsnips, string beans, peas, lima beans, corn, tomatoes, onions, spinach, salsify, egg plant, beets, pumpkins, endive, celery, parsley, squash, cucumbers, mushrooms, sweet herbs of all kinds, salads of all kinds, garlic, shallots.

NOVEMBER.

MEATS.—Beef, veal, mutton, pork, venison, antelope.

POULTRY AND GAME.—Rabbits, hares, pheasants, woodcock, partridges, quails, snipe, grouse, wild ducks, wild geese, fowls, turkeys, pigeons.

FISH.—Striped bass, fresh cod, halibut, haddock, salmon, fresh mackerel, blackfish, whitefish, bluefish, catfish, redfish or spotted bass, black bass, yellow perch, skate, red-snapper, salmon-trout, pickerel, shad, wall-eyed pike, cisco, crayfish, terrapin, green turtle, scallops, prawns, white bait, frogs' legs, hard crabs, oysters.

VEGETABLES.—Potatoes, carrots, parsnips, turnips, onions, dried beans, artichokes, cabbages, beets, winter squash, celery, parsley, pumpkins, shallots, mushrooms, chiccory, all sorts of salads and sweet herbs.

DECEMBER.

MEATS.—Beef, veal, mutton, pork, venison.

POULTRY AND GAME.—Rabbits, hares, grouse, pheasants, woodcock, snipe, partridges, turkey, fowls, chickens, pullets, geese, wild geese, ducks, wild duck, tame duck, canvas-back duck, quails.

FISH.—Turbot, sturgeon, haddock, halibut, eels, striped bass, flounders, salmon, fresh cod, blackfish, whitefish, grouper, cusk, shad, mullet, a sweet panfish, black bass, yellow perch, salmon-trout, pickerel, cisco, skate, wall-eyed pike, terrapin, crayfish, green turtle, prawns, hard crabs, soft crabs, scallops, frogs' legs, oysters.

VEGETABLES.—- Potatoes, cabbages, onions, winter squash, beets, turnips, pumpkins, carrots, parsnips, dried beans, dried peas, mushrooms, parsley, shallots, Brussels-sprouts, leeks, horse-radish, garlic, mint, sage and small salads. Garden herbs which are mostly used for stuffings and for flavoring dishes, soups, etc., or for garnishing, may be found either green or dried the year round, always in season.

Melons can be had at most of our markets from July 1st until the 15th of October; they are received from the South in the early part of the season, and are not as fresh and good as those ripened in our own vicinity.



MENUS

BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER FOR THE HOLIDAYS

And for a Week in Each Month In the Year.

* * * * *

JANUARY.

NEW YEAR'S DAY.

BREAKFAST.

Baked Apples 515. Hominy 274. Boiled White Fish 59. Ham Omelet 233. Potatoes a la Creme 193. Parker House Rolls 253. Crullers 317. Toast 276. Coffee 458.

SUPPER.

Cold Roast Turkey 82. Boston Oyster Pie 76. Celery Salad 174. Baked Sweet Potatoes 198. Rusks 256. Fruit Cake 290. Sliced Oranges. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Oysters on Half Shell. Julienne Soup 33. Baked Pickerel 51. Roast Turkey 82, Oyster Stuffing 83. Mashed Potatoes 192. Boiled Onions 198. Baked Winter Squash 212. Cranberry Sauce 163. Chicken Pie 89. Plain Celery 175. Lobster Salad 171. Olives. Spiced Currants 189. English Plum Pudding 396, Wine Sauce 417. Mince Pie 338. Orange-water Ice 380. Fancy Cakes 310. Cheese. Fruits. Nuts. Raisins. Confectionery. Coffee 458.

SUNDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Oranges. Oatmeal, with Cream 274. Broiled Mutton Chops 139. Tomato Sauce 159. Favorite Warmed Potatoes 195. Eggs on Toast 279. Graham Gems 259. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

SUPPER.

Potted Ham 152. Cheese Cream Toast 223. Celery Salad 174. Cold Raised Biscuit 251. Gooseberry Jam 435. Citron Cake 295. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Oysters on Half Shell. Mock Turtle Soup 39. Boiled Halibut 57, Sauce Maitre d'Hotel 160. Roast Haunch of Venison 104, Currant Jelly 431. Potato Croquettes No. 1 196. Creamed Parsnips 204. Celery. Pickled White Cabbage 182. Chicken Patties 88. Baked Lemon Pudding 399. Jelly Kisses 372. Raisins. Nuts. Fruit. Coffee 458.

MONDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Baked Apples 515. Boiled Rice 275. Pork Cutlets 147. Waffles 260, with Maple Syrup. Potato Fillets 196. Toast 276. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Cold Roast Venison 104. Broiled Oysters 73. Potato Salad 175. Rye Drop-cakes 261. Canned Peaches 439. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Macaroni Soup 40. Boiled Leg of Mutton 137, Caper Sauce 158. Potatoes a la Delmonico 197. Steamed Cabbage 201. Cheese Fondu 222. Cucumber Pickles 180. Boston Cream Pie 331. Sliced Oranges. Crackers. Cheese. Coffee 458.

TUESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Raspberry Jam 436. Hominy 274. Saratoga Chips 193. Porterhouse Steak 110. French Griddle-cakes 265. Brown Bread 244. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Scrambled Mutton 141. Welsh Rarebit 224. Olives. Hominy Croquettes 274. Currant Jelly 431. Molasses Cup Cake 308. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Oyster Soup 46. Roast Loin of Pork 145. Apple Sauce 162. Boiled Sweet Potatoes 198. Scalloped Onions 199. Stewed Carrots 213. Pickled Green Peppers 183. Royal Sago Pudding 401. Sweet Sauce 421. Crullers 317. Fruit. Cheese. Coffee 458.

WEDNESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Old-fashioned Apple Sauce 162. Fried Mush 273. Pork Tenderloins 147. Fried Sweet Potatoes 198. Parker House Rolls 253. Omelet 230. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Cold Roast Pork 145. Stewed Codfish 64. Green Tomato Pickles 181. Rusks 256. Strawberry Jam 435. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Beef Soup 31. Roast Fillet of Veal 127. Tomato Sauce 159. Browned Potatoes 192. Macaroni a la Creme 217. Parsnip Fritters 203. Piccalili 186. Lemon Pie 328. Cocoanut Tarts 341. Cheese. Coffee 458.

THURSDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Stewed Peaches. Corn Meal Mush 273. Stewed Beef Kidney 124. Egg Muffins 257. Crisp Potatoes 195. Ham Toast 279. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Veal Croquettes 129. Sardines. Cold Slaw 173. Cheese Toast 277. Canned Plums 442. Soft Ginger Cake 306. Cocoa 461.

DINNER.

Chicken Cream Soup 34. Boiled Corned Beef 118. Boiled Potatoes 192. Boiled Turnips 214. Boiled Cabbage 200. Beets Boiled 210. Charlotte Russe 361. Preserved Strawberries 425. Fruit Jumbles 315. Fruit. Coffee 458.

FRIDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Orange Marmalade 434. Oat Flakes 275. Codfish Balls 63. Baked Eggs on Toast 279. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Sally Lunn 255. Raised Doughnuts 317. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Cold Corned Beef 118. Vegetable Hash 212. Deviled Lobster 69. Graham Bread 243. Peach Butter 443. Golden Spice Cake 303. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Celery Soup 43. Baked Halibut 58. Hollandaise Sauce 161. Browned Potatoes 192. Scalloped Oysters 76. Stewed Tomatoes 204. Fried Salsify 209. Suet Plum Pudding 413. Brandy Sauce 417. Sponge Drops 312. Fruit. Coffee 458.

SATURDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Apple Sauce 162. Cracked Wheat 275. Beef Hash 123. Fried Raw Potatoes 194. Buckwheat Cakes with Maple Syrup 265-266. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Scalloped Fish 64. Head Cheese 154. Celery 175. Grafton Milk Biscuits 254. Grape Jelly 433. Cream Cake 300. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Tomato Soup 38. Fricassee Chicken 87. Mashed Potatoes 192. Ladies' Cabbage 201. Boiled Rice 202. Cold Slaw 173. Apple Pie 326. Mock Ice 354. Cookies 315. Cheese. Coffee 458.



FEBRUARY.

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Oranges. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Country Sausage 153. Baked Omelet 234. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Clam Fritters 78. Egg muffins 257. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

DINNER

Oysters on Half Shell. Mock Turtle Soup 39. Baked White Fish 56. Bechamel Sauce 160. Boiled Turkey 84. Oyster Sauce 157. Boiled Sweet Potatoes 198. Steamed Potatoes 194. Stewed Tomatoes 204. Scalloped Onions 199. Salmi of Game 103. Olives. Chicken Salad 171. Washington Poe 365. Bavarian Cream 349. Variegated Jelly 374. Marble Cake 297. Candied Fruits. Raisins and Nuts. Coffee 458.

SUPPER

Cold Boiled Turkey 84. Potato Croquettes 196. Lobster Salad 171. Soda Biscuit 251. English Pound Cake 294. Pineapple Preserves 427. Tea 460.

SUNDAY

BREAKFAST

Old-fashioned Apple Sauce 162. Graham Mush 273. Broiled Ham 152. Potato Croquettes 196. Fried Eggs 228. Virginia Corn Bread 247. German Doughnuts 318. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

DINNER

Ox-tail Soup 34 Baked White Fish (Bordeaux Sauce) 56. Braised Ducks with Turnips 97. Mashed Potatoes 192. Stewed Tomatoes 204. Timbale of Macaroni 217. Celery Salad 174. Fried Sweetbreads 135. Sago Apple Pudding 401. Lemon Jelly 373. Fruit. Almond Macaroons 372. Coffee 458.

SUPPER

Boston Oyster Pie 76. Cold Boiled Tongue 124. Sliced Cucumber Pickle 180. Orange Short-cake 270. Ginger Snaps 309. Tea 460.

MONDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Stewed Apricots. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Fried Chicken 90. Potato Puffs 193. Flannel Cakes 262. Milk Toast 277. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Warmed-up Duck 98. Sliced Bologna Sausage 152. Celery 175. Potato Biscuit 254. Canned Grapes 439. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Vermicelli Soup 42. Stewed Brisket of Beef 120. Scalloped Potatoes 194. Stewed Parsnips 203. French Cabbage 201. Mixed Pickles 187. Cranberry Pie 335. Spanish Cream 349. Fruit. Cheese. Coffee 458.

TUESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Sliced Oranges. Hominy 274. Hamburger Steak 123. Grilled Pork 149. Saratoga Chips 193. Tennessee Muffins 258. Puff Ball Doughnuts 319. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Cold Sliced Beef 120. Potato Puffs 193. Tomato Catsup 176. Light Biscuit 252. Jelly Fritters 369. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Scotch Mutton Broth 32. Baked Ham 151. Potato Snow 194. Scalloped Tomatoes 204. Veal Croquettes 129. Stewed Beets 210. Sunderland Pudding 415. Custard Sauce 420. Lemon Cookies 316. Fruit. Coffee 458.

WEDNESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Fried Apples 147. Corn Meal Mush 273. Fried Pork Chops 148. Newport Waffles 260. Favorite Warmed Potatoes 195. Brown Bread 244. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Sliced Ham 151. Scalloped Oysters 76. Fried Sweet Potatoes 198. Sweet Pickle 188. Lemon Toast 367. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Mullagatawny Soup 38. Boned Leg of Mutton, Roasted 136. Boiled Potatoes 192. Stewed Onions 199. Mashed Turnips 214. Hot Slaw 173. Tapioca Blanc Mange 358, with Raspberry Jam 415. Neapolitaines 313. Fruit. Coffee 458.

THURSDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Bananas. Samp 275. Broiled Veal Cutlets 129. Tomato Sauce 159. Fried Potatoes 194. French Rolls 253. Wonders 318. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Hashed Mutton on Toast 138. Potato Croquettes 196. Pickled Oysters 185. Preserved Cherries 424. Feather Cake 300. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Tapioca Cream Soup 41. Curry Chicken with Rice 93. Steamed Sweet Potatoes 198. Stewed Salsify 209. Boiled Squash 212. Pickled Onions 184. Delicate Indian Pudding 395. Orange Jelly 377. Crackers. Cheese. Coffee 458.

FRIDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Oranges. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Boiled Salt Mackerel 60. Veal Hash on Toast 280. Fried Sweet Potatoes 198. Corn Meal Griddle-cakes 263. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Lobster Croquettes 69. French Stew 119. Cold Slaw 173. Rusks 256. Sweet Omelet 368. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Lobster Soup 46. Boiled Cod with Oyster Sauce 65. Potato Puffs 193. Fried Cabbage 201. Muttonettes 140. Olives. Cocoanut Pudding 395. Banana Cream 352. Cup Cakes 311. Coffee 458.

SATURDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Apple Jelly 433. Boiled Rice 275. Fried Pickled Pigs' Feet 151. Baked Potatoes 197. Fish Omelet 233. English Crumpets 272. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Dried Beef with Cream 121. Cheese Fondu 222. Potato Salad 174. Grafton Milk Biscuits 254. Corn Meal Puffs 395. Lemon Sauce 418. Cocoa 461.

DINNER.

Turtle Bean Soup 37. Beef a la Mode 113. Baked Potatoes 197. Sourcrout 202. Macaroni a la Italienne 216. Chowchow 183. Chocolate Custard Pie 328. Little Plum Cakes 313. Fruit. Coffee 458.

* * * * *

MARCH.

SUNDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Sliced Oranges. Oat Flakes 275. Porterhouse Steak 110. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Oyster Omelet 233. Raised Biscuit 251. Sour Milk Griddle-cakes 263. Coffee 458.

SUPPER.

Calf's Head Cheese 132. Lobster Patties 70. Potato Salad 174. Warm Soda Biscuits 251. Honey. Lemon Cookies 316. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Swiss White Soup 42. Boiled Fresh Mackerel 61, Egg Sauce 156. Roast Beef 109. Yorkshire Pudding 110. Browned Potatoes 192. Spinach with Eggs 212. Boiled Parsnips 203. Scalloped Cheese 212. Chicken Croquettes 90. Tapioca Cream Custard 352. Rhubarb Pie 333. Sponge Drops 312. Cheese. Coffee 458.

MONDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Baked Apples 515. Hominy 274. Fried Ham and Eggs 150. Crisp Potatoes 195. Plain Muffins 258. Brown Bread 244. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Cold Roast Beef 109. Fish Fritters 65. Baked Potatoes 197. Indian Loaf Cake 248. Plum Preserves 425. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Split Pea Soup 35. Braised Veal 132. Steamed Potatoes 194. Cabbage with Cream 200. Stewed Beets 210. Mixed Pickles 187. Superior Bread Pudding 389. Plain Sauce 420. Orange Tarts 340. Fruit. Coffee 458.

TUESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Bananas. Fried Mush 273. Fried Veal Chops 128. Hasty Cooked Potatoes 195. Egg Biscuit 252. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Oyster Stew 72. Spiced Beef Relish 119. Hominy Croquettes 274. Rusks 256. Canned Peaches 439. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Consomme Soup 33. Roast Chicken 86. Mashed Potatoes 192. Stewed Carrots 213. Tomato Toast 278. Spiced Currants 189. Almond Pudding 390. Lemon Trifle 356. Angel Cake 302. Fruit. Coffee 458.

WEDNESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Lemon Marmalade 435. Cracked Wheat 275. Country Sausages 153. Potato Puffs 193. Bread Griddle-cakes 264. Cream Toast 277. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Chicken Patties 88. Baked Omelet 234. Potato Croquettes 196. East India Pickle 187. Beaten Biscuit 254. Apple Pudding 403. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Vegetable Soup 42. Baked Calf's Head 132. Boiled Potatoes 192. Stewed Onions 199. Macaroni and Tomato Sauce 218. Cold Slaw 173. Apple Custard Pie 326. Wine Jelly 373. Cocoanut Cookies 316. Cheese. Coffee 458.

THURSDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Stewed Prunes. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Pork Cutlets 147. Baked Potatoes 197. Scrambled Eggs 327. Corn Meal Fritters 266. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Fricasseed Tripe 126. Hashed Beef on Toast 280. Chicken Salad 171. Cream Toast 277. Crullers 318. Grape Jelly 433. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Oyster Soup 46. Spiced Beef 112. Potato Croquettes 196. Spinach with Eggs 212. Scalloped Tomatoes 204. Olives. Plain Charlotte Russe 362. Jam Tarts 343. Fruit. Coffee 458.

FRIDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Peach Jelly 434. Boiled Rice 275. Fried Pan Fish 51. Veal Hash on Toast 280. Saratoga Chips 193. Feather Griddle-cakes 262. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Cold Spiced Beef 112. Stewed Codfish 64. Fried Potatoes 194. Brown Bread. Apple Fritters 267. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Tomato Soup No. 2 38. Boiled White Fish 59. Maitre d'Hotel Sauce 160. Potato Snow 194. Fried Parsnips 203. Boiled Cabbage 200, and Ham 151. Cucumber Pickle 180. Cracker Pudding 393. Fruit Sauce 421. Lemon Jelly 373. Delicate Cake 295. Fruit. Coffee 458.

SATURDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Cider Apple Sauce 162. Hominy 276. Calf's Liver and Bacon 134. Potatoes a la Creme 193. Egg muffins 257. Brown Bread 244. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Ham Omelet 233. Pan Oysters 74. Rice Croquettes 274. Cream Short-cake 269. Strawberry Preserves 425. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Philadelphia Pepper Pot 37. Baked Mutton Cutlets 140. Roast Sweet Potatoes 198. Mashed Turnips 214. Stewed Celery 209. Lobster Salad 171. Apple Dumplings 384. Sweet Sauce 421. Baked Custard 345. Raisins. Nuts. Coffee 458.

* * * * *

APRIL.

SUNDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Stewed Apples 370. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Veal Cutlets Broiled 129. Shirred eggs 227. Warmed Potatoes 195. French Rolls 253. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

SUPPER.

Cold Roast Chicken 86. Mayonnaise Fish 62. Welsh Rarebit 224. Baking Powder Biscuit 251. Layer Cake 304, with Banana Filling 289. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Cream of Spinach Soup 34. Broiled Shad 55, Sauce Tartare 156. Leg of Mutton a la Venison 132. Steamed Potatoes 194. Creamed Parsnips 204. Oyster Patties 75. Currant Jelly 431. Lettuce Salad 174. Delmonico Pudding 406 Pineapple Sherbet 380. Rolled Jelly Cake 304. Fruit. Coffee 458.

MONDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Sliced Oranges. Hominy 276. Broiled Halibut 58. Omelet of Herbs 231. Saratoga Chips 193. Raised Muffins 257. Brown Bread 238. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Mutton Pudding 141. Oyster Roast 74. Lettuce with Cream Dressing 170. French Rolls 253. Cup Custard 345. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Mock Turtle Soup 39. Tenderloin of Beef 113. Boiled Potatoes 192. Steamed Cabbage 201. Stewed Onions 199. Radishes. Snow Pudding 410. Peach Meringue Pie 327. Crisp Cookies 316. Fruit. Coffee 458.

TUESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Stewed Prunes. Oat Flakes 275. Frizzled Beef 118. Grilled Salt Pork 149. Potato Puffs 193. Sally Lunn 255. Toast 276. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Roast Beef Pie with Potato Crust 116. Fried Tripe 125. Hominy Croquettes 274. Olives. Light Biscuit 252. Jelly Puddings 415. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Celery Soup 43. French Stew 119. Potato Puffs 193. Mashed Turnips 214. Brain Cutlets 133. Pickled Cabbage 182. Golden Cream Cake 300. Orange Cocoanut Salad 368. Nuts. Raisins. Coffee 458.

WEDNESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Baked Apples 515. Boiled Rice 275. Mutton Chops Fried 139. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Parker House Rolls 253. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Chicken Omelet 233. Fried Eels 56. Radishes 175. Steamed Brown Bread 245. Sponge Cake 293. Quince Preserves 427. Tea 461.

DINNER.

Mullagatawny Soup 38. Boiled Fillet of Veal 127. Boiled Sweet Potatoes 198. Stewed Tomatoes 204. Baked Sweetbreads 135. Chowchow 183. Mock Cream Pie 331. Lemon Jelly 373. Almond Jumbles 315. Fruit. Coffee 458.

THURSDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Oranges. Cracked Wheat 275. Dried Beef with Cream 121. Veal Collops 128. Baked Potatoes 197. Grafton Milk Biscuits 254. Dipped Toast 276. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Pressed Beef 119. Stewed Kidneys 124. Baked Potatoes 197. Pickled Peppers 183. Fried Dinner Rolls 271. Canned Peaches 439. Cocoa 461.

DINNER.

Beef Soup 31. Chicken a la Terrapin 95. Browned Potatoes 192. Fried Parsnips 203. Macaroni and Cheese 217. Lettuce 176, with French Dressing 170. Banana Pudding 412. Jam Tarts 343. Nuts. Raisins. Coffee 458.

FRIDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Bananas. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Stewed Codfish 64. Bread Omelet 234. Boiled Potatoes 192. Hot Cross Buns 255. Brown Bread 244. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Rissoles of Chicken 88. Potted Fish 62, Nun's Toast 277. Potato Biscuit 254. Lemon Cake 295. Peach Jelly 434. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Vermicelli Soup 42. Baked Shad with Dressing 55. Scalloped Potatoes 194. Spinach with Eggs 212. Veal Croquettes 129. Olives. Fig Pudding 404. Chocolate Eclairs 308. Fruit. Coffee 458.

SATURDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Stewed Apricots. Samp 275. Broiled Ham 151. Fried Eggs 228. Sweet Potatoes Fried 198. Newport Waffles 260. Flannel Cakes 262. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Veal Stew 131. Scalloped Cheese 222. Potato Croquettes 196. Radishes 175. Boston Brown Bread 244. Ginger Snaps 309. Canned Grapes 439. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Onion Soup 41. Pot Roast 112. Mashed Potatoes 192. Boiled Onions 198. Lobster Patties 70. Lettuce 176, with Mayonnaise 169. Pineapple Charlotte Russe 364. Lady Fingers 312. Nuts. Raisins. Coffee 458.

* * * * *

MAY.

SUNDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Sliced Pineapple. Oat Flakes 275. Fried Chicken 90. Mushroom Omelet 233. Saratoga Chips 193. Sally Lunn 255. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

SUPPER.

Veal Loaf Sliced 131. Scalloped Clams 79. Ham Salad 172. Rusks 256. Preserved Pears 427. Almond Cake 303. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Cream of Asparagus Soup 36. Boiled Bass 55. Sauce Tartare 156. Roast Lamb 142, with Mint Sauce 160. Boiled New Potatoes 192. Green Peas 211. Rice Croquettes 274. Lobster Salad 171. Cabinet Pudding 398. Custard Ice-cream 377. Jelly Kisses 371. Fruit. Coffee 458.

MONDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Oranges. Boiled Rice 275. Broiled Lamb Chops 139. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Egg Muffins 257. Milk Toast 277. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Cold Roast Lamb 142. Chicken Turnovers 95. Lettuce 176, with Mayonnaise 169. French Bread 246. Layer Cake with Fig Filling 289. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Macaroni Soup 40. Beefsteak Pie 117. Mashed Potatoes 192. String Beans 208. Ladies' Cabbage 201. Horse-radish 176. Rhubarb Pie 333. Rice Meringue 407. Nuts. Cheese. Raisins. Coffee 458.



TUESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Stewed Rhubarb. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Broiled Shad 55. Scrambled Eggs 227. Browned Potatoes 192. Brown Bread 244. Parker House Rolls 253. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Hamburger Steak 123. Potato Croquettes 196. Bean Salad 175. Sour Milk Biscuits 251. Election Cake 300. Peach Butter 443. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Swiss White Soup 42. Roast Loin of Veal 126. New Potatoes a la Creme 193. Baked Onions 199. Cheese Fondu 222. Spinach with Egg 212. Transparent Pudding 410. Cold Cream Sauce 399. Cookies 315. Fruit. Coffee 458.

WEDNESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Stewed Peaches. Fried Mush 273. Frogs' Legs Fried 80, Tomato Sauce 159. New Boiled Potatoes 192. French Rolls 253. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Veal Pie 130. Broiled Ham 152. String Beans 208. Corn Bread 247. Pineapple Fritters 267. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Julienne Soup 33. Boiled Beef Tongue 124. Potato Snow 194. Boiled Turnips 214. Macaroni a la Italienne 216. Lettuce Salad 174. Chocolate Pudding 401, Whipped Cream 349. Nuts. Raisins. Coffee 458.



THURSDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Sliced Pineapple. Hominy 276. Tripe Lyonnaise 126. Plain Omelet 230. New Potatoes a la Creme 193. Plain Crumpets 272. Wheat Griddle-cakes 262. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Cold Tongue 125. Beefsteak 110. Walnut Catsup 177. Light Biscuit 252. Cheap Cream Cake 306. Preserved Apples 426. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Split Pea Soup 35. Chicken Pot-pie 94. Boiled Potatoes 192. Stewed Tomatoes 204. Fried Sweetbreads 135. Bean Salad 175. Burnt Almond Charlotte 364. Orange Jelly 374. Cornstarch Cakes 312. Fruit. Coffee 458.

FRIDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Oranges. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Fresh Salmon Fried 52. Boiled Eggs 226. Warmed Potatoes 193. Cream Waffles 260. Brown Bread 244. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Lamb Stew 143. Asparagus Omelet 232. Lettuce Salad 174. German Bread 234. Canned Peaches 439. Molasses Cup Cakes 308. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Irish Potato Soup 43. Steamed Halibut 57. Egg Sauce 156. Steamed Sweet Potatoes 198. Green Peas 211. Veal Olives 129. Dandelion Greens 213. Cold Lemon Pudding 400. Jelly Fritters 369. Fruit. Coffee 458.

SATURDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Stewed Rhubarb. Cracked Wheat 275. Baked Mutton Chops with Potatoes 140. Eggs aux Fines Herbes 228. Graham Gems 259. Dipped Toast 277. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Fried Spring Chicken 90. Clam Fritters 78. Sliced Tomatoes. Wheat Drop Cakes 262. Coffee Cake 299. Crab Apple Jelly 434. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Ox-tail Soup 34. Spiced Beef 112. Boiled New Potatoes 192. String Beans 208. Spinach with Eggs 212. Radishes 175. Pineapple Pie 334. Dessert Puffs 366. Fruit. Coffee 458.

* * * * *

JUNE.

SUNDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Strawberries and Cream. Hominy 276. Fried Brook Trout 58. Poached Eggs 228. Potatoes a la Creme 193. Corn Meal Muffins 258. Mushrooms on Toast 278. Coffee 458.

SUPPER.

Scalloped Crabs 61. Cold Pressed Lamb 143. Sliced Tomatoes with Mayonnaise 169. Buns 255. Angel Cake 302. Raspberries. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Green Pea Soup 36. Boiled Salmon 52, Bechamel Sauce 160. Stewed Whole Spring Chicken 87. Steamed New Potatoes 194. Beet Greens 213. Summer Squash 211. Raw Cucumbers 175. Sweetbread Croquettes 135. Chocolate Blanc Mange 359. Strawberry Ice-cream 378. Queen's Cake 302. Coffee 458.

MONDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Stewed Apricots. Graham Mush 273. Fried Chicken a la Italienne 90. Steamed Potatoes 194. Continental Hotel Waffles 260. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Pickled Salmon 53. Scalloped Chicken 92. Hominy Croquettes 274. Sliced Cucumbers. Strawberry Short-cake 270, with Cream. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Beef Soup 31, with Noodles 43. Veal Pie 130. New Potatoes 192. Cucumbers a la Creme 206. Asparagus 210, White Sauce 156. Lettuce 176, French Dressing 176. Green Currant Pie 332. Boiled Custard 346. Brunswick Jelly Cakes 313. Cheese. Coffee 458.

TUESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Raspberries and Cream. Oat Flakes 275. Soft Shell Crabs Fried 71. Ham Omelet 233. Warmed Potatoes 195. Pop-overs 262. Toast 276. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

French Stew 262. Cold Sliced Tongue 125. Bean Salad 175. Milk Biscuits 254. Cold Custard Pie 331. Iced Tea 461.

DINNER.

White Mushroom Soup 31. Roast Beef 109. Potatoes a la Creme 193. Fried Cauliflower 200. Spinach with Eggs 212. Sliced Tomatoes, Mayonnaise 169. Strawberry Short-cake 270, with Whipped Cream 349. Wafers 310. Cheese. Coffee 458.

WEDNESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Cherries. Cracked Wheat 275. Broiled Lamb Chops 139, Tomato Sauce 159. Saratoga Chips 193. Raised Muffins 257. Brown Bread 244. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Roast Beef Pie 117. Fried Potatoes with Eggs 197. Crab Salad 173. Soda Biscuit 251. Pineapple Fritters 267. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Veal Soup 32, with Croutons 45. Boiled Chicken 83, Caper Sauce 158. Steamed New Potatoes 194. Asparagus on Toast 210. String Beans 208. Young Onions. Green Gooseberry Tart 341. Golden Cream 350. Cocoanut Macaroons 372. Cheese. Coffee 458.

THURSDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Strawberries and Cream. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Chicken Omelet 233. Corned Beef Hash 123. Potato Fillets 196. Grafton Milk Biscuits 254. Cream Toast 277. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Smothered Beefsteak 114. Potato Croquettes 196. Lettuce with Mayonnaise 169. Cream Short-cake 269. Cherry Pudding 396. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Clam Soup, French Style 47. Broiled Fore-quarter of Lamb 143, Tomato Sauce 159. Potatoes a la Delmonico 197. String Beans 208. Cauliflower 200. Tomato Salad 174. Strawberry Bavarian Cream 350. Sliced Pineapple. Pound Cake 294. Coffee 458.

FRIDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Sliced Tomatoes. Boiled Rice 275. Broiled Spanish Mackerel 60. Scalloped Eggs 226. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. French Rolls 253. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Clam Chowder 79. Cold Pressed Beef 119. Mixed Summer Salad 170. Buns 255. Fancy Cakes 310. Currants. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Cream of Asparagus 36. Baked Blue Fish 56, Tomato Sauce 159. New Potatoes and Cream 193. Summer Squash 211. Muttonettes 140. Sliced Cucumbers 175. Charlotte Russe 362. Strawberries and Cream. Pastry Ramakins 223. Coffee 458.

SATURDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Stewed Green Currants. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Porterhouse Steak Broiled with Water-cress 110. New Boiled Potatoes 192. Rusks 256. American Toast 277. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Fricassee Chicken 87. Rice Croquettes 274. Dressed Cucumbers 175. French Bread 246. Cup Cakes 311. Strawberries and Cream. Iced Tea 460.

DINNER.

Tomato Soup 38. Roast Loin of Mutton 136. Scalloped New Potatoes 194. Cauliflower 200. Beet Greens 213. Radishes 175. Cherry Pie 332. Mock Ice 354. Variegated Cakes 311. Cheese. Coffee 458.

* * * * *

JULY.

FOURTH OF JULY.

BREAKFAST.

Red Raspberries and Cream. Fried Chicken 90. Scrambled Tomatoes 206. Warmed Potatoes 195. Tennessee Muffins 258. Toast 276. Coffee 458.

SUPPER.

Cold Sliced Lamb 140. Crab Pie 71. Water-cress Salad 176. Cheese Toast 277. Graham Bread 243. Sponge Cake 292. Blackberries. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Clam Soup 47. Boiled Cod 65, with Lobster Sauce 157. Roast Lamb 142. Mint Sauce 160. New Potatoes Boiled 192. Green Peas 211. Spinach with Eggs 212. Cucumbers Sliced 175. Chicken Patties 88. Naple Biscuits 362. Vanilla Ice-cream 376. Chocolate Macaroons 373. Strawberries. Coffee 458.

SUNDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Fresh Cherries. Hominy 274. Broiled Chicken 89. Poached Eggs 227. Saratoga Chips 193. New England Corn Cake 246. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

SUPPER.

Spiced Beef Tongue 125. Lobster Patties 70. Sliced Tomatoes with Mayonnaise 169. Crumpets 272. White Fruit Cake 291. Blackberries. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Cream of Spinach Soup 34. Boiled Blue Fish 56, Sauce Maitre d'Hotel 160. Roast Lamb 136, Tomato Sauce 159. New Potatoes with Cream 193. Green Corn 206. Cauliflower 200. White Sauce 156. Crab Sated 173. Salmon Croquettes 66. Cottage Pudding 395. Chocolate Ice-cream 377. Raspberries. Coffee 458.

MONDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Stewed Pears 370. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Veal Chops Fried 128. Plain Omelet 230. Warmed Potatoes 195. Raised Muffins 257. Dry Toast 276. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Cold Roast Lamb 142. Corn Pudding 207. Potato Salad 175. French Bread 246. Currant Fritters 266. Cocoa 461.

DINNER.

Julienne Soup 33. Beef a la Mode 113. Boiled Potatoes 192. Green Peas 211. Stuffed Baked Tomatoes 204. Lettuce Salad 177. Blackberry Pudding 409. Floating Islands 358. Sponge Cake 292. Coffee 458.

TUESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Raspberries. Cracked Wheat 275. Beefsteak Broiled 110. Cream Toast 277. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Light Biscuit 252. Brown Bread 244. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Cold Sliced Beef 112. Cheese Souffle 222. Tomato Salad 174. Graham Bread 243. Green Gooseberry Tart 341. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Vermicelli Soup 42. Chicken Stewed, with Biscuit 95. Steamed Potatoes 194. Stewed Corn 207. Lobster Croquettes 69. Cucumbers Sliced 175. Ripe Currant Pie 332. Snow Cream 353. Ribbon Cake 302. Cheese. Coffee 458.

WEDNESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Blackberries. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Fresh Salmon Fried 52. Beef Hash 123. Potato Fillets 196. Tennessee Muffins 258. Dipped Toast 276. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Beefsteak Pie 117. Chicken Turnovers 95. Lettuce with Mayonnaise 169. Buns 255. Layer Cake 304. Banana Filling 289. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Spring Vegetable Soup 42. Scalloped Mutton and Tomatoes 142. Boiled Potatoes 192. Spinach with Eggs 212. Clam Fritters 73. Young Onions. Cornstarch Pudding 392. Raspberries with Cream. Silver Cake 296. Coffee 458.

THURSDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Red Raspberries. Graham Mush with Maple Syrup 273. Broiled Lamb Chops 139. Fried Tomatoes 205. Potatoes a la Creme 193. Raised Biscuit 251. Dry Toast 276. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Sliced Veal Loaf 131. Brain Cutlets 133. Fried Potatoes 194. Dressed Cucumbers 175. French Bread 246. Cherry Pie 332. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Gumbo Soup 41. Roast Beef Pie with Potato Crust 116. Potatoes a la Delmonico 197. Cauliflower 200. Stewed Green Peas 211. Lettuce 176, with Mayonnaise 169. Cherry Roley Poley 411. Syllabub 355. Boston Cream Cakes 307. Coffee 458.

FRIDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Fresh Currants. Boiled Rice 275. Perch Fried 51. Scrambled Eggs 227. Baked Potatoes 197. Parker House Rolls 253. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Broiled Chicken on Toast 93. Green Corn Fritters 269. Stewed Tomatoes 204. Blackberries. Berry Tea Cake 261. Cocoa 461.

DINNER.

Clam Chowder 79. Salmon 52, and Caper Sauce 158. New Potatoes Scalloped 194. Summer Squash 211. Chicken Turnovers 95. New Beets Boiled 210. Rice Pudding 407. Raspberry Sherbet 380. Philadelphia Jumbles 314. Coffee 458.

SATURDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Stewed Gooseberries. Corn Meal Mush 273. Broiled Ham 152. Vegetable Omelet 231. Newport Breakfast Cakes 271. Crisp Potatoes 195. Brown Bread 238. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Fricassee Salmon 53. Beefsteak 110. Bean Salad 175. Corn Bread 247. Transparent Pudding 410. Iced Tea 460.

DINNER.

Green Pea Soup 43. French Stew 119. New Potatoes with Cream 193. Mock Oysters 77. Scalloped Clams 79. Tomato Salad 174. Custard Pie 331. Sponge Drops 312. Red Raspberries and Cream. Coffee 458.

* * * * *

AUGUST.

SUNDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Peaches and Cream. Boiled Rice 275. Broiled Spanish Mackerel 60. Eggs aux Fines Herbes 228. Warmed Potatoes 195. Rusks 256. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

SUPPER.

Cold Boiled Chicken 87. Pickled Salmon 53. Potato Salad 175. French Rolls 253. Raspberries. White Mountain Cake 301. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Consomme Soup 33. Baked Pickerel 51. Egg Sauce 156. Stewed Ducks 97. Potatoes a la Delmonico 197. Cabbage with Cream 200. Lobster Salad 171. Stuffed Baked Tomatoes 204. Lamb Sweetbreads 142. Custard Pudding 391. Frozen Peaches 379. Fruit Jumbles 314. Coffee 458.

MONDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Stewed Plums. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Mutton Cutlets 140. Tomato Toast 278. Potato Fillets 196. Egg Muffins 257. Brown Bread 244. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Veal Pot-pie 130. Vegetable Omelet 231. Lettuce with French Dressing 170. German Bread 247. Peach Fritters 267. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Tomato Soup 38. Roast Beef's Heart 124. Boiled New Potatoes 192. Cauliflower 200. String Beans 208. Cucumbers Sliced 175. Damson Pie 334. Peach Trifle 357. Sponge Cake 292. Cheese. Coffee 458.

TUESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Blackberries. Hominy 276. Frizzled Beef 118. Boiled Eggs 226. Saratoga Chips 193. Breakfast Puffs 272. Dipped Toast 276. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Sliced Beef Heart 124. Fried Tripe 125. Stuffed Baked Tomatoes 204. Pear Pickle 189. Buns 255. Plum Cobbler 413. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Scotch Mutton Broth 32. Broiled Fore-quarter of Lamb 143. New Potatoes and Cream 193. Green Peas 211. Lettuce 174, French Dressing 170. Corn Pudding 207. Apricot Meringue Pie 332. Lemon Jelly 373. Cookies 315. Fruit. Coffee 458.

WEDNESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Fresh Pears. Cracked Wheat 276. Brain Cutlets 133. Meat Omelet 231. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Huckleberry Griddle-cakes 265. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Broiled Salmon 52. Sliced Pressed Lamb 143. Tomatoes with Mayonnaise 169. French Bread 246. Sponge Cake 292. Blackberries and Cream. Iced Tea 460.

DINNER.

Cream of Spinach Soup 34. Fried Chicken a la Italienne 90, Tomato Sauce 159. Boiled Sweet Potatoes 198. Stuffed Egg Plant 208. Green Corn Boiled 206. Young Onions. Rice Pudding 408. Peaches and Cream. Walnut Cake 305. Coffee 458.

THURSDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Musk Melon. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Calf's Liver and Bacon 134. Broiled Tomatoes 205. Crisp Potatoes 195. New England Corn Cake 246. Dry Toast 276. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Steamed Chicken 87. Green Corn Fritters 269. Fried Sweet Potatoes 198. Dressed Cucumbers 175. Light Biscuit 252. Peaches and Cream. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Green Pea Soup 36. Stewed Brisket of Beef 120. New Potatoes Boiled 192. Lima Beans 209. Fried Egg Plant 208. Lettuce Salad 174. Huckleberry Pudding 409, Rich Wine Sauce 417. Cream Tarts 343. Fruit. Coffee 458.

FRIDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Whole Peaches. Corn Meal Mush 273. Fried Blue Fish 51. Dried Beef, with Cream 121. Sweet Potatoes Fried 198. Raised Muffins 257. Brown Bread 244. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Beef Croquettes 121. Scalloped Lobster 69. Mixed Summer Salad 170. German Bread 247. Huckleberry Short-cake 271. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Corn Soup 35. Baked Salmon Trout 59, Bechamel Sauce 160. Potato Croquettes 196. Spinach with Eggs 212. Hashed Mutton 138. Tomatoes with Mayonnaise 169. Grape Pie 334. Peach Cream 353. Wafers 310. Cheese. Coffee 458.

SATURDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Fresh Greengages. Oat Flakes 275. Broiled Chicken 93. Cream Toast 277. Boiled Potatoes 192. Graham Gems 259. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Broiled Ham 152. Tomato Omelet 232. Dressed Cucumbers 175. French Bread 246. Cold Fruit Pudding 392. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Chicken Cream Soup 34. Irish Stew 141. Steamed Potatoes 194. Green Peas 211. Boiled Corn 206. Crab Salad 173. Huckleberry Pie 333. Peaches and Cream. Cup Cakes 311. Cheese. Coffee 458.

* * * * *

SEPTEMBER.

SUNDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Musk Melon. Corn Meal Mush 273. Fried Smelts 58. Veal Hash on Toast 280. Potatoes a la Creme 193. Graham Gems 259. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

SUPPER.

Potted Ham 152. Small Oyster Pies 78. Rice Omelet 232. Cold Slaw 173. French Bread 246. Cream Cake 300. Sliced Peaches. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Beef Soup 31, with Croutons 45. Boiled Fresh Mackerel 61, Hollandaise Sauce 161. Roast Partridges 101. Mashed Potatoes 192. Stewed Corn 207. Stuffed Egg Plant 208. Tomato Salad 174. Lobster Croquettes 69. Peach Meringue Pie 327. Tutti Frutti Ice-cream 378. Rochester Jelly Cake 303. Cheese. Coffee 458.

MONDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Peaches and Cream. Graham Mush with Maple Syrup 273. Broiled Lamb Chops 139. Fried Tomatoes 205. Baked Potatoes 197. Raised Muffins 257. Dry Toast 276. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Salmi of Game 103. Cold Beef Tongue 124. Potato Croquettes 196. Watermelon Pickle 188. Egg Biscuit 252. Layer Cake 304, with Peach Cream Filling 288. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Vegetable Soup 42. Tenderloin of Beef 113. Potato Puffs 193. Lima Beans 208. Fried Tomatoes 205. Mixed Summer Salad 170. Peach Pudding 403, with Whipped Cream 349. Cocoanut Tarts 341. Cheese. Coffee 458.

TUESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Huckleberries. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Veal Collops 128. Ham Toast 279. Potato Fillets 196. Newport Breakfast Cakes 271. Brown Bread 244. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Cold Roast Warmed 122. Cheese Fondu 222. Fish Salad 172. Potato Biscuit 254. Peach Cobbler 413. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Vermicelli Soup 42. Baked Mutton Cutlets 140. Boiled Potatoes 192. Baked Beets 210. Corn Pudding 207. Horse-radish 176. Plum Pie 334. Floating Islands 358. Lemon Cake 295. Cheese. Coffee 458.

WEDNESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Sliced Tomatoes. Oat Flakes 275. Beef Hash 123. Boiled Eggs 226. Sweet Potatoes Baked 198. Parker House Rolls 253. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Fried Smelts 58. Ham Toast 279. Potato Salad 175. French Bread 246. Huckleberry Cake 308. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Split Pea Soup 35. Roast Tame Duck 96. Browned Potatoes 192. String Beans 208. Baked Tomatoes 205. Lettuce 176, with Mayonnaise 169. Boiled Lemon Pudding 400. Peach Meringue 354. Feather Cake 300. Coffee 458.

THURSDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Whole Pears. Hominy 276. Hamburger Steak 123. Bread Omelet 234. Saratoga Chips 193. Light Biscuit 252. Dry Toast 276. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Duck Pie 98. Grilled Bacon 149. Tomato Salad 174. Graham Bread 243. Cold Berry Pudding 388. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Corn Soup 35. Steamed Leg of Mutton 138. Potatoes a la Delmonico 197. Fried Corn 207. Stewed Salsify 209. Currant Jelly 431. Grape Pie 334. Tapioca Cream Custard 352. Watermelon. Cheese. Coffee 458.

FRIDAY

BREAKFAST.

Musk Melon. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Broiled Spanish Maceral 60. Scalloped Eggs 226. Warmed Potatoes 195. Tennesee Muffins 258. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Hashed Mutton 138. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Cold Greens 213. Corn Bread 247. Boston Cream Cakes 258. Grape Jelly 433. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Clam Soup 47. Fresh Salmon, Fried 52. Tomato Sauce 159. Mashed Potatoes 192. Cauliflower 200. White Sauce 156. Beefsteak Rolls 115. Cucumbers Sliced 175. Country Plum Charlotte 364. German Custard 347. Jumbles 314. Fruit. Coffee 458.

SATURDAY

BREAKFAST.

Fresh Apricots Cracked Wheat 275. Stewed Kidneys 124. Grilled Salt Pork 149. Lyonaise Potatoes 196. Sally Lunn 255. Dry Toast 276. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Breaded Chicken 92. Potato Croquettes 273. Tomatoes with Mayonnaise 169. Twist Bread 246. Sponge Drops 312. Hukleberries and Cream Tea 460.

DINNER.

Gumbo Soup 41. Roast Lopin of Veal 126. Browned Potatoes 192. Succotash 208. Mashed Squash 212. Bean Salad 175. Baked Custard 345. Peaches and Cream. Almond Cake 303. Coffee 458.

* * * * *



OCTOBER.

SUNDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Grapes. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Broiled Veal Cutlets 129. Minced Egg 229. Crisp Potatoes 195. Buckwheat Cakes 266. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

SUPPER.

Oyster Stew 72. Cold Pork and Beans 149. Cold Slaw 173. Boston Brown Bread 244. Peach Meringue Pie 327. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Ox-tail Soup 34. Broiled Halibut 38. Sauce Tartare 136. Roast Beef 109. Brown Sauce 161. Steamed Potatoes 194. Caulilower 200. Boiled Onions 198. Chicken Salad 171. Scalloped Tomatoes 204. French Cocoanut Pudding 395. Grape Trifle 357. Fancy Cakes 310. Fruit Coffee 458.

MONDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Stewed Quinces. Lamb 136. Blue Fish Fried 56. Milk Toast 277. Hasty Cooked Potatoes 195. Pop-overs 262. Brown Bread 244. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Cold Roast Beef 109. Onion Omelet 234. Fried Potatoes 194. French Bread 246. Peach Fritters 267. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Julienne Soup 33. Roast Pheasants 101. Cabbage with Cream 200. Boiled Potatoes 192. Mashed Turnips 214. Tomato Salad 174. Apple Custard Pie 326. Baked Quinces 371. Chocolate Eclairs 308. Coffee 458.

TUESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Baked Pears 370. Cracked Wheat 375. Calf's Liver and Bacon 134. Fried Eggs 228. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Dry Toast 276. New England Corn Cake 246. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Cold Roast Pheasant 101. Potato Croquettes 196. Lobster Salad 171. Graham Bread 243. Country Plum Charlotte 364. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Game Soup 32. Braised Leg of Mutton 137. Mashed Potatoes 192. Scalloped Oysters 76. Boiled Sweet Potatoes 198. Cold Slaw 173. Peach Cobbler 413. French Custard 346. Layer Jelly Cake 289. Coffee 458.

WEDNESDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Grapes. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Beefsteak Broiled 110. Tomato Omelet 232. Warmed Potatoes 195. English Crumpets 272. Brown Bread 244. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Scrambled Mutton 141. Sardines. Corn Pudding 207. French Rolls 253. Ginger Bread 306. Sliced Oranges. Cocoa 461.

DINNER.

Mock Turtle Soup 39. Boiled Fillet of Veal 127. Potatoes a la Delmonico 197. Fried Egg Plant 208. Mashed Squash 212. Olives. Saucer Puddings 406. Apple Snow 356. Crisp Cookies 316. Coffee 458.

THURSDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Baked Quinces 371. Boiled Rice 202. Broiled Grouse 101. Tripe Lyonnaise 126. Potatoes a la Creme 184. Raised Muffins 257. Dry Toast 276. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Veal Croquettes 129. Cheese Souffle 222. Potato Salad 175. Buns 255. Grape Pie 334. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Swiss White Soup 42. Pot Roast 112. Steamed Potatoes 194. Lima Beans 209. French Cabbage 201. Lettuce Salad 174. Plum Puff Pudding 411. Blanc Mange 359. Dominoes 310. Fruit. Coffee 458.

FRIDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Stewed Plums. Oat Flakes 275. Eels Fried 56. Beef Hash 123. Potato Fillets 196. Egg Muffins 257. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Oyster-pot Pie 76. Muttonettes 140. Fried Egg Plant 208. French Bread 246. Stewed Crab Apples. Silver Cake 296. Chocolate 461.

DINNER.

Onion Soup 41. Baked Smelts 59. Potato Snow 194. Cauliflower 200. Beef Croquettes 121. Spiced Plums 189. Plain Charlotte Russe 362. Quince Jelly 432. Nuts. Raisins. Coffee 458.

SATURDAY.

BREAKFAST.

Whole Pears. Hominy 276. Mutton Cutlets 140. Tomato Sauce 159. Saratoga Chips 193. Corn Meal Griddle-cakes 263. Dry Toast 276. Coffee 458.

LUNCHEON.

Dried Beef with Cream 121. Baked Omelet 234. Tomato Salad 176. Rusks 256. Quince Trifle 357. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Veal Soup 32, with Noodles 43. Chicken Pot-pie 94. Mashed Potatoes 192. Fried Salsify 209. Baked Onions 199. Ham Salad 172. Chocolate Pie 328. Sliced Oranges. Hickory Nut Cake 305. Coffee 458.

* * * * *

NOVEMBER.

THANKSGIVING DAY.

BREAKFAST.

Grapes. Oat Flakes 275. Broiled Porterhouse Steak 110. Codfish Balls 63. Browned Potatoes 192. Buckwheat Cakes 266, Maple Syrup. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458.

SUPPER.

Cold Roast Turkey 82. Scalloped Oysters 76. Potato Salad 175. Cream Short-cake 269. Eclairs 308. Preserved Egg Plums 425. Tea 460.

DINNER.

Oysters on Half Shell. Cream of Chicken Soup 34. Fried Smelts 58, Sauce Tartare 156. Roast Turkey 82, Cranberry Sauce 163. Mashed Potatoes 192. Baked Squash 212. Boiled Onions 198. Parsnip Fritters 203. Olives. Chicken Salad 171. Venison Pastry 105. Pumpkin Pie 336. Mince Pie 338. Charlotte Russe 361. Almond Ice-cream 380. Lemon Jelly 373. Hickory Nut Cake 305. Cheese. Fruits. Coffee 458.

Previous Part     1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14     Next Part
Home - Random Browse