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The South of France—East Half
by Charles Bertram Black
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For Clermont-Ferrand to Brive by Royat, Mont-Dore, and Bourboule, see p.376. Junction at Clermont with rail to Lyons, 121m. E. by Courty (where change for Thiers), Montbrison, St. Etienne, and Givors-Canal (see p.349).

From Clermont-Ferrand the railway to Nmes ascends the course of the Allier to La Bastide, 116m. S.Some parts of the valley are very picturesque. The train after Clermont passes, 267m., Le Cendre, 1145 ft.; 270m., Les Martres-de-Veyre, 1148 ft.; 272m., Vie-le-Comte, 1164 ft.; 276m., Coudes. The station is near the Allier, 1173 ft., but the town is on the top of an adjoining hill, with the tower of Montpeyroux, 13th cent.

[Headnote: ISSOIRE.]

{282}{247} ISSOIRE, pop. 6400, and 1200 ft. above the sea-level. Hotels: Poste; Pezissat; opposite each other in the principal street. It is a clean little town. The principal church, founded in the 10th cent., is a highly interesting specimen of the architecture of Auvergne. The exterior is plain, but the plan admirable. The transepts are just sufficiently developed to give expression to the edifice; while the elegant projection of the five apsidal chapels illustrates one of the characteristic beauties of the style. Amosaic decoration of differently-coloured lavas under a handsome cornice runs round the chancel, resembling what is seen on the south transept and tower of St. Amable at Riom. The interior is beautiful and harmonious, but the gaudy painting on the walls of an edifice of such a severe style surprises the eye on entering. The crypt (10th cent.), below the chancel, but not below the ground, consists of many short massive columns, bearing a complex series of arches around a central arch, under which is the altar.

[Headnote: LE BREUIL.]

{287}{242} LE BREUIL, 1287 ft., pop. 1000. Opposite station, Inn: H.Beranger. Coaches await passengers for St. Germain-Lembron, an agricultural town, 2m. W., and Ardes. The road to Ardes from St. Germain ascends through a hilly and well-cultivated country, passing, at 4m. from St. Germain, abathing establishment, possessing a copious spring containing the carbonate of iron and a large quantity of free carbonic acid gas. 2 m. farther is Ardes; Inns: Paillardin; Barreyre; on an eminence rising from the Couze. In the low part of the village is the church, 11th cent., but restored and repaired. In the cemetery is a stone cross (1519) with Mary and Child against it, resting on a demure-looking figure holding an open book. The valley of the Couze, between high wooded mountains and great basaltic cliffs, offers an excellent field for geological and botanical rambles, while the river itself, which runs in a narrow bed at the foot of the mountains, through little meadows by the side of the road, contains excellent trout. High up are firs and forest trees, but below are apricot, apple, pear, quince, cherry, and walnut trees interspersed among small vineyards and meadows. The best display of the basaltic formation is between the first bridge and the village of Rentire, perched on a basalt cliff rising from the road. A little way beyond, on the right or opposite bank of the river, is an isolated cliff resembling a statue of Mary with the back towards the spectator. About 4m. up the valley are the ruins of a mill, La Gravire, destroyed by lightning in 1881. This is considered the commencement of the widest and most imposing part of the valley, which extends to the Cantal. About 5m. up, on the top of a hill on the right bank, is the chapel of St. Pesade.

2 m. S. from Le Breuil is Le Saut du Loup, avillage with mineral waters, picturesquely situated on the Allier, 1277 ft. above the sea. Between Brassal, Inn: Chevalier, 3 m. farther S., 1322 ft. above the sea, and Arvant are valuable coal-fields and a bed of kaolin clay.

[Headnote: ARVANT.]

miles from PARIS miles to MARSEILLES

{298}{232} ARVANT, 1400 ft., a dirty hamlet on the Vergonghon, an affluent of the Allier. The best of the inns is the H.Voyageurs. Junction here with the line to Capdenac, 110m. S.W., traversing the whole of the interesting geological region of the Cantal. (See Black's South France, West Half.)

From the hamlet of Neussargues, 30 m. S.W. from Arvant, commences the loop-line of the Chemins de Fer du Midi, which traverses the lofty woodless highlands of Lozre, the coal-region of Aveyron, and the wine and olive department of Herault to Beziers on the Mediterranean line, between Cette and Narbonne. On this line, 11m. S. from Neussargues, 7m. S. from St. Flour, and 37m. N. from Marvejols, is the highest bridge in the world, the Pont de Garabit, which crosses the ravine of the Truyre 400 ft. above the river. The span of the great arch is 541 ft., and the length of the viaduct 1851ft.

[Headnote: BRIOUDE.]

{304}{226} BRIOUDE, 1430 ft. above the sea, pop. 5000. Inns: *Nord; Commerce. Adirty town on a tableland, 1m. from the Allier. The parish church St. Julien (restored) dates from the 11th and 12th cents. The W. faade, of red sandstone, is flat, with round-headed windows over the three portals. The largest, the centre one, is between two thick plain buttresses, over which rises a low square tower. On the S. side of the church is another portal, preceded by a massive portico on three large semicircular arches, resting on short square piers with attached columns bearing large foliaged capitals. On the N. side is a similar entrance, but plainer. From the choir rises a square tower, becoming octagonal in the two upper stages. From the apse, which is semicircular, radiate at a lower level five semicircular chapels, their roofs terminating in a cornice of tiny stone interlaced arches. The wall of the apse above the chapels is ornamented with a mosaic, chiefly stars, in black and white stones.

The interior of the church is surrounded by great, tall, square piers with attached columns and vaulting shafts bearing grotesque foliaged capitals. Over the arches, which are early pointed, run a built-up triforium and circular clerestory windows. The five chapels have a profusion of colonnettes, three round-headed windows each, and some beautiful sculpture in relief. Under the chancel is a crypt.

Behind the church is the covered market, and a little farther the Htel de Ville, with the town promenade on a terrace overlooking the plain.

[Headnote: ST. GEORGES-D'AURAC.]

{318}{211} ST. GEORGES-D'AURAC, 1872 ft. above the sea. Inn: Lombardin, near the station. Change carriages for Le Puy, 32m. E., and for St. Etienne 54m. farther. (See p.91, and map p.46.)

[Headnote: LANGEAC.]

{323}{207} LANGEAC, pop. 4800. Inns: H. Lombardin; Pascon. (See p.91, and map p.46.) Between Langeac and Langogne the train passes through a most picturesque country. Rich vegetation amidst vast masses of basalt, either continuous or isolated, either rugged or grooved with pentagonal columns; sometimes also rent into deep dark ravines, between vertical cliffs of which the eye just catches a glance while being hurried past in the train. 3m. S. from Langeac is Chanteuges, 1800 ft., pop. 1000, on an eminence above the station. The fortified tower, the remains of the old abbey, is well seen from the rail. Just before arriving at the next station, Chazes, 8m. S. from Langeac, is an interesting church, 11th cent., against a rock. Then follow the stations of Monistrol-d'Allier, 2000 ft. (p.91); Alleyras, 2195 ft.; and Jonchure, 2238ft.

[Headnote: LANGOGNE.]

{364}{165} LANGOGNE, 2940 ft. above the sea, pop. 4000. Inns: Cheval Blanc; Chambon. Pleasantly situated on the Langouyrou. All the trains halt here. (See pp.88 and 94, and map p.46.) 7m. farther S. is Luc station, 2900 ft.; and 4m. farther S., La Bastide, 3070 ft., the culminating point of the line. Afew miles to the W. of the station is the source of the Allier. At Prevenchres, 6m. S., the station is only 2580 ft. above the sea. The line now passes by immense rocks and cliffs of granite.

{390}{140} VILLEFORT, 1820 ft., pop. 2000. A poor village on the Devze, in a deep valley at the foot of Mt. Lozre. Diligences at this station for Mende, passing through, at about half-way, Bagnols les Bains, 23m.W.

Bagnols les Bains, pop. 500. Inns: Lacombe; Des Bains; Midi. A poor village 3087 ft. above the sea, at the confluence of the Villaret and the Lot. It has a thermal establishment supplied by an unctuous and clear water, temperature 100 Fahr., efficacious in rheumatic affections, cutaneous diseases, bruises, etc. In the neighbourhood are pleasant excursions, good fishing in the Lot, and plenty of game on the mountains.

From Villefort to Alais the line penetrates a very mountainous country by numerous tunnels and viaducts. At La Grande Combe, with the two stations of La Levade and La Pise, the important coal, iron, and zinc mines commence which extend to Alais.

[Headnote: ALAIS.]

{419}{111} ALAIS, pop. 22,000, on the Gardon. Hotels: Commerce; *Luxembourg; Champagne. Situated, like Sainte Cecile, La Levade, La Pise, and Tamaris, among coal-fields, iron-works, and manufactories. This is the best station from which to enter the mountainous regions of Lozre, traversed easily by diligences corresponding with each other. Some very capital wine is made at Alais.

Junction at Alais with the branch line extending 62m. N.E. to Teil (see p.96, and map p.56); also to Laudun, 35m. E. (see p.99, and map p.56).

{450}{80} NMES (see p. 101, and map p. 66).

{467}{63} TARASCON (see p. 66, and map p. 66).

{470}{60} ARLES (see p. 68, and map p. 66).

{499}{30} ST. CHAMAS (see p. 76, and map p. 66).

{512}{17} ROGNAC (see p. 77, and map p. 66).

{518}{12} PAS-DES-LANCIERS.

{530}{ } MARSEILLES (see p. 111, and map p. 123).

[Headnote: ROYAT. ST. MART.]

miles from CLERMONT miles to MARSEILLES

Clermont-Ferrand to Brive-la-Gaillard,

122 m. W. by rail, passing Royat 3 m., Durtol 5m., Volvic 12m., Vauriat 17m., St. Ours-les-Roches 20m., Pont-Gibaud 24m., La Miouze-Rochefort 28m., Bourgheade-Herment 35m., Laqueuille 40m., Meymac 73m., and Tulle 105m. S.W. from Clermont and 16m. N.E. from Brive.

From Clermont station the train describes a semicircle as it ascends the highly-cultivated vineclad mountains rising from Clermont. The first station is Royat, with the hotels Univers; Monnet; Nice; St. Mart, adjoining the Casino; Grand Hotel; Continental Hotel. On the road up to Royat are H.Chabassire; Victoria; Paix; Paris; Europe; Lyons. Higher up beyond the hotels is the village of Royat. The parish church, founded in the 7th cent, and rebuilt in the 10th and 11th, was heightened and fortified in the 12th cent. In the centre of the transept is a low tower, square in the first stage and octagonal in the second. Under the small chancel, raised 5 ft. above the floor of the nave, is a crypt supported on six colonnettes.

In the "Place" is a crucifix of lava erected in 1486. At the back of J.C. is Mary with the child, and the apostles standing on consoles. The narrow steep road from in front of the Mary side leads down to the Grotte des Sources, a cave in basalt, whence gush forth sundry springs of crystal water. Only those, however, are seen which are allowed to flow into the receptacle used by the washerwomen; the others are led to Clermont, where they supply the fountains. The road, after crossing the Tirtaine, enters the territory of St. Mart. In the lower part of the valley, in a small park on the right side of the Tirtaine, is the bathing establishment, supplied by five springs, of which the most important is the Eugenie, which rises in front of the establishment; temperature, 100 Fahr. The principal ingredients are the chlorate of sodium, mixed with the bicarbonates of lime, soda, and magnesia, and a little iron. The baths are made of volcanic tufa. The charge is from 1 fr. to 2 frs. according to the season.

Besides the hotels already mentioned there are around the establishment the H. St. Mart; the H.Splendide; Bains; Bristol, all large first-class houses. On the road up the left bank of the Tirtaine are the Louvre; Richelieu; Belle Vue; France et Angleterre; Sources. St. Mart is 1m. from Clermont by omnibus, passing through Chamalires. Agreat variety of excursions in the neighbourhood.

miles from CLERMONT miles to MARSEILLES

{5}{117} DURTOL, situated among high wooded mountains.

[Headnote: VOLVIC. PONT-GIBAUD.]

{12}{109} VOLVIC. In the neighbourhood of the station are large quarries of lava, the produce of the extinct crater Puy de la Nugre, 3261 ft. Through the gap in the hill in front of the station is an excellent view of Riom, 3m. E. from Volvic by coach. Volvic, pop. 4000, is partly on an eminence at the foot of Le Puy de la Bannire. The parish church dates from the 13th cent. Quarrying, stonecutting, and agriculture are the principal industries (see p.369).

The train still ascending passes Vauriat 17m., St. Ours-les-Roches 20m., and then arrives at the station for Pont-Gibaud, pop. 1300, 24m. distant. Inns: H.Johannel; H. Beraud. Their omnibuses await passengers. Pont-Gibaud and its castle, 14th cent., are situated on the Sioule, which traverses by a deep ravine a bed of lava from the crater of Puy de Dome. Near the castle are the smelting-houses of the important argentiferous mines in the neighbourhood.

[Headnote: LAQUEUILLE.]

{40}{81} LAQUEUILLE, 3624 ft. above the sea. Change here for Mont-Dore-les-Bains 10m. S.E., and for Bourboule 8m. S.W. The beautiful mountain-road to Mont Dore passes through at about halfway the village of Le Quaire, 3620 ft. above the sea. Immediately below Le Quaire is Bourboule. The road to Bourboule passes through the village of St. Sauves, 2838 ft. above the sea.

MONT-DORE-LES-BAINS

is situated among high mountains, in the narrow valley of the Dordogne, 3402 ft. above the sea. Hotels.—Considering the style of their furniture and of the meals, they are rather dear. The charge in the first-class houses is from 12 to 18 frs. per day, which includes coffee or tea in the morning, two meals with wine and service. The difference in the price is caused by the position of the room. Around the "Place" of the bathing establishment are the first-class houses, Chabaury ain; Paris; Poste. By the side of the Casino, the H. du Parc and the Grand Hotel, which last charges from 16 to 21 frs. as it is rather better furnished. Around these hotels are what may be considered second-class houses, but if no agreement is made they are apt to charge as much as those of the first class: H.Bardet-Chanonat; H. Boyer-Bertrand; the Paix, open all the year; H.Ramade; H. Parisien; France; Nord; Madeuf-Baraduc; Thermes. The Casino is a handsome edifice, the greatest part being occupied by the theatre and the halls connected with it. The Mineral Bath Establishment and the Inhaling Establishment occupy two sides of the principal square; the other two are occupied by the first-class hotels.

The bathing establishment is slightly lugubrious; otherwise it is well adapted for the cure or alleviation of the diseases it professes to treat. The springs for drinking are arranged in the vestibule just within the entrance. In the right-hand corner is the Source de la Madeleine or Bertrand, temperature 113 Fahr. Besides containing the usual quantity of the arseniate of soda, about one-thousandth part in two pints, it contains more than any of the other springs of the bicarbonate of soda, lime, and magnesia. Next it is the Source Ramond, temperature 107, containing the greatest quantity of iron. It rises in an octagonal basin built of large stones by the Romans. Then the Source Csar, temperature 113, used chiefly for baths. Towards the left-hand end is the Source Sainte Marguerite, temperature 55, used at table mixed with the wine.

Among the baths there are five upstairs supplied directly from some little springs which rise through the fissures of the rock. The flow in and out is constant. These baths are made of stone; all the others are of iron. Besides the usual appliances for making the water act upon the more delicate parts of the body, there are also elaborate arrangements for foot-bathing and for douching the nose.

The tariffs of everything at Bourboule and Mont-Dore depend on the month. The hotels, baths, casinos, etc., are at their dearest during July, the height of the season. An ordinary bath with towels costs then 2frs., at other times 1 fr.; a nose douche, 50 c. to 75 c. Baths from 92 to 100 should be continued from 30 to 40 minutes; from 109 to 112, from 10 to 15 minutes. The charge for drinking the water in July is 10 frs., in other months 5 frs. The men who carry the sedan-chairs between the hotels and the establishment are paid by tickets bought at the office of the baths.

[Map: Environs of Mont Dore and La Bourboule.]

[Headnote: ANALYSIS OF THE WATER.]

CONTENTS OF THE SPRINGS OF MONT-DORE AND BOURBOULE.

MdS Madeleine Spring. CsS Caesar Spring. PvS Pavillon Spring. RaS Ramond Spring. RiS Rigny Spring. BPC Bourboule, Perrire and Choussy Springs.

- - - - - - MdS PvS RiS CsS RaS BPCS - - - - - - Free carbonic 0.3552 0.3810 0.3644 0.5967 0.4997 0.0518 acid gas Bicarbonate 0.5362 0.5452 0.5375 0.5361 0.5362 2.8920 of soda " of potash 0.0309 0.0309 0.0232 0.0212 0.0212 .... " of lime 0.3423 0.3142 0.3092 0.3209 0.2720 0.1905 " of magnesia 0.1757 0.1676 0.1628 0.1676 0.1647 .... " of protoxide 0.0207 0.0235 0.025 0.0258 0.0317 0.0021 of iron Chloride of Sodium 0.3685 0.3630 0.3599 0.3587 0.3578 2.8406 Sulphate of soda 0.0761 0.0761 0.0761 0.0756 0.0737 0.2084 Arseniate of soda 0.00096 0.00096 0.00096 0.0009 0.00095 0.02847 Silicic acid 0.1654 0.1686 0.1653 0.1552 0.1550 0.1200 Alumina 0.0112 0.0094 0.0101 0.0083 0.0065 Traces. - - - - - -

Bourboule contains, besides what is given here, the chloride of potassium and magnesium. The active and special principle of both waters is the arseniate of soda, which, it will be observed, is 29 times more abundant in the Bourboule water than in that of Mont-Dore. The temperature of the two hottest Bourboule springs is 140 F., or 27 above the hottest of Mont-Dore.

These waters are recommended for certain forms of chronic bronchitis, asthma, and laryngeal complaints, gastro-enteric and uterine disorders marked by congestion, similar cases in which the liver is implicated, nervous maladies, and scrofulous diseases. —Madden's Health Resorts. Three or four glasses of the Madeleine water are taken daily by the majority of patients. It produces an increase of appetite, and is often attended with diarrhoea about the fifth or sixth day; this is mostly succeeded by a certain degree of constipation, which frequently lasts to the end of the course. About the twentieth day a disgust of the water is generally experienced, which is an indication that the saturation point has been obtained. —Lee's Baths.

As the weather of Mont-Dore is changeable, asupply of warm clothing is necessary. For excursions, a vehicle with 2 horses costs per day 20 to 25 frs.; saddle-horses, 5 to 10 frs. per day.

[Headnote: EXCURSIONS. QUEUREUILH.]

Excursions.—There are many pleasant and beautiful excursions around Mont-Dore, among the volcanic hills clothed with sombre pine forests and verdant meadows, rent at intervals by deep gullies with sullen waters or roaring torrents in the dark depths below, chafing against the jagged vertical cliffs of the ravines. Lakes sleep placidly in the craters which vomited forth these confused masses of rocks and knolls over which in many places now rush and tumble superb waterfalls. The Alpine Club have distributed over the district a liberal supply of finger-posts, which indicate the distance as well as the way to the different places.

One of the first excursions undertaken is to the Cascade du Queureuilh, about 2 m. N. by the village of Le Queureuilh, half-way between the falls and Mont-Dore. This cascade, one of the most beautiful in this region, is formed by the outlet of the Enfer from Lake Gury (see below), 5 m. N. from Mont-Dore, or 3 from the falls. The stream, after rushing through the ravines of Blaise and Queue, tumbles over a hard basaltic precipice 98 ft. high. From the falls of Queureuilh tourists often return by what is incorrectly called the falls of the Rossignolet, aplacid stream which enters the ravine of Enfer about half a mile below the falls of Queureuilh. This excursion may be made in a carriage. On foot it is easily walked in 4 hrs.

Excursions of much the same character, and in the same direction, are made to the Cascades de l'Angle 1 m., to the Saut-du-Loup 1m., and to the Pr du Barbier.

[Headnote: LAKE GURY.]

The excursion to Lake Gury, 5 m. N., commences by the new road to Randanne, cut in the flanks of the prettily-wooded Mt. Angle. At a turning of the road, just over the village of Queureuilh, there is a charming panoramic view of the valleys of Mont-Dore and of Sauves. To the W. are the towns of Le Quaire and Bourboule. Southwards are the Capucin, 4807 ft., the Aiguilles d'Enfer, and the giant peak De Sancy. Lake Gury, one of the shallowest of the lakes, 4062 ft., is 1m. W. from the main road, in a desolate region, surrounded by arid rugged peaks. N. from the lake, at the entrance to a picturesque defile, stand like sentries, on the left the Roche Tuillire, 4246 ft., one side a vertical cliff, the other clothed with verdure; on the right the Roche Sanadoire, with huge basaltic columns, resembling those of the Giant's Causeway.

[Headnote: ORCIVAL.]

4 m. N. from Lake Gury is the ancient village of Orcival, with an inn and a church of the 9th and 10th cents., containing a miraculous image found near it under the earth. 2 m. W. from the Orcival road is the Pierre-Branlante, a slightly movable overhanging rock. From Orcival return by the Randanne road to Mont-Dore, 11m. S.

N.E. from Lake Gury, or 9 m. N.E. from Mont-Dore by Mt. Aiguiller, 5076 ft., is Lake Servires, 3939 ft. above the sea, 75 ft. deep, in an extinct crater. On the N. margin are a tumulus and an ancient camp.

9 m. E., at the village of Fohet, S. from Lake Aydat, are some menhirs.

The village and lake of Chambon, 2881 ft. above the sea, are 12m. E. from Mont-Dore by the valleys of Moneau and Chaudefour, and rather less by the highway passing Diane or Dyanne.

From Murols the road ascends 5 m. S. to Besse, whence it passes by Lake Pavin to Vassivires, 5 m. W. from Besse. At Vassivires a bridle-path diverges N. to the Pics of Ferrand and Sancy (see p. 381).

To the W. and S.W. of Mont-Dore are the Salon Mirabeau 2m., the cascades of Vernire 3 m., and Plat-a-Barbe 3m. (p.385); and the top of the Puy Gros 3m. (p. 385).

[Headnote: PICS DE SANCY AND FERRAND. LAKE PAVIN.]

The most important excursion is to the summit of the Pic de Sancy, 6188 ft. above the sea, or 2786 ft. above the village of Mont-Dore, and 5 m. S. from it by the valley of the Dordogne. Guide unnecessary. Good bridle-road till within 20 minutes of the top. Horse, 6frs. From the Grande Rue enter the Pic de Sancy road, leave the Chteau-d'Eau on the left. At about a third of the way the Dordogne is crossed, and shortly afterwards is passed the ravine of the Egravats, formed by a landslip of the trachytic mountain, the Roc de Cuzeau, 5706 ft.; and a little farther S. on the same (E.) side the Puy de Carcadogne, 5890 ft. To the right or W. side are the valleys of Lacour and Enfer, separated from each other by a dyke of dark porphyritic trachyte. Shortly after, the Dore is crossed where it joins the Dogne, 4420 ft. above the sea. A little farther is the cascade of the Serpent, where the Dogne, descending by a tortuous course, has been likened to a serpent. Opposite are the more noisy falls of the Dore. Apath at the foot leads to an old alum mine.

The road, cut in the sides of the mountain, now ascends by the course of the Dogne, which rises between two large blocks. Then having crossed the infant Dore we arrive at the Buffet, 5863 ft., situated in the marshy meadow of the Dore. The horses are left here—25 c. charged for taking care of each. From this to the top on foot requires about 20 minutes. The view is splendid and of immense extent from this the highest mountain in central France and the culminating point of that great volcanic eruption called the Mounts Dore, 54m. in circumference, which have broken their way through the early and solid granite rocks. A half-hour is sufficient to descend Sancy and mount the Puy Ferrand, 6066 ft. Return to Mont-Dore, 6m. N., by the Chemin des Crtes.

3 m. S. from Sancy or 8 from Mont-Dore is Vassivires, apoor hamlet on a tableland, 4266 ft., with a church built in 1595, containing a miracle-working image, discovered while digging for water a little to the W. of the church. It spends four months of the year at Vassivires, and the rest in the church of Besse. It is carried between the two places with all the pomp possible; the iron crosses on the road indicate the resting stations. 2m. E. from Vassivires, or 10 m. from Mont-Dore, on the road to Besse, is the Lac-de-Pavin, 3928 ft. above the sea, in the crater of an extinct volcano, but not full to the brim. It is 2625 ft. long, 2462 ft. wide, and 315 ft. deep, completely surrounded, excepting at the outlet, by vertical cliffs from 300 to 500 ft. high. Boats are let for sailing and fishing on this singular lake. At the S. end rises the Puy Montchal, 4629 ft. At the foot of Montchal, S. side, is the Creux-de-Sancy, acircular cavity 55 ft. deep, at the bottom of which a stream of water is seen, supposed to come from Lake Pavin.

3 m. E., or 13 from Mont-Dore by an excellent road, is Besse-en-Chandesse, 3399 ft., on the slope of a mountain. Inns: Voyageurs; Commerce; pop. 2000, the wealthiest town in the neighbourhood, and excellent headquarters for visiting this region. It contains some 14th and 15th cent. houses and most of its old gates, one having the belfry or Tour du Beffroi built over it. In the centre of the town is the house Queen Marguerite de Navarre inhabited; now it is converted into shops and dwellings.

[Headnote: MUROLS.]

From Besse go 5 m. N. to Murols, 13 m. E. from Mont-Dore, on the highway between Mont-Dore and Issoire. The road to Murols discloses beautiful views of Limagne as it passes Montredon, Chomeilles, Breuil, St. Victor, and Bessoles. As most of the houses in Murols (Inn: Nierat, pop. 700) have been built of material taken from the castle, many have escutcheons and sculptured stones on their walls. On a cone of basalt, 3186 ft., overlooking the village, are the ruins of a formerly important castle, 12th or 13th cent., and favourite residence of the lords of Murols et d'Estaing. From the top of the repaired tower is a beautiful and extensive view, embracing Besse, St. Victor, Lake Pavin, the Chaudefour valley, Chambon with its lake, Varennes, the Dent-de-Marais, and Tartaret. 13 m. W. from Murols is Mont-Dore, passing on the left the Puy du Tartaret, 2953 ft., Lake Chambon, 2625 ft. above the sea, considered one of the prettiest lakes in Auvergne. A little farther W. is the village of Chambon, 40 ft. higher than the lake, pop. 1000, on the Couze and Surrain at the foot of a granite mountain.

The journey from Mont-Dore to the Pics de Sancy and Ferrand and back is 11 m.; but if it be prolonged round by Vassivires, Besse, and Murols the entire distance is 32 m.

[Headnote: SALON DU CAPUCIN. VALLE D'ENFER.]

A very pleasant promenade is to the Salon du Capucin, recommended as well as the Salon de Mirabeau for the breathing of the air from the pine forest. If on foot, cross the suspension bridge, and having reached the Jubilee cross about 600 yards from Mont-Dore, take the road to the left which enters the forest, and after having ascended a few minutes, a stone to the right will be seen bearing the inscription: "Petit Chemin du Capucin," which take. Shortly after it divides, when take the left. At last the path enters a large open space surrounded by beeches, where several roads meet. The road to the left goes to the Valle d'Enfer, to the right to the Rigolet, and the road in front to the Salon, which is quite near. The path which divides the Salon into two parts leads up to the top of the Rocher du Capucin, 4807 ft. above the sea, about 2 m. S. from Mont-Dore, commanding a charming view. It owes its name to the detached pinnacle, like a monk's hood, called the Aiguille du Capucin, which is rather difficult to ascend.

To go to the Valle d'Enfer return to the open glade and take the Enfer path which leads to the valley by the Valle Lacour, m. long, near the top of which, at the Rocher de Courlande, 5325 ft., is the opening where those on foot climb over to the Valle d'Enfer; those on horseback have to pass round by Burens. The Valle d'Enfer is an arid narrow gorge between naked volcanic cliffs traversed by vertical dykes. From the valley continue southwards to the Pic de Sancy, or return to Mont-Dore, 4 m. N.

[Headnote: HOTELS. BATHS. CHARGES.]

BOURBOULE.

8 m. from Laqueuille, surrounded by wooded mountains, in the valley of the Dordogne, is Bourboule, pop. 1600, 2796 ft. above the sea, or 606 ft. lower than Mont-Dore. The rapid increase of Bourboule is due to the excellence of its mineral waters, of the same nature as those of Mont-Dore, but richer in the chief ingredient to which they owe their especial virtue—the arseniate of soda. The climate too is a little milder, and the valley of the Dordogne wider and more open than it is at Mont-Dore.

Hotels.—Around the principal establishment, called the Etablissement des Thermes, are the Grand Hotel; H. Bellon; Univers; Bains; Europe; Globe; trangers; H. de l'Etablissement; Paris; Sources. On the other side of the Dordogne, by the side of the Parc de Fenestre, are the Angleterre; France; Parc; Beausejour; and also the Casino, Theatre, and Gambling-rooms.

At the east end of the town, on the road to Mont-Dore, are the Poste; Bourboule; Helder; Louvre; Nice; Ambassadeurs; Continental.

Abundance of furnished lodgings (Maisons Meubles) and villas to let.

The figure () indicates that the hotel is first-class, with first-class prices, which vary according to the month and the story in which the room is situated. From the 25th of June to the 10th of August the charge is from 11 to 15 frs. the day, which includes room and two meals with wine. Coffee or tea in the morning, 1fr. extra. Service, to 1fr. per day. Candles, 3 frs. at end of season. From the 25th of May to the 25th of June, and from the 10th of August to the 30th of September, the charges are less. Intending visitors should bear this in mind in their correspondence with the hotel-keepers.

The other hotels should charge less; but unless the price be agreed upon beforehand it will be much the same.

The bath charges are rather complicated. There are three bathing-houses, of which the most important is the Etablissement des Thermes, a very large, well-arranged, and handsome building by the side of the Dordogne, opposite the park, near the springs Fenestre and Plage. Behind it, and more hidden among houses, are the Etablissement Chaussy and the Etablissement Mabru, both under the same roof. Apart of the latter establishment is portioned off for the indigent.

In the Etablissement des Thermes a bath with linen, from 16th June to 31st August, 3 frs.; from 25th May to 15th June, and from the 1st to the 30th September, 2 frs.

In the Etablissement Choussy the charges are fr. less than in the Thermes. In the Mabru they are fr. less than in the Choussy.

The pump-rooms of the Thermes and Choussy cost the season 10 frs., and in the indigent department of Mabru 5 frs.

The duration of a bath, with or without a douche, and of an inhalation or pulverisation sitting bath, must never exceed one hour, including the time for dressing and undressing; whoever exceeds that time pays double. Chairmen to the baths and back, 1 fr.

[Headnote: SPRINGS.]

The Springs.

Bourboule possesses seven mineral springs, of which five are on the right bank of the Dordogne, and two, the Sources Fenestre on the left, in the Park. The three most important, the Perrire, the Choussy, and Sdaiges, are within a few feet of each other, near the Mabru bathhouse. They rise from the place where the trachytic rocks overlap the granite, and were obtained by boring to the depth of from 82 to 92 ft. The water pumped up by steam-engines has, above ground, a temperature of 140 F.

These three springs produce the strongest arsenical water as yet discovered. Near them, but still on the same side of the river, are the springs of the Puits de la Plage, 81, and of the Puits Central, 104, mineralised more feebly, but in the same proportions. The two springs Fenestre, on the opposite side of the river, are cold (64 F.), and as they contain more free carbonic acid gas than the others, are drunk with wine at dinner.

Their Constituents and Effects.

Of the springs, Perrire, Choussy, and Sdaiges, each litre (11/50 of a gallon) contains 82 grains of mineral substances, of which nearly one half is the bicarbonate of soda, and the other half the chloride of sodium; and every 28 ounces contains the third of a grain of the arseniate of soda (see p. 379). Besides the special uses of these waters arising from the arsenic, their composition, resembling that of the serum of the blood, makes them applicable to cases of arrested development, defective nutrition, cases of slow convalescence, and other forms of general debility. In all scrofulous affections, such as enlarged glands, scrofulous discharges from mucous membranes, diseases of the bones, etc., these waters produce great benefit. But it is more especially in the chronic forms of skin disease that La Bourboule claims to effect the most remarkable cures, and chiefly when they arise in connection with a rheumatic or scrofulous constitution, or as the result of simple debility. The scrofulous form of pulmonary consumption, nasal and pharyngeal catarrhs, asthma, and chronic bronchitis, are all alleviated by the use of the Bourboule waters.

[Headnote: EXCURSIONS.]

Bourboule Excursions.

On the wall of the Etablissement des Thermes a notice indicates that it is 2 m. from the Cascade de la Vernire, 2m. from the Cascade du Plat-a-Barbe, 3-1/10 m. from Murat-le-Quaire, 5m. from Mont-Dore-les-Bains, 4-1/3 m. from the Cascade du Queureuilh, 4m. from the Cascade de Rossignolet, 4 m. from the summit of the Puy Gros, 2m. from the petrifying spring, 3 m. from the village of St. Sauves, and 10-4/5 m. from Latour. The most of these places are between Mont-Dore and Bourboule.

The only promenade of interest which may be said to belong especially to Bourboule is to the top of the Roche-Vendeix, with splendid specimens of basaltic columns, 2m. S. by a path following the right or east bank of the stream Vendeix. About m. beyond, the Vendeix path joins the high road between Latour and Mont-Dore, which traverses the forest of La Reine and the forest of Bozat. Near the point of junction, in a glade of the forest, are a large sawmill and Mont Bozat. About 1 m. E. from the junction the high road crosses the Clergue, where a path descends northwards by the stream passing the Cascade Plat-a-Barbe, about 4m. from Bourboule by this roundabout way, but only 2 m. by the direct path. The falls, 60 ft. high, tumble into a cavity bearing some resemblance to a barber's shaving basin. A little way farther down through the woods the Clergue makes the cascade of La Vernire, consisting of a sheet of water 26 ft. high, 2 m. from Bourboule.

On the way between Bourboule and Mont-Dore, 1m. from Bourboule and 4m. from Mont-Dore, aroad extends 2 m. N. to the summit of the Puy Gros, 5003 ft. above the sea.

[Headnote: SAINT-NECTAIRE.]

Mont-Dore to Issoire,

31 m. E., by Saint Nectaire 15 m. E., and Champeix other 8m. Diligence from St. Nectaire to Coudes railway station, 12m. E.The Mont-Dore coach, after having passed by the cascades of the Saut-du-Loup and of the Barbier, the village of Diane, the castle of Murols, and traversed the village of Sachapt and its narrow gorge, arrives at Saint-Nectaire-le-Bas, with a large bathing establishment. Hotels: Paris; Madeuf; Mandon, etc.

N. from St. Nectaire-le-Bas is Saint-Nectaire-le-Haut, also with a large bathing establishment, supplied with similar mineral waters. Hotels: Mont Cornadore; France. The waters are alkaline, ferruginous, and stimulant, temperature between 75 F. and 110 F., and are recommended for renal and hepatic diseases, amenorrhoea, leucorrhoea, and gout. The specialit may be said to be baths and douches of carbonic acid gas. In Mont Cornadore are large caves.

The parish church, built on a rock, 11th cent., is a curious specimen of Auvergnian architecture. In the neighbourhood, at Pernay, is a dolmen, of which the horizontal surface is 13 ft. by 6 ft.; and 2 m. distant the cascade of the Granges. 8 m. beyond, towards Issoire, is Champeix, pop. 2100, most picturesquely situated in the valley of the Couze. From Champeix the plateau of Pardines, 1620 ft., may be ascended; whence continue to the Tour de Maurifolet, and descend by the stair in the cliff to Perrier, pop. 600, among rocks pierced with caves, 3m. from Issoire (p. 372).

Continuation of Route—Clermont to Brive.

14 m. S.W. from Laqueuille by rail, 54 m. S.W. from Clermont, and 68m. N.E. from Brive, is Eyguirande, pop. 1150. Junction here with loop-line to Largnac, 30m. S.Coach daily to Murat 41m. S., passing Mauriac 12m. S. (see Black's South France, West Half).

31 m. S.W. from Eyguirande station is Meymac, pop. 3200, on the Lozege. Romanesque church, tower 15th cent.; remains of fortifications. Junction here with loop-line to Puy-Imbert, 9m. N., and close to Limoges. (See South France, West Half.)

[Headnote: TULLE. BRIVE-LA-GAILLARDE.]

16 m. N.E. from Brive, and 105 m. S.W. from Clermont, is Tulle, pop. 15,500, on the Corrze. Hotels: Notre Dame; Lyon; Charles. Firearms and coarse woollens are made here, but not an inch of the fabric called tulle.

122 m. S.W. from Clermont, 311 m. S. from Paris, 156m. N. from Toulouse, and 45m. E. from Perigueux, is Brive-la-Gaillarde, pop. 12,000, on the Corrze. Hotels: Bordeaux; Toulouse (see Black's South France, West Half).

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

INDEX.

ABRIES 344 Acqui 184 Agay 147 Aiguebelle 289 Aigueperse 368 Aigues-Mortes 73 Aiguilles 344 Aime 321 Aix-en-Provence 78, 338 olive oil 79

Aix-les-Bains 283 —— to Geneva by Annecy 286 Alacoque, M. M. 27 Alais 375 Alan 49 Alassio 208 Albenga 208 Albertville 320 —— to Annecy 320 Albissla 210 Alesia 19

Alessandria 280 Alise-St. Reine 19 Allgre 89 Allevard-les-Bains 336 Allos 339 Alvernia 279 Alzon 105 Amberieux 281 Ambert 91 Amplepuis 348 Ampuis 81 wine 81

Amyot, Jacques 3 Ancy-le-Franc 18 Annecy 286 Annonay 81 Antibes 154, 169 Antraigues 94 Apricale 201 Aps 97 Apt 66 preserves 66 Aramon 99 Arenzano 211 Ardche, sketch of 45 —— coaches to 45 —— map of 46 Ardes 373 Arezzo 279 Arfeuilles 346 Arlanc 90

Arles 68, 376 to Fontvieille 71 to Port Bouc 72 to Port St. Louis 72 to St. Gilles 72

Arma 207 Arsac 86 Artemart 282 Arvant 373 Aspres 48, 345 Astet 89 Asti 280 Aubagne 122 Aubenas 93 Aups 145, 167 Auribeau 156 Autun 24 Auxerre 14 Avallon 16 Avenza 222

Avignon 58 Benezet's bridge 63 —— tomb 62 Hotels 58 Htel de Ville 61 J. S. Mill's tomb 63 Laura's tomb 62 Muse Calvet 61 Museum of Natural History 62 Notre Dame des Doms 60 Popes' palace 58 Rocher des Doms 60 St. Agricol 61 St. Didier 62 St. Joseph 62 St. Nicolas 63 St. Pierre 62 to Manosque by Cavaillon 66 to Nmes 64 to Vaucluse 64 to Villeneuve 63

BAGNOLES-LES-BAINS 375 Bagnoles-sur-Ceze 99 Bains 91 Balaruc 76 Bandols 123 Banges 285 Bar 163 Barcelonnette 341 to Cuneo 341 to St. Paul 341

Bardonnechia 291 Barjols 143, 167 Barrme 166 Baths—Acqui 184 —— Aix-les-Bains 283 —— Aix-en-Provence 78 —— Allevard 336 —— Bagnols 375 —— Balaruc 76 —— Bourboule 383 —— Bourbon-Lancy 358 —— Bourbon l'Archambault 357 —— Challes 284, 288 —— Chteauneuf 369 —— Chtelguyon 369 —— Chateldon 367 —— Cusset 365 —— Foncaude 75 —— Groulx 168 —— La Motte 327 —— Lucca 230 —— Marlioz 284 —— Mont-Dore 378 —— Neyrac 94 —— Pougues-les-Eaux 352 —— Royat 376 —— Sail 348 —— St. Alban 348 —— St. Galmier 348 —— St. Giuliano 227 —— St. Honor 354 —— St. Mart 377 —— St. Nectaire 385 —— Uriage 336 —— Valdieri 181, 182 —— Vals 103 —— Vichy 359 —— Vinadio 183

Beage, Le 84 Beaucaire 67 Beauchastel 82 Beaufort 46 Beaujolais 29 Beaulieu 184 Beaune 23 Beaurires 48 Beausset 123

Bec-de-l'Homme 331 Becket, Thomas 11, 15, 17 Bedoin 56 Belgentier 129 Bellentre 321 Belleville 29 Belvedre 181 Berarde 330 Berlingots 56

Bernadette Soubirous 353 Berre 77 Bersezio 342 Besse 344 —— to Mt. Pelvoux 344 Besse-en-Chandesse 381 Beza, T. 15 Billom 350 Blaizy-Bas 20 Bobbio 306 Bogliasco 219 Boileau 2 Bollne 50

Bologna 315 Accademia 315 Ai Servi (church), 318 Annunziata 320 Biblioteca Communale 318 Bolognese school 315 Cabs 315 Certosa 320 Galvani 316 Guido's grave 319 Madonna di S. Luca 320 Mezzofanti 316 Pal. Mercanzia 318 Pal. Zampieri 318 Picture gallery 315 S. Bartolommeo 318 S. Domenico 319 S. G. Maggiore 316 S. Petronio 317 S. Pietro 319 S. Stefano 318 S. Vitale 319 Torre Asinelli 317 Torre Garisenda 317 University 316 Bondonneau 49

Bordighera 200 Bormes 142 Borne 89 Bossuet, J. B. 22 Bouillabaisse 113 Boulerie 147 Bourbon-Lancy baths 358 Bourbon-l'Archambault baths 357

Bourboule 383 Bourdeaux 47 Bourg-Argental 81 Bourg-d'Oisans 329 —— to Lac Blanc 329 —— to the Ecrin group 329 Bourgoin 322 Bourg-St. Andeol 97 Bourg-St. Maurice 321 Breuil, Le 373 Brianon 332 —— to Mt. Pelvoux 333, 345 —— to Oulx 333 Briare 352 Brignoles 142, 167 Brillane 339 Brioude 374 Brive 386 Brogny 287 Brunoy 2 Buffon, Comte de 18 Burgundy wines 22, 23, 24 Busalla 279 Bussoleno 291

CAGNES 165 Callian 162 Camaldoli 278 Camargue 70, 72 Campo-Rosso 201

Cannes 149 Agents 149 Adalbert 151, 159 Antibes 154 Auribeau 156 Banks 151 Brougham, Lord 151, 155 Cabs 151 Californie 152 Canal 152, 162 Cannet 154 Castelaras 156 Cemetery 152 Churches 151 Clausonne 154 Climate 151 Corniche 152 Croisette, La 154 Croix des Gardes 155 Drives 152 Estrels 155 Hesperide 154 Hotels and Pensions 149 Iron Mask 157 Lerins Islands 156 Mont Vinaigre 156 Mouans-Sartoux 156 Mougins 156 Napoule 154 N. D. d'Esperance 151 Observatories 151, 152 Pegomas 156 Pottery 153 St. Anne 151 St. Cassien 155 St. Honorat 158 St. Marguerite 157 Thoule 155 Vallauris 153

Carnoules 142 Carpentras 54

Carqueyranne 141 Mont Negre 141 Mont Paradis 141

Carrara 222 Casset, Le 332 Cassini, G. D. 201 Castellane 165 Castellaro 206 Cavaillon 66 Cayres 88 Celles-les-Bains 83 Cercy-la-Tour 25, 354 Certosa 184 Cervo 208 Cesanne 333 Cette 75 —— to Balaruc 76 Chablis 14 Chabons 323 Chagny 24, 355 Chaise-Dieu 89 Challes 284, 288 Chalon-sur-Sane 26 Chambertin 23 Chambery 287 Chambon 380 Champeix 385 Charenton 2 Charmes 82 Charmettes, Les 288 Chteauneuf (Riom) 369 Chteauroux 343 Chtelard, Le 285 Chateldon 367 Chtelguyon 369 Chtillon 47 Chtillon (Lake Bourget) 282 Chtillon-sur-Loing 351 Chtillon-sur-Loire 352 Chavanay 81 Cheilard 83 Chenal 341 Chiavari 220 Chiomonte 291 Chorges 342 Cirque-d'Annibal 321 Citeaux abbey 23 Claix 328, 345 Clamecy 354, 15 Clelles 345

Clermont-Ferrand 369 Academie 371 Botanic gardens 371 Cathedral 370 Coaches 370 Hotels 369 Notre Dame 371 Pascal's house 370 Peter the Hermit 371 Preserved fruits 370 Puy de Dome 372 Romagnat 372 to Brive by Mont-Dore-les-Bains and Bourboule 376 to Lyons by St. Etienne 349

Cluny 27 Cogoleto 210 Cogolin 145 Col Abris 307 —— Braus 183 —— Brouis 183 —— Cabres 48 —— Cerise 181 —— Chavade 89 —— Croix 306 —— Finestra 181 —— Fremamorta 181 —— Lautaret 331 —— Longet 341 —— Maddalena 342 —— Maure 339 —— Moulires 181 —— Muselle 330 —— Mulo 342 —— Ribeyret 51 —— Sestrires 307 —— Tenda 183 —— Traversette 308, 344 Colla, La 202 Colmars 339 Collobrires 130 Columbus 211 Condamine-Chtelard 342 Condamine, La 189

Condrieu 81 wine 81 Cornigliano 212 Corps 334 Correggio 313 Corsena 230 Cosne 352 Cote d'Or 22 Coupe-d'Aizac 94 Courmayeur 322 Courpire 91 Courty 350 Craponne 89 Cravant 14, 355 Crest 46 —— to Aspres 47 Crissolo 308, 344 Croisire, La 50 Croix Blanche 105 Cruseilles 287 Cruzy-le-Chatel 18 Cuers 130, 142 Culinary terms xxiii Culoz 282 Cuneo 182, 279, 308 —— to Barcelonnette 341 —— to Nice 182 Cusset 365

DARCEY 19 Darsac 89 —— to Chaise-Dieu 89 Dauphin, Le 331 Decize 25 Demonte 342 Dent de Nivolet 288 Dent-du-Chat 282 Diano Marina 208 Die 47 Dieulefit 47 Digne 166 Digoin 358 Dijon 20 Doctors' fees 110 Dolce-Acqua 201 Domne 336 Dompierre-sur-Bebre 357 Donzre 50 Doussard 287 Draguignan 145 Duingt 287 Duke of Berwick 356 Duranus 180 Durtol 377

EAUX CHAUDES 166 Embrun 343 Enchastraye 330 Entraque 181 Epinac 24 Escragnolles 165 Espaly 89 Estaque, L' 80 Estrels 146, 156 Etang 25 Eugene Su 286 Eyguirande 386 Eze 186

FAYENCE 145 Fenestrelle 307 Feurs 346 Fiesole 276 Finalmarina 209 Fix-St. Geneys 91 Flavigny 19

Florence 233 Academy of Fine Arts 271 Alkermes 268 Alvernia 279 Amerigo Vespucci 275 Arcetri 248 Arezzo 279 Badia, La 263 Baptistery 256 Bargello 261 Bello Sguardo 250 Bibbiena 279 Bibliotheca Laurentiana 266 —— Nazionale 236 Bigallo, Il 257 Boboli Gardens 246 Brancacci chapel 252 Brunelleschi's crucifix 268 Cab tariff 234 Camaldoli 278 Campanile 255 Cascine 276 Cathedral 252 Certosa 250 Dante 258 David, by Michael Angelo 272 Donatello's crucifix 260 Duomo 252 Galileo 247, 260 Galleria Uffizi 237 Gallery of mosaics 273 Guide books 234 Hawkwood, John 255 Hospital St. Giovanni 275 Hotels and apartments 233 House of Amerigo Vespucci 275 —— of Dante 274 —— of Galileo 248 —— of Macchiavelli 247 —— of Michael Angelo 263 Ketterick, John 259 Loggia Orcagna 235 Luca della Robbia ware 263 Masaccio 252 Money-changers 234 Monte Oliveto 251 Mortuary chapel 255 Mosaic manufacture 273 Museum of Etruscan Antiquities 267 —— Nat. Hist. 247 National Museum 261 Niobe 242 Ognissanti 275 Or St. Michele 257 Palaces 273 Palazzo Corsini 275 —— Riccardi 275 —— Strozzi 275 —— Torrigiani 276 —— Vecchio 274 Park 276 Pazzi chapel 260 Perazzi chapel 259 Piazza S. Annunziata 269 —— S. Croce 258 —— Signoria 235 Piazzale Michelangiolo 249 Picture gallery of S. Marco 270 Pitti gallery 243 —— palace 246 Pontassieve 278 Porta Romana 248 Post office 236 Prefettura della Provincia 275 Protestant churches 234 Raphael 239 Refectory of S. Croce 261 Restaurants 234 Rucellai chapel 268 Sagrestia Nuova 265 S. Annunziata 268 S. Croce 258 S. Giovannino 264 S. Lorenzo 264 S. Marco 270 S. Maria del Carmine 252 S. Maria del Fiore 252 —— Novella 267 S. Michele 257 S. Miniato 249 S. Spirito 251 Sarto, Andrea del 269 Savonarola 270 Sights 234 Spezeria 268 Straw-plaiting 277 Torre del Gallo 248 Tribuna 238 —— di Galileo 247 Uffizi gallery 237 Vallombrosa 278 Venus de Medici 238 Views 250

Foncaude baths 75 Fontainebleau 3 Fontana 183 Fontenay abbey 19 Forcalqueiret 129 Fos 76 Fourchambault 353 Freaux, Les 331 Frejus 146 Freney, Le 331 Frontignan 75 salt 75 wine 75

GALLINARIA 208 Gannat 368 Gap 340, —— to Barcelonnette 340 —— to Grenoble 342 Garabit, Pont de 374 Gardanne 80, 142, 338 —— to Carnoules 142

Genoa 212, 279 Accademia 216 Acquasola 216 Albergo dei Poveri 218 Cabs 213, Cafs 213, Campo-Santo 218 Cathedral 217 Corsos 213 English church 212 Hotels 212 Money-changers 213 Palazzo Adorno 216 —— Balbi 215 —— Doria 214 —— —— (Giorgio) 216 —— Ducal 217 —— Durazzo 215 —— Municipicio 216 —— Rosso 216 —— Serra 216 —— Spinola 216 Post office 216 Royal Palace 214 S. Ambrogio 217 S. Annunziata 215 S. Maria in Carignano 218 S. Matteo 217 S. Siro 215 Shops 212 Steamers 213 Telegraph office 213 Valdensian church 212 Via Circonvallazione 213 Via Milano 214

Gerbier-de-Joncs 84 Gevrey 23 Giandola 183 Gien 351

Giens 140 La Madrague 141 Le Chateau 141 Salt works 141 Semaphore 141

Gires 336 Gilly 358 Givors-Canal 81, 349 Gleyzin glacier 337 Golf Jouan 169 Goncelin 336 Gonfaron 131 Gourdon 163 Grand Som 324 Grande-Chartreuse 323 Grande Combe 375 Grasse 160 Grave, La 331

Grenoble 324 Bastile 325 Bayard 325 Coaches 325, 327 Gloves 327 Hotels 324 Library 326 Picture gallery 326 St. Andr 325 St. Laurent 327 to Barcelonnette 341 to Brianon 328 to Corps 333 to Gap 342 to La Motte-les-Bains 327 to Sassenage 327

Groulx 167 Grignan 49 Grimaud 144 Guerigny 354 Guillestre 344

HAUTECOMBE ABBEY 284 Hermitage wine 43 Hospice of Little St. Bernard 321

Hyres 133 Banks 133 Butterflies 139 Cabs 134 Caterpillars 139 Charles of Anjou 136 Chteau, Le 136 Climate 140 Clubs 134 Cork trees 139 Costebelle 136 Drives 134 English Pharmacy 133 Episcopal Chapel 133 Fenouillet, Mont 137 Game 138 Hermitage 136 Hotels 133 Jardin d'Acclimatation 136 La Plage 140 Map 129 Massillon 135 Napoleon I. 136 Oiseaux Monts. 128 Olive trees 138 Palm sticks 108 Palms 136 Paradis, Mont 141 Pauline, La 142 Pipes 139 Potence 139 Productions 139 St. Louis 136 St. Paul 135 Stage coaches 134 Temple Protestant 133 Town water 139 Trou des Fes 138 View from Le Chteau 137

ILES DE LERINS 157 Iles d'Or 131 Il Serraglio 230

Issoire 372, coach to St. Nectaire 385

Isola Buona 201 Istres 76 Italian railway terms and time-tables 200, 291

JAUJAC 95 Jausiers 342 Javie 339 Jean-Sans-Peur 10, 20, 22 Joigny 14 Jouques 79 Joyeuse 96

LA BALME 282 La Barben 79 La Bastide 375 La Begude 93 La Bollene 181 La Chalp 306 La Chambre 289 La Charit 352 La Ciotat 122 La Crau 130 La Garde 128, 130 La Garde Fraiseinet 144 La Madrague 141 La Monta 344 La Mothe 94 La Palisse 346, 368 La Pauline 142 La Roche 14 La Salle 334 La Salette 334 La Sauvetat 88 La Seyne 123 La Valette 128 La Voulte 82

Lachamp-Raphael 84 Laffrey 333 Lagnieu 282 Laigueglia 208 Lake Allos 339 —— Annecy 286 —— Bourget 282 —— Paladru 323 —— Pavin 381 —— Thau 76 Lamartine 27 Lambesc 80 Langeac 91, 375 Langogne 95, 375 —— to Le Puy 88 Lans-le-Bourg 290 Lantosque 180 Laqueuille 377 —— to Mont-Dore 377 —— to Bourboule 377 Larche 342 Largentire 96 —— to Les Laumes 14 Larzac 106 Laudun 99 Laurent-du-Pont 323 Lauzet 331 Lauzet, Le 341 Lavandou 143

Le Barroux 57 Le Beage 84 Le Bouchet 88 Le Buis 57 Le Creusot 25 Le Monastier 85 Le Pal 96 Le Peage de Roussillon 43 Le Pouzin 92 Le Puy 86 Le Teil 93 Le Trayas 149

Leghorn 226 Lemons 191, 194, 201 Lerici 221 Les Arcs 145 Les Baux 67 Les Etables 85 Les Etages 330 Les Laumes 19 Les Marches 289, 338 Les Piles 51 Les Saintes Maries 72 Les Salins 141

Leschaux 287 Levant, Ile du 132 Levens 180 Limone 183 L'Isle 64 Livet 329 Livron 46 Loano 209 Lorgues 145 Lord Clarendon 356 Lovagny 286 Luc 144

Lucca 227 Cabs 227 Cathedral 228 Hotels 227 Picture gallery 228 S. Frediano 229 S. Michele 229 Luc-en-Diois 48

Lunel 72 wine 73 Lurs 339 Luserna 305 Luzy 25

Lyons 29 Antiquaille Hospital 33 Aqueduct 34 Boats, Penny 31 Bourse 38 Cabs 30 Cathedral 34 Cheese 42 Condition des Soies 37 Distances 29 First sewing-machine 38 Flourvire 32 History 41 Hospice 39 Htel de Ville 37 —— Dieu 39 Hotels 29 Ile Barbe 42 Jacquard's loom 38 Libraries 37, 38 Minerals 37 Mont Ceindre 41 —— d'Or 42 Muse Archologique 36 —— Guimet 40 —— Lapidaire 35 —— of Silk 38 Notre Dame 33 Observatoire Gay 33 Palais de Justice 35 —— des Beaux Arts 35 Park 40 Picture gallery 36 Place des Terreaux 37 Post office 30 Prfecture 37 Railway station 30 St. Bruno 37 St. Irne 34 St. Martin d'Ainay 39 St. Nizier 35 St. Paul 33 St. Pierre 35 St. Polycarpe 37 Sights 32 Silk museum 38 Squares (Places) 32 Steamers 31 Tte d'Or 40 Theatres 31 to Nmes 81 Trams 31 Weavers 40 Workhouse (Hospice) 39

MACON 26 wines 24 Maisons-Alfort 2 Malaucene 57 Manosque 66, 166, 168, 339 Marcols 84 Marlioz 284

Marseilles 80, 111 Anglican chapel 112 Arc de Triomphe 116 Biblothque 117 Bishop Belsunce 116 Boats 112 Bonneveine 113 Bouillabaisse 113 Bourse 116 Cabs 111 Canal 77 Cathedral 115 Charities 119 Chteau Borely 113 Commerce 120 Consigne 115 Corniche 113 Custom-house 112 cole des Beaux Arts 117 History 120 Htel de Ville 115 Hotels 111 If, island of 118 Industries 119 Joliette 115 Lazarus's grave 119 Lyce 117 Marseillaise, the 120 Martigues 118 Money-changers 112 Muse d'Archologie 113 Notre Dame 117 Observatory 115 Palais de Justice 116 —— Longchamp 114 Port 115 Prfecture 116 Reservoir 115 St. Victor 117 Sights 112, Steamboats 112 Temple 112 to Grenoble 338 to Menton 112 Trams 113, Zoological garden 115

Martinet 341 Mary Magdalene 124, 145 Massa 223 Maurin 341 Mayres 89, 94 Meana 291 Meije 331 Melun 2 Menthon 287

Menton 193 Annunciata 196 Banks 194 Bennet garden 197 Berceau 196 Cabs 194 Cape St. Martin 195 Castellar 196 Castellon 197 Caves 195 Churches 194 Ciotti 197 Climate 199 Gorvio 197 Gourg-d'Ora 197 Grimaldi 197 Hanbury grounds 197 Hotels 193 Mont Baudon 196 Monti 198 Mortola 197 St. Agnese 196 —— (village) 197 St. Louis 196 to Genoa 199

Meounes 129 Meursault 24 Meymac 386 Meyrargues 80 Meze 76 Mezillac 84 Mirabeau 338 Mirabouc 306 Miramas 76 —— to Port Bouc 76 Modane 290 —— by road to Susa 290

Modena 313 Campanile 314 Cathedral 314 Library 314 Museo Lapidario 315 Picture gallery 314 Moirans 324

Monaco 187 Monastier, Le 85 Mondov 184, 304 Monestier de Clermont 345 Montier de Brianon 332 Monge, Gaspard 23 Monistrol-d'Allier 91 Mons cave 163 Mont Agel 192 —— Aulas 105 —— Auxois 19 —— Belledonne 336 —— Cenis 290 —— —— Hospice 290 —— Chenavari 93 —— Coudon 125, 128 —— Faron 127 —— Ferrand 331 —— Genvre 333 —— Gergovia 372 —— Grand Sambiu 79 —— Gravenne 96 —— Meidassa 305, 344 —— Mezenc 85 —— Pelvoux 333, 344, 345 —— Pilat 348 —— Pirchiriano 291 —— Protomagno 278 —— Sancy 381 —— Semnoz 287 —— Taillefer 329 —— Ventoux 56, 57 —— Vestide 96 —— Viso 305, 344 Montagnac 88 Montallieu 281 Montargis 351 Montauroux 162 Montbard 18 Montbrison 349 Montchanin 25 Mont-Dore-les-Bains 378 —— to Issoire 385 —— to St. Nectaire 385 Mont Dauphin 306, 307, 343 —— to Saluzzo 344 Monte Carlo 189, 192 Monte Grosso 210 Montlimart 48 Montereau 10 Montgeron 2 Mont-Majour 71 Montmlian 167, 289, 338

Montpellier 73 cole de Mdecine 74 Muse Fabre 74 to Palavas 75 wine 75 Montpezat 96 Montrieux 129 Moret 10 Mornas 46 Moulins 355 —— Les 190 Moustiers Ste. Marie 167 Moutiers on Doron 320 Mure, La 334, 342 Murols 382

NAPOLEON I. 64 Napoule 156 Narce 89, 94

Nervi 219 Neussargues 374 Nevers 353 Neyrac 94

Nice 169 Banks 172 Booksellers 172 Cabs 173 Cafs 172 Carabacl 177 Caterina Segurmana 176 Cathedral 176 Chteau, Le 175 Churches 173 Cimis 177 Climate 174 Clubs 172 Column 177 Confectioneries 173 Contes 174 Crois-de-Marbre 177 Diligences 173 Drives 178 Falicon 180 Garibaldi 176 Hotels and Pensions 170 House agents 172 Jardin Public 178 Luther 176 Massena 177 Memorial chapel 176 Money-changers 172 Mont Chauve 179 Monte Carlo 178 Museum 178 Observatory 180 Paganini 176 Palais de Lascaris 176 Pharmacies 172 Post office 172 Promenade 175 Protestant churches 173 Public library 172 St. Andr 179 St. Augustin 176 St. Jean 178 St. Pons 179 Val Obscur 178 Vallon des Fleurs 179 Vallons 174 Villa Clery 179 Villefranche 178, 184

Nicholas V. 221 Nieigles 95 Nmes 101, 376 —— to Vigan 105 Nolay 24 Noli 209 Novi 279 Nuits 23 Nuits-sous-Ravieres 18 Nyons 50 —— to Serres 51

OLBON 83 Olliergues 91 Ollioules 123 Olive tree 138 Orange 51 —— Prince of 52 Orcival 380 Orgon 66 Ortolans 56 Ospedaletti 201, 202 Oulx 291, 333 Ours-Mons 88

PALAVAS 75 Paradisino 278 Paray-le-Monial 27 Paris to Lyons by St. Etienne 346 —— to Marseilles 1 —— Directions 1 —— to Marseilles by Clermont and Nmes 351 —— to Marseilles by Lyons 1 —— to Turin by Aix-les-Bains 281 —— to Turin by Grenoble 322

Parma 310 Parmesan cheese 313 Pas-des-Lanciers 80, 88, 376 Pegli 211 Pelago 278 Pelussin 81 Perinaldo 201 Perosa 307 —— to Cesanne 307 ——to Mont-Dauphin 307 Pertuis 77, 338 Petite Afrique 186 Petrarch 65 Peyerbelle 89, 95 Peyraud 81 Peyrolles 79 Piacenza 309 Pian Fiorenza 308 —— del R 308 Pierre-Chatel 334 Pierrefeu 130 Pietrasanta 223 Pigna 201 Pinerolo 306

Pisa 223 Baptistery 225 Cabs 224 Campo Santo 225 Cathedral 224 Hotels 223 Leaning Tower 225 Post office 224 Santa Maria 226 University 226

Pistoja 231 Polignac 89 Pomaretto 307 Pomponiana 143 Pontaix 47 Pontassieve 277 Pont Avignon 99 —— d'Arc 97 —— de-la-Beaune 95 —— du-Gard 104 —— Ecofier 329 —— Gibaud 377 —— St. Esprit 98 Pontcharra 337 Pontigny 16 Pontius Pilate 43 Porquerolles 131 Port Bouc 76 —— to Arles 76 Port Cros 132 —— Grau du Roi 73 —— Man 132 —— St. Louis 72 Porto Maurizio 207 —— Oneglia 208 —— Venere 220 Portofino 220 Pougues-les-Eaux 352 Pouilly-sur-Loire 352 Pourcheyrolles 95 Pouzin 92 Pra 211 Pradelles 89, 95 Prades (Ardche) 95 Prato 232 Praz 289 Pr-St Didier 321 Prices 109 Privas 92 Puget, Pierre 80 Puget-Theniers 182 Puligny 24 Puy-de-Dome 372

QUEYRAS 344 Quincy abbey 18

RANDAN 366, 368 Rapallo 220 Reggio Emilia 313 Remoulins 99 Resin baths 48, 57 Rians 79 Riez 166, 168 Riom 369 Riouperoux 329 Rioutort 96 Ris 367 Rives 323

Riviera, the 107 Climate 108 Cost of living 109 road to 1 Vegetation 108

Roanne 346, 348 Robilante 183 Rocavignon 160 Roche Cevins 320 Rochemaure 92 Rocher Blanc 164 —— Noir 165 Rognac 77, 376 —— to Aix-en-Provence 77 —— to Roquefavour 77 Romaneche 28 Roquebillre 181 Roquebrune 192 Roquefavour aqueduct 77 Roquemaure 99 Roquotaillado tunnel 162 Rosans 51 Roumoulles 168 Rousseau, J. J. 287, 288 Rouvray 16 Royat 376 Ruoms 96 Ruota 201

SAILLANS 47 Sail-les-Bains 348 Saincaize 355 St. Agnan 358 St. Agnes 131 St. Alban 348 St. Ambroix 96 St. Andr-le-Gaz 322 —— to Chambery 322 St. Auban 166, 339 St. Baume (Agay) 147 —— (Bouches du Rhne) 144 St. Bernard 27, 287 St. Cannat 79 St. Cesaire 162 St. Chamas 76, 376 St. Christophe 330 St. Cyre 123 St. Didier 57 St. Edmund 17 St. Etienne 346, 349 manufactories of muskets, pistols, swords, and ribbons 346, 347 St. Eulalie 96 St. Florentin 16 —— to Chablis 16 St. Galmier 346, 348 St. Georges-d'Aurac 91, 374 St. Germain 321 St. Germain-au-Mont d'Or 29 St. Germain-des-Fosss 358 St. Gilles 72 St. Honorat 158 St. Honor baths 354 St. Honor-les-Bains 25, 354 St. Jean 185 St. Jean du Bruel 106 St. Julien-du-Sault 13 St. Louis (king) 73 St. Marcel caves 98 St. Marcellin 324 —— to Pont-en-Royan 324 St. Marguerite 157 St. Mart 377 St. Martin 98 St. Martin-Lantosque 181 St. Maurice 2, 50 St. Maximin 143 St. May 51 St. Menet 122 St. Michael (Mont Cenis) 289 St. Nazaire 123 St. Nectaire 385 St. Pardoux 357 St. Paul-Trois-Chteau 50 St. Pray 82 wine 82 St. Pre 15 St. Pierre-d'Albigny 289 —— to Annecy 289 —— to Courmayeur 320 St. Pierre-d'Argenson 48 St. Pierreville 83 St. Pilon 144 St. Pons 341 St. Priest 322 St. Privat 91 St. Rambert-d'Albon 43 St. Raphael 147 St. Remi-en-Rollat 368 St. Remy 67 St. Sauveur 83, 182 St. Seine 19 St. Thom 97 St. Tropez 145 St. Vallier 43, 165 St. Yorre 366

Salon 66 Saluzzo 307, 344 —— to Cuneo 307 —— to Mont Dauphin 308 —— to Paesana 308 —— to Sampeyre 308, 344 Sampierdarena 212 San Ambrogio (Mt. Cenis) 291 San Chiaffredo 308 San Dalmazzo 308 San Giuliano 227

San Remo 203 Cabs 203 Ceriana 204 Climate 204 Hotels 203 Madonna 205 Monte Bignone 205 Poggia 204 St. Romolo 205 —— to Taggia 207

San Stefano 207 San Terenzo 221 Sancerre 352

Santa Margherita 220 Saou 46 Sarzana 221 Sassenage 327 Sauclires 105 Saugues 91 Saulieu 16 Saut-du-Loup 373 Savigny 24 Savines 343 Savona 209

Sea bathing 110 Schilienne 329 Seez 321 Seine, source of 19 Semur 16 Senez 166 Sens 10 Sept Laux 337 Sermizelles 15 Serres 51, 340 Serrires 81 Sestri Levante 220 —— Ponente 212 Settignano 277 Seyne-les-Alpes 339

Shelley 221, 223 Sisteron 339 Six-Fours 123 Sollis-Pont 129, 142 Sollis-Ville 129, 142 Sorgues 54 Sospello 182 Source of the Loire 84 Souvigny 356 Spezia 220 Steam trams 304 Sue du Pal 96 Susa 291 Suze-le-Rousse 50

TAGGIA 206, 207 Tain 43 Talloires 286 Tanlay 17 Tarascon 66, 376 Martha's grave 67 Taulignan 49 Tavernettes, Les 290 Teil 93 Tenay 282 Tenda 183 Termignon 290

Theoule 155 Thezirs 99 Thiers 367, 350 Thomery 10 Thueyts 94 Thuile 321 Tonnerre 17 Torre-Pllice 305 —— to Mont Dauphin 306

Toulon 124 Arsenal 125 Bagne 125 Balaguier 127 Belle-Poule 124 Cap Brun 128 Cathedral 126 Dardenne 128 Diligences 129 Hotels 124 Le Pradet 128 Le Tamaris 127 Mont Faron 127 Omnibuses 124, 128 Port, the 124 Puget's house 126 Rue Lafayette 126 St. Franois de Paule 126 St. Mandrier 127 St. Marguerite 128 Smith, Sir Sydney 126 Temple Protestant 124 Town Hall 126 Tour-du-Pin 322 Tournon 82 Tournus 26 Trayas, Le 148 Trets 144 Trvoux 29 Trinit-Victor 182 Troy weight 13 Troyes 11 Truffles 55 Tulle 386 Turbie, La 191, 192

Turin 292 Accademia Albertina 300 Armoury 297 Biblioteca del R 297 Booksellers 293 Cabs 292 Cafs 293 Castello, the 299 Cathedral 298 Cavour house 294 —— monument 301 Cemetery 302 Gran Madre di Dio 300 Gressini 303 Hotels 292 King's palace 298 La Consolata 301 Medagliere del R 297 Money-changers 293 Monuments 293, 301 Museo Civico 299 Museum of antiquities and picture gallery 294 Museum of zoology and mineralogy 297 Palazzo Carignano 297 —— dell' Accademia delle Scienze 294 —— di Citta 301 Piazza Carlo Felice 293 —— dello Statuto 293 —— San Carlo 293 —— Vitt. Emanuele 300 Post and telegraph offices 293 Railway stations 293 Superga, La 302 Teatro Regio 298 Theatres 293 to Cuneo 153 to Florence 309 to Genoa 279 to Savona 183 Trams 292 University 300 Via di Po 300 Wines 303

UBAYE 341 Uriage baths 336 Usclades 96 Uzs 99

VAISON 53 Val Louise 333, 345 Valbonne 98 Valdieri 181, 182 Valence 44 —— coaches from 45 Vallauris 154 Valleraugue 105 Vallombrosa 278 Vallon 97 Valras 49 Vals 93 Var 169 Varazze 210 Varennes 26 Varzy 354 Vassivires 381 Vaucluse 64 Vaugris 43 Velars 20 Venanson 181 Vence 163 Vence-Cagnes 169 Vencigliato 277 Venosc 330

Ventimiglia 200 Vernet 91 —— (Digne) 339 Verrey 19 Vesseaux 93 Veynes 340 Vezelay 15 Viareggio 223

Vichy 359 Vienne 42 Vif 345 Vigan 105 —— to Millau 105 Villa Pallavicini 211 Villard-d'Arne 331 Villefort 375 —— to Bagnol-les-Bains 375 Villefranche 184 Villefranche-sur-Sane 29 Villeperdrix 51 Ville-la-Vieille 344 Villeneuve-les-Avignon 63 Hospital 63 Marchioness de Ganges 63 Villeneuve-St. George 2 Villeneuve-sur-Yonne 13 Vinadio 183, 342 Virieu 322 Virieu-le-Grand 282 Viviers 97 Vizille 328, 333, 345 Voghera 309 Voiron 323 coach to the Grande Chartreuse 323 Voltri 211 Volvic 369, 377 Volx 339 Voreppe 324 coach to the Grande Chartreuse 324 Vougeot 23 Voulte, La 82 Voute-Chilhac 91

WALDENSES, OR VAUDOIS 305 Waldensian valleys 304 Warrens, Mme. 286, 288 Wellington 2

THE END.

Printed by R. & R. CLARK, Edinburgh.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Errors and Inconsistencies

LIST OF MAPS: Mont Cenis railway, Plan of 291 [text has "191"]

A few points are missing "from" or "to" mileages. They have not been individually noted. Two occurrences of "Coreggio" for "Correggio" have been silently corrected.

Map references are inconsistent. The "Rhne and Savoy" map was printed twice, between pages 26/27 and 106/107. In the List of Maps it is given as "page 107"; in the text it is randomly cited as "page 27" and "page 26". "Map. p. 199" and "p. 200" both refer to the Italian Riviera map; it is also cited twice as "p. 220". The map of Hyres (p. 129) is twice cited as "p.177".

Occupied successively by Marie de Medicis, [elsewhere "Mdicis"] Antoine Bourbon (father of Henri IV.), [closing parenthesis missing] H. Rigaud, 1552-1745 [text unchanged: Hyacinthe Rigaud 1659-1743] 23m. E. from Crest, and 34 m. W. from Aspres, is Die [text has "23m. L."] [Pisa] in the Lung' Arno Regio [text has "Lung 'Arno"] [headnote] ... S. FREDIANO [text has "S. FREDIANA"] Evi mori il 6 Giugno 1861." [close quote missing] and for description, Black's France, North half). [closing parenthesis missing]

Avignon to Nmes ... [text has 110 for 101 and 114 for 104] [Florence] ... in the Sagrestia Nuova, see page 266. [text has 166 for 266] From Roannes (p. 346), on the St. Galmier branch line [text has 246 for 346]

INDEX Inconsistencies between Index and body text were changed when one form was clearly wrong; others are simply noted. Page references that were wrong by only one page were disregarded.

Avignon: St Didier [spelled "Dedier" in body text] Bardonnecchia [text has "Bardonnechia"] Estrels [spelled "Estrel" in body text] Florence: S. Maria del Fiore [text has "del Fiori"] Hyeres: Oiseaux Monts 138 [text has 128] Menton: Annunciata [spelled "Annonciade" in body text] —: Gorvio [spelled "Gorbio" in body text] —: Castellon 199 [text has 197] Rocher Blanc [spelled "Roche-Blanche" in body text] San Remo: Poggio [text has "Poggia"] St Michael [spelled "Michel" in body text]

THE END

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