HotFreeBooks.com
The Life of Sir James Fitzjames Stephen, Bart., K.C.S.I. - A Judge of the High Court of Justice
by Sir Leslie Stephen
Previous Part     1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11
Home - Random Browse

The following is a list of the chief contributions to quarterly and monthly periodicals.

Cambridge Essays

1. Oct. 1855. Relation of Novels to Life.

2. July 1857. Characteristics of English Criminal Law.

National Review

1. April 1856. Cambridge Reform.

2. Nov. 1864. The Public Schools Commission.

Edinburgh Review

1. July 1856. Cavallier.

2. July 1857. Novelists.

3. Jan. 1858. Tom Brown's Schooldays.

4. April 1858. Buckle's 'Civilisation.'

5. Oct. 1858. Guy Livingstone.

6. April 1859. Hodson.

7. Oct. 1861. Jurisprudence.

Cornhill Magazine

1. Sept. 1860. Luxury.

2. Dec. 1860. Criminal Law and the Detection of Crime.

3. April 1861. The Morality of Advocacy.

4. May 1861. Dignity.

5. June and July 1861. The Study of History.

6. Aug. 1861. The Dissolution of the Union.

7. Sept. 1861. Keeping up Appearances.

8. Nov. 1861. National Character.

9. Dec. 1861. Competitive Examinations.

10. Jan. 1862. Liberalism.

11. Feb. 1862. Commissions of Lunacy.

12. March 1862. Gentlemen.

13. May 1862. Superstition.

14. June 1862. Courts Martial.

15. July 1862. Journalism.

16. Sept. 1862. The State Trials.

17. Nov. 1862. Circumstantial Evidence.

18. Jan. 1863. Society.

19. Feb. 1863. The Punishment of Convicts.

20. April 1863. Oaths.

21. June 1863. Spiritualism.

22. July 1863. Commonplaces on England.

23. July 1863. Professional Etiquette.

24. Sept. 1863. Anti-respectability.

25. Oct. 1863. A Letter to a Saturday Reviewer.

26. Dec. 1863. Marriage Settlements.

27. Jan. 1864. Money and Money's Worth.

28. June 1864. The Church as a Profession.

29. July 1864. Sentimentalism.

30. Dec. 1864. The Bars of France and England.

31. Jan. 1867. The Law of Libel.

Fraser's Magazine

(A few earlier articles had appeared in this magazine.)

1. Dec. 1863. Women and Scepticism.

2. Jan. 1864. Japan.

3. Feb. 1864. Theodore Parker.

4. April 1864. Mr. Thackeray.

5. May 1864. The Privy Council.

6. June 1864. Capital Punishment.

7. Sept. 1864. Newman's 'Apologia.'

8. Nov. 1864. Dr. Pusey and the Court of Appeal.

9. Dec. 1864. Kaye's 'Indian Mutiny.'

10. Feb. 1865. Law of the Church of England.

11. March 1965. Merivale's 'Conversion of the Roman Empire.'

12. June and July 1865. English Ultramontanism.

13. Nov. 1865. Mr. Lecky's 'Rationalism.'

14. Feb. 1866. Capital Punishment.

15. June and July 1866. 'Ecce Homo.'

16. Nov. 1866. Voltaire.

17. Nov. 1869. Religious Controversy.

18. Jan. 1872. Certitude in Religious Assent.

19. July 1873. Froissart's 'Chronicles.'

Fortnightly Review

1. Dec. 1872. Codification in India and England.

2. March 1877. A Penal Code.

3. March 1884. Blasphemy and Seditious Libel.

Contemporary Review

1. Dec. 1873 and March 1874. Parliamentary Government.

2. March 1874. Caesarism and Ultramontanism.

3. May 1874. Caesarism and Ultramontanism: a Rejoinder.

4. Dec. 1874. Necessary Truth.

5. Feb. 1875. The Law of England as to the Expression of Religious Opinion.

Nineteenth Century

1. April 1877. Mr. Gladstone and Sir G. C. Lewis on Authority.

2. May 1877. Morality and Religious Belief.

3. Sept. 1877. Improvement of the Law by Private Enterprise.

4. Dec. 1877. Suggestions as to the Reform of the Criminal Law.

5. Jan. 1880. The Criminal Code (1879).

6. Jan. 1881. The High Court of Justice.

7. April 1882. A Sketch of the Criminal Law.

8. Oct. 1883. India; the Foundations of Government.

9. June 1884. The Unknowable and the Unknown.

10. May 1885. Variations in the Punishment of Crime.

11. Oct. 1886. Prisoners as Witnesses.

12. Dec. 1886. The Suppression of Boycotting.

13. Oct. 1887. Mr. Mivart's 'Modern Catholicism.'

14. Jan. 1888. A Rejoinder to Mr. Mivart.

15. April and May 1888. Max Mueller's 'Science of Thought.'

16. June 1891. The Opium Resolution.

17. July 1891. Gambling and the Law.



INDEX

Aberdare, Lord, 340

Aberdeen in 1775-77, 11

Achill, Sir J. F. Stephen at, 409

Adams, Professor, 93

Adams, Mr. Henry, 24n

Addison, Joseph, 430

Afghanistan, Lord Lytton's policy in, and the subjugation of its tribes,391-401

Agency Committee, organised by George Stephen, 28

Albert, Prince Consort, 95

Allen, William, 309

America, the Civil War in, 319

American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Sir J. F. Stephen an honorary member of, 478

Anaverna House, 386, 406-409, 477-479

Annet, Peter, last Deist imprisoned for blasphemous libel, 8

'Anti-Slavery Reporter,' the, 47

'Apostles,' the, at Cambridge, 100-106, 300, 472

Aquinas, Thomas, 60, 364

Argyll, Duke of, 354

Arnold, Matthew, 165

Arnold, Rev. Dr., 76, 221

Ashton, John, Jacobite conspirator, 34

Ashton, Miss. See Venn, Rev. Richard

Ashwell, R. v., 443

Athenaeum Club, the, 302

Auerbach's 'Auf der Hoehe,' 298

Austen, Jane, 103

Austerlitz, 60

Austin, Charles, 123

Austin, John, as a writer compared with Sir J. Stephen, 54; John and Mrs. Austin's associations with Sir J. Stephen, 60, 76; influence of Austin's works on Sir J. F. Stephen, 116, 204-206, 220, 317, 396, 413; death, 172

Austin, Miss Lucy. See Gordon, Lady Duff

Bacon murder trial, 146-148, 173

Bain, Professor, 339

Balmat, Auguste, 143

Balston, Mr., 80, 81, 86

Balzac, Honore, 156

Barkley, Mr. D. G., 256

Barry, Mr. Justice, 380

Bate, Parson. See Dudley, Sir Henry Bate

Bathurst, Earl, and Sir J. Stephen, 32

Batten, Rev. Ellis, Master at Harrow, his wife (Miss Caroline Venn) and daughter, 36n., 39, 129

Baxter and his writings, Sir J. Stephen on, 56, 57, 116

Beaconsfield, Lord, 344, 349, 352

Beattie, Dr., 11

Beaumont, W. J., 85

Bellingham, Henry, murderer of Mr. Perceval, 20

Bentham, Jeremy, Sir J. F. Stephen and his writings, 71, 101, 116, 123-125, 159, 189, 204, 206-208, 210, 211, 308, 309, 311, 312, 317, 321, 322, 325, 333, 413, 423, 424, 464; his efforts on behalf of codification, 246, 247

Bethell Sir Richard. See Westbury, Lord

Blackburn, Lord, 353, 380

Blackstone, Mr. Justice, 26, 412, 418

Blakesley, Canon, 100

Blomfield, Bishop, 37

Bluecher, Field-Marshal, 21

Board of Trade, Sir J. Stephen's connection with the, 42, 49

Bolingbroke, James Kenneth Stephen's essay on, 472

Bonney, Professor, 4n

Bowen, Lord Justice, 150, 232, 413

Brahmos sect (India), 260-266

Bramwell, Lord, 140, 353

Brand, Lieut., his share in the execution of Gordon, 229

Bright, John, 107, 160, 224, 304, 394

Bronte, Charlotte, 103

Brougham, Lord, 19, 20, 22, 24n

Brown, Mary. See Stephen, Mr. James

Browning, Mr. Oscar, 469, 472, 476

Browning, Robert, 5, 476

Browning, Mr. William, 469

Bryce, Mr. James, 32n

Buckle, T. H., 312, 320

Buller, Mr. Charles, 46, 100

Bunyan, John, 69

Burke, Edmund, 433, 434

Butler, Bishop, Sir James Stephen and his 'Analogy,' 18; Sir J. F. Stephen and Butler's works, 161, 196, 423

Butler, Mr. Montague, 99n

Buxton, Mr. Charles, his connection with the Jamaica Committee, 228n

Buxtn, Sir Thomas Fowell, his efforts to suppress the slave trade, 28

Byron, Lord, 103, 400

Cairns, Lord, 380

Calcutta, work and life at, 241, 244, 304

Calder, Mrs., daughter of Mr. James Stephen, 2

Calverley, C. S., 476

'Cambridge Essays,' 149, 155, 203, 206, 484

'Cambridge Review,' the, 469n

Cambridge University, John Venn at, 35; connection of Sir J. Stephen with, 56; Sir J. F Stephen at, 93-106; the 'Apostles,' 100; J. K. Stephen at, 472-3, 476-7

Cameron, C. H., his share in codifying Indian Penal Laws, 247

Campbell's Poems, 40, 68

Campbell, Mr. J. Dykes, 33n

Campbell, Lord, Chief Justice, 140, 441, 442

Campbell, Sir George, 269

Canning, Lord, 399

Capital punishment, 426, 445

Carlyle, Jane Welsh, 201

Carlyle, Thomas, 50, 53, 54; his political and philosophic writings, 77, 104, 159, 180, 182, 225, 230, 315, 453, 458; friendship with Sir J. F. Stephen, 201-203, 238, 245, 302, 305, 309, 360, 385, 419

Caroline, Queen, 27

Cashmire Gate, the, 398

Castlereagh, Lord, 22

Cavagnari, Major, 397, 399

Cavaignac and the French revolution of 1848, 108

Cavallier, 162, 163

Cayley, Professor, 93

Cervantes, 464

Chamberlain, Mr. Joseph, 231, 232

Charlemagne, 319

Charles II., criminal law in his day 241

Charlotte, Princess, 21

Chenery, Thomas, Editor of the 'Times,' 85

Chillingworth, William, 186

Chitty, Mr. Justice, 85

'Christian Observer,' 127-130, 149

Christie, W. D., 100n

Church Missionary Society, 33, 35

'Clapham Sect,' the, 24n, 32-35, 55-57, 83, 84, 127

Clark, Sir Andrew, 435, 436, 477, 478

Clarke, Mrs. See Stephen, Mr. James

Cleasby, Baron, 402, 403

Clifford, Professor W. K., 361

Clifton v. Ridsdale, 384

Club 'The,' 385

Cobden, Richard, 107, 160

Cockburn, Sir Alexander, Lord Chief Justice, his charge regarding the alleged murder of Gordon, 229; and the Homicide Bill, 353; on the Criminal Code Bill, 381

Cockerell, Mr., 246n, 254

Codification, in India, 233, 249, 303, 392, 393, 418; in England, 302, 305, 340, 341, 347, 351-358, 379-381, 388, 389, 392, 393

Colenso, Bishop, 219

Coleridge, Mr. Arthur, 77, 78, 80, 85, 139-141

Coleridge, Herbert, 82, 85

Coleridge, Lord, Chief Justice, 165, 303, 305, 306, 340, 341, 343, 351, 352, 377, 389, 477, 478

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, 58, 84, 105, 168, 221, 368

Colonial Department and Office, 32, 42-45

Colquhoun's 'Wilberforce' cited, 24n

Comte, Auguste, 375

Congreve, Mr., 161

'Contemporary Review,' the, 350n, 365, 422n, 485

Contracts, Sir J. F. Stephen and the law of, 276-278, 355, 376

Conybeare and Philips, their work on Geology, cited, 4n

Cook, John Douglas, 148, 149, 150, 153

Copyright Commission, the, 402

'Cornhill Magazine,' the, 139n, 175, 177, 178, 182-184, 208n, 212, 214, 223, 484, 485

Cornish, Mr., Vice-Provost of Eton, 469n, 471

Cosmopolitan Club, the, 385, 386

Courts-Martial, Sir J. F. Stephen on, 208

Cowie, Mr., Advocate-General, 261

Cowper, the poet, 34, 40

Cremation, 450

Criminal Law, 149; 'General View' of, 203-212, 412, 413, 463, 483, 484; 'Digest' of, 375-377, 412, 463, 483; the Criminal Code, 380, 381, 402, 418; 'History' of, 410-428, 463, 483; Court of Criminal Appeal, 463

Croker, John Wilson, 21

Cumming, Dr., and the 'Saturday Review,' 154

Cunningham, Sir Henry Stewart, 130, 234, 235, 237, 245, 246n, 249, 275n, 295, 298, 304, 305

Cunningham, Rev. J. W., 128-130

Curzon, Hon. George, 470

Cust, Mr. Robert, 257

Dalgairns, Father, 361

Dalhousie, Lord, 399

Dante, 464, 465

Darwinism, 374, 375, 456

Davies, Rev. J. Llewelyn, 99, 106, 125, 126, 132

Delhi, 237, 245; the great Durbar at (1877), 398

De Maistre, 226, 330

Denison, Archdeacon, 351

Derby, Earl of (Edward Geoffrey), 47, 48, 53

Derby, Earl of (Edward Henry), 102

Descartes, 363

De Vere, Aubrey, 59

Dicey, Professor Albert Venn, Mr. Edward, Mr. Frank, and Mr. Henry, 31

Dicey, Mr. Thomas Edward, 29-31, 76, 85, 120

Dickens, Charles, 155, 156, 158, 160, 180, 345

Dickens, Mr., Q.C., 439

Dove, trial of, 146

Dowden, Professor, 55n

Dromquina, Ireland, 235, 236, 405, 406

Dudley, Sir Henry Bate ('Parson' Bate), 14

Duff, James Grant, 171

Duff, Sir Mountstuart Elphinstone Grant, and Lady, 119, 120, 139, 140, 171, 190, 235, 303, 451, 466n

Dundee, candidature for, 343-348, 352

'Ecce Homo,' review of, 200, 221

Ecclesiastical cases, 381-386

Edinburgh, Duke of (Prince Alfred), 245

'Edinburgh Review,' the, 55, 150, 153, 160, 162, 163, 172n, 175, 204, 205, 484

Education Commission (1859), 165-167, 172, 203

Egerton, Lady, 130, 234, 245, 403, 404, 435

Egerton, Sir Robert, 400

Eldon, Earl of, 247

Elliot, Gilbert (Earl Minto), 433

Elliott, Miss Charlotte, 72, 73

Elliott, E. B., 154

Elliott, Rev. Henry Venn, 72, 73

Ellis, Mr. Leslie, 93, 97

Erie, Lord Chief Justice, 442

'Essays and Reviews,' 184, 219, 369

'Essays by a Barrister,' 170n, 172n, 177; character of its contents, 178-182, 412

Estlin, John Prior, 31

Eton, 76-86, 469-472

'Etonian,' the, 470

Evidence, Digest of the Law of, 483

Evidence Act (India) and Bill (England), 277, 278, 291, 305, 306, 341

Extradition Commission, the, 402

Eyre, Governor, 227-230, 296

Fane, Julian, 102, 104

Farish, Professor William, 8n, 31, 36

Fawcett, Professor Henry, 222

Field, Lord, 118, 120, 212, 357

Fielding, Sir John, 7

Flowers, Mr. F., 138

Forbes, Miss Mary. See Stephen, Mr. William

Forster, the Rt. Hon. W. E., 167

'Fortnightly Review,' the, 246n, 340, 485

Francis, Sir Philip, 433

Francis, Miss Elizabeth, 40

Franqueville, M. de, 478

'Fraser's Magazine,' 163, 184, 188, 190, 194, 200, 202, 225, 226, 365, 485

Freeman, Professor E. A., 150, 351

Freshfield, Messrs., 27

Froude, James Anthony, 151n, 200, 201, 236, 238, 300, 302, 304, 385, 405, 446, 478

Fuller, Mr., 435

Galway, Ireland, 409

Garratt, Rev. Samuel, 30n

Garratt, Mr. W. A., 29, 30, 180

George III., criminal law in his day, 421

Gibbet Law of Halifax, 420

Gibbon, Edward, 226, 358, 359, 416

Gibbs, Mr. Frederick Waymouth, 42, 72, 82, 101, 346, 407

Giffard, Mr. Hardinge (afterwards Lord Halsbury), 229

Gisborne, Thomas, 18, 55

Gladstone, Mr., his work on Church and State, 219; Irish Church Act and Irish University Bill, 225, 341; connection with the Metaphysical Society, 361, 365, 366; recent Irish and Indian policies, 460, 461

Glenelg, Lord, 44

Goodhart, Professor, 470

Gordon, Adam Lindsay, 459

Gordon, Lady Duff (nee Austin), 60

Gordon, Lord George, 14

Gordon, hanged for his share in the Jamaica insurrection, 227-230

Gorham case, the, 109

Gower, Lord F. L., 68

Grace, Miss. See Stephen, Rev. William

Graham, Sir James, and the slave trade, 48n

Gray, the poet, 39; his 'Elegy,' 170

Great Grimsby Riots, 173

Green, T. H., 362

Greenwood, Mr. Frederick, editor of the 'Pall Mall Gazette 'and the 'St. James's Gazette,' 214-217, 300, 307, 460, 474

Greg, William Rathbone, 124, 212, 213

Greville, Charles, the diarist, 60

Grey, Earl. See Howick, Lord

Guest, Rev. B., 73-76

Gurney, Mr. Russell, recorder of London, 39, 73, 129, 228, 300, 304, 305, 341, 353, 389, 402

Haileybury, Sir J. Stephen at, 91

Hallam, the historian, 182, 414

Hallam, Henry Fitzmaurice, 100, 102

Hamilton, the logician, anecdote concerning, 103

Hamilton, Sir William, introduces German philosophy into England, 105; Mill's examination of his philosophy, 182, 183

Hampden, Bishop, 186

Hannen, Mr. (afterwards Lord), counsel for General Nelson and Lieut. Brand, 229

Harcourt, Sir William (4 Historicus'), contemporary of Sir J. F. Stephen at Cambridge, 99,102, 106; connection with the 'Saturday Review,' 150, 213, 302, 395, 445

Harrison, Mr. Frederic, his controversies with Sir J. F. Stephen and connection with the Metaphysical Society, 213, 339, 340, 361, 371, 454

Harwich, candidature for, 222, 344

Hastings, Warren, Sir J. F. Stephen's interest in the study of his works and impeachment, 233, 395, 398, 399, 429; character of Lord Macaulay's article on, 430-434

Hazlitt, as an essayist, 178

Helps, Sir Arthur, an 'Apostle' at Cambridge, 100; as an essayist, 178

Henry, Sir Thomas, 229

Hey, Rev. John, 35

Hick, Mr., M.P., 232

Higgins, Matthew James ('Jacob Omnium'), his connection with the 'Pall Mall Gazette,' 212

Hildebrand, Sir J. Stephen on, 56

Hill, Rowland, and the Post Office, 159

Himalayas, the, Sir J. F. Stephen's description of, 245

Hindoo laws, remarriage of widows legalised, 260; alterations in the oaths and wills enactments, 277. See also India

'Historicus.' See Harcourt, Sir William

'History 'of the criminal law. See Criminal law

Hobbes, Thomas, the study of his philosophy by Sir J. F. Stephen and its influence on his character, 116, 141, 220, 308, 317, 320, 330, 442, 455

Hobhouse, Lord, 304, 392

Hodson, Archdeacon, 24; Indian reminiscences of Hodson of Hodson's Horse, 245

Holker, Sir John, 380

Holland, Canon, 102

Holland House, society gatherings at, 60

Home Rule, Sir J. F. Stephen's objections to, 460-462

Homer, study of, 358

Homicide Bill, 304, 340, 353, 379

Hooghly, its aspect during State ceremonial after Lord Mayo's murder, 293, 294

Hooker, 186, 226

'Horae Sabbaticae,' 225, 226, 479, 484

Hort, Professor, 102, 149

Howick, Lord (afterwards Earl Grey), and the slave trade, 47

Hughes, Tom (Judge), his 'Tom Brown's School Days,' 95; mission work in the East End, 126

Hughes v. Edwards, 384

Hume, David, 58

Hunter, Sir W. W., his 'Life of the Earl of Mayo,' 246n, 48, 282-290, 342

Hutton, Mr. R. H., 360, 361

Huxley, Professor, 361, 371

Hyde Park Riots, the, 224

Ilbert, Sir C. P., on Sir J. F. Stephen's legislative work in India, 246n, 279, 280, 378; advocates the collection of antiquarian laws, 379; his 'Indian' Bill proposals criticised by Sir J. F. Stephen, 461

Impey, Sir Elijah, Sir J. F. Stephen's work on his 'Trial of Nuncomar,' 353, 429, 484; injustice of Lord Macaulay's treatment of Impey, 432

India, Sir J. F. Stephen on James Grant Duff's administration of, 171; on British rule in, 223, 459; legal codes in, 225; Sir J. F. Stephen's interest in, 233; his appointment as Member of Council, 235; account of his duties and of the Indian Civil Servants, 242, 243; personal experiences there, 244-246; the India Company and the passage of the Penal Code, 247-249; constitution of the Legislative Council, 249; the executive, 249; the legislative department and its functions, 249; the committee, 250, 269, 270; process of preparing legislative measures, 250, 251; the Indian and English systems compared, 251, 252; varied character of its regulations, laws, and executive orders, and consequent irregularities, 252-254; British administration of the Punjab and the introduction of Codes, 255-259; the difficulties of our position in India, 259; enumeration of legislative reforms in India, 259-278; criticisms and appreciations of Sir J. F. Stephen's work in India, 278-282; summary of Sir J. F. Stephen's views on the principles of Indian legislation, 282-289; his Minute on the administration of justice in India, 289-291; the murder of Lord Mayo in, 291-296; riot and excesses of Kookas sect, 296, 297; Roman analogy of British rule, 297; Sir J. F. Stephen's last days in, 297; educational value of India to him, 299; his codification of the law in, 303; Evidence Act, 305; legislation in, compared with England, 304; contemplated work on, 353; his Acts relating to consolidation, 354, 355, 376, 377; correspondence with Lord Lytton concerning Indian affairs, 389-393, 398; controversy with John Bright, Lord Lawrence, and other statesmen on Indian policy, 394-397; proclamation of Queen Victoria as Empress of, 398; proposed moral text-book for India, 399; Sir J. F. Stephen's study of Parliamentary Papers concerning, 429; his views on the 'Ilbert Bill,' 460, 461; work in, 480. See also Punjab

Indian Law Commission, its share in Indian law reform, 248, 249, 260, 266, 268, 271, 276

Indian Mutiny, the, Sir J. F. Stephen's article on, 161; and legislation in India, 248

Inns of Court, Sir J. F. Stephen Professor of Common Law at, 377

Insanity and crime, 425, 426

Institut de France, Sir J. F. Stephen elected a corresponding member of, 478

International law, Austinian theory regarding, 396

Ipswich, Sir J. F. Stephen's residence and death at, 479

Ireland, Sir J. F. Stephen in, 235, 236, 405-409, 412, 477-479. See also Home Rule

Irish Church, the, 224, 225

Irish University Bill, the, defeat of, 341

Italian, study of, 298, 299, 435, 464

Jackson, Rev. William, 5; letter on James Stephen, 7

Jacob, General, his 'Progress of Being,' Sir J. F. Stephen's review of, 375

Jacob Omnium. See Higgins, Matthew James

Jamaica, slave insurrection in (1831), 47; revolt in (1865), and its suppression, 227-231

James, Mr. Edward, Q.C., 228

James, Sir Henry, appointed Solicitor-General, 351

Jeffrey, Lord, his conduct of the 'Edinburgh Review,' 162

Jeffreys, Judge, 419, 420

Jelf, Dr., the theologian, 88

Jenkins, Mr. Edward, author of 'Ginx's Baby,' and the Dundee election, 345-349, 352

Jenkins v. Cook, 383

Jerrold, Douglas, 155

Jessel, Sir George, Solicitor-General, 343

Jeune, Sir Francis, 382, 384

Johnson, Dr., and Sir J. F. Stephen: a comparison, 131, 133; character of his essays, 178

Jowett, Rev. H., tutor of Sir J. Stephen, 31; and of the Rev. J. W. Cunningham, 129

Jowett, Professor Joseph, an Evangelical, 31

Jowett, Professor William, his writings on theology, 184, 185

Judicature Act (1873), the, 343

Jungfrau, ascent of the, 96

Junius' letters, 5, 6

Jurisprudence, Sir J. F. Stephen on, 204, 206

Jury, the history of trial by, 419

Justinian's 'Institutes,' 152

Kane, E. K., 167

Kant, 311, 333

Kelly, Chief Baron, 342, 351

Kelvin, Lord, 93

Kenilworth Castle, 303

Kenmare river, the, Ireland, 236, 405

Kensington, the Stephens at, 22, 66, 235

Kent, Chancellor, on Serjeant Stephen's first book, 26

Killmakalogue Harbour, 405

King, Miss Catherine. See Venn, Rev. John

King's College, London, 86, 87

Kingsley, Charles, 180

Kitchin, Dean, 87, 109

Knight, Rev. William, his work on the Rev. Henry Venn, D.D., 37

Knowles, Mr. James, 360, 365

Kooka sect, their religious fanaticisms and barbarities, 296

Lahore, 237

Lake, Dean, Education Commissioner (1858), 165

Lamb, Charles, as an essayist, 178

Lansdowne, Lord, his house in Ireland, 405

'Lapsus Calami,' James Kenneth Stephen's, 476

Lardner, his work on 'Gospel History' 124

Las Casas, and his account of Napoleon at St. Helena, 359, 360

Law, William, effect of his 'Serious Call' on Rev. Richard Venn, 34

Law, definition of, 317, 320; considered in relation to Mill's theory, 322-324; its connection with morality, 423-428

'Law Magazine,' the, 149

'Law Quarterly Review,' Sir C. P. Ilbert's article in, on Sir J. F. Stephen, 246n

Lawrence, Henry, assists in the administration of the Punjab, 255

Lawrence, John (Lord), his legislative reforms in India and administration of the Punjab, 253, 255, 285; journalistic encounters and friendship with Sir J. F. Stephen, 395, 396; text of Dean Stanley's sermon on, 468

Lecky, W. E. H., his 'Rationalism,' 200

Lewis, Sir George Cornewall, 244; his 'Authority 'discussed, 366

'Liberty, Equality, Fraternity,' 170, 483; account of its inception, character of the work, 306-340, 428, 459; effect on the Dundee election, 345

'Liberty of the Savoy,' 420

Lightfoot, Dr., 97, 98

Lilburne, John, 420

Lincoln, General, 319

Lipski, the murderer, 446, 447

Literary Society, the, 385

Liveing, Dr. Robert, 23

Liverpool, invitation to contest, 340

Locke, 104, 105, 363

'London Review,' the, 177

Louis Philippe, 108

Lowe, Mr. Robert (Lord Sherbrooke), on public-school life at Winchester, 80; and the Revised Educational Code, 167; and the Evidence Bill, 306

Lowry, Mr., of Eton, 469n, 470n

Loyola, Ignatius, Sir J. Stephen on, 56, 57

Lush, Mr. Justice, his trial of the Tichborne case, 342; Criminal Law Commissioner, 378

Lushington, Mr. Franklin, 137-139, 143, 144, 229

Luther, Sir J. Stephen on, 56

Luttrell, 471

Lyall, Sir Alfred, his works and character, 353, 400, 458

Lyndhurst, Lord, and Serjeant Stephen, 27

Lytton, Earl of, Governor-General of India, his correspondence and friendship with Sir J. F. Stephen, 333, 349, 384, 386, 390, 391, 404, 411, 451, 456; characteristics of, 387-390; confidential nature of their correspondence, 391; Sir J. F. Stephen on Lord Lytton's Indian policy, 391-401, 403; Ambassador at Paris, 451; his death, 477

Macaulay, Kenneth, leader of the Midland Circuit, 136, 140, 173, 176; godfather of James Kenneth Stephen, 469

Macaulay, Thomas Babington (Lord), as a writer compared with Sir J. Stephen, 54, 55; on the meetings at Holland House, 60; his patriotism, 161; his literary style, 162, 163, 417; Sir J. F. Stephen's obituary notice of, 182; on Church and State, 219; impression of his Indian essays on Sir J. F. Stephen, 233; advised Sir J. Stephen to accept Indian appointment, 235; his share in preparing the Indian Code, 247, 248; personal claims of Impey on Macaulay, 429; character of his essay on Hastings, 430; Macaulay's imaginative process contrasted with Sir J. F. Stephen's judicial method, 430-432; examples of the former's audacious rhetoric, 432, 433; effect of Sir J. F. Stephen's regard for Macaulay on his criticisms, 433, 434

Macaulay, Zachary, his share in the suppression of slavery, 17, 28, 47; as a philanthropist, 309

Mackintosh, 60

'Macmillan's Magazine,' 177

Madras, its administrative regulations anterior to 1834, 252; the famine in, 392

Maine, Sir Henry Sumner, his career at Cambridge and his friendship with Sir J. F. Stephen, 93, 101, 102, 104, 110, 111, 153, 300, 385; his journalistic work on the 'Morning Chronicle,' 'Cambridge Essays,' 'Saturday Review,' and 'St. James's Gazette,' 148-150, 460; Stephen's review and criticisms of his 'Ancient Law,' 205, 413, 417; his work as legal member of the Council of India, 233, 234, 249, 250, 253, 261-263, 267; revises Stephen's draft scheme for consolidating the Acts relating to India, 355; Stephen's and Maine's interest in Indian matters, 376, 392, 400; his death, and biographical notice by Stephen, 466, 467; the latter appoints Maine's son clerk of assize, 467, 475

Maitland, Professor, on Sir J. F. Stephen's writings, 415, 416, 431

Manchester School, the, 225, 310, 394

Manning, Cardinal, 200, 365, 366, 369, 371, 373

Mansel, Dean, introduces German philosophy into England, 105; Sir J. F. Stephen on his 'Metaphysics,' 182

Mansel, Mr., assists Lord Lawrence in the administration of the Punjab, 255

Mansfield, Lord, his relations with James Stephen, 5-7

'Maria,' 12, 13, 15

Marriage, Mill's theories concerning, 329, 330

Martial Law, Sir J. F. Stephen on, 229

Martineau, Dr., his connection with the Metaphysical Society, 361

Martyn, Henry, 57

Matthews, Mr. Henry, Home Secretary, and the Lipski trial, 446, 447

Maule, Mr., member of the Jamaica Commission, 228

Maurice, Professor F. D., of King's College, London, his influence on Sir J. F. Stephen, 88, 116, 124, 127; formerly an 'Apostle' at Cambridge, 100; his influence at Cambridge, 105; his style of preaching, 124, 125

Mauritius, the, Sir George Stephen and the slave trade in, 28

Max Mueller, Professor, his 'Science of Thought' reviewed by Sir J. F. Stephen, 455

Maxwell, Clerk, an 'Apostle' at Cambridge, 102; anecdote concerning, 103

Maybrick, Mrs., her trial, 447

Mayo, Earl of, Sir J. F. Stephen's contribution to his life, 246n, 248, 282-290, 342; his hunting parties in India, 245; Sir J. F. Stephen on his character and work in India 291; account of his murder, 291; and the State ceremonial in Calcutta, 291-295; incident connected with the trial of his murderer, 292, 293; legislative work in India, 305

Melbourne, Lord, on Sir J. Stephen at the Colonial Office, 49

Merivale, Charles, an 'Apostle' at Cambridge, 100

Merivale, Mr. Herman, and the consolidation of Acts relating to India, 354

Metaphysical Society, the, its inception, 360; its first members, 361; Sir J. F. Stephen's connection with and contributions to, 361-375

Metaphysics, Sir J. F. Stephen and, 104, 114

Miall, Edward, Education Commissioner (1858), 165

Middleton, Conyers, his quarrel with the Rev. Richard Venn, 33, 34

Mill, James, his influence at Cambridge, 123; his advocacy of Codification, 246, 247; his share in the suppression of slavery, 309; as a political economist, 311; allusion to, 233; the effect of his writings on Macaulay, 433; Mill on Criminal Law, 424

Mill, John Stuart, Sir James Stephen's acquaintance with, 60, 76; on hell and God, 74; Sir J. F. Stephen on his 'Political Economy,' 104; influence at Cambridge, 105, 123; and on Sir J. F. Stephen, 124, 182, 183, 193, 202, 205, 206, 275; Chairman of the Jamaica Committee, 228-230; estrangement from Sir J. F. Stephen, 230, 231; his theories concerning liberty, 299, 308-340; his controversy with W. G. Ward, 367; his indifference to evolution theories, 375

Millar, Mr. A. H., his account of the Dundee election, 344n

Milner, Miss Sibella. See Stephen, Mr. James

Milner, Mr., of Poole, his kindness to James Stephen, 3

Milner, Mr. George, 11, 13

Milner, Mr. Isaac, Evangelical leader at Cambridge, 31, 35, 36

Milner, Mr. Joseph, educates Rev. John Venn, 35

Milner, Mr. William, merchant, his bankruptcy, 3; marries Miss Elizabeth Stephen, 8n

Milnes, Monckton, an 'Apostle' at Cambridge, 100, 102

Milton, John, 103, 359, 465

Missionaries in India, 299

Mister, hanged for attempted murder 77

Mivart, Mr. St. George, 455

Mohammedanism, 459

Moltke, Field-Marshal von, 319

Monteagle, Lord, on Sir J. Stephen as a talker, 53

Moody and Sankey, James Kenneth Stephen's 'constitutional' opposition to, 471

More, Sir Thomas, 420

Morison, Miss Mary. See Stephen, Serjeant

Morison, Mr. William Maxwell, 8n

Morley, Mr. John, connection with the 'Saturday Review,' 150; invites Sir F. J. Stephen to write 'Carlyle' for his series, 203; replies to Stephen's criticisms of Mill, 339, 340

'Morning Chronicle,' the, 148-150

'Morning Herald,' the, 14

'Morning Post,' the, Master James Stephen's connection with, 14

Morton, Mr., village postmaster at Ravensdale, 407

Mourne Mountains, 406

Mozley, Rev. T., 49n

Munro, Professor, 93

Murder, curious punishment for, anterior to 1487, 421

Napier, Macvey, his 'Correspondence' cited, 55n, 88

Napoleon, Sir F. J. Stephen on his captivity, 359, 360

'National Review,' the, 163, 484

Navigation Act, its provisions enforced by Nelson, 16

Nazim, Nawab, 254

Nelson, General, his share in the execution of Gordon, 227-230

Nelson, Horatio, captain of the 'Boreas,' enforces Navigation Act, 16

Nettlefold and Chamberlain arbitration case, 231, 232

Newark, Sir J. F. Stephen, Recorder of, 169, 236

Newcastle, Duke of, his interest in J. D. Cook, 150, 165; chairman of Royal Commission on Education (1858), 165

Newman, Cardinal, review of his 'Apologia' by Sir J. F. Stephen, 175, 190, 192; their acquaintance and discussions on theology, 190-200, 366; Newman's ascetic and monastic views, 219, 338; his 'Grammar of Assent,' 365

Newman's Rooms, Oxford, 105

Newton, John, 34

'Nineteenth Century,' the, its account of the Metaphysical Society, 360; contributions to, 365, 366, 379, 381, 427n, 454, 455, 478, 486

North, Christopher, wrestling bout with Ritson, 95

'Northampton Mercury,' the, 30

Northbrook, Lord, 395

North-Western Provinces (India), executive orders for, 252, 254

Novels, 109, 114, 123, 345, 484

Nuccoll, Mrs., daughter of Mr. James Stephen, 2

'Nuncomar and Impey,' Sir J. F. Stephen's book on, 428-434, 484

O'Connell, Daniel, the Agitator, 28, 82

Old Bailey, professional experiences at the, 302, 303

Orange, Prince of, 21

Ordnance Department Commission, Sir J. F. Stephen chairman of, 462, 463

Oudh, executive orders applicable to, 253

Oxford, Newman's meetings at, 105

'Oxford Essays,' 149

Oxford movement, Sir J. Stephen and the, 57, 58

Oxford University confers the D.C.L. degree on Sir J. F. Stephen, 402

Paine, Thos., his 'Age of Reason,' Sir J. F. Stephen's impressions concerning, 84; allusion to, 125; and the 'Rights of Man,' 311

Paley, William, his Utilitarian tendencies, 35; Sir J. F. Stephen on his writings and teachings, 105, 124, 126, 193, 226, 368

'Pall Mall Gazette,' the, Sir J. F. Stephen's connection with, and other particulars concerning, 169, 198n, 212-227, 232, 241, 299, 306, 307, 340, 351, 381

Palmer, trial of, 146, 156

Palmerston, Lord, article on his death, 216-219; effect of his death on parties, 222

Pantheism, Newman and, 192

Parke, Baron, 442

Parker, Theodore, 194, 195

Parknasilla, residence at, 405

Parliamentary Government, Sir J. F. Stephen on, 320, 350, 351

Pascal, 226

Pattison, Mark, on the meetings in Newman's Rooms at Oxford, 105; his connection with the 'Saturday Review,' 150; his share in the Education Commission (1858), 165; his connection with the Metaphysical Society, 361

Peacock, Sir Barnes, Chief Justice of Calcutta, 235; his share in Indian law reforms, 248, 267

Pearson, Charles Henry, 120

Peel, Sir Robert, connection of his followers with the 'Morning Chronicle,' 148; his reform of the criminal law, 247

Pember, Mr., 467, 468

Perceval, Mr. Spencer, his Orders in Council, 19; murdered, 20

Perry, Sir Erskine, and consolidation of Acts relating to India, 355

'Peter Simple,' 168

'Pilgrim's Progress,' the, 69

Pitt, Wilberforce's antagonism toward, 18

Place, Francis, and Zachary Macaulay, 309

Plato, 97, 358, 363

Politics, Sir J. F. Stephen's views on and interest in, 104, 106-109, 113, 160, 161, 222-225, 453, 456, 460-462

Pollock, Chief Baron, description of, 140; appoints Stephen revising barrister, 173; arbitrator in the Nettlefold and Chamberlain case, 232

Pollock, Sir Frederick, on Sir J. F. Stephen's 'History of the Criminal Law,' 418

Pontius Pilate, 326

Poole, James Stephen's enterprise at, 4

Pope, 34, 400

Popish plots, Sir J. F. Stephen's account of, 420

Positivism, Sir. J. F. Stephen's views on, 161, 335-339, 374, 454

Price and the 'Rights of Man,' 311

Price, William, the 'Druid,' 450

Prize Appeal Court of the Privy Council, the, James Stephen's connection with, 17

Protestantism, Newman on, 193; and Rationalism, 309, 310

'Public Advertiser,' the, James Stephen's contributions to, 5

Public Schools Commission, the, 81

Punishment considered in its relation to revenge, 161, 162; and to Mill's theory, 322, 323

Punjab, executive orders applicable to the, 253; administration of the province by Lord Lawrence, 255, 285; its 'Civil Code,' 255; regulations relating to the Punjab consolidated, 256; Land Revenue Act, 256-258, 277; Criminal Tribes Act and measure repressing kidnapping of children, 258, 259, 283

Purbeck Island, James Stephen shipwrecked on, 2

Purgatory, the doctrine of, 372

Puritanism, Sir J. F. Stephen and, 309, 336, 368

'Quo Musa Tendis,' James Kenneth Stephen's, 476

Raleigh, allusion to, 420

Rapin's History, Master James Stephen's early acquaintance with, 9

Rationalism, Sir J. Stephen and, 56; its exponents combine with Protestants against Sacerdotalism, 309; Sir J. F. Stephen and, 371

Ravenscroft, Miss. See Stephen, Sir George

Reade, Charles, Sir J. F. Stephen on his 'Never Too Late to Mend,' 158

'Reasoner,' the, attacked by the 'Saturday Review,' 155

'Record,' the, criticised by the 'Saturday Review,' 155

'Reflector,' the, James Kenneth Stephen's paper, 474, 475

Reform Bill of 1832, Sir J. F. Stephen on the, 224, 247

Renan, his writings, 369, 422

Ricardo as a political economist, 205, 311, 312

Richardson, Mr. Joseph, of the 'Morning Post,' 14

Ritson, the wrestler, 95

Roberts's 'Hannah More,' 24n

Robespierre, Sir J. F. Stephen's reflections on, 180

Robinson, Crabb, on James Stephen, 33

'Robinson Crusoe,' 69, 155, 156

Rogers, Rev. William, on the Education Commission (1858), 165-167

Roman Catholicism, Sir George Stephen and, 29; Sir J. Stephen and, 56-58; Sir J. F. Stephen and, 191, 194, 219-222, 366-368, 372, 373, 455

Roman rule in Syria, an analogy, 297; in Palestine, 326

Romilly, Lord, and Sir J. Stephen, 22; his efforts to reform the criminal law, 247; retires from Mastership of the Rolls, 343

'Rotuli Parliamentorum,' 414

Roy, Ram Mohun, founder of the Brahmos sect, 260

Rugby School, visit to, 76; contrasted with Eton, 81

Rundle, Rev. Thomas, and the Rev. Richard Venn, 34

Ruskin, Mr. John, an expositor of Carlyle's socialistic theories, 202; his connection with the Metaphysical Society, 361

Russell, Lord Arthur, 386

'Russell on Crimes,' 376

Russia, Bentham and codification in, 246; and the Eastern Question, 394, 395

Ryan, Sir Edward, his position in the Privy Council, 89n

St. Christopher's, West Indies, members of the Stephen family at, 2, 11, 14, 16, 17

'St. James's Gazette,' the, particulars concerning, 457n, 460, 474

Sainte-Beuve, the writings of, 226, 298

Salisbury, Sir J. F. Stephen at, 343

Salisbury, Marquis of, 354, 355, 392, 401

Sandars, Thomas Collett, 152, 178, 197

'Sandford and Merton,' 72

'Saturday Review,' the, Sir J. F. Stephen's connection with, 96, 147, 148, 152-165, 167, 375, 466, 468; its first editor, 149, 150, 165; some of its noted contributors, 150-152; characteristics of the journal, 150, 153, 154; its arraignment of popular idols and contemporary journals, 154-157, 160-162; secession from, 177; character of its 'Middles,' 178

Savigny, John Austin and, 356

Schiller, 68

Scott, Dr., at Cambridge, 94

Scott, Sir Walter, 40; his works quoted, 142, 319, 326; literary character of his 'History,' 417

Scroggs, Sir William, 419, 420

Seditious libels, 84, 423

Seeley, Professor, and his 'Ecce Homo,' 200, 221

Selborne, Lord, 343; his connection with the Metaphysical Society, 361

Selden Society, the, its objects, 379

Senior, Nassau, friendship with Sir J. Stephen, 60; Education Commissioner (1858), 165-167

Sermon on the Mount, the, 126, 132, 213n

Shakespeare's 'Henry the Fifth,' 68

Sharpe, Granville, Sir J. Stephen's acquaintance with, 55

Shelley, views on his essays, 103

Sherbrooke, Lord. See Lowe, Mr. Robert

Sheridan, Richard Brinsley, 21, 433

Sheridan, Mr., innkeeper at Achill, 409

Sidgwick, Professor, on Sir J. F. Stephen and the 'Apostles,' 103; his connection with the Metaphysical Society, 361, 362

Simeon, Rev. Charles, founder of the 'Sims,' 35, 128

Simla, Sir J. F. Stephen at, 237, 240, 243, 245, 304

Singh, Ram, of the Kookas sect, 296, 297, 326

Slave trade, the Stephen family and the 2, 15-17, 28, 46, 47, 402

Smart, Christopher, the crazy poet, 4, 5, 9

Smith, Adam, his political economy, 205

Smith, Mr. Bullen, his share in the Indian Contract Act, 276

Smith, Mr. George, Sir J. F. Stephen's connection with, 178, 183, 212, 213

Smith, Mr. Goldwin, connection with the 'Saturday Review,' 150; Education Commissioner (1858), 165

Smith, Henry John Stephen (mathematician), 120, 185; memoir, 120n; estimate of his character and powers, 121; Stephen's account of their relations, 122

Smith, Mr. Reginald J., 469n, 474

Smith, Sydney, and the 'Clapham Sect,' 55n; as a clergyman, 118; and the Church of England, 471

Smith, Mr. W. H., appoints Sir. J. F. Stephen chairman of Ordnance Commission, 462, 463

Smith, Elder & Co., Messrs., publishers of the 'Cornhill Magazine,' 177

Smyth, Professor William, death of, 89

Sneem Harbour, 405

Snow, Captain Parker, arctic explorer, 167, 168, 173

'Social Science Association,' the, Sir J. F. Stephen's address to, 246n

Socialism, Sir J. F. Stephen and, 104, 312, 462

Socinianism, Newman and, 192

Sortaine, Mr., anti-papist, 75

Southey, Robert, his literary labours, 163

Spain, Bentham and codification in, 246

Spanish, Sir J. F. Stephen's study of the language, 435, 464

Spanish Inquisition, 325, 326, 422

Spedding, James, friendship with Sir J. Stephen, 59; and J. F. Stephen, 97; an 'Apostle' at Cambridge, 100, 102

Spencer, Mr. Herbert, 311, 453, 454

Spiritual Courts, history of the, 422

Spring Rice, Mr. Cecil, and the 'Etonian,' 470

Stafford election petition, 235

Stanley, Dean, 185; his sermon on Lord Lawrence, 468

Star Chamber, the, 420

State trials, 146, 156, 379, 417

Staubbach, the, 42

Steele, Sir Richard, his quarrel with Addison, 430

Stent, Mr., Mrs., Miss Anne and Thomas, 9, 12, 13. See also Stephen, Mr. James

Stephen, Mr. Alexander, 2

Stephen, Sir Alexander Condie, K.C.M.G., 1n

Stephen, Sir Alfred, 24, 25; his pamphlets, 24n; descendants, 25

Stephen, Miss Anne Mary. See Dicey, Mr. Thomas

Stephen, Miss Caroline Emelia, 65n, 66

Stephen, Miss Elizabeth. See Milner, Mr. William

Stephen, Miss Frances Wilberforce, 42, 65

Stephen, Sir George, 'Life' of his father James Stephen, 24n; characteristics of, 27; his career and writings, 28, 29, 113; marries Miss Ravenscroft, 29n; his children, 29n; his death, 29

Stephen, Miss Hannah. See Farish, Professor William

Stephen, Henry John, S. L., his life, writings, and family, 26, 27, 120, 122

Stephen Sir Herbert, 'Note' on Sir J. F. Stephen's life in Ireland, 405-409

Stephen, Mr. Herbert Venn, his birth, 42, 65; his army experiences, 38; discussions and relations with J. F. Stephen, 83; tour to Constantinople and death at Dresden, 88

Stephen, Mr. James, of Ardenbraught, 1n

Stephen, Mr. James, tenant farmer, and family, 1

Stephen, Mr. James, writer on imprisonment for debt, 2; early history, 2; adventures on Purbeck Island, 2, 3; marriage to Miss Sibella Milner, 3, 5, 6; commercial failure, 3; manager of Sir John Webbe's estate, 4; imprisoned in King's Bench prison for debt, 4; efforts to prove illegality of imprisonment, 4; consequent popularity among fellow-prisoners, 4, 5; arguments and writings on the subject, 5, 6; removed to the 'New Jail,' 5, 6; 'Blarney' Thompson's portrait of, 6; release of Stephen from prison, 6; connection with the legal profession, 6-8; his family, death of his wife, 8; his death, 8

Stephen, Mr. James, Master in Chancery, at King's Bench Prison, 5, 9; education and early training, 8, 9; his relations with the Stents, 9-12; chequered career, 10; studies law at Aberdeen, 11; legal business in London, 11; his love affairs, 12-15; life as a journalist, 14; called to the Bar, 14; practice at St. Christopher's, 14; marriage to Miss Stent, 15; character, 15; speech against slavery, 15; attends trial of slaves for murder at Barbadoes, 16; prosecutes planter for ill-treating negro children, 16; flourishing law practice at St. Christopher's, 16, 17; returns to England, 17; employment in the Cockpit, 17; joins Wilberforce in his anti-slavery crusade, 17; death of his first wife, 17; second marriage, to Mrs. Clarke, 17; her eccentricities, 18; relations with Wilberforce, 18; his pamphlet on the slave trade, 18; his 'War in Disguise,' 19; the policy suggested therein adopted by the Government, 19; enters Parliament, 19, 20; Brougham's criticism of Stephen, 20; speech of Stephen in opposition to Benchers' petition, 20, 21; Parliamentary encounter with Whitbread, 21; resigns his seat as a protest against slackness of Government in suppressing the slave trade, 21, 22; Master in Chancery, 22, 32; death of his second wife, 22; town and country residences, 22, 23; his works on the slave trade, 22, 23, 32; example of his prowess, 23; his faith in the virtue of port wine, 23; death and burial, 23, 24; relatives, 24; authorities for his life, 24; his children, 25-33

Stephen, His Honour Judge, son of Serjeant Stephen, 27n

Stephen, Sir James, father of Sir James Fitzjames, 25; birth and early training, 31; the 'Clapham Sect,' 24n; college life, 31; official appointments, 32; character, 33; marriage to Miss Venn, 33, 130; influence of the Venns over, 36, 59; visit to the Continent, 41; birth of his eldest son, 42; illness, 42; Counsel to the Colonial Office and Board of Trade, 42; adopts F. W. Gibbs, 42; Sir F. J. Stephen's life of his father, 43; Sir James's 'Essays in Ecclesiastical Biography,' 43, 54; relations with Sir Henry Taylor, 43; duties and influence at the Colonial Office, 44-46; gluttony for work, 45, 50; nicknames, 46; interest in the suppression of slavery, 46, 48; appointed Assistant Under-Secretary, 48; resigns Board of Trade, 49; share in the establishment of responsible government in Canada, 49; sensitive and shy in disposition, 51, 52; tenacity of opinion, 52; perfection and richness of his conversational diction, 52-54; character of his essays and letters, 54, 55; religious creed and sympathies, 55-59; distinguished acquaintances and friends, 59, 60; distaste for general society and feasts, 60, 61; his ascetic temperament and systematic abstemiousness, 61; delight in family meetings, 61; evangelical character of his household, 61-63; as a father, 63, 64; physical and personal characteristics, 64; family, 65; talks with Fitzjames, 69, 75, 76, 82, 84, 89; concern for Fitzjames's health, 74-76; places his sons at Eton, 77, 78; anxiety concerning his son Herbert, 84; letter to Fitzjames, 85; effect of Herbert's death on, 88; illness and resignation of his post, 89; made a Privy Councillor and created K.C.B., 89; Regius Professor of Modern History at Cambridge, 89; delivery, reception and publication of his lectures, 89, 90; accepts professorship at Haileybury, 91; desires a clerical career for Fitzjames, 113, 118; and Fitzjames's views on theology, 124, 127, 128; Sir James satirised in 'Little Dorrit,' 159; his criticisms of Fitzjames's literary work, 162, 163; on the slavery of a journalistic career, 163, 164; suggestions to Fitzjames for a legal history, 164, 414; last days and death, 169, 170; inscription on his tombstone, 170

Stephen, Lady, birth, 36n; marriage, 33; personal characteristics, 39, 40; love of the poets, 40; devotion to her husband and children, 40; serenity of disposition, 40, 41; religious convictions, 41; her reminiscences of Switzerland, 42; her diary, 66, 67; Sir F. J. Stephen's letters to, from India, 238, 291-296; last years and death, 300, 301

Stephen, Sir James Fitzjames—Family History: James Stephen (great-grandfather), 1-8; Master James Stephen (grandfather) and his children, 9-33; the Venns, 33-41; Sir James Stephen (father), 41-65

Stephen, Sir James Fitzjames—Early Life: Birth, 65n, 66; material for his biography, 66, 67; examples of a retentive memory, 67, 68; infantile greeting to Wilberforce, 67; acquaintance with the poets and other standard works, 68, 69; precocious views on religion and moral conduct, 69-72; love for his father, their talks on theology and other subjects, 69, 71, 75, 76, 82, 84; home life and behaviour, 71, 72; school life at Brighton and the effect of an excess of Evangelical theology received there, 72-74, 76; visits Rugby, impression of Dr. Arnold, 76; at Eton, account of his public school life, 77-82; argument with Herbert Coleridge on the subject of Confirmation, 82; contempt for sentimental writers, 83; discussions with his brother Herbert on ethics, 83, 84; progress at Eton, his contemporaries and amusements, 84, 85; visit to the Beamonts, 85; leaves Eton, 86; enters King's College, London, 86; enters its debating society, 87; progress of his studies, 87; his opinion of Henry Venn, 87; and Dr. Jelf, 88; relations with F. D. Maurice, 88; death of his brother Herbert, 88; analysis of his character in his Cambridge days, 91, 92; dislike for mathematics and classics, 93, 94; Mr. Watson on his Cambridge career, 94, 95; distaste for athletics generally, 95; but fondness for walking as an exercise, 96; his Alpine ascents, 96; tutors and contemporaries at Cambridge, 97; his share in a scene during one of the debates, at the Union, 98, 99; encounters with Sir William Harcourt, 99, 106; connection with the Cambridge Conversazione Society, 100-108; themes supported by him whilst an 'Apostle,' 103-106; theological opinions at this period, 106; interest in contemporary politics, the French Revolution, 107-109; and the Gorham case, 109; visits Paris, 109; his affection for Cambridge and reasons for his failure there, 110-114; reading for the Bar, 114; autobiographical memoranda and criticisms dealing with the choice of a profession, 114-116; a clerical career suggested, 117; enters the Inner Temple, 118; early legal education and practice, 118, 119; introduction to journalism, 119; takes LL.B. degree, Lond., 119; relations with Grant Duff and Smith, 119-122; his readings of Stephen's Commentaries, Bentham, Greg, Lardner, and Paley, 123, 124; impressions of Maurice, 124, 125; recollections of his theology by Mr. Llewelyn Davies, 125, 126; the 'Christian Observer,' 127-129; autobiographical account of his courtship and marriage, 129, 130

Stephen, Sir James Fitzjames—The Bar and Journalism: Manifestation of moral and mental qualities described, 131, 132; his powerful affections and lasting attachments, 133; the positions of journalism and the law as affecting his career, 134-136; called to the Bar, 136; first brief, 136; joins the Midland Circuit, 136-138; his views on the English Bar, 139; contemporaries on Circuit, 139; on monastic life, 139, 140; at the Crown Court, 140; characteristics of judges with whom he had intercourse, 140; Mr. Justice Wills's recollections of Fitzjames, 141-144; method and manner as an advocate, 144, 145; distaste for professional technicalities, 145, 146; interest in criminal trials, 146; the Bacon case, 146-148, 173; work as a journalist, 148; contributes to the 'Morning Chronicle,' 'Christian Observer,' 'Law Magazine,' 149; 'Saturday Review,' 152-155; criticisms on novels and novelists, 155-161; opposition to the policy of the Manchester School, 160, 161; his views on theology and denunciation of Positivism, 161; doctrine of revenge and punishment, 161; Sir James Stephen on Fitzjames's literary work, 162-164; a legal history attempted and abandoned, 164, 165; work on the Education Commission (1858), 165-167; literary work and interest in Arctic adventure, 167; the case of Captain Parker Snow, 167, 168, 173; Recorder of Newark (1859), 169; last days and death of his father, 169-171; his essay on the Wealth of Nature, 170; appreciation of James Grant Duff, 171; death of John Austin and Lord Macaulay (1859), 172; enumerating his labours during this period, 172; progress at the bar, 173; complimented by Mr. Justice Willes, 173; revising barrister for North Derby, 173; presented with a red bag, 173; Circuit successes in 1862-3, 173; reflections and performances during this period, 174, 175; the two principal cases, 175; his defence of a murderer, 176; character of his literary work: 'Essays by a Barrister,' contributions to the 'London Review,' 'Cornhill Magazine,' and 'Fraser's,' 177-184; his conduct of Dr. Williams's trial, 184-187; his theological views at this time, 188-200; his acquaintance and discussion with Newman, 190-200; his articles in 'Fraser's Magazine' and intimacy with Froude, 200, 201; friendship with the Carlyles, 201-203; his General 'View of the Criminal Law,' 203; aim and scope of the work, 203, 204; fundamental agreement with Bentham and Austin, 204; his article on Jurisprudence and criticism of Maine, 204-206; comparison of the English and French criminal systems, 206-210; divergence from Bentham, 207, 208, 210, 211; appreciation of the English system, 211; favourable reception of the work, 211; Mr. Justice Willes and the Press on his works and his ability and eloquence as an advocate, 211, 212; connection with the 'Pall Mall Gazette,' 212; his contemporaries and antagonists on the journal, 212, 213; number of articles appearing in its columns, 213, 214; character of his productions and method of procedure, 214-216; his article on Palmerston as an example of his style, 217, 218; reflections on his characteristics as a journalist, 218, 219; breadth of theological views, 218-222; political convictions, his liberalism defined, 222-225; summary of his literary activity at this time (1865-1878), 225, 226; his literary tastes and aspirations, 226, 227; his share in the agitation against Governor Eyre, 227-230; estrangement from J. S. Mill, 230, 231; professional work: arbitration cases, Nettlefold & Chamberlain, 231, 232; takes silk in 1868, and acts as judge, 232; Counsel in election petition cases, 232, 233, 235; early and continued interest in India, 233; stimulated by presence of friends leads him to accept appointment, 234-236; short residence in Ireland previous to departure for India, 235, 236

Stephen, Sir James Fitzjames—Indian Appointment: length of his stay and details of his domestic experiences in India, 237, 238; as a letter-writer, 238; style of his correspondence, frankness, 239, 240; paternal affection, 240, 241; insatiable appetite for journalistic work, 241; personal account of his official duties, 242; his estimate of Indian Civil servants, 243; his description of life in Calcutta, 244; friendships formed, 245; personal nature of his Indian story, 241, 242; sources from which it has been culled, 246n; his official work in India, 246; his views on the Penal Code, 247; Fitzjames and the initiation and development of legislation in India, 249, 250; on the framing of a code, 250; nature of his task, 252; his Act consolidating the Bengal Criminal Law (1871), 254; the Punjab Civil Code, 255, 256; the Punjab Land Revenue Act (1871), 256-258, 277; the Criminal Tribes Act, 258, 259, 283; the Native Marriages Act (1872), 260-266, 277; his share in amending the Penal Code, 266, 267; interest in the law relating to Seditious Libels, 267; his share in amending the Code of Criminal Procedure, 268-270, 277; his views on the Penal Code and the Code of Criminal Procedure, 270, 278; his treatment of the Evidence Act, 271-275; his appreciation of the Limitation of Suits Act, 275, 276, 278; revision of the Contract Act, 276, 277; his Bills on Hindoo wills and oaths, 277; summary of the results of his official labours, 277, 278; Sir C. P. Ilbert and other critics on his legislation, 279; his intellectual fitness for the work, 279-282; the special principles of Indian legislation, 282; as expounded in Lord Mayo's 'Life,' 282-289; as given in his 'Minute on the Administration of British India,' 289-291; his account of Lord Mayo's work, his murder, State ceremonial, and trial of the murderer, 291-296; views on the prosecution and sentences of the Kookas sect, 296, 297; last attendance at Legislative Council, 297

Stephen, Sir James Fitzjames—Last Years at the Bar: Occupation during voyage to England, 298; article on 'May Meetings,' 299; educational value of Indian experience, 299; arrival in England and meetings with old friends, 300; death of his uncle Henry and close of his mother's life, 300, 301; return to professional career, 301; his hopes concerning codification, 302, 305, 306; position in intellectual society, 302; appearance at the Old Bailey, 302; goes on Circuit, 303; prepares Homicide and other Bills, and disgust at English legislative methods, 304-306; his 'Liberty, Equality, Fraternity,' an Apologia, 306-308; his differences with Mill's latter theories, 308-317; views on law and the necessity of coercion in all matters appertaining to morality, 317-337; views on God and a future life, 337-339; criticisms of the book, 339, 340; invited to stand for Liverpool, 340; expectations regarding codification and law-office appointments, 340, 341, 351; acts as Judge, vice Mr. Justice Lush, 341, 342, 350, 351; contests and is defeated at Dundee, 343-349; Lord Beaconsfield on Stephen as a politician, 349; his lectures on Parliamentary Government, 350; prospects of a judgeship disappear, 352; resolves to codify and devote himself to literary work, 353; the Homicide Bill, 353, 379; work on Consolidating Indian Acts, 354, 355; and English law of contracts, 355n, 356; leading counsel for London, Chatham and Dover Railway Co., 356; practice before the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, 357; connection with the Metaphysical Society, 358-375; work on the Criminal Code, 375, 376; the 'Digest,' 377; appointed Professor of Common Law at the Inns of Court, 377, 378; his 'Digest' of the English Law of Evidence, 377; his advanced reputation and schemes of various legal reforms, 379; Penal Code scheme, 379-381; volume of his past work as a journalist, 381; professional engagements on Ecclesiastical cases, 382-386; his correspondence and friendship with Lord Lytton, 386-390; nature of the correspondence, 390, 391; Stephen's defence of Lytton's Indian policy, 391-400; his political views at this time, 400, 401; made K.C.S.I, 401; D.C.L. Oxford, and member of several commissions, 402; appointed judge, 402-404; note on his life in Ireland, 405-409

Stephen, Sir James Fitzjames—Judicial Career: First appearance, 410; his 'History 'of the criminal law, 411, 412; account of its inception, 412, 413; the 'historical method,' 413, 414; Professor Maitland's view of the work, 415, 416; character of his literary style, 416, 417; contents of the work, 418; method of dealing with his subjects, 419; history of trial by jury, 419-421; history of the 'benefit of the clergy,' and Spiritual Courts, 421, 422; history of impeachments, 423; ethical problems raised by the inquiry, 423-428; his work on Nuncomar and Impey: differences with Macaulay, 428-434; illness, 435, 436; judicial characteristics, 437-445; the convict Lipski, 446; and Mrs. Maybrick, 447; his authority with juries in criminal cases, 448, 449; examples of his judgments, 449, 450; miscellaneous occupations: correspondence with Lord Lytton and Lady Grant Duff, 451; private, personal and other particulars regarding these letters, 451, 452; his views on religious matters, 454-456; his poem on Tennyson's 'Despair,' 456-458; his dislike for Buddhism and ascetic Christianity, 458, 459; respect for Mohammedanism and Calvinism, 459, 460; his contributions to the 'St. James's Gazette,' 460; his criticisms and opposition to the 'Ilbert Bill' and Home Rule, 460-462; chairman of Ordnance Commission and judicial labour, 462, 463; prepares the second edition of the 'View,' 463; variety of his reading and study of languages at this time, 463, 464; Spanish and Italian languages, Cervantes and Dante, 464, 465; Milton, 465; death of his friends Maine and Venables, 466-468; appoints his son Clerk of Assize, 475; death of his son and Lord Lytton, 477; illness and resignation, 477, 478; created a baronet, 478; his French, Scottish and American honours, 478; residence at Ipswich, 478, 479; death and burial, 479, 480; reflections on his career, 480, 481; bibliography of his works and essays, 483-486

Stephen, James Kenneth, birth and education, 469; Eton contemporaries, 470; prowess as an athlete, 470; literary achievements and connection with the 'Etonian,' 470; his 'constitutional' opposition to Moody and Sankey, 471; prizeman at Eton, 471, 472; life at Cambridge University, 110, 472; takes the character of 'Ajax,' 473; personal characteristics and political predilections, 473; elected Fellow of King's College, 473; called to the Bar, 474; oratorical powers, 474; his literary venture, the 'Reflector,' and its fate, 474, 475; appointed Clerk of Assize on South Wales Circuit, 475; resignation of his assize clerkship and settlement at Cambridge, 476; illness and death, 477

Stephen, Mr. James Wilberforce, 29n

Stephen, Mr. James Young, 1n

Stephen, Mr. John, 1n

Stephen, Mr. John, 8n

Stephen, Mr. John, Judge in N. S. W., 24

Stephen, Mr. Leslie, 65n, 66; on Public School life at Eton, 78, 79; ascent of the Jungfrauwith Sir J. F. Stephen, 96; on the Metaphysical Society, 361, 362

Stephen, Miss Mary. See Hodson, Archdeacon

Stephen, Mr. Oscar Leslie, 1n

Stephen, Mr. Oscar Leslie, junior, 1n

Stephen, Miss Sarah, character and works, 27n

Stephen, Miss Sibella. See Morison, Mr. William Maxwell

Stephen, Miss Sibella. See Garratt, Mrs. W. A.

Stephen, Mr. Thomas, Provost of Dundee, 1n

Stephen, Dr. William, physician and planter at St. Christopher's, 2; quarrel with his brother James, 3; interest in his nephew William, 11; his death, 14

Stephen, Mr. William, 8n; visits his uncle at St. Christopher's, 10; returns home and studies medicine, 10; settles at St. Christopher's, 11; assists his brother James, 14

Stephen, Mr. William, 8n; his career, 10, 11, 14, 23; death, 24; his wife (Mary Forbes) and family, 24

Stephen, Rev. William, characteristics of, 25, 26; marries Miss Grace, 25

Sterling an 'Apostle' at Cambridge, 100

Sterne, as a novelist, 155

Stewart, Mr., his share in the Indian Contract Act, 276

Stokes, Sir George, 93

Stokes, Mr. Whitley, 246n, 249, 271, 275, 393

Storks, Sir Henry, member of the Jamaica Commission, 228

Strachey, Sir J. F. Stephen's friendship with, 245; official duties in India, 269, 393, 400; residence in Ireland, 386, 406

Stuarts, the Criminal Law in the time of, 420-422

Stubbs, Dr., 414

Swift as a clergyman, 118; his pessimistic views on politics and religion, 453

Swinburne, Algernon Charles, his merits as a poet, 152

Switzerland, visit of Sir J. and Lady Stephen to, 41, 42

Sykes, Miss Martha. See Venn, Rev. Henry

Syria, the Romans in, an analogy, 297

'Tablet,' the, on the Ward-Stephen controversy, 307

Talleyrand, 60

Taylor, Sir Henry, his intimacy with Sir J. Stephen, and story of the latter's official career, 43-55, 59

Taylor, Mr. P. A., vice-chairman of the Jamaica Committee, 228

Taylor, Tom, an 'Apostle' at Cambridge, 100

Taylor on Evidence discussed, 274, 275

Temple, Sir Richard, prepares the Punjab Civil Code, 255; on the Punjab Land Revenue Act, 257; his share in the Indian Code of Criminal Procedure, 269

Tennyson, Alfred, an 'Apostle' at Cambridge, 100; criticism of the 'Princess,' 103; quoted, 130; intimacy with G. S. Venables, 151, 152; connection with the Metaphysical Society, 360, 361; his 'Maud' quoted, 398; his poem 'Despair,' 456, 457

Thackeray, Miss (Mrs. Richmond Ritchie), Sir J. F. Stephen's letters to, 238, 242, 243

Thackeray, W. M., reference to his works and characters, 108, 144, 150; intimacy with G. S. Venables, 151; edits the 'Cornhill Magazine,' 177; intimacy with J. F. Stephen, 177

Theology, Sir J. F. Stephen and, 104-106, 109, 113, 428, 453-456

Thirlwall, Bishop, the historian, his defence of the Cambridge 'Apostles,' 100

Thomason, Mr., his works relating to the administration of the Punjab, 257

Thompson, William ('Blarney'), the painter, 5; his portrait of Mr. James Stephen, 6

Thompson, W. H., 97; an 'Apostle' at Cambridge, 102; Master of Trinity, Cambridge, 251

Thomson, Dr. William (Archbishop of York), Sir J. F. Stephen's review of his pamphlet, 198

Thornton, Mr. Henry, of the Clapham Sect, 34

Thornton, Mr. John, of the Clapham Sect, 34

Throckmorton, 420

Tichborne Claimant, the, 342

Tierra del Fuego, Captain Parker Snow's explorations in, 168

'Times,' the, J. D. Cook's and J. S. Venables' connection with, 150, 151n; criticised by the 'Saturday Review,' 155; Sir J. F. Stephen's letters to 394, 395, 461

Tocqueville, on Sir J. Stephen's Lectures on France, 90; influence of his writings on J. S. Mill, 313

Tooke, Horne, 368, 455

'Torch,' the, its account of the Dundee election, 346, 347, 350

Trappist Monastery, Charnwood Forest, Sir J. F. Stephen's visit to, 139, 140

Trevelyan, Sir George, 408

Tudors, the Criminal Law in the time of the, 420

Turkey, war with Russia, 394

Tyndall, Professor, his connection with the Metaphysical Society, 361

Ultramontane controversy, 219-221

Unitarianism, 35; its counterpart in India, 261

United States, the, effect of James Stephen's writings on England's relations with, 19; legislation in, compared with England, 304. See America and American

Utilitarianism and Utilitarians, 104, 116, 123, 230, 246, 299, 310-312, 317, 321, 328, 332-337, 368, 424

Venables, George Stovin, friendship with Sir J. F. Stephen, 151, 238, 241, 385; his public school, university, and professional career, 151; his contributions to the 'Saturday Review' and 'Times,' 151, 152; Sir J. F. Stephen's biographical notice of, 467, 468

Venables, Mrs. Lyster, 468

Venn, Miss Caroline. See Batten, Rev. Ellis

Venn, Miss Catherine Eling, 35n

Venn, Miss Emelia, particulars concerning, 36n, 38-40, 300

Venn, Rev. Henry, Vicar of Huddersfield, his character, life, and works 34, 35

Venn, Rev. Henry, birth and education, 36; influence over James Stephen, 36, 59, 61; marriage to Miss Sykes, 36; livings, 36; connection with Church Missionary Society, 37; character, 37-40; his vindication of Sir J. Stephen, 56; J. F. Stephen's residence with and opinion of, 86, 87; on the choice of a profession for Fitzjames, 115, 118; suggests that he should edit the 'Christian Observer,' 127, 128; his death, 300

Venn, Rev. John, of Clapham, 33

Venn, Rev. John, Rector of Clapham, 35; founder and projector of the Church Missionary Society, 35; his wife (Miss Catherine King) and child, 35n, 36

Venn, Rev. John, birth, 36n; influence over James Stephen, 36, 59, 61; life in Hereford, 38; character, 39; connection with Rev. J. W. Cunningham, 129; Sir J. F. Stephen visits, 300

Venn, Dr. John, on the Venn family, 33n

Venn, Rev. Richard, 33; marries Miss Ashton, 34

Venn, Rev. William, Vicar of Atterton, 33n

Victoria, Queen, proclaimed Empress of India, 398

Walpole, his 'Life of Perceval,' 24

Walter, Mr. John, his interest in J. D. Cook, 150

War Office, disorganised state of, 305

Warburton, Bishop, and the Rev. Richard Venn, 33; as a clergyman, 118

Ward, Mr. W. G., his connection with the Metaphysical Society, 361, 362; his encounters with Sir J. F. Stephen, 365, 367, 368, 371

Warwick, Sir J. F. Stephen at, 303

Watson, David, his Unitarian tendencies, 35

Watson, Rev. W. H., on Sir J. F. Stephen at Cambridge, 94; an 'Apostle' at Cambridge, 102

Watts's Hymns, 68

Webbe, Sir John, his business relations with James Stephen, 4, 6

Webster, Sir Richard, Attorney-General, 478

Wellesley, his work in India, 395, 399

Wengern Alp, the, 42

Wensleydale, Lord, 275

Wesley, Rev. John, 34; Sir J. Stephen on, 56; and the Church of England, 126

Westbury, Lord, 169, 225; his judgment in Dr. Williams's case, 186, 187

Whewell, William, at Cambridge University, 95; relations with Sir James and J. F. Stephen, 97

Whewell Scholarship at Cambridge, 472

Whitbread, Samuel, Parliamentary encounters with James Stephen, 21

Whitefield, George, 34

Whitworth, Mr. G. C., his criticisms of Sir J. F. Stephen's Views on the Law of Evidence, 275

Wilberforce, William, his crusade against the slave trade and relations with James Stephen, 17, 18, 22, 24; presents Rev. Henry Venn to living, 36; Sir James Stephen and, 55, 56; J. F. Stephen's first greeting to, 67

'Wilberforce's Walk,' 23

Willes, Mr. Justice, 140, 173 211, 212

Williams, Mr., publisher of Paine's 'Age of Reason,' his trial, 84

Williams, Sir Monier, and native testimony regarding our rule in India, 270

Williams, Mr. Montagu, 439

Williams, Dr. Rowland, his trial, 175, 184; fitness of J. F. Stephen to defend, 184, 185; his speech and line of defence, 185, 186; result of the trial, 186, 187; conduct of the case, 383; Work on, 483

Wills, Mr. Justice, his reminiscences of Sir J. F. Stephen, 140-144

Wilson, Mr. H. F., 469n

Winchester College, Mr. R. Lowe on, 80

Wolfe, 'Burial of Sir John Moore,' the, 68

Wordsworth, his Poems, 40, 68

Xavier, St. Francis, Sir J. Stephen on, 56, 57

Yeaman, Mr., opposes Sir J. F. Stephen at Dundee, 344, 349

Young, Sir Charles, late Secretary English Church Union, 382

Young's 'Night Thoughts,' Master Stephen's early acquaintance with, 9



Spottiswooode & Co. Printers, New-street Square, London.



* * * * *



Transcriber's note:

The following changes have been made to the text:

In the index entry for "Lady Egerton" page 405 was changed to 404.

In the index entry for "Stephen, Sir James Fitzjames—Judicial Career: bibliography of his works and essays," "483-485" was changed to "483-486".

Page 50: "try ot teach" changed to "try to teach".

Page 50: Added missing footnote anchor for footnote 41.

Page 119: "conected with some" changed to "connected with some".

Page 148: "uch as 200,000" changed to "much as 200,000."

Page 195: "with with Fitzjames" changed to "with Fitzjames".

Page 229: "1865, the trial of Nelson and Brand" changed to "1867, the trial of Nelson and Brand".

Page 315: "intelligble principles" changed to "intelligible principles".

Page 330: "partly from comtempt" changed to "partly from contempt".

Page 394: "expreses very scanty" changed to "expresses very scanty".

Page 488: "Editor of th 'Times" changed to "Editor of the 'Times".

Page 496: "Robespierre, Sir J. F. Stephen s" changed to "Robespierre, Sir J. F. Stephen's.

Page 498" "anti-slavery crusude" changed to "anti-slavery crusade".

Page 499: "visit to the Beaumonts" changed to "visit to the Beamonts".

THE END

Previous Part     1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11
Home - Random Browse