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The Every-day Life of Abraham Lincoln
by Francis Fisher Browne
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At the principal cities delays were made to enable the people to pay their tribute of respect to the remains of their beloved President. Through Baltimore, Harrisburg, Philadelphia, the train passed to New York City, where a magnificent funeral was held; thence along the shore of the Hudson river to Albany, thence westward through the principal cities of New York, Ohio, and Northern Indiana, the cortege wended its solemn way, reaching, on the 1st of May, the city of Chicago. Here very extensive preparations for funeral obsequies had been made by the thousands who had known him in his life, and other thousands who had learned to love him and now mourned his death.

On the 3d of May the funeral train reached Springfield, where old friends and neighbors tenderly received the dust of their beloved dead. Funeral services were held, and for twenty-four hours the catafalque remained in the hall of the House, where thousands of tear-dimmed eyes gazed for the last time upon the familiar face. Then, on the morning of the 4th of May, a sorrowing procession escorted the remains to the beautiful grounds of Oak Ridge Cemetery, to rest at last from the care and tumult of a troubled life. To this hallowed spot have come the gray-haired soldiers of that stormy war, reverently to salute their great commander's tomb. Here shall long be paid the loving homage of the dusky race that he redeemed. And pilgrims from every land, who value human worth and human liberty, bring here their tributes of respect. And here, while the Government that he saved endures, shall throng his patriot countrymen, not idly to lament his loss, but to resolve that from this honored dead they take increased devotion to that cause for which he gave the last full measure of devotion; that the dead shall not have died in vain; that the nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom; and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.



NOTES

[A] The popular vote was as follows: Lincoln, 1,857,610; Douglas, 1,291,574; Breckenridge, 850,082; Bell, 646,124. Of the electoral votes, Lincoln had 180; Breckenridge, 72; Bell, 39; and Douglas, 12.

[B] On the very day of Lincoln's arrival in Washington, he said to some prominent men who had called upon him at his hotel, "As the country has placed me at the helm of the ship, I'll try to steer her through."

[C] This first call for troops was supplemented a month later (May 16) by a call for 42,034 volunteers for three years, for 22,114 officers and men for the regular army, and 18,000 seamen for the navy.

[D] Orpheus C. Kerr (Office Seeker) was the pseudonymn of Robert H. Newell, a popular humorist of the war period, who dealt particularly with the comic aspects of Washington and army life.

[E] Lincoln never lost his interest in exhibitions of physical strength, and involuntarily he always compared its possessor with himself. On one occasion—it was in 1859—he was asked to make an address at the State Fair of Wisconsin, which was held at Milwaukee. Among the attractions was a "strong man" who went through the usual performance of tossing iron balls and letting them roll back down his arms, lifting heavy weights, etc. Apparently Lincoln had never seen such a combination of strength and agility before. He was greatly interested. Every now and then he gave vent to the ejaculation, "By George! By George!" After the speech was over, Governor Hoyt introduced him to the athlete; and as Lincoln stood looking down at him from his great height, evidently pondering that one so small could be so strong, he suddenly gave utterance to one of his quaint speeches. "Why," he said, "I could lick salt off the top of your hat!"

[F] Hon. George S. Boutwell of Massachusetts stated Lincoln said to him personally: "When Lee came over the river, I made a resolution that if McClellan drove him back I would send the proclamation after him. The battle of Antietam was fought Wednesday, and until Saturday I could not find out whether we had gained a victory or lost a battle. It was then too late to issue the proclamation that day; and the fact is, I fixed it up a little on Sunday, and Monday I let them have it."

[G] The cause of General Hooker's seeming stupefaction at the critical point of the Chancellorsville battle has been much discussed but never satisfactorily explained. It has been thought that he was disabled by the shock of a cannon-ball striking a post or pillar of the house where he had his headquarters. An interesting entry in Welles's Diary, made soon after the battle, reflects somewhat the feeling at the time. "Sumner expresses an absolute want of confidence in Hooker; says he knows him to be a blasphemous wretch; that after crossing the Rappahannock and reaching Centreville, Hooker exultingly exclaimed, 'The enemy are in my power, and God Almighty cannot deprive me of them.' I have heard before of this, but not so direct and positive. The sudden paralysis that followed, when the army in the midst of a successful career was suddenly checked and commenced its retreat, has never been explained. Whiskey is said by Sumner to have done the work. The President said that if Hooker had been killed by the shot which knocked over the pillar that stunned him, we should have been successful."

[H] General T.R. Tannatt, a graduate of West Point in 1858, is now (1913) an active and honored citizen of Spokane, Washington.

[I] The criticism of Meade for not attacking Lee before he recrossed the Potomac is based on the assumption that the attack must be successful. On this point Meade's words to Halleck, written in reply to the latter's conciliatory letter of July 28, can hardly be ignored. "Had I attacked Lee the day I proposed to do so, and in the ignorance that then existed of his position, I have every reason to believe the attack would have been unsuccessful, and would have resulted disastrously. This opinion is founded on the judgment of a number of distinguished officers after inspecting Lee's vacated works and position. Among these officers I could name Generals Sedgwick, Wright, Slocum, Hays, Sykes, and others." In other words the attack which Meade has been so severely blamed for not making might have ended in reversing the results at Gettysburg, losing all we had gained at such terrible cost, placed Washington and other Northern cities in far more deadly peril, and changing the whole subsequent issues of the war.

[J] A curious revelation of the estimate of General Halleck held by at least one member of the Cabinet, and of the relations between Halleck and the President, is found in Welles's Diary in the record of a rather free conversation with the President during the anxious period about the time of the battle of Gettysburg. Says Mr. Welles: "I stated I had observed the inertness if not the incapacity of the General-in-Chief, and had hoped that he [the President], who had better and more correct views, would issue peremptory orders. The President immediately softened his tone, and said, 'Halleck knows better than I what to do. He is a military man, has had a military education. I brought him here to give me military advice. His views and mine are widely different. It is better that I, who am not a military man, should defer to him, rather than he to me.' This," continues Mr. Welles, "is the President's error. His own convictions and conclusions are infinitely superior to Halleck's; even in military operations, more sensible and more correct always.... Halleck has no activity; never exhibits sagacity or foresight." And in another place in the same Diary we are given this singular picture by a Cabinet minister of the man who was at that moment the General-in-Chief of the Union armies and the military adviser of the President: "Halleck sits and smokes, and swears, and scratches his arm, but exhibits little military capacity or intelligence; is obfuscated, muddy, uncertain, stupid as to what is doing or to be done."



INDEX

[The abbreviation "L.," as used in this index, refers in every case to the subject of this biography.]

Abolitionists, Bloomington convention, 165-169; crusade against slavery, 244-245; "Boston set" visits L., 482-484

Adams, Charles Francis, 343

Adams, John Quincy, 100, 549

Agassiz, Louis, visits L., 475-476

Alabama, secedes, 261

Allen, Robert, L's letter to, 59

Ames, Dr., 232

Ames, Oakes, 482

Anderson, Robert, meetings with L., 39-40; holds Fort Sumter, 262

Andrew, John A., mentioned, 234, 342, 466; impression of L., 235

Anecdotes of L., Aaron's commission from the Lord, 477; Abolitionist call for a convention, 165-166; About his wealth, 216; Actor who wanted consulship, 470; Anderson and L's good memory, 39-40; Anxiety during summer of 1864, 542-546; Artemus Ward, reading of, 332-333; Attorney for the people, 459; Authenticity of, 32; Baker rescued from opponents, 91; "Biggest shuck and smallest nubbin," 556; Birds restored to nest, 76; Black Hawk War, 37, 38, 40; Bob Lewis and the Mormon lands, 334-335; Booth's acting, 469; Bores, getting rid of, 460; Breach of promise suit, 81-82; Bread and butter dinner, 255; Bullet-hole through L's hat, 541-542; Burnside's brigadiers, promoted, 385; Butterfield's son, appointment, 107; "Cabinet a-sittin'," 330; Call for additional troops "not a personal question," 537; Cashiered officer, censured, 477-478; Challenge to work in field for votes, 48; "Charles I. lost his head," 556; Chase's appointment as chief-justice, 550-551; Client's fee divided with defendant, 128-129; Cogdal note returned by L., 136; Confederate soldiers greeting at Petersburg, 567-568; Congress, first speech in, 101; Credits of troops, Stanton overmatched, 376; Coward, "If any man calls me coward let him test it," 38; Darkey arithmetic, 357-358; Dennis Hanks' recollections, 6-9; Douglas reproved, 203; Dreams significant, 583-584; DuPont's slowness, 457-458; Earning the first dollar, 17-18; Editor who nominated L., 460-461; Election clerk, first official act, 32; Five Points Sunday School visit, 225-226; Forced serenity deceptive, 542; Free-soil party, prediction, 172-174; Gavel of Confederate congress, 586-587; Gettysburg battle, L's anxiety during, 499-500; "Give and take" rule for office-seekers, 295-296; Government on a tight rope, 484; Grant accused of drunkenness, 524; Grant invited to dinner, 520-521; Grant's ability to manage the army, 526-527; Grant's political aspirations, 523; Greeley's criticism, 429; Gunboat advice to New Yorkers, 338; Herndon's convictions on slavery, 166-167; Hooker's appointment, 487-488; Hooker's self-confidence, 491-492; Horsemanship tested by McClellan, 415-416; Horses captured by guerillas, 399; Horse-trading, 140; Ignorance of Latin admitted, 468-469; Impromptu speeches written, 471; Inaugural message, loss of, 283; Indian protected by L., 37; Jack-knife given him because of ugliness, 83; Jacob Thompson, proposed arrest, 585-586; Jefferson Davis and the troublesome coon story, 580; Johnnie Kongapod, 81; Joseph Jefferson and his players, 79; Kerr's papers enjoyed, 334; Kindness to birds, 76; Kindness to old colored woman, 128; Kindness to old John Burns, 515; Last drive with wife, 584-585; Law cases refused on moral grounds, 137-138; Lawsuits, gaining advantage in, 80-82; Lee, attitude of L. toward, 582; Lightning rod and Forquer, 56-57; Logan and his shirt, 139-140; "Long sword in a short scabbard," 566-567; Loyalty to old friends, Hubbard, 458-459; McClellan's body-guard, 417-418; McClellan's fatigued horses, 416; McClellan's pass to Richmond, 454; McCormick reaper case, 173-175; McCullough thanked by L., 469-470; Major-generals and hard tack, 400; Manners, first lesson, 13; Measuring backs with Sumner, 336; Measuring height with Ab McElrath, 274-275; Measuring height with a Southerner, 247; Measuring height with a young "Sucker," 254; Meeting with Smoot, 29-30; Mrs. White, southern sympathizer, 453; "Monarch of all you survey," 47; Name refused for commercial use, 452; Negroes at White House reception, 552-553; Negroes welcome their "Great Messiah," 569-571; Noisy and boastful fighter, 189; Office-seeker from Wisconsin repulsed, 353; Office-seeker, unfit, 307; Old sign, "Lincoln and Herndon," 264-265; Old woman and the bread and milk, 255; One-legged soldier, lack of credentials, 451-452; Oratorical success discussed with Gulliver, 222-223; Pardon for deserters, 397; Pardon for young soldier, 396-397; Pardoning prisoners of war, 578-580; Pass given Laura Jones, Southerner, 453; Paymaster, appointment, 377-378; Philadelphia receives news of L's death, 594-596; Pig rescued from a pit, 76-77; Pigeon holes versus letter files, 474; Powder sample, testing, 383-384; Quaker demand for emancipation, 425-427; Quakers sent home, 398; Rail making, 230-231; Reading Nasby during election returns, 548; Rebel mail examined, 354-355; Rebels number twelve hundred thousand, 454; Revolutionary War defended, 77-78; Sandwich Islands, commissioner, applicants, 339; School of events, suggestion, 475; Scott's request concerning wife's body, 408-410; Scott "unable as a politician," 337; Sherman and the officer, 328-329; Sherman after Bull Run, 327-329; Sherman's visit from Louisiana, 299; Sitting for life-mask, 237-243; Skunks, shooting, 373-374; Slave girl sold, 147; Slavery speech criticised by Long, 181-182; Soldiers' humor, 399, 400; "Something everybody can take," 460; South Carolina lady's visit, 297-298; Stanton calls L. a d——d fool, 378; "Stoning Stephen," 204; Storekeeper in New Salem, 43; Strength, physical, 92-93; Stump speech, first appearance, 41; Sun doesn't set, 20; Swapping horses mid stream, 535; Sykes's yellow dog 525-526; Tad and the scattered pages of L's speech, 575-576; Tad's grief over death of father, 596; "Taking the wind out of his sails," 88; Talking against time, 80; Taylor's fine clothes, 57-58; Thrashing a bully, 28-29; "To whom it may concern," 539; Trousers requested by office-seeker,569; Trust in God, 351-352; Use of old-fashioned words, 139; Used on adversaries, 86; Verses written from memory, 356; Vicksburg, joy of L., 501; Wade's effort to remove Grant, 503; Weem's life of Washington, 15; Whigs all dead, 157; Wood-craft knowledge, 474-475; Wrestling match with Jack Armstrong, 28

Antietam, battle of, 414, 437; L's dream, 583

Appomattox, Lee's surrender at, 573

Armstrong, Hannah, 133-135

Armstrong, Hugh, 30

Armstrong, Jack, trial of strength, 28; early friend, 133

Armstrong, John, quoted, 178

Armstrong, William D., defended by L., 133-135

Arnold, Isaac N., quoted, 3, 14, 19, 31, 56, 59, 72, 150, 153, 185, 190, 205, 232, 244, 297-298, 299-301, 332-333, 422-423, 466-467, 468, 545, 584-585; interview with L., 422-423; mentioned, 237

Arnold, Matthew, quoted, 546

Ashley, Hon. James M., constitutional amendment introduced by, 554

Ashmore, Congressman, of South Carolina, quoted, 431

Ashmun, George, mentioned, 241-243, 586

Austin, G.L., quoted, 136

Baker, Edward D., mentioned, 74, 186; refuses to defend slaves, 77; Whig debater, 89; personal and political friend of L., 91; elected congressman, 97; killed at Balls' Bluff, 131; magnanimity of L. towards, 159; introduced L. at inauguration, 284

Balch, George B., quoted, 21-23

Baltimore, republican convention at, 1864, 534

Bancroft, George, contrasted with L., 217; quoted, 578

Banks, Nathaniel P., 501

Barnes, Surgeon-General, 591

Barrett, J.H., quoted, 23-24, 26

Bateman, Newton, quoted, 202-203, 245-247

Bates, Edward, candidate for president,231; made attorney general, 293, 294; characterized, 366; visits army with L., 490; resignation, 552

Beckwith, H.W., 81

Beecher, Henry Ward, abolition sermons read by L., 166; invites L. to speak in his church, 214; eloquent abolitionist, 245

Bell, John, nominated for president, 251

Bennett, John, impressions of L., 67-68

Bible, L's knowledge of, 118; L. quotes from, 473; L's opinion of, 478

Bigelow, John, quoted, 303-304, 345, 359-361, 363-364, 513, 514, 546-547

Bird, Francis, W., 482

Birney, Zachariah, L's school-master, 11

Bissell, William H., mentioned, 74-209

Bixby, Mrs., 397-398

Black Hawk War, L's military experience in, 35-40

Blaine, James G., compares Lincoln and Douglas, 183-185

Blair, F.P., attacks Chase, 533; reprehended by L., 534

Blair, Montgomery, made postmaster general, 293-294; arming of negroes deprecated by, 436; residence fired, 536; resignation, 551

Bloomington Convention, 165-169

Bonham, Jeriah, quoted, 180, 197, 203

Boone, Daniel, 2

Booneville, Ind., L. attends court, 9, 19

Booth, Edwin, L's enjoyment of his acting, 469

Booth, John Wilkes, assassination of L., 588-590

Boston delegation, conference with L., 482

Boutwell, George S., quoted, 437

Bowles, Samuel, quoted, 206

Brainard and Knott, quoted, 220

Breckenridge, John A., early influence on L., 9, 19

Breckenridge, John C, nominated for president, 250

Breese, Sidney, dignity, 84; quoted, 141

Brewster, Father, 204

Bright, John, 357

Brooklyn, L's lecture trip, 214-215

Brooks, Senator, knocks down Sumner, 245; quoted, 192

Brooks, Noah P., 470; quoted, 171-173, 462-463, 466-467, 471, 474, 490, 491-492, 493, 543, 546; describes L's last speech, 575-576

Brooks, Phillips, quoted, 478-479

Bross, John A., 538

Bross, William, first meeting with L., 170; interview with L., 265, 538-539

Brough, John, victorious governor of Ohio, 510; effort to reconcile L. and Chase, 549

Brown, John, 485

Browne, Francis Fisher, biographical sketch, v-vii

Browning, O.H., mentioned, 74-186; Whig debater, 89; inaugural party, member of, 266, 275

Browning Robert, L's fondness for his poetry, 387

Bryan, Thomas B., purchases MS. of emancipation proclamation, 445

Bryan, William J., on L. as an orator, 473

Bryant, William Cullen, presided over Cooper Institute meeting, 217; abolitionist, 245; favored L. for presidency, 247-248

Buchanan, James, mentioned, 294, 295; treachery during his administration, 261-262; escorts L. to Capitol, 284-286; characterized, 291; escorts L. to White House, 292

Bull Run, battle of, depression after, 326-437; L's dream, 583, second battle, 411

Bulwer-Lytton, mentioned, 469

Burns, John, 515

Burns, Robert, L's fondness for his poetry, 466

Burnside, Ambrose E., Fredericksburg repulse, 368,487,488; victories in N.C., 385; unpopularity, 404; replaces McClellan, 417; L's opinion of, 487

Bushnell, C.S., agent for Ericsson, 345, 346

Butler, William, L. boards with, in Springfield, 70

Butterfield, Daniel, 493

Butterfield, Justin, mentioned, 74; appointed commissioner of land office, 106; son of, desires appointment, 107

Byron, Lord, L's fondness for his poetry, 132; quoted, 350

Cabinet, L's political rivals chosen, 256; L's non-partisan ideas, 256, 259; makeup discussed with Weed, 257-259; with Riddle, 275; Banks considered, 283; final appointments and how decided, 293; changes during administration, 294; meetings enlivened by stories, 336; L's relations with, 363; misconceptions of rights and duties, 364; unfriendly feeling between members, 365; earliest meetings informal, 365-366; attitude toward the war, 366-367; personal dissensions, 367-370; Seward's removal demanded, 368; Chase and Seward resignations, 368-370; Stanton the master-mind, 370-371; Cameron's relations with L., 371-373; Stanton succeeds Cameron, 372-373; Senators advise reconstruction of, 373-374; Stanton's relations with L., 374-379; opposes L's reinstatement of McClellan, 412-413; attitude toward emancipation, 432; preliminary proclamation discussed, L's own account, 436-438; second draft discussed, 437-439, 444; disposal of freedmen discussed, 439-440; Chase finally disposed of, 549-550; Blair succeeded by Dennison, 551; Bates resigns, 552; ignored by L., 555; last meeting attended by L., 580-581, 583-584

Calhoun, John C, mentioned, 186; appoints L. deputy surveyor, 47; democratic debater, 89; congressman, 100

California, L.'s desire to live in, 549

Cameron, Simon, mentioned, 506; congressman, 100; presidential candidate, 231; cabinet possibility, 275; secretary of war, 293, 294, 298; retirement from the cabinet, 371-373; advocates arming the blacks, 447

Campbell, Major, rescues fugitive slaves, 248

Campbell, John A., Southern peace commissioner, 555

Canada, rebel agents in, 352-353

Capital and labor. See Labor and capital

Carpenter, Francis B., mentioned, 469; quoted, 234, 436-437, 464-465, 544, 573

Cartwright, Peter, 99

Cass, Lewis, mentioned, 100; ridiculed by L., 102-104

Caton, John Dean, first meeting with L., 60-61; opinion of L. as lawyer, 141-142; fugitive slave decision, 248; advice on war policy, 255-256

Chancellorsville, battle of, 492-494, 496-497, 506

Chandler, Zack, aids L. in Schofield matter, 456; quoted, 498-499; lack of military judgment, 505

Channing, William Henry, abolitionist, 245; conversation with L. on slavery, 427-428

Chapman, Colonel, quoted, 263-264

Chapman, Mrs., 263; quoted, 113

Charleston, L's opinion of situation, 490-491

Chase, Salmon P., mentioned, 185, 501, 548; opposes Nebraska bill, 153; presidential candidate, 231-233, 532; logic of, 245; cabinet possibility, 258-275, 371; secretary of the treasury, 293, 294, 297; rivalry with Seward, 366-370; upholds Stanton, 368; resignation and withdrawal, 369-370; consulted about Stanton, 373; opposes negro enlistment, 373; visits Fortress Monroe with L., 386-392; opinion of emancipation proclamation, 436; contribution to emancipation proclamation, 444; rupture with Lincoln, 532-534; second resignation offered, 549; accepted, 550; appointed Chief Justice, 550-551; quoted, 367

Chattanooga, Grant's success, 516

Chicago, L. visits N.B. Judd, 117-118; national republican convention, 231-237; memorial on emancipation, 427; Northwestern fair, 445; funeral services for L., 598

Chicago Historical Society, owned emancipation proclamation MS., 445

Cincinnati, L's first visit, 173-176; L's second visit, 213; visits on inaugural journey, 270-273;

City Point, visited by L., 562-566

Civil War, L's peace pleas before war, extract, 158, 270; L. foresees coming struggle, 255-256; L. promises to promote peace, 268; workingmen offer support for freedom, 271-273; L's reluctance to express opinion, 272-273; L's peace plea in inaugural speech, 287-291; Washington swarms with rebels, 292; desperate condition of treasury, 292; secession a political issue, 292-293 Stanton's loyalty to Union, 295; faithless officials in departments, 295; L's conquest of a South Carolinian, 297-298 Louisiana's war preparations, 299; Sumter attack, 312; call for volunteers, 312-314; Massachusetts first in field, 314; Baltimore attack, 315; Douglas stands by government, 315-316; Washington thrills over Sumter, 316; blockade of Southern ports, proclamation, 318 Key West, Tortugas, and Santa Rosa proclamation, 318; Virginia asks expression of federal policy, 318; L's reply, 319-320; L's hope for Union, 320; L's desire to retain Kentucky, 320-321; Kentucky saved to Union, 321-322; special session of Congress, 322; L's appeal for funds and men, 323-325; preparations, 325-326; review of N.Y. troops, 326; Bull Run, 326; L. visits army in Virginia, 327-329; L's anxiety after Bull Run, 329-331; Harper's Ferry, 333-334; fleet urged to draw rebels from Washington, 337; L. refuses gun-boat to New Yorkers, 338; Trent affair, Mason and Slidell, 340-345; English neutrality established, 343; English controversies, 344-345 Ericsson's "Monitor,", 345-347; Ross's mission to Canada; 352-355; L's reply on number of losses, 357-358; friction concerning direction, 366-368; negro enlistment, recommended, 373; Sabin's appointment, 377-378 inertia of proceedings, 380-381; L. develops military sagacity, 381-385; brightening prospects, proclamation, 385-386; L. visits Fortress Monroe, 386-392; Merrimac and Monitor, 390-391; Norfolk captured, 390-391; L's letter to McClellan on over-cautiousness, 392-395 L's sympathy for soldiers, 395-402; visits hospitals, 400-401; L's letter to McClellan concerning route to Richmond, 405-407; impatience over approach to Richmond, 406-408; strain of summer of 1862, 408; refusal of leave for Scott, 408-410; McClellan's army ordered withdrawn, 410; Pope's defeat at Manassas, 410-411; McClellan's reinstatement, 411-413; Washington peril, 413; Antietam victory, 414; L. visits Army of Potomac, 414-416; Fredericksburg attacked, 417; L's dissatisfaction with McClellan, 418; Missouri factional quarrels, 454-457; L's dissatisfaction with DuPont, 457-458; Fredericksburg, L's grief over, 461-462; L's visit to army before Chancellorsville, 465-466; L's method criticised, 480-484, 485; negro enlistment, 484-486; retaliation opposed by L., 485; Fredericksburg defeat, 487, 488; Hooker succeeds Burnside, 487-490; naval operations, 490; Chancellorsville defeat, 492-494; defeat, dissatisfaction of North, 493-494; turning-point of war, 496; Pennsylvania invaded, 497; Northern fear of Lee, 497; Hooker succeeded by Meade, 497-498; Gettysburg, 498-499; Vicksburg campaign, 500-503; L's joy over victory, 501; Wade urges Grant's dismissal, 503; Gettysburg victory, 503-504; Washington criticisms, 505; Meade's leadership, 504-507; Chancellorsville defeat, 506; Fredericksburg defeat, 506; L. against compromise, 507; brightening prospects after elections, 510; L's confidence in Grant, 516, 520-521; Grant's victories after Vicksburg, 516; his plans, 516-517; Grant's commission received, 519; L's plan of campaign for Grant, 522; Early's raid, L's plan against, 522; Grant's reply, 523; Vicksburg, criticisms of campaign, anecdote, 525-526; Grant and Stanton clash, 526-527; Early's attack on Washington, 525-537; call for additional troops, July 18, 1864, 537; gloomy prospects, 537-539, 542-546; Wilderness and Petersburg losses, 538-539; peace negotiations, "To whom it may concern,", 539; effect of L's re-election, 548; Sherman's march to the sea, 552; L's conditions for peace, 552; peace negotiations with Southern commissioners, 554-557; Lee's last efforts, 561-562; closing events, 562; L. visits army, 562-573; fall of Petersburg, 567; fall of Richmond, 568; Lee's surrender, 573; end of war, 573-576; pardoning prisoners, 578-580. See also Emancipation; Secession

Clary Grove boys, attack on L., 27-28; volunteers in Black Hawk War, 36; smash store in New Salem, 42-43

Clay, Cassius M., 309-322

Clay, Henry, influence of speeches on L., 8; L's admiration and disillusion, 98-99; gradual emancipation speech, 98; L's eulogy of, 147

Clephane, Lewis, 468-469

Cleveland, Grover, 360

Cleveland, Ohio, visit on inaugural journey, 274-275

Clinton, DeWitt, 61

Cobb, Howell, distinguished in civil war, 100

Cogdal's note, 136

Colfax, Schuyler, interview with L., 545, 583, 586-587; L.'s death-bed, 591, 593

Collamer, Jacob, 368

Collyer, Robert, quoted, 329

Columbus, Ohio, welcome on inaugural journey, 268-269

Confederate States, considered a fact by Wigfall, 286; knowledge of Union moves, 292; Trent affair, 340-345; favored capital, 348; Canadian machinations, 352-353

Congress, special session, July 4,1861, 322; emancipation measures, 421

Conkling, James C., 80; quoted, 86

Constitution, slavery amendment, 553-554

Constitutional Union Party, 251

Conway, Moncure D., impression of L., 176; interview with L., 482-484; quoted, 427-429

Cook, Mr., of Illinois, 232, 233

Cooper Institute speech, 215-221, 223-224, 232

Costa Rica, asylum for freedom, 440

Covode, John, 445

Crane, C.B., quoted, 546

Crawford, Andrew, L's schoolmaster, 12

Crawford, Josiah, incident of the ruined book, 14-16

Crawford, Mrs. Josiah, quoted, 16

Crittenden, John J., 185

Curdy, Dr., 170

Curtin, Andrew G., 497

Curtis-Gamble controversy, 454-456

Cushing, Caleb, 354; candidate for attorney general, 552; quoted, 207

Dahlgren, John A., quoted, 383, 384, 385

Dana, Charles A., quoted, 295, 547-548, 585-586

Davis, David, mentioned, 74; quoted, 113, 144-145, 256; advised L. on cabinet; 257; member of inaugural party, 266

Davis, Jefferson, in Black Hawk War, 39; in senate, 100; recognition asked by Southern commissioners, 555-556; mansion occupied by Weitzel, 572 L's clemency toward, 580

Davis, O.L., 81

Dayton, William L., vice-presidential nominee, 170

Defrees, public printer, objects to L's colloquialisms, 471-472

Deming, Henry Champion, quoted, 302-303

Democratic Party, dominates Illinois, 65; pro-slavery tendencies, 251; rebel sympathisers, 292; opposes congressional war measures, 481

Dennison, William, postmaster general, 294; presides over Baltimore convention, 534; replaces Blair, 551; at L's death-bed, 591

Dicey, Edward, quoted, 544

Dickey, T. Lyle, quoted, 524

Dickson, W.M., quoted, 174, 176, 213

District of Columbia, slavery abolished, 421

Dixon, Father, quoted, 40

Dominican question, Seward's embarrassment, 336

Dorsey, Azel, L's schoolmaster, 12

Douglas, Stephen A., mentioned, 74, 285; groggery taunt about L., 26; L's first impression of, 62, 188; debates with L., 89-90, 153-154, 177, 182-207; courts Mary Todd, 94; Mexican War, blames L. for opposition, 102; opens campaign, 1852, 147; defends Missouri compromise, 154-155, 157, 159; claims Whigs are dead, 157; senatorial nomination, 177; oratory compared with L., 182-207; debater and orator, 183-184, 186, 190, 205; appearance and characteristics, 185-186, 188-189, 190-191; quoted, 187-188; senator in 1846, 188; magnetism, 197; re-elected senator in 1858, 208; speeches in Ohio in 1859, 211; L's attitude toward, 216; democratic nominee for president, 244; magnanimity, 291; sustains the government, 315-316; death, 316

Douglass, Frederick, conference with L., 484-486; impression of L., 486

Dresser, Rev. Nathan, residence of, in Springfield, purchased by L., 96

Drummond, Thomas, quoted, 142-144

Dummer, H.C., quoted, 46

Duncan, Major, teaches L. use of broadsword, 93

DuPont, Admiral, characterized by L., 457-458

Early, Dr., L's reply to, 58-59

Early, Jubal A., raid on Washington, 522, 535

Eaton, Page, quoted, 70, 114

Eckert, General, 547

Edwards, Matilda, admired by L., 95

Edwards, Ninian W., mentioned, 74; candidate for legislature, 58

Edwards, Mrs. Ninian W., sister of Mary Todd, 94

Egan, Dr., of Chicago, 171

Eggleston, Edward, quoted, 225

Elkin, Elder, funeral services for Nancy Hanks, 10

Ellis, A.Y., quoted, 42

Ellsworth, E.E., member of inaugural party, 266

Emancipation, discussion of measures, 419-448; Fremont's proclamation, 420; gradual, advocated, 420-423; first discussed by L. with cabinet members, 423-424; military, authorized, 421; Quaker delegation demands, 425-427; Chicago clergymen demand, 427; Lincoln and Channing interview, 427; Lincoln and Greeley, 429-431; Greeley's "Prayer of twenty millions," and L's reply, 429-430; compensation suggested, 428, 433, 447; deportation suggested, 439-440; L's message to congress, 1862, 440-441; "Boston set" discussed with L., 482-484; defended by L., 507

Emancipation proclamation, issued, 419; official measures preceding, 419-422; preliminary text, 432-435; L's own account of, 436-438, 444-445; Seward's view of, 436-437; Welles's account, 438-439; text, 441-443; signed, 441; pen used, 445

Emerson, Ralph Waldo, quoted, 304-305; belief in L., 482

England, neutrality established, 343; controversies with, 344-345

Ericsson, John, inventor of "Monitor," 345-346

Evarts, Mr., of N.Y., grieved over Seward's defeat, 234

Everett, Edward, nominated for vice-president, 251; appreciation of L's Gettysburg address, 513; impression of L., 515

Ewing, Lee D., opposed to change in Illinois State capital, 66

Farragut, David G., 537; compared with DuPont, 458

Fell, Jesse W., 32

Fessenden, William P., 185, 368; secretary of the treasury, 294

Ficklin, O.B., 126

Fithian, Dr., 126

Flatboat, constructed by L., 17-18

Florida, secedes, 261

Ford's Theatre, scene of assassination, 586-591

Forquer, George, lightning rod anecdote, 57

Forrest, Edwin, 469

Forrest, Thomas L., 458

Fort Sumter, held by Anderson, 262; attack, 312, 316; L's dream, 583;

Fortress Monroe, L. visits, 386-392;

Foster, Major-General, 385, 400

Fox, G.V., assistant secretary of the navy, 536

Franklin, Benjamin, L. ranked with, 549

Fredericksburg, repulse at, 368; attacked, 417; L's grief over, 461-462; defeat, 487, 488, 506;

Free-Soil Party, 150, 172, 173

Free-state cause, L. sympathises with, 158

Freedmen. See Negroes

Fremont, John C., nominated for president, 170; defeated, 173 pioneer emancipator, 420, 447; presidential possibility in, 1864, 532

Fry, J.B., quoted, 376

Fugitive Slave Law, detested by L., 248-249; text, 434-435

Fusion Party, L. candidate of, for senator, 162

Gamble, Governor, Curtis-Gamble faction, 454-456

Gentry, Allen, 19-20

Gentry, Mrs. Allen, quoted, 12

Georgia, seceded, 261

Germans in Cincinnati, welcome L., 271-272

Gettysburg, mentioned, 478, 496; victory, 498-499, 503-504; L's feeling during battle, 499-500; victory cheers L., 507; battle-field purchase and dedication, 511-515; L's dream, 583

Gettysburg Address, rewritten many times, 471; world's model, 473; text, 512-515

Gillespie, Joseph, quoted, 80, 83; conversation with L. on slavery, 148-149

Grant, Frederick D., 519

Grant, Ulysses S., mentioned, 403, 464, 542; opinion of McClellan's difficulties, 367, 404; victories in Tenn., 385; Vicksburg campaign, 500-502; L's letter on Vicksburg, 502; L's dissatisfaction before Vicksburg, 503; commands military division of Miss., 516; rank of Lieut.-General created for, 516; assumes command of army, 517; summoned to Washington, 517; at White House reception, 517-518; receives commission from L., 519; refusal to dine at White House, 519-520; L's impressions of personality and military capacities, 510-521; L.'s letter of commendation, 521; interview with L. on military matters, Grant's own account, 521-522; L's suggestion about Early's repulse, 522; Grant's reply, 523; L. seeks to know his political aspirations, 523; true version of whiskey anecdote, 524; L. tells story of Sykes's dog, 525-526; dispute with Stanton, 526; upheld by president, 526-527; presidential possibility, 532; attacks Early, 537; telegram to L. on re-election, 548; peace overture made through, 554; forces Lee to Richmond, 561-562; visited by L. at City Point, 562-563; interview with L. at City Point, 563-566; L's visit at Petersburg, 567-568; Lee's surrender, 573; praised by L., 574, 575; instructions for conference with Lee, 577-578; denies Stone River victory, 583; drives with L. and attends last cabinet meeting, 583; declines invitation to theater, 586

Grant, Mrs. Ulysses S., 527

Gray, Dr., officiated at L's funeral, 597

Great Britain. See England

Gladstone, William Ewart, opinion of second inaugural address, 559-560

Globe Tavern, Springfield, Ill., L's first home after marriage, 96

Godbey, Squire, quoted, 46

Goldsborough, Lewis M., 390

Goodrich, Judge, L. declines partnership, 109

Greeley, Horace, opposes L's policy in N.Y. "Tribune," 429-431; publishes "The prayer of twenty millions," 429; L's reply, 429-430; conference with L., 430-431; L.'s "pigeonhole" for, 474; seeks successor to L., 480; peace importunities and L's famous reply, 539;

Green, L.M., quoted, 27

Greene, Bowlin, friend of L., 52

Greene, W.G., 30

Gridley, G.A., 137

Grigsby, Aaron, 17

Grigsby, Nat, quoted, 13

Griswold, John A., builder of "Monitor," 345-347

Grimes, James W., 368

Grover, A.J., quoted, 248-249

Gulliver, John P., estimate of L's speeches, 221-223

Gurley, Rev. Dr., officiated at L's funeral, 597

Haines, Elijah M., quoted, 162-164; 209, 228-229

Hale, John P., mentioned, 185, 297; calls on L., 583

Hall, Doctor, attends L., 593

Hall, John, 263

Hall, Newman, quoted, 397; officiated at L's funeral, 596

Halleck, Henry W., mentioned, 393, 413, 487, 490, 519; telegrams to Meade, 504-505; military ability, 505-506; at L's death-bed, 591

Halpine, Colonel, 310

Hamlin, Hannibal, nominated for vice-president, 234

Hampton Roads, meeting of peace commissioners, 555-557

Hanks, Dennis, recollections of L's boyhood, 6-9; story-telling ability, 31; L. visits, 263

Hanks, John, L's fellow-laborer, 24; bears campaign banner, 230

Hanks, Nancy. See Lincoln; Nancy Hanks

Hannegan, Edward A., 126

Hapgood, Norman, quoted, 359

Hardin, Colonel, 4

Hardin, John J., mentioned, 186; congressional candidate, 99; killed in Mexican War, 131

Harding, George, attorney in McCormick Reaper case, 173-174

Harper's Ferry, Union forces driven out, 333-334

Harris, G.W., quoted, 87-88, 128

Harris, Ira, 368; daughter, 587, 593

Harris, Thomas L., 160

Harrisburg, L's visit on inaugural journey, 278

Hatch, O.M., mentioned, 227; quoted, 417-418

Hawk, Mr., actor, describes assassination, 588

Hay, John M., private secretary, 266; quoted, 305-307

Hayes, General, 504

Hazel, Caleb, L's schoolmaster, 11

Henderson, J.B., constitutional amendment introduced by, 554; interviews L. about pardons, 578-580

Henry, Dr., 493

Herndon, William H., law partnership with L., 71, 97-98; letter of advice from L., 104-105; quoted, 24-26, 48, 92, 95, 113, 114, 115, 116, 121, 132, 140, 154, 165, 166, 167-168, 178; sympathy for L., 116; abolitionist efforts, 165-169; "Lincoln and Herndon" law sign, 264

Hitt, Robert R., 198

Holland, Josiah G., quoted, 11, 14-15, 76-77, 98, 111, 236, 268-269, 277-278, 283-284, 351, 371

Holmes, Oliver Wendell, L's fondness for his poetry, 466

Holt, Joseph, appeals for Union, 321, 322; possibility as secretary of war, 372; candidate for attorney general, 552

Homestead law, opinion of L. on, 273

Hood, Thomas, L's fondness for his poetry, 466

Hooker, Joseph, 463; visited by L. before Chancellorsville, 465; interview with L. and promotion, 487-488; "Fighting Joe Hooker," 488; L's letter to, 489-490; Hooker's comment, 492; accused of drunkenness, 492; Sumner's opinion of, 492; self-confidence, 491-492; unequal to responsibility, 497; asked to be relieved, 498; aids Grant in victories, 516

Hossack, John, 248

"House-Divided-Against-Itself" speech, quoted, 180, 426, 473

Howard, Senator, 368

Hoyne, Thomas, 237

Hoyt, Governor, 389

Hubbard, Gurdon S., quoted, 49; works for Illinois and Michigan Canal, 49; interview with L., 458-459

Hunter, David, attempts military emancipation, 447

Hunter, Robert M.T., Southern peace commissioner, 555-556

Iles, Elijah, service in Black Hawk War, 39

Illinois, Lincoln family settles in, 21; slavery sentiment, 65-66; first to ratify 13th amendment, 554

Illinois and Michigan Canal, favored by Lincoln, 49

Indiana, early home of Lincoln, 6

Indianapolis, speech, on inaugural journey, 268

Indians, hostile in Kentucky, 2; execution refused by L., 453

Invention, L's interest in history of, 118-119; navigation device, 24-26

Jackson, Andrew, L. compared with, 413, 549

Jackson, Thomas Jonathan (Stonewall), 414; death, 492

Jayne, William, quoted, 161

Jefferson, Joseph, quoted, 79

Jefferson, Thomas, 360; L. ranked with, 549

Johnson, Andrew, mentioned, 100, 585; nominated for vice-president, 534; sworn in, 557; at L's death-bed, 591; at funeral, 596

Johnson, Bradley, Confederate general, raid of country around Washington, 536

Johnson, Oliver, visit to L., 468-469

Johnson, Reverdy, attorney in McCormick case, 173, 174, 176

Johnston, Albert Sidney, at Vicksburg, 501

Johnston, Joseph E., mentioned, 578; Sherman defeats, 561-562; plan to force surrender, 564-565; L's dream, 584

Johnston, John, step-brother of L., 24; indolent and shiftless nature, 121; L's letters to, 120-123

Jones, J. Russell, L. consults about Grant, 523

Jones, Laura, L's leniency to, 453

Joy, James F., 237

Judd, Norman B., L. visits, 117-118; member of inaugural party, 266, 275; mentioned, 161, 162, 189, 227, 232

Judd, Mrs. Norman B., quoted, 117-118

Julian, George W., quoted, 253-254, 375, 378

Kansas, L's visit to, 213-214

Kansas-Nebraska Bill, controversy, 147, 152-155, 159-161

Kelly, William D., quoted, 356-358, 465

Kelton, Colonel, 413

Kentucky, Lincoln family in, 2; plea for neutrality, 270; importance of neutrality, 320-322; concessions made to, 431

"Kerr, Orpheus C," (Robert Henry Newell), 334, footnote; L's great fondness for his writings, 334, 467

Keyes, General, quoted, 381

King, Preston, 303

Kirkpatrick, William, 36

Know-Nothing-Party, 153

Knox, Joe, 171

Labor and capital discussed by Lincoln, 348-350

Laboring-men, L's speech to Cincinnati Germans, 272-273

Lamborn, Josiah, 74, 89, 186

Lamon, Ward H., mentioned, 81; member of inaugural party, 266, 275, 278; quoted, 12, 16, 29-30, 58, 84, 112, 114, 115, 154, 161, 229, 254-255, 256, 263, 266, 267

Lane, General, 309

Lectures. See Speeches and Lectures

Lee, Harry T., impression of Gettysburg address, 514

Lee, Robert E., mentioned, 300, 437, 499, 517; Pennsylvania invasion, 333, 497; Manassas successes, 411, 414; Antietam defeat, 414; Chancellorsville victory, 492; Gettysburg defeat, 498, 501; Appomattox surrender, 517, 573; Richmond, retreat to, 568; Union plans for capture, 564-565; Richmond, retreat from, 568; Grant ordered not to confer with, 577-578; L's comment on portrait, 582

Letters and telegrams, acceptance of presidential nomination, 244; correspondence burdensome, 474; written by hand, 474; to Bryant concerning party pledges, 248; to Mrs. Bixby on loss of sons, 397-398; to Curtis on factional quarrels, 455; to Douglas, invitation to debate, 182; telegram to Grant during Early's raid, 522-523; to Grant after Vicksburg, 502; to Grant, expressing satisfaction, 521; to Greeley on emancipation, 429-430; to Herndon, giving advice, 104-105; to Hooker, on latter's appointment, 489-490; to Judd about campaign contribution, 209; to Judd regarding the presidency, 228; to Kentucky unionist on slavery, 446-448; to McClellan on over-cautiousness, 392-395; to McClellan concerning route to Richmond, 405-407; to McNeill relating to fees for speeches, 223-224; to Schofield, advice on factional quarrels, 455-456; to Speed on slavery, 151-153; to Speed's sister on slavery, 148; to Springfield friends after Gettysburg and Vicksburg, 507-508; to step-brother on death of father, 120-123; to Washburne, about forts, 261; to Washburne, against compromises, 260-261; to Weed on secession, 262; "To whom it may concern," safe conduct for peace envoys, 539

Lewis, Robert, 334

Lincoln, Abraham, grandfather of L., settles in Kentucky, 2; death, 3

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM CHARACTERISTICS, inherited, 5, 11; in boyhood and youth, 9, 16, 20, 35, 49, 53, 75-77; handwriting, 19; elements of greatness, 53; claims to be a fatalist, 108; absent-mindedness, 112, 114; debt abhorred, 130; as a lawyer, 142-146, 235; as a public speaker, 171-172, 183-188, 194-197, 204-206; master of himself, 235; compared with Jackson, 260; attitude toward public visitors, 301-302; lack of sovereignty, 304; simplicity of manner, 305-306; qualities of a leader, 307-308; morbid dislike of guard, 310-311; forbearance, 315, 320; precision and minuteness of information, 358; living power of integrity and elasticity, 359; greatness in moral strength, 359-361; summed up by Nicolay, 361-362; peace-maker, 364, 456; wisdom and moderation, 374; guileless and single-hearted, 387; power to make quick and important decisions, 412; will compared to Andrew Jackson, 413; easily accessible to visitors, 450; no case too trivial, 451; ability to say no, 451,452; diplomacy in Schofield-Rosecrans episode, 456-457; loyalty to friends, 458; fortitude, 462; imagination versus reason, 466; tireless worker, 473; magnanimity toward opponents, 476-477; stern when necessary, 477-478; candor and friendliness in criticism, 489-490; willingness to admit errors, 502; quickness of perception, 527; tenacity, 527; Sherman's tribute, 565-566; unselfishness, 566-567; magnanimity toward southern leaders, 580; clemency in granting pardons, 586

Ambitions, presentiment of future greatness, 18-19, 27, 53; desire to be the "DeWitt Clinton of Illinois," 61; encouraged by friends, 116; generous quality of, 159; senatorial, 161-164; presidential, 331; not concerned over political future, 529-532 Appearance, at fifteen, 12; at nineteen, 20; in 1832, 42; in 1847, 105-106; in 1849, 109-110, 111; "man of sorrows," 113-114; singular walk, 114-115; on the circuit, 125-127; face transformed in speaking, 181; in repose and on the stump, 194-195; in 1858, 201, 205; in 1860, 215; height, 247; as President-elect, 253-254, 274-275, 279; arrival at Washington, 282; inauguration, 285-286; in his reception room, 302-303; changed by anxiety, 355; Nicolay's description, 361; face a surprise to Winchell, 382; unconventional dress, 356-357, 377, 450; changed by grief, 462-463; Frederick Douglass' impressions, 484, 485, 486; saddest man in the world, 543-546 Courage, fighting qualities, 27-29; encounter with a bully, 29; in Black Hawk War, 38-40; rescues Baker from a fight, 91-92; duel with Shields, 93; under discouragements, 292, 331; did not fear attempt upon his life, 540-542 Honesty, at nineteen, 20; as a salesman, 31; "Honest Abe," 31, 53, 68, 171; trust funds never used, 46; in voting, 101-102; as a lawyer, 130, 138, 143; refused to defend the guilty, 136-137; intellectual and moral, 144 Horsemanship, 415-416, 491, 562, 563 Justice, anecdote of Black Hawk War, 38; refusal to countenance injustice, 130-131, 453; sense of, 476-478; injustice to Gen. Meade, 503-506; Literary methods and style, early example, 63-65; example from Douglas debates, 89-90; methods, 470-471; style, 471-473 Kindness and sympathy, 16; to animals, 13, 76; everybody's friend, 35 in his home, 113 regard for old friends and relatives, 119, 121-123; to old colored woman, 128; to young attorneys, 130; for Col. Scott, 410 for soldiers, 395-397, 400-401, 499-500; embarrassing results of friendliness, 470 Melancholy and sadness, caused by love of Anne Rutledge, 49; temporary attack, 95-96; causes, 112-113; struggles with, 115-117; depression in 1854, 161; evidence of, 170, 175, 198, 246, 361; over defeat for senate, 204; on inaugural journey, 266-267; after Bull Run, 330-331; over war victims, 401-402, 500; engraved on features, 462-463; summer of 1864, 537-538, 542-546; Matthew Arnold's poem, 546 Memory, for faces and names, 9, 39, 40; for events, 36; retentive, 467, 468 Military sagacity, 380-386, 390-395, 405-407, 411-414, 416-417, 502, 506 Modesty, unassuming manner in politics, 163; about printing speeches, 216; in regard to presidential nomination, 227-228; as president, 304, 306, 307, 459; natural, 360; about second nomination, 535; on news of second election, 547 Popularity, as a young man, 28-29, 75; in New Salem, 35, 53; in Black Hawk War, 39, 41; universal favorite, 130; in Kansas, 213, 214; at Republican convention in 1860, 229-230; among old friends and relatives, 263-264; Confederate soldiers' greeting at Petersburg, 567-568 Physical strength, in boyhood, 9; incidents showing, 91-93, 389, 401 Religious nature, knowledge of the Bible, 118-119; shown in letter to step-brother, 120; reliance on Divine help, 265, 267, 268; influence of son's death, 351-352; spirituality highly organized, 360, 361, 362; religious spirit, 385-386; shown in fortitude, 462; quotes the Bible, 473; his views on, 478-479; not a church member, 478; shown in second inaugural address, 557-559 Tact, 357; in official relations, 368-370, 378; anecdotes illustrating, 451-457 Temperance, reply to Douglas's taunt, 83, 85, 130, 203; Voice, magnetism of, 59; not pleasing, 142, 221; clear and vigorous, 205; high but clear, 302, 515 Wit and humor, power of satire, 17; examples of, 56-57; love of practical joke, 57; no end to his fund of, 84; used against adversaries, 87, 139-140, 202-204; chief attraction at dinners, 110; cultivated, 113; stories not always dignified, 139; repartee, 157; advantage of L. over Douglas, 86, 195; indelicacy charge refuted, 258; safety-valve of L., 332-333; enjoyment of "Orpheus C. Kerr," 334; at cabinet meetings, 336; soldiers' humor appreciated by L., 399-400; humorists liked by L., 467-468 PRIVATE LIFE: ancestry, 1-5; L's own account, 32-33; birth, 1,4; illegitimate parentage legend, 4; Lincoln family in Kentucky, 4; removal to Indiana, 5-6; in Indiana, 6-19; reminiscences by Dennis Hanks, 7-9; death of his mother, 10; love for his mother, 5, 10, 21; tribute to her influence, 11; his father remarries, 11; affection for step-mother, 11, 119, 123, 124, 263; moves to Macon Co., Ill., 21, 33; his father's possessions, 21; death of father, 22; L. helps build log cabin, 23; splitting rails, 23; flatboat voyages down the Mississippi, 23-24; settles in New Salem, 24-26, 33; patent for navigation device, 24-26; athletic skill, 27-29; first meeting with Smoot, 29; meets Governor Yates, 30; love of story-telling, 30-31; home life, 31, 113, 115; autobiography, 32-34; struggle with poverty, 45, 47, 69-71, 209, 225; love for Anne Rutledge, 49-52; close of his boyhood and youth, 52-54; New Salem a desolate waste, 54; moves to Springfield, 33, 69-70; struggles of a young lawyer, 69-84; meeting with Speed, 69; shares his home, 70, 88; in state politics, 85-96; Mary Todd's satirical article, 93; love affairs with Matilda Edwards and Mary Todd, 94-95; derangement, 95; goes to Kentucky with Speed, 96; marriage to Mary Todd, 95, 96; lives at Globe Tavern, 96; purchases Dressar home, 96; enters national politics, 97-108; back in Springfield, 109; simplicity of home life in Springfield, 110; income from law practice, 110; property owned, 111; his children, 111-112; L. as husband and father, 113; marriage unhappy, 112-117; did his own marketing, 114; visits Chicago, 117; regard for relatives, 119; purchases home for father, 119 letters to step-brother, 120-123; idol of his step-mother, 123-124; wealth, not desired by L., 125; L. as a lawyer, 125-146; careless about money, 130; keeping partnership accounts, 133; anecdote about his wealth, 216; summer home during presidency, 401; home life in White House, 464-465; desire to live in California, 549; plans for retirement, 584-585. Education, early education, 7-9, 11-19; early schools attended, 11-13; his copy book inscription, 13; first efforts in composition, 13; mental training from reading, 14; scrap-book kept in youth, 14; handwriting at seventeen, 19; book of arithmetic examples, 19 knowledge of astronomy and geology, 20-21; study of grammar, 26-27; L.'s own account, 33; knowledge of drama, 79; L. as a student, 130-131; musical taste, 466-467; unashamed of early deficiencies, 468-469 Books and reading, influence of first books, 8, 14-16; his own testimony, 15; the ruined volume, 14, 16; method of reading, 131; wrote verses, 132; books in White House office, 300; love for Shakespeare, Browning, and Byron, 387; memory for poetry, 356; poets best loved, 466-467; humorists liked, 467; best-loved books, 468; novel reading, 469 Employments, first work, 16; first dollar earned, 17-18; flatboat constructed for commercial enterprise, 17-18; his first employer, 19-20; first flatboat journey to New Orleans, 195; second flatboat journey to New Orleans, 23-34; clerk at New Salem, 26-34; Offutt's store closed, 35; brief career as country merchant, 42-44; blacksmith trade considered, 42; surveys and plans Petersburg, 47, 67; notion to become a carpenter, 71 Law career, early interest in law, 9, 19; study and practice, 33-43; begins study of, 46-47; begins practice, 47; period covered, 55; reverence for law, 64; in Springfield, 69; without plans or money, 60-70; asking credit, 70; partnership with Stuart and Logan, 71; with Herndon, 71; riding the circuit, 71-84; borrows, then owns a horse, 71; welcome by other lawyers, 72; humility, 72; court scene, 72-73; freedom in social intercourse, 73; leading lawyers of the day, 73-74; adventures and hardships, 74; popularity and appearance, 75-76; not afraid of unpopular cases, 77; wins case of widow of revolutionary pensioner, 77-79; wins case for Jefferson, 79; ridiculing the eloquence of opponent, 80-81; breach of promise suit, 81-82; ready wit, 83-84; dissolved partnership with Logan, 97; partnership with Herndon, 97-98; declined partnership with Goodrich, 109; resumes practice in 1849, 109, 125-146; legal fee ridiculously small, 125; appearance in court, 125-128; defending a colored woman, 128; dividing fee with defendant, 128-129; refused to take unjust cases, 130-131; keeping accounts, 1133; fees moderate, 133; defends son of Jack Armstrong, 133-136; would not press for pay, 135-136; refused to defend guilty, 136-137; would never advise unwise suits, 137-138; returns fee, 138; anecdotes of L. at the bar, 138-140; his rank as a lawyer, 140-146; special characteristics, 145 Recreations, games, 129; dancing, 210; theatre, 469-470; fondness for walking, 46 PUBLIC LIFE, Nicknames, "Railsplitter," 9, 23, 230-231; "Uncle Abe," 75; "Old Abe," 105; "Honest Abe," 31, 53, 68, 171 Oratory, first efforts, 27; reputation, 62; spoke without manuscript, 89; manner of speaking described, 100, 127, 172; used old-fashioned words, 139, 146; jury speeches, 146; eloquence of Bloomington speech, 167-168; compared with Douglas, 89, 177, 182-207; Cooper Institute speech, 217-221; New England tour, 221-223; W.J. Bryan's opinion, 473; Gettysburg address, 512-515; eloquence of second inaugural, 557-559 Public questions, L's views on: Mexican war, 101-102, 131; Missouri compromise, 150-160; Kansas-Nebraska bill, 152-155; secession views, 262, 287-291, 320-321; labor and capital, 348-350; emancipation, 447, 482-484; reconstruction policy, 576-581 Slavery, L. opposes pro-slavery enactment in Illinois, 65-66; attitude shown in Douglas debates, 89-90, 191-194; 205; sale of slave girl, 147-148; early views, 148-149; opposed slavery in Congress and in speeches, 149-151; views in letters to Speed, 151-153; argues eternal right at Bloomington Convention, 167-168; resolution adopted, 169; "House divided against itself," 177-182; Cincinnati speech, 211-212; L.'s policy, 419-446; Channing interview, 427; Chicago clergymen's delegation, 427; Greeley and L., 429-431; L's own account, 446-448; 4th annual message, 552 Early political career, change in views, 8; made election clerk, 32; appointed postmaster at Salem, 44; made deputy surveyor, 47; natural taste for politics, 55; candidate for presidential elector, 87; Whig leader, 87; canvassed Illinois in Clay-Polk campaign, 99; leader of Whigs in Congress, 100; Whig delegate to National Convention, 104; seeks appointment as land commissioner, 106-107; little interested in politics until 1854, 147; building up the Free Soil party, 150; admits being a Whig, 153, 157; generosity toward rivals, 160; considered for vice president, 170, 228-229; activity in Fremont campaign, 170-173; no political enemies, 232; bored with talk on politics, 240 Illinois legislature, defeat and election, 33; first candidacy unsuccessful, 41-42, 47; campaign of 1834, and election, 48; aids canal bill, 49; reputation in, 49; renominated, 1836, 55; campaign methods, 56-60; lightning rod anecdote, 56-57; not an aristocrat, 57-58; reply to Early, 58-59; letter to Allen, 59-60; election, 60; journey to capital, 60; meets Judge Caton, 61; first meeting with Douglas, 61-62; removal of Illinois Capitol, 62; an early speech, 62-65; opposes pro-slavery enactment, 65-66; contest with Ewing, 66-67; campaign of 1838 and election, 85; end of legislative service, 86; election and resignation, 1864, 160-161; senatorial contest, 161-161 Black Hawk War, candidate for captain, 36; memories of L., 36-37; first experience drilling troops, 37; rescues an Indian, 37-38; meeting with Stuart, 38-39; L. re-enlists, 39; recollects Major Anderson after 29 years, 39; courage as a soldier, 40; his own account of his service, 40-41; popularity with comrades, 41 Congress, aspirations, 97; elected to lower house, 1846, 34, 99-100, 159; Whig leader, 100; reputation in, 100; first speech, 101; Mexican War attitude, 101-102; notable speech and ridicule of Gen. Cass, 102-104; bill for abolition of slavery, 104; campaign methods, 131-132; senatorial contest, 1855, 161-163; defeated, 164; senatorial contest with Douglas, 1858, 177-207; defeated, 208; depression of L. over, 208-209 Presidency, presentiment of L. concerning, 18-19; modest over proposed nomination, 144; almost in his grasp, 213; Cooper Institute speech aids toward, 220, 232; suggested as a candidate, 227-228; nomination, 231-237; sittings for life mask, 237-243; cast of hands, 242; notified of nomination, 243-244; opposition of Springfield clergymen, 247; election, 1860, 250-251; non-partisan appointments, 256-257; unembarrassed by promises, 259, 260; preparation for inauguration, 263; journey to Washington, 265-280; stories of disguises, 280; week preceding inauguration, 281-283; ceremonies described, 283-292; oath administered, 284, 291; first night at the White House, 292; cabinet appointments, 293; cabinet changes, 294; difficulties selecting loyal and capable men, 295; impression on people, 298-310; modest as president, 306-307; fears for attempted assassination, 308-310; L's dislike for guard, 311; Civil War begun, 312; first call for troops, 312-314; creates excitement, 314; Boston riots, 315; loyalty of Douglas, 315-316; proclamation of blockade of Southern ports, 316-318; blockade extended, 318; Virginia convention waits on L., 318; L's war policy outlined, 319-320; L's conciliatory course, 320-321; tries to save Kentucky, 321-322; special session of Congress, 322; L's first message, 322-325; difficulties of a new administration, 325-326; Bull Run disaster, 326; visits the army in Virginia, 327; depression following Bull Run, 329-331; unfaltering courage, 331; relief in story-telling, 332-333; depression relieved by humor, 333-336; measuring up with Sumner, 336; diplomacy in Mason and Slidell affair, 340-344; in French invasion of Mexico, 345; building the "Monitor," 346-347; first annual message, 347-350; reception at White House, 350; illness and death at the White House, 351-352; secret service incidents, 352-353; annoyed by office-seekers, 353; Mr. Ross at the White House, 353-356; William Kelley at the White House, 356; Goldwin Smith's impressions, 356-359; tributes from Hapgood, Bigelow, and Nicolay, 359-362; cabinet relations, 363-379; with Stanton, 364-379; with Seward, 366-371; Cameron and Stanton, 371-373; L. considers McClellan over-cautious, 392-395; L. visits hospitals, 400-401; differences of opinion with McClellan, 404; letter to him about campaign, 405-406; urges action, 406-407; L's defence of him, 407; L. recalls him, 410; reinstates him, 411-412; McClellan's own account, 413; correspondence, 416-417; L's summing up of McClellan, 417-418; signs emancipation proclamation, 441; his life as president, 449; society at the White House, 449-450; public receptions, 450; tact with favor seekers and bores, 451-453; sense of justice, 453; answering improper questions, 454; settles the Curtis-Gamble dispute, 454-457; appoints Schofield, 455-457; views of his own position, 459; dealing with cranks, 459-461; Fredericksburg disaster, 461-461; responsibility of his position, 462-463; home life in the White House, 464-465; visits Army of the Potomac, 465-466; tireless worker, 473; health, 473-474; his letter file, 474; Agassiz and L., 475-476; his official acts not influenced by personal consideration, 476-477; criticism of the administration, 480-481; war policy opposed by Greeley, 480; by high official, 481; Democrats of the North, 481; Boston abolitionists, 482-484; effect of abuse, 481; Western delegation, 484; personal responsibility for policy, 484; interview with Douglas on enlisting colored soldiers, 484-486; McClellan's removal, 487; relations with Burnside, 487; with Hooker, 487-490; candor and friendliness with officers, 489-490; visits army of the Potomac, 490-492; his view of Charleston attack, 490; effect of Chancellorsville on L. 492-493; reads Stedman's poem to cabinet, 494-495; the tide turns, 495; Lee invades Pennsylvania, 497; Hooker proves unfit, 497-498; Meade appointed, 498; L's feelings during Gettysburg battle, 498-500; joy over Vicksburg, 501-503; praise of Grant, 502; criticism of Meade for Lee's escape, 503-504; Meade asks to be relieved, 504; criticism answered, 504; resignation not insisted upon, 505; L's opinion modified, 506-507; improved conditions, 507; defence of emancipation proclamation, 507-508; Thanksgiving proclamation, 508-510; fall election, 1863, 510; L. upheld, 511; his own comment, 511; Gettysburg dedication, 512-515; relations with Grant, 516-527; appoints Grant Lieut-General, 516; summons him to Washington, 517; Grant receives commission, 517-519; first meeting with Grant, 520; L's letter of satisfaction, 521; military orders issued by L., 522; interested in Grant's career, 523; interest in Grant's political aspirations, 523; Grant-Stanton episode, 526-527; Grant's opinion of Lincoln, 527; campaign of 1864, 528-535; L's attitude toward a second term, 528-532; New England's attitude toward the administration, 529; relations with Chase, 532-534, 549-550; candidates of 1864, 532-533; L's nomination, 1864, 534; acceptance speech, 535; Early's raid, 532-537; call for more troops, 537; war policy criticized, 537; depression of L., 538-539; campaign of 1864, 539-540; McClellan a candidate, 539; L's secret pledge to support successor, 540; attempt on life, 540-541; effect of burdens and anxiety during war, 542-546; election of 1864, victory, 546-549; Grant's telegram, 548; Seward's tribute, 548-549; Chase's resignation, 549-550; other cabinet changes, 550-552; fourth annual message, 552; colored people at White House reception, 552-553; negotiates with Southern peace commissioners, 554-556; assumes responsibility for unpopular measures, 554-555; scheme for compensation emancipation, 556-557; second inauguration, 557-560; close of the war, 561-563; escapes office-seekers, 563; with Grant, Sherman, and Porter at City Point, 562-566; on the River Queen, 563-566; concern about Schofield, 565; on the Malvern 566-567; at Petersburg, 567-568; at Richmond, 568-573; news of Richmond's fall, 568; visit to Richmond, 569; welcomed by the negroes, 571; Southerners' reception, 572; joy over Lee's surrender, 573; scene at Capitol, 574-575; L.'s speech to the multitude, 576; reconstruction views, 576-581; instructions to Grant on final conference with Lee, 577-578; feeling toward the South, 577-580; pardoning confederates, 579-580; the last day: talk with Robert, 582; receives visitors, 583; last cabinet meeting, 583-584; significant dreams, 583-584; drive with Mrs. Lincoln, 584-585; last official acts, 585-587; reaches theatre, 587; the shot fired, 588; Booth's escape, 588-589; Walt Whitman's description, 589; Booth's plan, 590; Rathbone's account, 590; death-bed, 591; Welles's account, 591-594; a nation's grief, 594-599; funeral ceremonies at the White House, 596; lying in state at Capitol, 597; funeral train to Springfield, 597-598; interment, 599

Lincoln, Edward Baker, L's son, birth, 111

Lincoln, John, L's great-grandfather, 2

Lincoln, John, L's half-brother, 11

Lincoln, Josiah, L's uncle, 3

Lincoln, Mary Todd, L's wife, published satirical articles about James Shields, 93; ambitions, 94; characteristics, 94; engagement to L. broken, 95; marriage, 94, 96; hospitality, 110; pro-slavery views, 167; meeting with Volk, 241; on inaugural journey, 266; opinion of Riddle on, 275-276; censured for frivolity, 450; defines L's religion, 478; visits Army of Potomac, 490; receives Grant, 518-520; fears of L's assassination, 540; desired to visit Europe, 549; last drive with L., 584-585; plans to visit theatre, 586; at theatre, 587; shock at assassination, 589; prostrated by L's death, 591; at L's death-bed, 593; unable to attend obsequies, 596

Lincoln, Matilda, L's half-sister, 11

Lincoln, Mordecai, son of Samuel Lincoln, 2

Lincoln, Mordecai, L's uncle, adventure with Indians, 3; character, 3-4; L's characterization of, 5; opinion of L. about, 264

Lincoln, Nancy Hanks, L's mother, marriage, 4; slurs upon her name, 4-5; character and appearance, 5; Dennis Hanks's opinion of, 7; death and funeral, 10; epitaph, 10; love of L. for, 10, 21; influence on L., 10-11; tribute of L. to, 11, 352

Lincoln, Robert Todd, L's son, birth, 111; student at Harvard, 221; gripsack anecdote, 283; student and soldier, 464; interview with L. about war, 582; with his mother after assassination, 591; at L's death-bed, 594

Lincoln, Samuel, L's English forbear, 1

Lincoln, Sarah, L's half-sister, 11; death, 17

Lincoln, Sarah, L's sister, birth, 4

Lincoln, Sarah Johnston, L's step-mother, marries Thomas Lincoln, 11; mutual fondness of L. and, 11, 119, 123-124, 263; quoted, 14; death, 124; visit of L. before inauguration, 263

Lincoln, Thomas, L's father, birth, 3; rescue from Indians, 3; marriage to Nancy Hanks, 4; moves to Rock Spring farm, 4; moves to Indiana, 5-6; second marriage, 11; moves to Illinois, 21; nicknames, 21; character-sketch, 21-23; death, 22, 120; epitaph, 22; story-telling ability, 31; death 120; solicitude for, 120-121; L. visits grave, 263

Lincoln, Thomas, L's son, birth, 111; "Little Tad," 464; companion of father, 464-466, 490, 491; death, 465; loved by soldiers, 465-466; anecdote of L's last speech, 575-576; grief over death of father, 596

Lincoln, William Wallace, L's son, birth, 111; death, 351, 464; influence of death on L., 478

Lincoln-Douglas Debates, comparative powers of speakers, 89, 177, 182-207. Extracts, Springfield, 89-90; Peoria, 155-157; Quincy and Alton, 191-194; 205

Linder, General, quoted, 62, 66, 91; talks against time, 80

Livermore, George, given proclamation pen, 445

Logan, John A., quoted, 286, 292

Logan, Mrs. John A., quoted, 197

Logan, Stephen T., mentioned, 74, 186; law partner of L., 71; Whig debater, 89; partnership dissolved, 97; anecdote of shirt, 139; favors L. for legislature, 161; elected to legislature, 162; L's champion in legislature, 163

Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, abolitionist, 345

Long, Dr., quoted, 181

"Long Nine," delegates to senate convention, 1836, 60, 62

Lookout Mountain, Grant's success, 516

Loring, George B., quoted, 282-283

Lossing, Benson J., quoted, 342-343

Louisiana, seceded, 261

Louisville "Journal," L's liking for, 27

Lovejoy, Elijah, 244

Lovejoy, Owen, abolitionist, 244; mentioned, 378, 422, 423, 436

Lowell, James Russell, abolitionist, 245; quoted, 340

Lucas, Major, quoted, 93

Lyons, Lord, 343

McClellan, George B., mentioned, 356, 375, 488; Stanton's hostility, 367, 407, 411; difficulties with Army of Potomac, 367; letter from L. on over-cautiousness, 392-395; as a soldier, 403-404; Meade and Grant quoted, 404; L's personal regard for, 404; appointed general of Union armies, 405; L.'s letter about plan of campaign, 405-406; urging action, 406-407; L. defends, 407; recalled from Peninsula; succeeded by Pope, 410; reinstated, 411-412; own account, 413; Antietam victory, 414; inaction after Antietam criticized, 414; quoted on L's visit to army, 414-415; correspondence with L., 416; replaced by Burnside, 417; L's opinion, 417-418, 457-458; bad news from the Peninsula, 425; fails to reach Richmond, 454; removal from Army of the Potomac, 487; L's presidential competitor, 539; defeated for presidency, 547

McCormick, R.C., quoted, 215, 252

McCormick reaper case, in 1857, 173-176

McCulloch, Hugh, quoted, 332; secretary of the treasury, 294; at L's death-bed, 591-593

McCullough, John Edward, summoned to meet L., 469-470

McDonald, Senator, 138

McHenry, Henry, quoted, 46

McNeill, James, (McNamar), Anne Rutledge's suitor, 49-50

Macon County, Ill., Lincoln family settle in, 21

Manassas defeat, 410-411

Markland, Mr., quoted, 321-322

Mason, Senator, 100

Mason and Slidell affair, 340-344

Massachusetts, first to put regiment in the field in Civil War, 314

Meade, George G., mentioned, 499, 501; opinion of McClellan, 404; succeeds Hooker, 498; criticized for Lee's escape, 503-504; asks to be relieved, 504; answers criticism, 504; does not press resignation, 505; L.'s opinion modified, 506-507

Meigs, Montgomery C., 334; at L's death-bed, 591

"Merrimac," frightens New Yorkers, 338; Hampton Roads defeat, 345; engagement with "Monitor," 390-391

Messages and proclamations, inaugural message, loss feared, 283; colloquialisms in, 471-473

Messages and proclamations, quotations, inaugural address, 287-291; volunteers called for, 313-314; blockade of southern ports, 317-318; Key West, Tortugas, and Santa Rosa, concerning authority, 318; Virginia convention, response to, 319-320; to congress, July 4, 1861, 322-325; first annual message, 348-350; President's general order, No. 1, Feb. 22, 1862, 383; thanksgiving proclamation, April 10, 1862, 385-386; emancipation, appeal to border states, 421-422; final proclamation, 433-435, 438, 441-444; second annual message, 440-441; Thanksgiving, 1863, 508-510; fourth annual message, 552; inaugural address, second, 557-559; Gladstone's tribute, 559-560. See also Speeches and Lectures

Metzgar murder case, 134

Mexican War, attitude of L. toward, 101-102, 131

Mexico, French invasion, 345

"Miami," Federal steamboat, 386, 391

Milroy, R.H., 333, 334

Milwaukee, speech of L. at State Fair, 389

Minnesota, asks execution of Indians, 453

Minter, Graham, L's schoolmaster, quoted, 32

"Mirror," The Manchester (N.H.), quoted, 221

Missionary Ridge, Grant's success, 516

Mississippi, seceded, 261

Missouri Compromise, views of L. and Douglas, 150-160

Missouri, factional quarrels, 454-457

Mitchell, General, telegram from, 388, 389

"Monitor," engagement with "Merrimac," 390-391; origin of, 345-347

Moore, Ex-governor, 266

Moore, Mrs., step-sister, 263, 264

Morgan, Edwin D., 533

Morse, John T., quoted, 364

"Nasby, Petroleum V." (David Ross Locke), read by L., 467-468, 548

Nebraska Bill. See Kansas-Nebraska Bill

Negroes, enlistment in army, 373, 484-486; justified by L., 507; New Year's reception, 552-553; grief over death of L., 597. See also Emancipation; Slavery

Neill, Secretary to L., quoted, 536-537, 585

New Brunswick affair, 356

New England, dissatisfaction with L., 529, speeches and visit of L., 221-223

New Salem, Ill., L. settles at, 24; L. appointed postmaster, 44; speech of L. before literary society, 44; now a desolate waste, 54

New Year's presidential reception, in 1862, 350; in 1863, 441; in 1865, 552-553

New York City, visit of L. in 1860, 215-221, 225-226; on inaugural journey, 276; funeral ceremonies, 598

New York "Tribune." See Greeley, Horace

New York troops, reviewed July 4, 1861, 326

Newpapers, L's favorite newspaper, 27; surveillance, 301

Nichols, John W., quoted, 541-542

Nicolay, John G., L's private secretary, 266; quoted, 302, 361-362, 478

Norfolk captured, 391-392

Norris, James H., 134

Nott and Brainard, quoted, 220

Noyes, George C., quoted, 194

Oberkleine, Frederick, address to L. at Cincinnati, 271-272; L's reply, 272-273

Office-seekers, patience of L. toward, 252; demands of, 296; annoy L., 353-354; actor who wanted consulship, 470

Offutt, Denton, 26; relations with L., 23-24; 26, quoted, 27; store closed in 1832, 35

Oglesby, Richard J., quoted, 229, 230

Oregon, federal office offered L., 107

Pain, John, 169

Parke, John G., 385

Parker, Theodore, abolitionist, 166

Parks, C.S., quoted, 144, 162

Pearson, John, quoted, 81

Pearson, Henry Greenleaf, quoted, 529-530

Peck, Ebenezer, mentioned, 171, 227; quoted, 87

Pemberton, J.C., 501, 525, 526

Pennsylvania, invaded by Lee, 497

Pennypacker, Isaac R., quoted, 505

Petersburg, Ill., surveyed and planned by L., 67

Petersburg, Va., victory, and visit by L., 567

Philadelphia, visited on inaugural journey, 277-278; receives news of L's death, 594-596

Phillips, Wendell, abolitionist, 166, 245; interview with L., 482-484

Piatt, Don, quoted, 252-253

Pierce, Franklin, 354

Pierpont, John, visits L., 468-469

Pinkerton, Allan, 179

Polk, James K., campaign, 98-99

Pomeroy, Senator, 368

Poore, Benjamin Perley, quoted, 301-302, 445

Pope, John, defeat at Manassas, 410-411; succeeded by McClellan, 411, 414; Bull Run disaster, 437

Porter, D.D., aids Grant, 501; interview with L. at City Point, 563-566, 578; L's visit to the Malvern, 566-567; visits Petersburg with L., 567-568; described visit to Richmond with L., 568-573; interview with L. at City Point, 578; quoted, 522-523

Prime, Irenaeus, quoted, 276

Pringle, Cyrus, the case of, 398-399

Proclamations. See Messages and Proclamations

Quakers, L's ancestry, 2; war scruples, 398-399; demand emancipation, 425-427

Rail-splitting episode, 23

Ramsey, Senator, 536

Rathbone, Major, at Ford's Theatre, 587; struggles with Booth, 590-591

Raymond, Henry J., quoted, 205, 314-315

Rebellion, War of. See Civil War

Reconstruction, L.'s speech on, quoted, 575-576; policy of L., 576-581

Reid, Whitelaw, 548

Reno, Jesse L., 385

Republican party, birth of, 159; organized in Illinois, 169; national convention in 1856, 170; asked L. to speak in Ohio, 211; advice of L. to, 219; Illinois convention of 1860, 229; national convention, 1860, 231-237; growth and tendencies, 251; fears for L's loyalty, 271; partisan and unreasonable, 293; office-seekers, 296; elections of 1863, 510-511; national convention of 1864, 534

Reynolds, John, call for volunteers, 36, 39

Rhett, Robert B., 100

Richardson, William A., resolution supported by L., 101

Richmond, plans to capture, 405-407; fall of, 568; visited by L., 568-573

Riddle, A.G. part in Lincoln-Chase affair, 533-534; urges Chase's appointment as chief justice, 550-551; quoted, 274, 276, 281, 291, 381, 395-396, 450, 451, 543-544

Rock Valley, 35

Rollins, James S., quoted, 554

Rosecrans, W.S., sent to Missouri, 456-457

Ross, A.M., quoted, 352-356

Rothschild, Alonzo, quoted, 294-295

Rousseau, Kentucky legislator, 321

Russell, Lord John, protest of, in Trent affair, 343

Rutledge, Anne, L's love-affair with, 49-52

Schenck, Robert C., 333

Schofield, J.M., mentioned, 564, 565; replaces Curtis, L's letter of appointment, 455-457; joins Sherman, 457; L's concern about ability, 565

Scott, Colonel, refused leave on death of wife, 408-410

Scott, Winfield, L's order to hold or retake forts, 261; warns L. of danger, 278; pays respects to L., 281-282; lacking as politician, 337; dislike of Hooker, 487

Schurz, Carl, seconded L's nomination, 234; quoted, 307

Secession, states that withdrew, 261; attitude of L. toward, 262, 287-291, 320-321; not considered rebellion, 292

Sedgwick, John, view of Meade's failure to attack Lee, 504

Selby, Paul, quoted, 158-160

Seward, Fanny, 592

Seward, Frederick W., warns L. of danger, 278, 280; attacked and wounded, 591-592

Seward, Mrs. Frederick W., 423

Seward, William H., mentioned, 17, 185, 296, 297, 305, 343, 441, 485, 593; opposes Nebraska bill, 153; doubt of his nomination, 215; statesmanship, 231; candidate for president, 231-234; eloquence of, 245; cabinet possibility, 258, 275; sends warning to L., 278; appointment as secretary of state, 293, 294, 295; press refused information, 301; diplomacy, credited to, 341; "Premier," self-styled, 364; arrogance, 366-368; rivalry with Chase, 366-370; resignation, 368; senate, opposition of, 368; L's objection to his resignation, 369; opposes negro enlistment, 373; emancipation views, 423; preliminary proclamation views, 436-437, 438; with Grant at White House reception, 518; tribute to L. on his re-election, 548-549; with L. meets peace commission, 554-557; L's visit, after Richmond, 573; attacked and wounded, 591-592

Seward, Mrs. William H., 592

Shakespeare, L's fondness for his works, 387, 466

Shepley, General, receives L. at Richmond, 572-573

Sherman, John, introduces brother to L., 298-299

Sherman, William T., mentioned, 367, 457, 516, 579; quoted, 298-299; march to the sea, 517; L's opinion, 552; at Atlanta, 537; victories after Atlanta, 561-562; interview with L. at City Point, 563-566, 578; tribute to L., 565-566; anxiety of L. and Grant, 583, 584

Shields, James, ridiculed by Mary Todd, 93; duel with L., 93; L. wishes to succeed in congress, 161, 163

Shuman, Andrew, reports Lincoln-Douglas debates, 198; quoted, 199

Sibley, Judge, quoted, 84

Simpson, Bishop, officiates at L's funeral, 596

Slavery, protest against pro-slavery act in Illinois, 65; L's defense of fugitive slaves, 77; Independence Hall flag-raising, 278; L. introduces bill against, 104; L's growing opposition to, 147-153; L's attitude in letter to Speed, 151-153; Peoria speech, extract, 155-157; L's growing opposition to, 166-169, 178-182; knowledge of L. regarding, 186; Cincinnati speech, 211-212; Cooper Institute speech, 218-220; L's hatred for, growing, 245; fugitive slave law, 248-249, 434-435; political issue, 251; attitude of L. toward, 254; L. opposes compromises, 261; legislation against, 1862, 421; L's own account of his views, 446-448; L's attitude in fourth annual message, 552; constitutional amendment, 553-554. See also Emancipation

Slocum, Henry W., 504

Smith, Caleb B., secretary of the interior, 293, 294; non-committal on Ericsson's invention, 347

Smith, Goldwin, visits L., 357-358; quoted, 358-359

Smith, James, 591

Smith, William Henry, quoted, 269-273, 550

Smoot, Coleman, friendship with L., 29-30

"Soldiers' Rest," Lincoln's summer home during presidency, 401

South Carolina, seceded, 261

Southern Confederacy. See Confederate states

Sparrow, Thomas and Betsy, 6

Spaulding, Judge, 533, 534

Speeches and lectures, in congress in 1848, 40; candidate for member of legislature, 41; to New Salem literary society, 44; stump-speaking, 55; on "Spot Resolutions," 101; on the presidency and general politics, 102; age of different inventions, 119; to Scott club of Springfield, 147; eulogy on death of Clay, 147; Bloomington convention, 167-168; "House-divided-against-itself," 178-182, 473; lectures in winter of 1859, 210; political speeches in Ohio, 211; political speeches in Kansas, 213; invitation to lecture in Beecher's church, 214; Cooper Institute speech, 215-221, 223-224; in New England, 221-223; accusation of fees received for speeches, 223-224; Five Points Sunday School, N.Y., talk, 225-226; inaugural journey, 268-276; Wisconsin state fair, 389

Speeches and lectures, quotations, influence of Weem's life of Washington, 15; Perpetuation of our political institutions, 63-65; Peace plea, 158; Bloomington ratification meeting, 169-170; "House-divided-against-itself," 180, 426, 473; Appeal for a hearing in southern Illinois, 199-200; Cincinnati, 1859, 211; Cooper Institute speech, 218-219; Presidential nomination, response, 243; Springfield farewell, 267; Cincinnati in 1861, 270; Cincinnati, reply to Oberkleine, 272-273; Philadelphia, on inaugural journey, 278; after Bull Run, 328; Slavery, 426; Emancipation proclamation, speech following, 444-445; Gettysburg address, text, 512, comments, 512-515; Grant's commission, presentation of, 519; Richmond, to negroes, 571; Close of war, 574; Reconstruction, last speech, 575-576. See also Lincoln-Douglas debates; Messages and proclamations

Speed, Joshua F., mentioned, 294, 322; first interview with L., 69-70; L's home with, 88; intimate friend of L., 95-96; opinion of L's ability as a lawyer, 145-146; L's letter to sister of Speed, quoted, 148; L's letter to, on slavery, 151; compares L. and Douglas, 182-183; appointed attorney general, 294; at L's death-bed, 591

"Spot Resolutions," speech, 101

Springfield, Ill., L. moves to, 60; agitation over removal of capital, 62, 66; removal accomplished, 69; L. returns to, 109; L's departure, Feb. 11, 1861, 265-266; recollections of L. about, 584; funeral ceremonies for L., 599

Stanton, Edwin M., mentioned, 356, 357, 399, 461, 497; professional meeting with L., 173-176; contempt for L., 175; appointed secretary of war, 294; member of Buchanan's cabinet, 294, 295; applicant for office, 296; press refused information, 301; Mason and Slidell capture approved, 341; impulsiveness and violence, 364; antagonism to Welles, 364, 368; relations with L., 364-379; resignation threatened, 368; resignation withdrawn, 370; master-mind of cabinet, 370-371; replaces Cameron in cabinet, 371; Cameron's own account, 372-373; Fortress Monroe, visit to, 386-392; hostility to McClellan, 407, 411-412; refuses Col. Scott leave of absence, 408-410; death of his child, 423; opposes the "Boston set," 482; discouraged at Hooker's resignation, 498; dispute with Grant, 526-527; irritated by L's humor, 548; relations with Blair, 552; dispatch to Grant, 577; reconstruction plan proposed, 581; at L's death-bed, 591, 593; at Seward's bedside, 592

Steamboat Invention, L's, 24-26

Stearns, George L., 482

Stedman, E.C., quoted, 494-495

Stephens, Alexander H., mentioned, 100; opinion of L. as a speaker, 100-101; Southern peace commissioner, 555; L's description of, 556

Stephenson, J.H., 482

Stewart, Harry W., quoted, 213

Stewart, James G., recollection of L's visit to Kansas, 213

Stone, Charles P., quoted, 280, 308-310

Stone River, costly success, 496; L's dream, 583; Grant denies victory, 583

Stories told by L., Bob Lewis and the Mormon lands, 334-335; Big fellow beaten by little wife, 429; Boy and the troublesome coon, 580; Darkey arithmetic, 357-358; Horse sold at cross-roads, 388; Johnnie Kongapod, 81; Jones and his bridge to the infernal regions, 338-339; Letting the dog go, 461-462; Plaster of psalm-tunes, 337; Sausages and cats, 260; Shooting skunks, 373-374; Sick man of Illinois and his grudge, 344; Swapping horses in mid-stream, 535; Sykes's yellow dog, 525-526; Taking to the woods, 336

Story-telling, used on troublesome visitors, 30-31; fondness of L. for, 68, 84, 101, 198; L. entertains Van Buren, 87; indelicacy charge refuted, 258; application of stories, 259; safety-valve of L., 332-333, 387; chagrins friends, 357; relieves bad news by, 461

Stowe, Harriet Beecher, "Uncle Tom's Cabin," 245; quoted, 307-308, 462, 472-473

Stuart, J.E.B., 150, 165, 497

Stuart, John T., mentioned, 74; L's first acquaintance with, 38; law partner of L., 71; on L's method of accounting, 133

Sumner, Charles, mentioned, 304, 305, 352, 368, 445, 586; opposes Nebraska Bill, 153; eloquence of, 245; assault upon, 245; member of inaugural party, 275; declined to measure backs with L., 336; lacks confidence in Hooker, 492; introduces constitutional amendment, 554; at L's death-bed, 591

Sumter. See Fort Sumter

Swett, Leonard, associate of L. in law case, 136; quoted, 181, 257, 542-543

Sykes, George, 504

Taney, R.B., administered oath of office to L., 284, 286; death, 550

Tannatt, T.R., 499, 500

Taylor Club, "the young Indians," 100

Taylor, Richard (Dick), L's discomfiture of, 57-58

Taylor, Zachary, Black Hawk War, 39; presidency supported by L. and Stephens, 100

Terry, Alfred H., 564

Texas, seceded, 261

Thirteenth Amendment passed, 553-554

Thomas, Jesse, 89

Thomas, George H., 459, 516

Thompson George, 468-469

Thompson, Jacob, 585-586

Thompson, Richard, 81

Todd, Captain, guards L. at White House, 308-309

Todd, Mary. See Lincoln, Mary Todd

Todd, Robert S., 94

Toombs, Robert, 100

Treat, Judge, 137, 141

Trent Affair, friendly attitude of France and Spain, 305; L's diplomacy in, 340-344

Trumbull, Lyman, mentioned, 74; 185, 368; elected senator, 161, 162, 164; substitute amendment introduced by 554

Usher, John D., appointed secretary of the interior, 294

Vallandigham, Clement L., opposes war policy, 481; candidate for governor of Ohio, 510; L's opinion of, 511

Van Buren, Martin, mentioned, 360; entertained by L's stories, 87

Vandalia, Ill., proposed change of state capital, 62, 66

Van Santvoord, C., quoted, 451-452

Verdi, Dr., 592

Vicksburg, mentioned, 516, 517, 518, 524; turning-point in war, 496; campaign, 500-503; L's joy over victory, 501, 507; L. meets criticism with anecdote, 525; L's dream, 583

Viele, General, describes visit to Fortress Monroe, 386-391

Virginia Convention, asks expression of Federal policy, 318

Volk, Leonard W., impressions of L., 201-202; makes cast of L., 237-243

Voorhees, Daniel W., 81

Wade, Benjamin, mentioned, 535; urges Grant's dismissal, 503; lack of military judgment, 505

Wadsworth, James S., 296

Walker, Isaac, recollections of L., 88

Washburne, E.B., mentioned 225; L's letters to, against compromise, 260-261; giving orders for Scott, 261; quoted, 105, 173, 279; bill creating rank of lieutenant-general, 516

Washington, D.C., L. reluctant to leave in 1849, 109; L's arrival, Feb. 23, 1861, 279-280; inaugural week, 281-290; rebels and rebel sympathizers in, 292; defenses visited by L., 400; regarded as lost, 413; relieved, 414; society in 1862-1863, 449-450; Early's attack, 533, 537; enthusiasm over Lee's surrender, 574-575

Washington, George, mentioned, 360; influence of Weem's life of W. on L., 8, 15; life read by L. as case preparation, 78; L. ranked with, 527, 549

Watson, assistant secretary of state, 375

Watterson, Henry, quoted 4

Webster, Daniel, mentioned, 100, 185; considered a leader, 529-530

Weed, Thurlow, mentioned, 474; quoted, 257-260; discusses cabinet appointments, 257-259; L's letter to, Dec. 17, 1860, extract, 262; objects to Welles, 365

Weitzel, Godfrey, occupies Richmond, 568; headquarters in Richmond, 572

Weldon, Lawrence, quoted, 139, 334

Welles, Gideon, mentioned, 347, 460, 511; cabinet possibility, 259; appointed secretary of the navy, 293; approves Mason and Slidell capture, 341; calmness of, 364; antagonism to Stanton, 364, 368; at L's death-bed, 591-594; quoted, 292-293, 320, 325, 333, 345, 365-366, 367, 368-369, 411-412, 412-413, 417, 423-424, 432, 438, 439, 440, 457-458, 473-474, 492, 493, 497, 501, 506, 511, 531, 535, 538, 540, 551-552, 555, 556-557, 563, 577, 581, 583-584, 591-594, 597

Welles, Mrs. Gideon, mentioned, 591

"Westminster Review," on Gettysburg address, 513

Wheeler, William A., quoted, 376-378

Whig Party, L. a delegate to presidential convention, 104; L. believes he is a Whig, 153, 157; symptoms of disintegration, 159; L. a leader, 162-163; dissolution, 165

White, Dr., 592

White, Mrs., 453

White House, L.'s first night at, 292, L's family life, 464-465; office of L. described, 299-300; official precedence, 300-301; New Year's receptions, 350, 441; society in 1862-63, 449-450; L's informal receptions, 450-451; freedom of access, 459-461; Grant's ovation at reception, 517-518; reception, 1865, negroes attend, 552-553

Whiting, solicitor of war department, 375; candidate for attorney general, 522

Whitman, Walt, quoted, 263, 589-590, 597-598

Whittier, John Greenleaf, abolitionist, 245

"Wide-awake" clubs, 250

Wigfall, Senator, 286

Wilcox, Major, quoted, 106

Willard's Hotel, Washington, headquarters of L., 281, 282

Willis, David, 515

Wilmington, L's dream, 583

Wilmot Proviso, L. votes for, 153

Wilkes, Charles, 341, 342

Wilson, Robert L., quoted, 62, 85

Wilson, Henry, 357, 482

Winchell, J.M., quoted, 382; interview with L., 531

Winslow, John F., builder of "Monitor," 345-347

Winthrop, Robert C., quoted, 100

Wisconsin State Fair, addressed by L. in 1859, 389

Wood, Fernando, 474

Wool, John E., 392

Workingmen, L's speech to, 272-273

Wright, Elizur, 492

Wright, Horatio, 504

Writings. See Letters and telegrams; Messages and proclamations; Speeches and lectures

Yates, Richard, mentioned, 266; beginning of friendship with L., 30; opposes Missouri Compromise, 159; election to Congress, 150

"Young Indians," Taylor club, 100

Young, John Russell, quoted, 514

Young Men's Lyceum, address of L. quoted, 62

THE END

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