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The 2004 CIA World Factbook
by United States. Central Intelligence Agency
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Tanzania Chama Cha Demokrasia na Maendeleo (Party of Democracy and Development) or CHADEMA [Bob MAKANI]; Chama Cha Mapinduzi or CCM (Revolutionary Party) [Benjamin William MKAPA]; Civic United Front or CUF [Ibrahim LIPUMBA]; Democratic Party (unregistered) [Christopher MTIKLA]; Tanzania Labor Party or TLP [Augustine Lyatonga MREMA]; United Democratic Party or UDP [John CHEYO]

Thailand Democrat Party or DP (Prachathipat Party) [BANYAT Bantadtan]; People's Party or PP (Mahachon Party) [ANEK Laothamatas]; Thai Nation Party or TNP (Chat Thai Party) [BARNHARN SILPA-ARCHA]; Thai Rak Thai Party or TRT [THAKSIN Chinnawat]

Togo Juvento [Monsilia DJATO]; Movement of the Believers of Peace and Equality or MOCEP [leader NA]; Rally for the Support for Development and Democracy or RSDD [Harryy OLYMPIO]; Rally of the Togolese People or RPT [President Gnassingbe EYADEMA]; Union for Democracy and Social Progress or UDPS [Gagou KOKOU] note: Rally of the Togolese People or RPT, led by President EYADEMA, was the only party until the formation of multiple parties was legalized 12 April 1991

Tokelau none

Tonga there are no political parties

Trinidad and Tobago National Alliance for Reconstruction or NAR [Lennox SANKERSINGH]; People's National Movement or PNM [Patrick MANNING]; Team Unity or TU [Ramesh MAHARAJ]; United National Congress or UNC [Basdeo PANDAY]; Democratic Action Committee or DAC [Hochoy CHARLES], note - only active in Tobago

Tunisia Al-Tajdid Movement [Ali HALOUANI]; Constitutional Democratic Rally Party (Rassemblement Constitutionnel Democratique) or RCD [President Zine El Abidine BEN ALI (official ruling party)]; Liberal Social Party or PSL [Mounir BEJI]; Movement of Socialist Democrats or MDS [Ismail BOULAHYA]; Popular Unity Party or PUP [Mohamed BOUCHIHA]; Progressive Democratic Party [Nejib CHEBBI]; Unionist Democratic Union or UDU [Abderrahmane TLILI]

Turkey Democratic Left Party or DSP [Mehmet Zeki SEZER]; Democratic People's Party or DEHAP [Tuncer BAKIRHAN]; Justice and Development Party or AKP [Recep Tayip ERDOGAN]; Liberal Democratic Party or LDP [Emin SIRIN]; Motherland Party or ANAP [leader NA]; Nationalist Action Party or MHP [Devlet BAHCELI]; Republican People's Party or CHP (includes the New Turkey Party) [Deniz BAYKAL]; Felicity Party (sometimes translated as Contentment Party) or SP [Necmettin ERBEKAN]; Social Democratic People's Party or SHP [Murat KARAYALCIN]; True Path Party (sometimes translated as Correct Way Party) or DYP [Mehmet AGAR] note: the parties listed above are some of the more significant of the 49 parties that Turkey had on 1 December 2004

Turkmenistan Democratic Party of Turkmenistan or DPT [Saparmurat NIYAZOV] note: formal opposition parties are outlawed; unofficial, small opposition movements exist underground or in foreign countries; the two most prominent opposition groups-in-exile have been Gundogar and Erkin; Gundogar was led by former Foreign Minister Boris SHIKHMURADOV until his arrest and imprisonment in the wake of the 25 November 2002 assassination attempt on President NIYAZOV; Erkin is led by former Foreign Minister Abdy KULIEV and is based out of Moscow; the Union of Democratic Forces, a coalition of opposition-in-exile groups, is based in Europe

Turks and Caicos Islands People's Democratic Movement or PDM [Derek H. TAYLOR]; Progressive National Party or PNP [Michael Eugene MISICK]; United Democratic Party or UDP [Wendal SWANN]

Tuvalu there are no political parties but members of Parliament usually align themselves in informal groupings

Uganda only one political organization, the Movement (formerly the NRM)[President MUSEVENI, chairman] is allowed to operate unfettered; note - the president maintains that the Movement is not a political party, but a mass organization, which claims the loyalty of all Ugandans note: the constitution requires the suspension of political parties while the Movement organization is in governance; of the political parties that exist but are prohibited from sponsoring candidates, the most important are the Ugandan People's Congress or UPC [Milton OBOTE]; Democratic Party or DP [Paul SSEMOGERERE]; Conservative Party or CP [Ken LUKYAMUZI]; Justice Forum [Muhammad Kibirige MAYANJA]; and National Democrats Forum [Chapaa KARUHANGA]

Ukraine Agrarian Party [Volodymyr LYTVYN]; Communist Party of Ukraine or CPU [Petro SYMONENKO]; Democratic Initiatives [Stepan HAVRYSH]; Industrialists and Entrepreneurs [Anatoliy KINAKH]; Our Ukraine bloc (comprised of several parties the most prominent of which are Rukh, the Ukrainian People's Party, Reforms and Order, and Solidarity) [Viktor YUSHCHENKO]; People's Democratic Party or PDP [Valeriy PUSTOVOYTENKO]; Regions of Ukraine [Viktor YANUKOVYCH]; Socialist Party of Ukraine or SPU [Oleksandr MOROZ, chairman]; United Social Democratic Party [Viktor MEDVEDCHUK]; Working Ukraine [Serhiy TYHYPKO]; Yuliya Tymoshenko Bloc [Yuliya TYMOSHENKO] note: as well as numerous smaller parties; United Ukraine and Center Group are not actual political parties, but rather deputy groups (factions not based on a party)

United Arab Emirates none

United Kingdom Conservative and Unionist Party [Michael HOWARD]; Democratic Unionist Party (Northern Ireland) [Rev. Ian PAISLEY]; Labor Party [Anthony (Tony) BLAIR]; Liberal Democrats [Charles KENNEDY]; Party of Wales (Plaid Cymru) [Dafydd IWAN]; Scottish National Party or SNP [Alex SALMOND]; Sinn Fein (Northern Ireland) [Gerry ADAMS]; Social Democratic and Labor Party or SDLP (Northern Ireland) [Mark DURKAN]; Ulster Unionist Party (Northern Ireland) [David TRIMBLE]

United States Democratic Party [Terence McAULIFFE]; Green Party [leader NA]; Libertarian Party [Steve DASBACH]; Republican Party [Edward GILLESPIE]

Uruguay Colorado Party [Jorge BATLLE Ibanez]; National Party or Blanco [Luis Alberto LACALLE Herrera]; New Sector/Space Coalition or Nuevo Espacio [Rafael MICHELINI]; Progressive Encounter/Broad Front Coalition or Encuentro Progresista/Frente Amplio [Tabare VAZQUEZ]

Uzbekistan Adolat (Justice) Social Democratic Party [Dilorom TOSHMUHAMMADOVA, chairman]; Democratic National Rebirth Party (Milly Tiklanish) or MTP [Xurshid DOSTMUHAMMADOV, chief]; Liberal Democratic Party of Uzbekistan or LDPU [Adham SHODMONOV, chairman]; People's Democratic Party or NDP (formerly Communist Party) [Asliddin RUSTAMOV, first secretary]; Self-Sacrificers Party or Fidokorlar National Democratic Party [Ahtam TURSUNOV, chief]; note - Fatherland Progress Party merged with Self-Sacrificers Party

Vanuatu Jon Frum Movement [Song KEASPAI]; Melanesian Progressive Party or MPP [Barak SOPE]; National United Party or NUP [NA]; Union of Moderate Parties or UMP [Serge VOHOR]; Vanua'aku Pati (Our Land Party) or VP [Edward NATAPEI]; Vanuatu Republican Party or VRP [Maxime Carlot KORMAN]; Greens (Vanuatu) [Moana CARCASSES]

Venezuela Democratic Action or AD [Henry RAMOS Allup]; Fifth Republic Movement or MVR [Hugo CHAVEZ]; Homeland for All or PPT [Jose ALBORNOZ]; Justice First [Julio BORGES]; Movement Toward Socialism or MAS [Hector MUJICA]; National Convergence or Convergencia [Juan Jose CALDERA]; Radical Cause or La Causa R [Andres VELASQUEZ]; Social Christian Party or COPEI [Eduardo FERNANDEZ]; Venezuela Project or PV [Henrique SALAS Romer]

Vietnam only party - Communist Party of Vietnam or CPV [Nong Duc Manh, general secretary]

Virgin Islands Democratic Party [Arturo WATLINGTON]; Independent Citizens' Movement or ICM [Usie RICHARDS]; Republican Party [Gary SPRAUVE]

Wallis and Futuna Lua Kae Tahi (Giscardians) [leader NA]; Mouvement des Radicaux de Gauche or MRG [leader NA]; Rally for the Republic or RPR [Clovis LOGOLOGOFOLAU]; Taumu'a Lelei [Soane Muni UHILA]; Union Populaire Locale or UPL [Falakiko GATA]; Union Pour la Democratie Francaise or UDF [leader NA]

Yemen there are more than 12 political parties active in Yemen, some of the more prominent are: General People's Congress or GPC [President Ali Abdallah SALIH]; Islamic Reform Grouping or Islah [Shaykh Abdallah bin Husayn al-AHMAR]; National Arab Socialist Ba'th Party [Dr. Qassim SALAAM]; Nasserite Unionist Party [Abdel Malik al-MAKHLAFI]; Yemeni Socialist Party or YSP [Ali Salih MUQBIL] note: President SALIH's General People's Congress or GPC won a landslide victory in the April 1997 legislative election and no longer governs in coalition with Shaykh Abdallah bin Husayn al-AHMAR's Islamic Reform Grouping or Islah - the two parties had been in coalition since the end of the civil war in 1994; the YSP, a loyal opposition party, represents the remnants of the former South Yemeni leadership; leaders of the 1994 secessionist movement have been pardoned by President SALIH and some are now returning to Yemen from exile

Zambia Agenda for Zambia or AZ [Inonge MBIKUSITA-LEWANIKA]; Forum for Democracy and Development or FDD [Christon TEMBO]; Heritage Party or HP [Godfrey MIYANDA]; Liberal Progressive Front or LPF [Roger CHONGWE, president]; Movement for Multiparty Democracy or MMD [Levy MWANAWASA, acting president]; National Leadership for Development or NLD [Yobert SHAMAPANDE]; National Party or NP [Dr. Sam CHIPUNGU]; Patriotic Front or PF [Michael SATA]; Zambian Republican Party or ZRP [Benjamin MWILA]; Social Democratic Party or SDP [Gwendoline KONIE]; United National Independence Party or UNIP [Francis NKHOMA, president]; United Party for National Development or UPND [Anderson MAZOKA]

Zimbabwe Movement for Democratic Change or MDC [Morgan TSVANGIRAI]; National Alliance for Good Governance or NAGG [Shakespeare MAYA]; United Parties [Abel MUZOREWA]; Zimbabwe African National Union-Ndonga or ZANU-Ndonga [Wilson KUMBULA]; Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front or ZANU-PF [Robert Gabriel MUGABE]; Zimbabwe African Peoples Union or ZAPU [Agrippa MADLELA]

This page was last updated on 10 February, 2005



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@2119 Population

Afghanistan 28,513,677 (July 2004 est.)

Akrotiri no indigenous inhabitants note: approximately 1,300 military personnel are on the base; note - there are another 5,000 British citizens who are families of military personnel or civilian staff on both Akrotiri and Dhekelia; Cyprus citizens work on the base, but do not live there

Albania 3,544,808 (July 2004 est.)

Algeria 32,129,324 (July 2004 est.)

American Samoa 57,902 (July 2004 est.)

Andorra 69,865 (July 2004 est.)

Angola 10,978,552 (July 2004 est.)

Anguilla 13,008 (July 2004 est.)

Antarctica no indigenous inhabitants, but there are both permanent and summer-only staffed research stations note: 26 nations, all signatory to the Antarctic Treaty, operate seasonal (summer) and year-round research stations on the continent and in its surrounding oceans; the population of persons doing and supporting science on the continent and its nearby islands south of 60 degrees south latitude (the region covered by the Antarctic Treaty) varies from approximately 4,000 in summer to 1,000 in winter; in addition, approximately 1,000 personnel including ship's crew and scientists doing onboard research are present in the waters of the treaty region; summer (January) population - 3,687 total; Argentina 302, Australia 201, Belgium 13, Brazil 80, Bulgaria 16, Chile 352, China 70, Finland 11, France 100, Germany 51, India 60, Italy 106, Japan 136, South Korea 14, Netherlands 10, NZ 60, Norway 40, Peru 28, Poland 70, Russia 254, South Africa 80, Spain 43, Sweden 20, UK 192, US 1,378 (1998-99); winter (July) population - 964 total; Argentina 165, Australia 75, Brazil 12, Chile 129, China 33, France 33, Germany 9, India 25, Japan 40, South Korea 14, NZ 10, Poland 20, Russia 102, South Africa 10, UK 39, US 248 (1998-99); research stations operated within the Antarctic Treaty area (south of 60 degrees south) by members of the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs (COMNAP): year-round stations - 37 total; Argentina 6, Australia 3, Brazil 1, Chile 4, China 2, France 1, Germany 1, India 1, Japan 1, South Korea 1, NZ 1, Poland 1, Russia 6, South Africa 1, Ukraine 1, UK 2, US 3, Uruguay 1 (2004); summer-only stations - 36 total; Argentina 8, Australia 2, Bulgaria 1, Chile 5, Ecuador 1, Finland 1, Germany 1, India 1, Italy 1, Japan 3, Norway 2, Peru 1, Russia 2, South Africa 1, Spain 2, Sweden 2, UK 1, Italy and France jointly 1 (2003-2004); in addition, during the austral summer some nations have numerous occupied locations such as tent camps, summer-long temporary facilities, and mobile traverses in support of research

Antigua and Barbuda 68,320 (July 2004 est.)

Argentina 39,144,753 (July 2004 est.)

Armenia 2,991,360 note: Armenia's first census since independence was conducted in October 2001 (July 2004 est.)

Aruba 71,218 (July 2004 est.)

Ashmore and Cartier Islands no indigenous inhabitants note: Indonesian fishermen are allowed access to the lagoon and fresh water at Ashmore Reef's West Island (July 2004 est.)

Australia 19,913,144 (July 2004 est.)

Austria 8,174,762 (July 2004 est.)

Azerbaijan 7,868,385 (July 2004 est.)

Bahamas, The 299,697 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Bahrain 677,886 note: includes 235,108 non-nationals (July 2004 est.)

Baker Island uninhabited note: American civilians evacuated in 1942 after Japanese air and naval attacks during World War II; occupied by US military during World War II, but abandoned after the war; public entry is by special-use permit from US Fish and Wildlife Service only and generally restricted to scientists and educators; a cemetery and remnants of structures from early settlement are located near the middle of the west coast; visited annually by US Fish and Wildlife Service (2004 est.)

Bangladesh 141,340,476 (July 2004 est.)

Barbados 278,289 (July 2004 est.)

Bassas da India uninhabited (July 2004 est.)

Belarus 10,310,520 (July 2004 est.)

Belgium 10,348,276 (July 2004 est.)

Belize 272,945 (July 2004 est.)

Benin 7,250,033 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Bermuda 64,935 (July 2004 est.)

Bhutan 2,185,569 note: other estimates range as low as 810,000 (July 2004 est.)

Bolivia 8,724,156 (July 2004 est.)

Bosnia and Herzegovina 4,007,608 (July 2004 est.)

Botswana 1,561,973 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Bouvet Island uninhabited (July 2004 est.)

Brazil 184,101,109 note: Brazil took a count in August 2000, which reported a population of 169,799,170; that figure was about 3.3% lower than projections by the US Census Bureau, and is close to the implied underenumeration of 4.6% for the 1991 census; estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

British Indian Ocean Territory no indigenous inhabitants note: approximately 1,200 former agricultural workers resident in the Chagos Archipelago, often referred to as Chagossians or Ilois, were relocated to Mauritius and the Seychelles in the 1960s and 1970s, in November 2000 they were granted the right of return by a British High Court ruling, though no timetable has been set; in 2001, there were approximately 1,500 UK and US military personnel and 2,000 civilian contractors living on the island of Diego Garcia (July 2004 est.)

British Virgin Islands 22,187 (July 2004 est.)

Brunei 365,251 (July 2004 est.)

Bulgaria 7,517,973 (July 2004 est.)

Burkina Faso 13,574,820 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Burma 42,720,196 note: estimates for this country take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Burundi 6,231,221 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Cambodia 13,363,421 note: estimates for this country take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Cameroon 16,063,678 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Canada 32,507,874 (July 2004 est.)

Cape Verde 415,294 (July 2004 est.)

Cayman Islands 43,103 (July 2004 est.)

Central African Republic 3,742,482 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Chad 9,538,544 (July 2004 est.)

Chile 15,823,957 (July 2004 est.)

China 1,298,847,624 (July 2004 est.)

Christmas Island 396 (July 2004 est.)

Clipperton Island uninhabited (July 2004 est.)

Cocos (Keeling) Islands 629 (July 2004 est.)

Colombia 42,310,775 (July 2004 est.)

Comoros 651,901 (July 2004 est.)

Congo, Democratic Republic of the 58,317,930 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Congo, Republic of the 2,998,040 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Cook Islands 21,200 (July 2004 est.)

Coral Sea Islands no indigenous inhabitants note: there is a staff of three to four at the meteorological station (2004 est.)

Costa Rica 3,956,507 (July 2004 est.)

Cote d'Ivoire 17,327,724 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Croatia 4,496,869 (July 2004 est.)

Cuba 11,308,764 (July 2004 est.)

Cyprus 775,927 (July 2004 est.)

Czech Republic 10,246,178 (July 2004 est.)

Denmark 5,413,392 (July 2004 est.)

Dhekelia no indigenous personnel note: approximately 2,200 military personnel are on the base; there are another 5,000 British citizens who are families of military personnel or civilian staff on both the bases of Akrotiri and Dhekelia; Cyprus citizens work on the base, but do not live there

Djibouti 466,900 (July 2004 est.)

Dominica 69,278 (July 2004 est.)

Dominican Republic 8,833,634 (July 2004 est.)

East Timor 1,019,252 note: other estimates range as low as 800,000 (July 2004 est.)

Ecuador 13,212,742 (July 2004 est.)

Egypt 76,117,421 (July 2004 est.)

El Salvador 6,587,541 (July 2004 est.)

Equatorial Guinea 523,051 (July 2004 est.)

Eritrea 4,447,307 (July 2004 est.)

Estonia 1,341,664 (July 2004 est.)

Ethiopia 67,851,281 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Europa Island no indigenous inhabitants note: there is a small French military garrison and a few meteorologists; visited by scientists (July 2004 est.)

European Union 456,285,839 (July 2004 est.)

Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas) 2,967 (July 2004 est.)

Faroe Islands 46,662 (July 2004 est.)

Fiji 880,874 (July 2004 est.)

Finland 5,214,512 (July 2004 est.)

France 60,424,213 (July 2004 est.)

French Guiana 191,309 (July 2004 est.)

French Polynesia 266,339 (July 2004 est.)

French Southern and Antarctic Lands no indigenous inhabitants (July 2002 est.) note: in 2002, there were 145 researchers whose numbers vary from winter (July) to summer (January) (July 2004 est.)

Gabon 1,355,246 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Gambia, The 1,546,848 (July 2004 est.)

Gaza Strip 1,324,991 note: in addition, there are more than 5,000 Israeli settlers in the Gaza Strip (July 2004 est.)

Georgia 4,693,892 (July 2004 est.)

Germany 82,424,609 (July 2004 est.)

Ghana 20,757,032 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Gibraltar 27,833 (July 2004 est.)

Glorioso Islands no indigenous inhabitants note: there is a small French military garrison along with a few meteorologists; visited by scientists (July 2004 est.)

Greece 10,647,529 (July 2004 est.)

Greenland 56,384 (July 2004 est.)

Grenada 89,357 (July 2004 est.)

Guadeloupe 444,515 (July 2004 est.)

Guam 166,090 (July 2004 est.)

Guatemala 14,280,596 (July 2004 est.)

Guernsey 65,031 (July 2004 est.)

Guinea 9,246,462 (July 2004 est.)

Guinea-Bissau 1,388,363 (July 2004 est.)

Guyana 705,803 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Haiti 7,656,166 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Heard Island and McDonald Islands uninhabited (July 2004 est.)

Holy See (Vatican City) 921 (July 2004 est.)

Honduras 6,823,568 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Hong Kong 6,855,125 (July 2004 est.)

Howland Island uninhabited note: American civilians evacuated in 1942 after Japanese air and naval attacks during World War II; occupied by US military during World War II, but abandoned after the war; public entry is by special-use permit from US Fish and Wildlife Service only and generally restricted to scientists and educators; visited annually by US Fish and Wildlife Service (July 2004 est.)

Hungary 10,032,375 (July 2004 est.)

Iceland 293,966 (July 2004 est.)

India 1,065,070,607 (July 2004 est.)

Indonesia 238,452,952 (July 2004 est.)

Iran 69,018,924 (July 2004 est.)

Iraq 25,374,691 (July 2004 est.)

Ireland 3,969,558 (July 2004 est.)

Israel 6,199,008 note: includes about 187,000 Israeli settlers in the West Bank, about 20,000 in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights, more than 5,000 in the Gaza Strip, and fewer than 177,000 in East Jerusalem (July 2004 est.)

Italy 58,057,477 (July 2004 est.)

Jamaica 2,713,130 (July 2004 est.)

Jan Mayen no indigenous inhabitants note: personnel operate the Long Range Navigation (Loran-C) base and the weather and coastal services radio station (July 2004 est.)

Japan 127,333,002 (July 2004 est.)

Jarvis Island uninhabited note: Millersville settlement on western side of island occasionally used as a weather station from 1935 until World War II, when it was abandoned; reoccupied in 1957 during the International Geophysical Year by scientists who left in 1958; public entry is by special-use permit from US Fish and Wildlife Service only and generally restricted to scientists and educators; visited annually by US Fish and Wildlife Service (July 2004 est.)

Jersey 90,502 (July 2004 est.)

Johnston Atoll 396 no indigenous inhabitants note: in previous years, there was an average of 1,100 US military and civilian contractor personnel present; as of September 2001, population had decreased significantly when US Army Chemical Activity Pacific (USACAP) departed; as of January 2004 the island population was just above 200 personnel, including US Air Force, US Fish and Wildlife Service, and civilian contractor personnel (July 2004 est.)

Jordan 5,611,202 (July 2004 est.)

Juan de Nova Island no indigenous inhabitants note: there is a small French military garrison along with a few meteorologists; occasionally visited by scientists (July 2004 est.)

Kazakhstan 15,143,704 (July 2004 est.)

Kenya 32,021,856 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Kingman Reef uninhabited (July 2004 est.)

Kiribati 100,798 (July 2004 est.)

Korea, North 22,697,553 (July 2004 est.)

Korea, South 48,598,175 (July 2004 est.)

Kuwait 2,257,549 note: includes 1,291,354 non-nationals (July 2004 est.)

Kyrgyzstan 5,081,429 (July 2004 est.)

Laos 6,068,117 (July 2004 est.)

Latvia 2,306,306 (July 2004 est.)

Lebanon 3,777,218 (July 2004 est.)

Lesotho 1,865,040 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Liberia 3,390,635 (July 2004 est.)

Libya 5,631,585 note: includes 166,510 non-nationals (July 2004 est.)

Liechtenstein 33,436 (July 2004 est.)

Lithuania 3,607,899 (July 2004 est.)

Luxembourg 462,690 (July 2004 est.)

Macau 445,286 (July 2004 est.)

Macedonia 2,071,210 (July 2004 est.)

Madagascar 17,501,871 (July 2004 est.)

Malawi 11,906,855 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Malaysia 23,522,482 (July 2004 est.)

Maldives 339,330 (July 2004 est.)

Mali 11,956,788 (July 2004 est.)

Malta 396,851 (July 2004 est.)

Man, Isle of 74,655 (July 2004 est.)

Marshall Islands 57,738 (July 2004 est.)

Martinique 429,510 (July 2004 est.)

Mauritania 2,998,563 (July 2004 est.)

Mauritius 1,220,481 (July 2004 est.)

Mayotte 186,026 (July 2004 est.)

Mexico 104,959,594 (July 2004 est.)

Micronesia, Federated States of 108,155 (July 2004 est.)

Midway Islands no indigenous inhabitants; approximately 40 people make up the staff of US Fish and Wildlife Service and their services contractor living at the atoll (July 2004 est.)

Moldova 4,446,455 (July 2004 est.)

Monaco 32,270 (July 2004 est.)

Mongolia 2,751,314 (July 2004 est.)

Montserrat 9,245 note: an estimated 8,000 refugees left the island following the resumption of volcanic activity in July 1995; some have returned (July 2004 est.)

Morocco 32,209,101 (July 2004 est.)

Mozambique 18,811,731 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected; the 1997 Mozambican census reported a population of 16,099,246 (July 2004 est.)

Namibia 1,954,033 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Nauru 12,809 (July 2004 est.)

Navassa Island uninhabited note: transient Haitian fishermen and others camp on the island (July 2004 est.)

Nepal 27,070,666 (July 2004 est.)

Netherlands 16,318,199 (July 2004 est.)

Netherlands Antilles 218,126 (July 2004 est.)

New Caledonia 213,679 (July 2004 est.)

New Zealand 3,993,817 (July 2004 est.)

Nicaragua 5,359,759 (July 2004 est.)

Niger 11,360,538 (July 2004 est.)

Nigeria 137,253,133 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Niue 2,156 (July 2004 est.)

Norfolk Island 1,841 (July 2004 est.)

Northern Mariana Islands 78,252 (July 2004 est.)

Norway 4,574,560 (July 2004 est.)

Oman 2,903,165 note: includes 577,293 non-nationals (July 2004 est.)

Pakistan 159,196,336 (July 2004 est.)

Palau 20,016 (July 2004 est.)

Palmyra Atoll no indigenous inhabitants; 4 to 20 Nature Conservancy staff, US Fish and Wildlife staff (July 2004 est.)

Panama 3,000,463 (July 2004 est.)

Papua New Guinea 5,420,280 (July 2004 est.)

Paracel Islands no indigenous inhabitants note: there are scattered Chinese garrisons (July 2004 est.)

Paraguay 6,191,368 (July 2004 est.)

Peru 27,544,305 (July 2004 est.)

Philippines 86,241,697 (July 2004 est.)

Pitcairn Islands 46 (July 2004 est.)

Poland 38,626,349 (July 2004 est.)

Portugal 10,524,145 (July 2004 est.)

Puerto Rico 3,897,960 (July 2004 est.)

Qatar 840,290 (July 2004 est.)

Reunion 766,153 (July 2004 est.)

Romania 22,355,551 (July 2004 est.)

Russia 143,782,338 (July 2004 est.)

Rwanda 7,954,013 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Saint Helena 7,415 (July 2004 est.)

Saint Kitts and Nevis 38,836 (July 2004 est.)

Saint Lucia 164,213 (July 2004 est.)

Saint Pierre and Miquelon 6,995 (July 2004 est.)

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 117,193 (July 2004 est.)

Samoa 177,714 (July 2004 est.)

San Marino 28,503 (July 2004 est.)

Sao Tome and Principe 181,565 (July 2004 est.)

Saudi Arabia 25,795,938 note: includes 5,576,076 non-nationals (July 2004 est.)

Senegal 10,852,147 (July 2004 est.)

Serbia and Montenegro 10,825,900 (July 2004 est.)

Seychelles 80,832 (July 2004 est.)

Sierra Leone 5,883,889 (July 2004 est.)

Singapore 4,353,893 (July 2004 est.)

Slovakia 5,423,567 (July 2004 est.)

Slovenia 2,011,473 (July 2004 est.)

Solomon Islands 523,617 (July 2004 est.)

Somalia 8,304,601 note: this estimate was derived from an official census taken in 1975 by the Somali Government; population counting in Somalia is complicated by the large number of nomads and by refugee movements in response to famine and clan warfare (July 2004 est.)

South Africa 42,718,530 note: South Africa took a census October 1996 that showed a population of 40,583,611 (after an official adjustment for a 6.8% underenumeration based on a postenumeration survey); estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands no indigenous inhabitants note: the small military garrison on South Georgia withdrew in March 2001, to be replaced by a permanent group of scientists of the British Antarctic Survey, which also has a biological station on Bird Island; the South Sandwich Islands are uninhabited (July 2004 est.)

Spain 40,280,780 (July 2004 est.)

Spratly Islands no indigenous inhabitants note: there are scattered garrisons occupied by personnel of several claimant states (July 2004 est.)

Sri Lanka 19,905,165 note: since the outbreak of hostilities between the government and armed Tamil separatists in the mid-1980s, several hundred thousand Tamil civilians have fled the island; as of yearend 2000, approximately 65,000 were housed in 131 refugee camps in south India, another 40,000 lived outside the Indian camps, and more than 200,000 Tamils have sought refuge in the West (July 2004 est.)

Sudan 39,148,162 (July 2004 est.)

Suriname 436,935 (July 2004 est.)

Svalbard 2,756 (July 2004 est.)

Swaziland 1,169,241 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Sweden 8,986,400 (July 2004 est.)

Switzerland 7,450,867 (July 2004 est.)

Syria 18,016,874 note: in addition, about 40,000 people live in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights - 20,000 Arabs (18,000 Druze and 2,000 Alawites) and about 20,000 Israeli settlers (July 2004 est.)

Taiwan 22,749,838 (July 2004 est.)

Tajikistan 7,011,556 (July 2004 est.)

Tanzania 36,588,225 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Thailand 64,865,523 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Togo 5,556,812 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Tokelau 1,405 (July 2004 est.)

Tonga 110,237 (July 2004 est.)

Trinidad and Tobago 1,096,585 (July 2004 est.)

Tromelin Island uninhabited, except for visits by scientists (July 2004 est.)

Tunisia 9,974,722 (July 2004 est.)

Turkey 68,893,918 (July 2004 est.)

Turkmenistan 4,863,169 (July 2004 est.)

Turks and Caicos Islands 19,956 (July 2004 est.)

Tuvalu 11,468 (July 2004 est.)

Uganda 26,404,543 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Ukraine 47,732,079 (July 2004 est.)

United Arab Emirates 2,523,915 note: includes an estimated 1,606,079 non-nationals; the 17 December 1995 census presents a total population figure of 2,377,453, and there are estimates of 3.44 million for 2002 (July 2004 est.)

United Kingdom 60,270,708 (July 2004 est.)

United States 293,027,571 (July 2004 est.)

Uruguay 3,399,237 (July 2004 est.)

Uzbekistan 26,410,416 (July 2004 est.)

Vanuatu 202,609 (July 2004 est.)

Venezuela 25,017,387 (July 2004 est.)

Vietnam 82,689,518 (July 2004 est.)

Virgin Islands 108,775 (July 2004 est.)

Wake Island no indigenous inhabitants note: US military personnel have left the island, but contractor personnel remain; as of October 2001, 200 contractor personnel were present (July 2004 est.)

Wallis and Futuna 15,880 (July 2004 est.)

West Bank 2,311,204 note: in addition, there are about 187,000 Israeli settlers in the West Bank and fewer than 177,000 in East Jerusalem (July 2004 est.)

Western Sahara 267,405 (July 2004 est.)

World 6,379,157,361 (July 2004 est.)

Yemen 20,024,867 (July 2004 est.)

Zambia 10,462,436 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

Zimbabwe 12,671,860 note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2004 est.)

This page was last updated on 10 February, 2005



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@2120 Ports and harbors

Afghanistan Kheyrabad, Shir Khan

Albania Durres, Sarande, Shengjin, Vlore

Algeria Algiers, Annaba, Arzew, Bejaia, Beni Saf, Dellys, Djendjene, Ghazaouet, Jijel, Mostaganem, Oran, Skikda, Tenes

American Samoa Aunu'u (new construction), Auasi, Faleosao, Ofu, Pago Pago, Ta'u

Andorra none

Angola Ambriz, Cabinda, Lobito, Luanda, Malongo, Namibe (Mocamedes), Porto Amboim, Soyo

Anguilla Blowing Point, Road Bay

Antarctica there are no developed ports and harbors in Antarctica; most coastal stations have offshore anchorages, and supplies are transferred from ship to shore by small boats, barges, and helicopters; a few stations have a basic wharf facility; US coastal stations include McMurdo (77 51 S, 166 40 E), Palmer (64 43 S, 64 03 W); government use only except by permit (see Permit Office under "Legal System"); all ships at port are subject to inspection in accordance with Article 7, Antarctic Treaty; offshore anchorage is sparse and intermittent

Antigua and Barbuda Saint John's

Arctic Ocean Churchill (Canada), Murmansk (Russia), Prudhoe Bay (US)

Argentina Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires, Comodoro Rivadavia, Concepcion del Uruguay, La Plata, Mar del Plata, Necochea, Rio Gallegos, Rosario, Santa Fe, Ushuaia

Armenia none

Aruba Barcadera, Oranjestad, Sint Nicolaas

Ashmore and Cartier Islands none; offshore anchorage only

Atlantic Ocean Alexandria (Egypt), Algiers (Algeria), Antwerp (Belgium), Barcelona (Spain), Buenos Aires (Argentina), Casablanca (Morocco), Colon (Panama), Copenhagen (Denmark), Dakar (Senegal), Gdansk (Poland), Hamburg (Germany), Helsinki (Finland), Las Palmas (Canary Islands, Spain), Le Havre (France), Lisbon (Portugal), London (UK), Marseille (France), Montevideo (Uruguay), Montreal (Canada), Naples (Italy), New Orleans (US), New York (US), Oran (Algeria), Oslo (Norway), Peiraiefs or Piraeus (Greece), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), Rotterdam (Netherlands), Saint Petersburg (Russia), Stockholm (Sweden)

Australia Adelaide, Brisbane, Cairns, Darwin, Devonport (Tasmania), Fremantle, Geelong, Hobart (Tasmania), Launceston (Tasmania), Mackay, Melbourne, Sydney, Townsville

Austria Enns, Krems, Linz, Vienna

Azerbaijan Baku (Baki)

Bahamas, The Freeport, Matthew Town, Nassau

Bahrain Manama, Mina' Salman, Sitrah

Baker Island none; offshore anchorage only; note - there is one small boat landing area along the middle of the west coast

Bangladesh Chittagong, Dhaka, Mongla Port, Narayanganj

Barbados Bridgetown, Speightstown (Port Charles Marina)

Bassas da India none; offshore anchorage only

Belarus Mazyr

Belgium Antwerp (one of the world's busiest ports), Brugge, Gent, Hasselt, Liege, Mons, Namur, Oostende, Zeebrugge

Belize Belize City, Big Creek, Corozol, Punta Gorda

Benin Cotonou, Porto-Novo

Bermuda Hamilton, Saint George's, Dockyard

Bhutan none

Bolivia Puerto Aguirre (on the Paraguay/Parana waterway, at the Bolivia/Brazil border); also, Bolivia has free port privileges in maritime ports in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Paraguay

Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosanska Gradiska, Bosanski Brod, Bosanski Samac, and Brcko (all inland waterway ports on the Sava), Orasje

Botswana none

Bouvet Island none; offshore anchorage only

Brazil Belem, Fortaleza, Ilheus, Imbituba, Manaus, Paranagua, Porto Alegre, Recife, Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande, Salvador, Santos, Vitoria

British Indian Ocean Territory Diego Garcia

British Virgin Islands Road Town

Brunei Bandar Seri Begawan, Kuala Belait, Muara, Seria, Tutong

Bulgaria Burgas, Lom, Nesebur, Ruse, Varna, Vidin

Burkina Faso none

Burma Bhamo, Chauk, Mandalay, Moulmein, Myitkyina, Pathein, Rangoon, Sittwe, Tavoy

Burundi Bujumbura

Cambodia Kampong Som (Sihanoukville), Kampot, Krong Kaoh Kong, Phnom Penh, Sre Ambol, Keo Phoh Port (privately owned) (2003)

Cameroon Bonaberi, Douala, Garoua, Kribi, Tiko

Canada Becancour (Quebec), Churchill, Halifax, Hamilton, Montreal, New Westminster, Prince Rupert, Quebec, Saint John (New Brunswick), St. John's (Newfoundland), Sept Isles, Sydney, Trois-Rivieres, Thunder Bay, Toronto, Vancouver, Windsor

Cape Verde Mindelo, Praia, Tarrafal

Cayman Islands Cayman Brac, George Town

Central African Republic Bangui, Nola, Salo, Nzinga

Chad none

Chile Antofagasta, Arica, Chanaral, Coquimbo, Iquique, Puerto Montt, Punta Arenas, San Antonio, San Vicente, Talcahuano, Valparaiso

China Dalian, Fuzhou, Guangzhou, Haikou, Huangpu, Lianyungang, Nanjing, Nantong, Ningbo, Qingdao, Qinhuangdao, Shanghai, Shantou, Shenzhen, Tianjin, Wenzhou, Xiamen, Xingang, Yantai, Zhanjiang (2001)

Christmas Island Flying Fish Cove

Clipperton Island none; offshore anchorage only

Cocos (Keeling) Islands none; lagoon anchorage only

Colombia Bahia de Portete, Barranquilla, Buenaventura, Cartagena, Leticia, Puerto Bolivar, San Andres, Santa Marta, Tumaco, Turbo

Comoros Fomboni, Moroni, Moutsamoudou

Congo, Democratic Republic of the Banana, Boma, Bukavu, Bumba, Goma, Kalemie, Kindu, Kinshasa, Kisangani, Matadi, Mbandaka

Congo, Republic of the Brazzaville, Impfondo, Ouesso, Oyo, Pointe-Noire

Cook Islands Avarua, Avatiu

Coral Sea Islands none; offshore anchorage only

Costa Rica Caldera, Golfito, Moin, Puerto Limon, Puerto Quepos, Puntarenas

Cote d'Ivoire Abidjan, Aboisso, Dabou, San-Pedro

Croatia Dubrovnik, Dugi Rat, Omisalj, Ploce, Pula, Rijeka, Sibenik, Split, Vukovar (inland waterway port on Danube), Zadar

Cuba Cienfuegos, Havana, Manzanillo, Mariel, Matanzas, Nuevitas, Santiago de Cuba

Cyprus Famagusta, Kyrenia, Larnaca, Limassol, Paphos, Vasilikos

Czech Republic Decin, Prague, Usti nad Labem

Denmark Aabenraa, Aalborg, Aarhus, Copenhagen, Esbjerg, Fredericia, Frederikshavn, Hirtshals, Kolding, Odense, Roenne (Bornholm), Vejle

Djibouti Djibouti

Dominica Portsmouth, Roseau

Dominican Republic Barahona, La Romana, Manzanillo, Puerto Plata, San Pedro de Macoris, Santo Domingo

East Timor NA

Ecuador Esmeraldas, Guayaquil, La Libertad, Manta, Puerto Bolivar, San Lorenzo

Egypt Alexandria, Al Ghardaqah, Aswan, Asyut, Bur Safajah, Damietta, Marsa Matruh, Port Said, Suez

El Salvador Acajutla, Puerto Cutuco, La Libertad, La Union, Puerto El Triunfo

Equatorial Guinea Bata, Luba, Malabo

Eritrea Assab (Aseb), Massawa (Mits'iwa)

Estonia Haapsalu, Kunda, Muuga, Paldiski, Parnu, Tallinn

Ethiopia none; Ethiopia is landlocked and was by agreement with Eritrea using the ports of Assab and Massawa; since the border dispute with Eritrea flared, Ethiopia has used the port of Djibouti for nearly all of its imports

Europa Island none; offshore anchorage only

European Union Antwerp (Belgium), Barcelona (Spain), Bremen (Germany), Copenhagen (Denmark), Gdansk (Poland), Hamburg (Germany), Helsinki (Finland), Las Palmas (Canary Islands, Spain), Le Havre (France), Lisbon (Portugal), London (UK), Marseille (France), Naples (Italy), Peiraiefs or Piraeus (Greece), Riga (Latvia), Rotterdam (Netherlands), Stockholm (Sweden), Talinn (Estonia)

Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas) Stanley note: the primary port is located in Stanley Harbour and known locally as FIPASS (Falkland Interim Port and Storage System); the facility consists of seven permanently moored barges providing 300 meters of berthing space; it was installed by the military after 1982 and handed over to the Falkland Islands Government in 1988

Faroe Islands Torshavn, Klaksvik, Tvoroyri, Runavik, Fuglafjordhur

Fiji Lambasa, Lautoka, Levuka, Malau, Savusavu, Suva, Vuda

Finland Hamina, Helsinki, Kokkola, Kotka, Loviisa, Oulu, Pori, Rauma, Turku, Uusikaupunki, Varkaus

France Bordeaux, Boulogne, Cherbourg, Dijon, Dunkerque, La Pallice, Le Havre, Lyon, Marseille, Mulhouse, Nantes, Paris, Rouen, Saint Nazaire, Saint Malo, Strasbourg (2003)

French Guiana Cayenne, Degrad des Cannes, Saint-Laurent du Maroni

French Polynesia Mataura, Papeete, Rikitea, Uturoa

French Southern and Antarctic Lands none; offshore anchorage only

Gabon Cap Lopez, Kango, Lambarene, Libreville, Mayumba, Owendo, Port-Gentil

Gambia, The Banjul

Gaza Strip Gaza

Georgia Bat'umi, P'ot'i, Sokhumi

Germany Berlin, Bonn, Brake, Bremen, Bremerhaven, Cologne, Dresden, Duisburg, Emden, Hamburg, Karlsruhe, Kiel, Luebeck, Magdeburg, Mannheim, Rostock, Stuttgart

Ghana Takoradi, Tema

Gibraltar Gibraltar

Glorioso Islands none; offshore anchorage only

Greece Alexandroupolis, Elefsis, Irakleion (Crete), Kavala, Kerkyra, Chalkis, Igoumenitsa, Lavrion, Patrai, Peiraiefs (Piraeus), Thessaloniki, Volos

Greenland Aasiaat (Egedesminde), Ilulissat (Jakobshavn), Kangerlussuaq, Nanortalik, Narsarsuaq, Nuuk (Godthab), Qaqortoq (Julianehab), Sisimiut (Holsteinsborg), Tasiilaq

Grenada Grenville, Saint George's

Guadeloupe Basse-Terre, Gustavia (on Saint Barthelemy), Marigot, Pointe-a-Pitre

Guam Apra Harbor

Guatemala Champerico, Puerto Barrios, Puerto Quetzal, San Jose, Santo Tomas de Castilla

Guernsey Saint Peter Port, Saint Sampson

Guinea Boke, Conakry, Kamsar

Guinea-Bissau Bissau, Buba, Cacheu, Farim

Guyana Bartica, Georgetown, Linden, New Amsterdam, Parika

Haiti Cap-Haitien, Gonaives, Jacmel, Jeremie, Les Cayes, Miragoane, Port-au-Prince, Port-de-Paix, Saint-Marc

Heard Island and McDonald Islands none; offshore anchorage only

Holy See (Vatican City) none

Honduras La Ceiba, Puerto Castilla, Puerto Cortes, San Lorenzo, Tela, Puerto Lempira

Hong Kong Hong Kong

Howland Island none; offshore anchorage only; note - there is one small boat landing area along the middle of the west coast

Hungary Budapest, Dunaujvaros, Gyor-Gonyu, Csepel, Baja, Mohacs (2003)

Iceland Akureyri, Hornafjordhur, Isafjordhur, Keflavik, Raufarhofn, Reykjavik, Seydhisfjordhur, Straumsvik, Vesttmannaeyjar

India Chennai (Madras), Cochin, Jawaharal Nehru, Kandla, Kolkata (Calcutta), Mumbai (Bombay), Vishakhapatnam

Indian Ocean Chennai (Madras; India), Colombo (Sri Lanka), Durban (South Africa), Jakarta (Indonesia), Kolkata (Calcutta; India) Melbourne (Australia), Mumbai (Bombay; India), Richards Bay (South Africa)

Indonesia Cilacap, Cirebon, Jakarta, Kupang, Makassar, Palembang, Semarang, Surabaya

Iran Abadan (largely destroyed in fighting during 1980-88 war), Ahvaz, Bandar 'Abbas, Bandar-e Anzali, Bushehr, Bandar-e Emam Khomeyni, Bandar-e Lengeh, Bandar-e Mahshahr, Bandar-e Torkaman, Chabahar (Bandar Beheshti), Jazireh-ye Khark, Jazireh-ye Lavan, Jazireh-ye Sirri, Khorramshahr (limited operation since November 1992), Now Shahr

Iraq Umm Qasr, Khawr az Zubayr, and Al Basrah have limited functionality

Ireland Arklow, Cork, Drogheda, Dublin, Foynes, Galway, Limerick, New Ross, Waterford

Israel Ashdod, Ashqelon, Elat (Eilat), Hadera, Haifa, Tel Aviv-Yafo

Italy Augusta (Sicily), Bagnoli, Bari, Brindisi, Gela (Sicily), Genoa, La Spezia, Livorno, Milazzo (Sicily), Naples, Porto Foxi, Porto Torres (Sardinia), Salerno, Savona, Taranto, Trieste, Venice

Jamaica Alligator Pond, Discovery Bay, Kingston, Montego Bay, Ocho Rios, Port Antonio, Rocky Point, Port Esquivel (Longswharf)

Jan Mayen none; offshore anchorage only

Japan Akita, Amagasaki, Chiba, Hachinohe, Hakodate, Higashi-Harima, Himeji, Hiroshima, Kawasaki, Kinuura, Kobe, Kushiro, Mizushima, Moji, Nagoya, Osaka, Sakai, Sakaide, Shimizu, Tokyo, Tomakomai

Jarvis Island none; offshore anchorage only; note - there is one small boat landing area in the middle of the west coast and another near the southwest corner of the island

Jersey Gorey, Saint Aubin, Saint Helier

Johnston Atoll Johnston Island

Jordan Al 'Aqabah

Juan de Nova Island none; offshore anchorage only

Kazakhstan Aqtau (Shevchenko), Atyrau (Gur'yev), Oskemen (Ust-Kamenogorsk), Pavlodar, Semey (Semipalatinsk)

Kenya Kisumu, Lamu, Mombasa

Kingman Reef none; offshore anchorage only

Kiribati Banaba, Betio, English Harbour, Kanton

Korea, North Ch'ongjin, Haeju, Hungnam (Hamhung), Kimch'aek, Kosong, Najin, Namp'o, Sinuiju, Songnim, Sonbong (formerly Unggi), Ungsang, Wonsan

Korea, South Chinhae, Inch'on, Kunsan, Masan, Mokp'o, P'ohang, Pusan, Tonghae-hang, Ulsan, Yosu

Kuwait Ash Shu'aybah, Ash Shuwaykh, Kuwait, Mina' 'Abd Allah, Mina' al Ahmadi, Mina' Su'ud

Kyrgyzstan Balykchy (Ysyk-Kol or Rybach'ye)

Laos none

Latvia Liepaja, Riga, Ventspils

Lebanon Antilyas, Batroun, Beirut, Chekka, El Mina, Ez Zahrani, Jbail, Jounie, Naqoura, Sidon, Tripoli, Tyre

Lesotho none

Liberia Buchanan, Greenville, Harper, Monrovia, Robertsport

Libya Al Khums, Banghazi, Darnah, Marsa al Burayqah, Misratah, Ra's Lanuf, Tobruk, Tripoli, Zuwarah

Liechtenstein none

Lithuania Butinge, Kaunas, Klaipeda

Luxembourg Mertert

Macau Macau

Macedonia none

Madagascar Antsiranana, Antsohimbondrona, Mahajanga, Toamasina, Toliara

Malawi Chipoka, Monkey Bay, Nkhata Bay, Nkhotakota, Chilumba

Malaysia Bintulu, Kota Kinabalu, Kuantan, Kuching, Kudat, Labuan, Lahad Datu, Lumut, Miri, Pasir Gudang, George Town (Penang), Port Dickson, Port Kelang, Sandakan, Sibu, Tanjung Berhala, Tanjung Kidurong, Tawau

Maldives Gan, Male

Mali Koulikoro

Malta Marsaxlokk, Valletta

Man, Isle of Castletown, Douglas, Peel, Ramsey

Marshall Islands Majuro

Martinique Fort-de-France, La Trinite

Mauritania Bogue, Kaedi, Nouadhibou, Nouakchott, Rosso

Mauritius Port Louis

Mayotte Dzaoudzi

Mexico Acapulco, Altamira, Bahias de Huatulco, Cabo San Lucas, Coatzacoalcos, Dos Bocas, Ensenada, Guaymas, Lazaro Cardenas, Manzanillo, Mazatlan, Puerto Progreso, Puerto Madero, Puerto Vallarta, Salina Cruz, Tampico, Topolobampo, Tuxpan, Veracruz (2003)

Micronesia, Federated States of Colonia (Yap), Kolonia (Pohnpei), Lele, Moen

Midway Islands Sand Island

Moldova none

Monaco Monaco

Mongolia none

Montserrat Plymouth (abandoned), Little Bay (anchorages and ferry landing), Carr's Bay

Morocco Agadir, El Jadida, Casablanca, El Jorf Lasfar, Kenitra, Mohammedia, Nador, Rabat, Safi, Tangier; also Spanish-controlled Ceuta and Melilla

Mozambique Beira, Inhambane, Maputo, Nacala, Pemba, Quelimane

Namibia Luderitz, Walvis Bay

Nauru Nauru

Navassa Island none; offshore anchorage only

Nepal none

Netherlands Amsterdam, Delfzijl, Dordrecht, Eemshaven, Groningen, Haarlem, IJmuiden, Maastricht, Rotterdam, Terneuzen, Utrecht, Vlissingen

Netherlands Antilles Kralendijk, Philipsburg, Willemstad

New Caledonia Mueo, Noumea, Thio

New Zealand Auckland, Christchurch, Dunedin, Tauranga, Wellington

Nicaragua Bluefields, Corinto, El Bluff, Puerto Cabezas, Puerto Sandino, Rama, San Juan del Sur

Niger none

Nigeria Calabar, Lagos, Onne, Port Harcourt, Sapele, Warri

Niue none; offshore anchorage only

Norfolk Island none; loading jetties at Kingston and Cascade

Northern Mariana Islands Saipan, Tinian

Norway Bergen, Drammen, Floro, Hammerfest, Harstad, Haugesund, Kristiansand, Larvik, Narvik, Oslo, Porsgrunn, Stavanger, Tromso, Trondheim

Oman Matrah, Mina' al Fahl, Mina' Raysut

Pacific Ocean Bangkok (Thailand), Hong Kong, Kao-hsiung (Taiwan), Los Angeles (US), Manila (Philippines), Pusan (South Korea), San Francisco (US), Seattle (US), Shanghai (China), Singapore, Sydney (Australia), Vladivostok (Russia), Wellington (NZ), Yokohama (Japan)

Pakistan Karachi, Port Muhammad bin Qasim

Palau Koror

Palmyra Atoll West Lagoon

Panama Balboa, Cristobal, Coco Solo, Manzanillo (part of Colon area), Vacamonte

Papua New Guinea Kieta, Lae, Madang, Port Moresby, Rabaul

Paracel Islands small Chinese port facilities on Woody Island and Duncan Island being expanded

Paraguay Asuncion, Villeta, San Antonio, Encarnacion

Peru Callao, Chimbote, Ilo, Matarani, Paita, Puerto Maldonado, Salaverry, San Martin, Talara, Iquitos, Pucallpa, Yurimaguas note: Iquitos, Pucallpa, and Yurimaguas are all on the upper reaches of the Amazon and its tributaries

Philippines Batangas, Cagayan de Oro, Cebu, Davao, Guimaras Island, Iligan, Iloilo, Jolo, Legaspi, Manila, Masao, Puerto Princesa, San Fernando, Subic Bay, Zamboanga

Pitcairn Islands Adamstown (on Bounty Bay)

Poland Gdansk, Gdynia, Gliwice, Kolobrzeg, Szczecin, Swinoujscie, Ustka, Warsaw, Wroclaw

Portugal Aveiro, Funchal (Madeira Islands), Horta (Azores), Leixoes, Lisbon, Porto, Ponta Delgada (Azores), Praia da Vitoria (Azores), Setubal, Viana do Castelo

Puerto Rico Aguadilla, Arecibo, Fajardo, Guanica, Guayanilla, Guayama, Mayaguez, Playa de Ponce, San Juan

Qatar Doha, Halul Island, Umm Sa'id (Musay'id)

Reunion Le Port, Pointe des Galets

Romania Braila, Constanta, Galati, Mangalia, Sulina, Tulcea

Russia Aleksandrovsk-Sakhalinskiy, Arkhangel'sk, Astrakhan', De-Kastri, Indigirskiy, Kaliningrad, Kandalaksha, Kazan', Khabarovsk, Kholmsk, Krasnoyarsk, Lazarev, Mago, Mezen', Moscow, Murmansk, Nakhodka, Nevel'sk, Novorossiysk, Onega, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, Rostov, Shakhtersk, Saint Petersburg, Sochi, Taganrog, Tuapse, Uglegorsk, Vanino, Vladivostok, Volgograd, Vostochnyy, Vyborg

Rwanda Cyangugu, Gisenyi, Kibuye

Saint Helena Georgetown (on Ascension), Jamestown

Saint Kitts and Nevis Basseterre, Charlestown

Saint Lucia Castries, Vieux Fort

Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Pierre

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Kingstown

Samoa Apia, Asau, Mulifanua, Salelologa

San Marino none

Sao Tome and Principe Santo Antonio, Sao Tome

Saudi Arabia Ad Dammam, Al Jubayl, Duba, Jiddah, Jizan, Rabigh, Ra's al Khafji, Mishab, Ras Tanura, Yanbu' al Bahr, Madinat Yanbu' al Sinaiyah

Senegal Dakar, Kaolack, Matam, Podor, Richard Toll, Saint-Louis, Ziguinchor

Serbia and Montenegro Bar, Belgrade, Kotor, Novi Sad, Pancevo, Tivat, Zelenika

Seychelles Victoria

Sierra Leone Bonthe, Freetown, Pepel

Singapore Singapore

Slovakia Bratislava, Komarno

Slovenia Izola, Koper, Piran

Solomon Islands Aola Bay, Honiara, Lofung, Noro, Viru Harbor, Yandina

Somalia Boosaaso, Berbera, Chisimayu (Kismaayo), Merca, Mogadishu

South Africa Cape Town, Durban, East London, Mossel Bay, Port Elizabeth, Richards Bay, Saldanha

South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands Grytviken

Southern Ocean McMurdo, Palmer, and offshore anchorages in Antarctica note: few ports or harbors exist on the southern side of the Southern Ocean; ice conditions limit use of most of them to short periods in midsummer; even then some cannot be entered without icebreaker escort; most antarctic ports are operated by government research stations and, except in an emergency, are not open to commercial or private vessels; vessels in any port south of 60 degrees south are subject to inspection by Antarctic Treaty observers (see Article 7)

Spain Aviles, Barcelona, Bilbao, Cadiz, Cartagena, Castellon de la Plana, Ceuta, Huelva, A Coruna, Las Palmas (Canary Islands), Malaga, Melilla, Pasajes, Gijon, Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Canary Islands), Santander, Tarragona, Valencia, Vigo

Spratly Islands none; offshore anchorage only

Sri Lanka Colombo, Galle, Jaffna, Trincomalee

Sudan Juba, Khartoum, Kusti, Malakal, Nimule, Port Sudan, Sawakin

Suriname Albina, Moengo, New Nickerie, Paramaribo, Paranam, Wageningen

Svalbard Barentsburg, Longyearbyen, Ny-Alesund, Pyramiden

Swaziland none

Sweden Gavle, Goteborg, Halmstad, Helsingborg, Hudiksvall, Kalmar, Karlshamn, Lulea, Malmo, Solvesborg, Stockholm, Sundsvall

Switzerland Basel

Syria Baniyas, Jablah, Latakia, Tartus

Taiwan Chi-lung (Keelung), Hua-lien, Kao-hsiung, Su-ao, T'ai-chung

Tajikistan none

Tanzania Bukoba, Dar es Salaam, Kigoma, Kilwa Masoko, Lindi, Mtwara, Mwanza, Pangani, Tanga, Wete, Zanzibar

Thailand Bangkok, Laem Chabang, Pattani, Phuket, Sattahip, Si Racha, Songkhla

Togo Kpeme, Lome

Tokelau none; offshore anchorage only

Tonga Neiafu, Nuku'alofa, Pangai

Trinidad and Tobago Pointe-a-Pierre, Point Fortin, Point Lisas, Port-of-Spain, Scarborough, Tembladora

Tromelin Island none; offshore anchorage only

Tunisia Bizerte, Gabes, La Goulette, Sfax, Sousse, Tunis, Zarzis

Turkey Gemlik, Hopa, Iskenderun, Istanbul, Izmir, Kocaeli (Izmit), Icel (Mersin), Samsun, Trabzon

Turkmenistan Turkmenbasy

Turks and Caicos Islands Grand Turk, Providenciales

Tuvalu Funafuti, Nukufetau

Uganda Entebbe, Jinja, Port Bell

Ukraine Berdyans'k, Feodosiya, Illichivs'k, Izmayil, Kerch, Kherson, Kiev (Kyyiv), Kiliya, Mariupol', Mykolayiv, Odesa, Reni, Sevastopol', Yalta, Yuzhnyy

United Arab Emirates 'Ajman, Al Fujayrah, Das Island, Khawr Fakkan, Mina' Jabal 'Ali, Mina' Khalid, Mina' Rashid, Mina' Saqr, Mina' Zayid, Umm al Qaywayn

United Kingdom Aberdeen, Belfast, Bristol, Cardiff, Dover, Falmouth, Felixstowe, Glasgow, Grangemouth, Hull, Leith, Liverpool, London, Manchester, Peterhead, Plymouth, Portsmouth, Ramsgate, Scapa Flow, Southampton, Sullom Voe, Teesport, Tyne

United States Anchorage, Baltimore, Boston, Charleston, Chicago, Duluth, Hampton Roads, Honolulu, Houston, Jacksonville, Los Angeles, New Orleans, New York, Philadelphia, Port Canaveral, Portland (Oregon), Prudhoe Bay, San Francisco, Savannah, Seattle, Tampa, Toledo

Uruguay Colonia, Fray Bentos, Juan La Caze, La Paloma, Montevideo, Nueva Palmira, Paysandu, Punta del Este, Piriapolis

Uzbekistan Termiz (Amu Darya)

Vanuatu Forari, Port-Vila, Santo (Espiritu Santo)

Venezuela Amuay, Bajo Grande, El Tablazo, La Guaira, La Salina, Maracaibo, Matanzas, Palua, Puerto Cabello, Puerto la Cruz, Puerto Ordaz, Puerto Sucre, Punta Cardon

Vietnam Cam Ranh, Da Nang, Haiphong, Ho Chi Minh City, Ha Long, Quy Nhon, Nha Trang, Vinh, Vung Tau

Virgin Islands Charlotte Amalie, Christiansted, Cruz Bay, Port Alucroix

Wake Island none; two offshore anchorages for large ships

Wallis and Futuna Leava, Mata-Utu

West Bank none

Western Sahara Ad Dakhla, Cabo Bojador, Laayoune (El Aaiun)

World Chiba, Houston, Kawasaki, Kobe, Marseille, Mina' al Ahmadi (Kuwait), New Orleans, New York, Rotterdam, Yokohama

Yemen Aden, Al Hudaydah, Al Mukalla, As Salif, Ras Issa, Mocha, Nishtun

Zambia Mpulungu

Zimbabwe Binga, Kariba

This page was last updated on 10 February, 2005



======================================================================



@2121 Railways (km)

Albania total: 447 km standard gauge: 447 km 1.435-m gauge (2003)

Algeria total: 3,973 km standard gauge: 2,888 km 1.435-m gauge (283 km electrified) narrow gauge: 1,085 km 1.055-m gauge (2003)

Angola total: 2,761 km narrow gauge: 2,638 km 1.067-m gauge; 123 km 0.600-m gauge (2003)

Argentina total: 34,091 km (167 km electrified) broad gauge: 20,594 km 1.676-m gauge (141 km electrified) standard gauge: 2,885 km 1.435-m gauge (26 km electrified) narrow gauge: 10,375 km 1.000-m gauge; 237 km 0.750-m gauge (2003)

Armenia total: 845 km broad gauge: 845 km 1.520-m gauge (828 km electrified) note: some lines are out of service (2003)

Australia total: 44,015 km (5,290 km electrified) broad gauge: 1,957 km 1.600-m gauge standard gauge: 27,095 km 1.435-m gauge (2,828 km electrified) narrow gauge: 14,957 km 1.067-m gauge (2,462 km electrified) dual gauge: 213 km dual gauge (2003)

Austria total: 6,021 km (3,552 km electrified) standard gauge: 5,565 km 1.435-m gauge (3,430 km electrified) narrow gauge: 34 km 1.000-m gauge (28 km electrified); 422 km 0.760-m gauge (94 km electrified) (2003)

Azerbaijan total: 2,957 km broad gauge: 2,957 km 1.520-m gauge (1,278 km electrified) (2003)

Bangladesh total: 2,706 km broad gauge: 884 km 1.676-m gauge narrow gauge: 1,822 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Belarus total: 5,523 km broad gauge: 5,523 km 1.520-m gauge (875 km electrified) (2003)

Belgium total: 3,518 km standard gauge: 3,518 km 1.435-m gauge (2,631 km electrified) (2003)

Benin total: 578 km narrow gauge: 578 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Bolivia total: 3,519 km narrow gauge: 3,519 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Bosnia and Herzegovina total: 1,021 km (795 km electrified) standard gauge: 1,021 km 1.435-m gauge (2003)

Botswana total: 888 km narrow gauge: 888 km 1.067-m gauge (2003)

Brazil total: 29,412 km (1,610 km electrified) broad gauge: 4,907 km 1.600-m gauge (942 km electrified) standard gauge: 194 km 1.440-m gauge narrow gauge: 23,915 km 1.000-m gauge (581 km electrified) dual gauge: 396 km 1.000-m and 1.600-m gauges (three rails) (78 km electrified) (2003)

Bulgaria total: 4,294 km standard gauge: 4,049 km 1.435-m gauge (2,710 km electrified) narrow gauge: 245 km 0.760-m gauge (2003)

Burkina Faso total: 622 km narrow gauge: 622 km 1.000-m gauge note:: another 660 km of this railway extends into Cote D'Ivoire (2003)

Burma total: 3,955 km narrow gauge: 3,955 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Cambodia total: 602 km narrow gauge: 602 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Cameroon total: 1,008 km narrow gauge: 1,008 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Canada total: 48,909 km standard gauge: 48,909 km 1.435-m gauge (2003)

Chile total: 6,585 km broad gauge: 2,831 km 1.676-m gauge (1,317 km electrified) narrow gauge: 3,754 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

China total: 70,058 km standard gauge: 68,000 km 1.435-m gauge (18,668 km electrified) narrow gauge: 3,600 km 1.000-m and 0.750-m gauge local industrial lines dual gauge: 22,640 km (not included in total) (2003)

Colombia total: 3,304 km standard gauge: 150 km 1.435-m gauge narrow gauge: 3,154 km 0.914-m gauge (2003)

Congo, Democratic Republic of the total: 5,138 km narrow gauge: 3,987 km 1.067-m gauge (858 km electrified); 125 km 1.000-m gauge; 1,026 km 0.600-m gauge (2003)

Congo, Republic of the total: 894 km narrow gauge: 894 km 1.067-m gauge (2003)

Costa Rica total: 950 km narrow gauge: 950 km 1.067-m gauge (260 km electrified) (2003)

Cote d'Ivoire total: 660 km narrow gauge: 660 km 1.000-meter gauge note: an additional 622 km of this railroad extends into Burkina Faso (2003)

Croatia total: 2,726 km standard gauge: 2,726 km 1.435-m gauge (984 km electrified) (2003)

Cuba total: 4,226 km standard gauge: 4,226 km 1.435-m gauge (140 km electrified) note: an additional 7,742 km of track is used by sugar plantations; about 65% of this track is standard gauge; the rest is narrow gauge (2003)

Czech Republic total: 9,520 km standard gauge: 9,421 km 1.435-m gauge (2,893 km electrified) narrow gauge: 99 km 0.760-m gauge (2003)

Denmark total: 3,002 km standard gauge: 3,002 km 1.435-m gauge (595 km electrified) (2003)

Djibouti total: 100 km (Djibouti segment of the Addis Ababa-Djibouti railway) narrow gauge: 100 km 1.000-m gauge note: railway under joint control of Djibouti and Ethiopia (2003)

Dominican Republic total: 1,743 km standard gauge: 375 km 1.435-m gauge narrow gauge: 142 km 0.762-m gauge note: additional 1,226 km operated by sugar companies in 1.076-m, 0.889-m, and 0.762-m gauges (2003)

Ecuador total: 966 km narrow gauge: 966 km 1.067-m gauge (2003)

Egypt total: 5,063 km standard gauge: 5,063 km 1.435-m gauge (62 km electrified) (2003)

El Salvador total: 283 km narrow gauge: 283 km 0.914-m gauge note: length of operational route reduced from 562 km to 283 km by disuse and lack of maintenance (2003)

Eritrea total: 306 km narrow gauge: 306 km 0.950-m gauge note: railway is being rebuilt; 117 km open (2003)

Estonia total: 958 km broad gauge: 958 km 1.520-m/1.524-m gauge (132 km electrified) note: gauge being increased from 1.520-m to 1.524-m to reduce wear on wheels and rail as lines are modernized (2003)

Ethiopia total: 681 km (Ethiopian segment of the Addis Ababa-Djibouti railroad) narrow gauge: 681 km 1.000-m gauge note: railway under joint control of Djibouti and Ethiopia (2003)

European Union total: 222,293 km broad gauge: 28,438 km standard gauge: 186,405 km narrow gauge: 7,427 km other: 23 km (2003)

Fiji total: 597 km narrow gauge: 597 km 0.600-m gauge note: belongs to the government-owned Fiji Sugar Corporation; used to haul sugarcane during harvest season (May to December) (2003)

Finland total: 5,851 km broad gauge: 5,851 km 1.524-m gauge (2,400 km electrified) (2003)

France total: 32,175 km standard gauge: 32,008 km 1.435-m gauge (14,320 km electrified) narrow gauge: 167 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Gabon total: 814 km standard gauge: 814 km 1.435-m gauge (2003)

Georgia total: 1,612 km (1,612 km electrified) broad gauge: 1,575 km 1.520-m gauge (1,575 electrified) narrow gauge: 37 km 0.912-m gauge (37 electrified) (2003)

Germany total: 46,039 km (20,100 km electrified) standard gauge: 45,801 km 1.435-m gauge (20,084 km electrified) narrow gauge: 214 km 1.000-m gauge (16 km electrified); 24 km 0.750-m gauge (2003)

Ghana total: 953 km narrow gauge: 953 km 1.067-m gauge (2003)

Greece total: 2,571 km (764 km electrified) standard gauge: 1,565 km 1.435-m gauge narrow gauge: 961 km 1.000-m gauge; 22 km 0.750-m gauge dual gauge: 23 km combined 1.435-m and 1.000-m gauges (three rail system) (2003)

Guatemala total: 886 km narrow gauge: 886 km 0.914-m gauge (2003)

Guinea total: 837 km standard gauge: 175 km 1.435-m gauge narrow gauge: 662 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Guyana total: 187 km standard gauge: 139 km 1.435-m gauge narrow gauge: 48 km 0.914-m gauge note: all dedicated to ore transport (2001 est.)

Honduras total: 699 km narrow gauge: 279 km 1.067-m gauge; 420 km 0.914-m gauge (2003)

Hungary total: 7,937 km broad gauge: 36 km 1.524-m gauge standard gauge: 7,682 km 1.435-m gauge (2,628 km electrified) narrow gauge: 219 km 0.760-m gauge (2003)

India total: 63,140 km (15,994 km electrified) broad gauge: 45,099 km 1.676-m gauge narrow gauge: 14,776 km 1.000-m gauge; 3,265 km 0.762-m gauge and 0.610-m gauge (2003)

Indonesia total: 6,458 km narrow gauge: 5,961 km 1.067-m gauge (125 km electrified); 497 km 0.750-m gauge (2003)

Iran total: 7,203 km broad gauge: 94 km 1.676-m gauge standard gauge: 7,109 km 1.435-m gauge (189 km electrified) (2003)

Iraq total: 1,963 km standard gauge: 1,963 km 1.435-m gauge (2003)

Ireland total: 3,312 km broad gauge: 1,947 km 1.600-m gauge (46 km electrified) narrow gauge: 1,365 km 0.914-m gauge (operated by the Irish Peat Board to transport peat to power stations and briquetting plants) (2003)

Israel total: 640 km standard gauge: 640 km 1.435-m gauge (2003)

Italy total: 19,507 km (11,651 km electrified) standard gauge: 18,070 km 1.435-m gauge (11,375 km electrified) narrow gauge: 123 km 1.000-m gauge (88 km electrified); 1,314 km 0.950-m gauge (188 km electrified) (2003)

Jamaica total: 272 km standard gauge: 272 km 1.435-m gauge note: 207 of these km belonging to the Jamaica Railway Corporation had been in common carrier service until 1992 but are no longer operational; 57 km of the remaining track is privately owned and used by ALCAN to transport bauxite (2003)

Japan total: 23,705 km (16,519 km electrified) standard gauge: 3,204 km 1.435-m gauge (3,204 km electrified) narrow gauge: 77 km 1.372-m gauge (77 km electrified); 20,393 km 1.067-m gauge (13,227 km electrified); 11 km 0.762-m gauge (11 km electrified) (2003)

Jordan total: 505 km narrow gauge: 505 km 1.050-m gauge (2003)

Kazakhstan total: 13,601 km broad gauge: 13,601 km 1.520-m gauge (3,661 km electrified) (2003)

Kenya total: 2,778 km narrow gauge: 2,778 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Korea, North total: 5,214 km standard gauge: 5,214 km 1.435-m gauge (3,500 km electrified) (2003)

Korea, South total: 3,125 km standard gauge: 3,125 km 1.435-m gauge (661 km electrified) (2003)

Kyrgyzstan total: 470 km broad gauge: 470 km 1.520-m gauge (2003)

Latvia total: 2,303 km broad gauge: 2,270 km 1.520-m gauge (257 km electrified) narrow gauge: 33 km 0.750-m gauge (2003)

Lebanon total: 401 km standard gauge: 319 km 1.435-m narrow gauge: 82 km 1.050-m note: rail system was unusable because of damage during the civil war in the 1980s; short sections are operable (2003)

Liberia total: 490 km standard gauge: 345 km 1.435-m gauge narrow gauge: 145 km 1.067-m gauge note: none of the railways are in operation (2003)

Libya 0 km note: Libya is working on 7 lines totaling 2,757 km of 1.435-m gauge track; it hopes to open a 191 km line by the end of 2004 (2003)

Lithuania total: 1,998 km broad gauge: 1,807 km 1.524-m gauge (122 km electrified) standard gauge: 22 km 1.435-m gauge narrow gauge: 169 km 0.750-m gauge (all service suspended) (2003)

Luxembourg total: 274 km standard gauge: 274 km 1.435-m gauge (242 km electrified) (2003)

Macedonia total: 699 km standard gauge: 699 km 1.435-m gauge (233 km electrified) (2003)

Madagascar total: 732 km narrow gauge: 732 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Malawi total: 797 km narrow gauge: 797 km 1.067-m gauge (2003)

Malaysia total: 2,418 km (207 km electrified) standard gauge: 57 km 1.435-m gauge (57 km electrified) narrow gauge: 2,361 km 1.000-m gauge (150 km electrified) (2003)

Mali total: 729 km narrow gauge: 729 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Man, Isle of total: 61 km (35 km electrified) (2003)

Mauritania 717 km standard gauge: 717 km 1.435-m gauge (2003)

Mexico total: 19,510 km standard gauge: 19,510 km 1.435-m gauge (2003)

Moldova total: 1,138 km broad gauge: 1,124 km 1.520-m gauge standard gauge: 14 km 1.435-m gauge (2003)

Mongolia 1,810 km broad gauge: 1,810 km 1.524-m gauge (2004)

Morocco total: 1,907 km standard gauge: 1,907 km 1.435-m gauge (1,003 km electrified) (2003)

Mozambique total: 3,123 km narrow gauge: 2,983 km 1.067-m gauge; 140 km 0.762-m gauge (2003)

Namibia total: 2,382 km narrow gauge: 2,382 km 1.067-m gauge (2003)

Nepal total: 59 km narrow gauge: 59 km 0.762-m gauge (2003)

Netherlands total: 2,808 km standard gauge: 2,808 km 1.435-m gauge (2,061 km electrified) (2003)

New Zealand total: 3,898 km narrow gauge: 3,898 km 1.067-m gauge (506 km electrified) (2003)

Nicaragua total: 6 km narrow gauge: 6 km 1.067-m gauge (2003)

Nigeria total: 3,557 km narrow gauge: 3,505 km 1.067-m gauge standard gauge: 52 km 1.435-m gauge (2003)

Norway total: 4,077 km standard gauge: 4,077 km 1.435-m gauge (2,518 km electrified) (2003)

Pakistan total: 8,163 km broad gauge: 7,718 km 1.676-m gauge (293 km electrified) narrow gauge: 445 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Panama total: 355 km standard gauge: 76 km 1.435-m gauge narrow gauge: 279 km 0.914-m gauge (2003)

Paraguay total: 441 km standard gauge: 441 km 1.435-m gauge (2003)

Peru total: 3,462 km standard gauge: 2,962 km 1.435-m gauge narrow gauge: 500 km 0.914-m gauge (2003)

Philippines total: 897 km narrow gauge: 897 km 1.067-m gauge (492 km are in operation) (2003)

Poland total: 23,852 km broad gauge: 629 km 1.524-m gauge standard gauge: 23,223 km 1.435-m gauge (11,962 km electrified) (2003)

Portugal total: 2,850 km broad gauge: 2,576 km 1.668-m gauge (623 km electrified) narrow gauge: 274 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Puerto Rico total: 96 km narrow gauge: 96 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Romania total: 11,385 km (3,888 km electrified) standard gauge: 10,898 km 1.435-m gauge broad gauge: 60 km 1.524-m gauge narrow gauge: 427 km 0.760-m gauge (2003)

Russia total: 87,157 km broad gauge: 86,200 km 1.520-m gauge (40,300 km electrified) narrow gauge: 957 km 1.067-m gauge (on Sakhalin Island) note: an additional 30,000 km of non-common carrier lines serve industries (2003)

Saint Kitts and Nevis total: 50 km narrow gauge: 50 km 0.762-m gauge on Saint Kitts to serve sugarcane plantations during harvest season (2003)

Saudi Arabia total: 1,392 km standard gauge: 1,392 km 1.435-m gauge (with branch lines and sidings) (2003)

Senegal total: 906 km narrow gauge: 906 km 1.000-meter gauge (2003)

Serbia and Montenegro total: 4,380 km standard gauge: 4,380 km 1.435-m gauge (1,445 km electrified) (2003)

Slovakia total: 3,661 km broad gauge: 100 km 1.520-m gauge standard gauge: 3,512 km 1.435-m gauge (1,588 km electrified) narrow gauge: 49 km (1.000-m or 0.750-m gauge) (2003)

Slovenia total: 1,201 km standard gauge: 1,201 km 1.435-m gauge (499 km electrified) (2003)

South Africa total: 22,298 km narrow gauge: 21,984 km 1.065-m gauge (10,436 km electrified); 314 km 0.610-m gauge note: includes a 2,228 km commuter rail system (2003)

Spain total: 14,268 km (7,718 km electrified) broad gauge: 11,804 km 1.668-m gauge (6,409 km electrified) standard gauge: 526 km 1.435-m gauge (526 km electrified) narrow gauge: 1,910 km 1.000-m gauge (755 km electrified); 28 km 0.914-m gauge (28 km electrified) (2003)

Sri Lanka total: 1,449 km broad gauge: 1,449 km 1.676-m gauge (2003)

Sudan total: 5,978 km narrow gauge: 4,595 km 1.067-m gauge; 1,400 km .600-m gauge for cotton plantations (2003)

Swaziland total: 301 km narrow gauge: 301 km 1.067-m gauge (2003)

Sweden total: 11,481 km standard gauge: 11,481 km 1.435-m gauge (7,527 km electrified) (2003)

Switzerland total: 4,533 km standard gauge: 3,483 km 1.435-m gauge (3,472 km electrified) narrow gauge: 1,004 km 1.000-m gauge (974 km electrified); 46 km 0.800-m gauge (46 km electrified) (2003)

Syria total: 2,711 km standard gauge: 2,460 km 1.435-m gauge narrow gauge: 251 km 1.050-m gauge (2003)

Taiwan total: 2,544 km narrow gauge: 1,108 km 1.067-m gauge (519 km electrified) note: 1,400 km .762-m gauge (belonging to the Taiwan Sugar Corporation and to the Taiwan Forestry Bureau used to haul products and limited numbers of passengers (2003)

Tajikistan total: 482 km broad gauge: 482 km 1.520-m gauge (2003)

Tanzania total: 3,690 km narrow gauge: 969 km 1.067-m gauge; 2,721 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Thailand total: 4,071 km narrow gauge: 4,071 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Togo total: 568 km narrow gauge: 568 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Tunisia total: 2,152 km standard gauge: 468 km 1.435-m gauge narrow gauge: 1,674 km 1.000-m gauge (65 km electrified) dual gauge: 10 km 1.435-m and 1.000-m gauges (three rails) (2003)

Turkey total: 8,671 km standard gauge: 8,671 km 1.435-m gauge (2,122 km electrified) (2003)

Turkmenistan total: 2,440 km broad gauge: 2,440 km 1.520-m gauge (2003)

Uganda total: 1,241 km narrow gauge: 1,241 km 1.000-m gauge (2003)

Ukraine total: 22,473 km broad gauge: 22,473 km 1.524-m gauge (9,250 km electrified) (2003)

United Kingdom total: 17,186 km standard gauge: 16,726 km 1.435-m gauge (5,243 km electrified) broad gauge: 460 km 1.600-m gauge (in Northern Ireland) (2003)

United States total: 228,464 km standard gauge: 228,464 km 1.435-m gauge (2003)

Uruguay total: 2,073 km standard gauge: 2,073 km 1.435-m gauge note: 461 km have been taken out of service and 460 km are in partial use (2003)

Uzbekistan total: 3,950 km broad gauge: 3,950 km 1.520-m gauge (620 km electrified) (2003)

Venezuela total: 682 km standard gauge: 682 km 1.435-m gauge (2003)

Vietnam total: 2,600 km standard gauge: 178 km 1.435-m gauge narrow gauge: 2,169 km 1.000-m gauge dual gauge: 253 km three-rail track combining 1.435-m and 1.000-m gauges (2003)

World total: 1,115,205 km broad gauge: 257,481 km standard gauge: 671,413 km narrow gauge: 186,311 km (2003)

Zambia total: 2,173 km narrow gauge: 2,173 km 1.067-m gauge note: includes 891 km of the Tanzania-Zambia Railway Authority (TAZARA) (2003)

Zimbabwe total: 3,077 km narrow gauge: 3,077 km 1.067-m gauge (313 km electrified) (2003)

This page was last updated on 10 February, 2005



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@2122 Religions (%)

Afghanistan Sunni Muslim 80%, Shi'a Muslim 19%, other 1%

Albania Muslim 70%, Albanian Orthodox 20%, Roman Catholic 10% note: percentages are estimates; there are no available current statistics on religious affiliation; all mosques and churches were closed in 1967 and religious observances prohibited; in November 1990, Albania began allowing private religious practice

Algeria Sunni Muslim (state religion) 99%, Christian and Jewish 1%

American Samoa Christian Congregationalist 50%, Roman Catholic 20%, Protestant and other 30%

Andorra Roman Catholic (predominant)

Angola indigenous beliefs 47%, Roman Catholic 38%, Protestant 15% (1998 est.)

Anguilla Anglican 40%, Methodist 33%, Seventh-Day Adventist 7%, Baptist 5%, Roman Catholic 3%, other 12%

Antigua and Barbuda Christian, (predominantly Anglican with other Protestant, and some Roman Catholic)

Argentina nominally Roman Catholic 92% (less than 20% practicing), Protestant 2%, Jewish 2%, other 4%

Armenia Armenian Apostolic 94%, other Christian 4%, Yezidi (Zoroastrian/animist) 2%

Aruba Roman Catholic 82%, Protestant 8%, Hindu, Muslim, Confucian, Jewish

Australia Anglican 26.1%, Roman Catholic 26%, other Christian 24.3%, non-Christian 11%, other 12.6%

Austria Roman Catholic 73.6%, Protestant 4.7%, Muslim 4.2%, other 0.1%, none 17.4%

Azerbaijan Muslim 93.4%, Russian Orthodox 2.5%, Armenian Orthodox 2.3%, other 1.8% (1995 est.) note: religious affiliation is still nominal in Azerbaijan; percentages for actual practicing adherents are much lower

Bahamas, The Baptist 32%, Anglican 20%, Roman Catholic 19%, Methodist 6%, Church of God 6%, other Protestant 12%, none or unknown 3%, other 2%

Bahrain Shi'a Muslim 70%, Sunni Muslim 30%

Bangladesh Muslim 83%, Hindu 16%, other 1% (1998)

Barbados Protestant 67% (Anglican 40%, Pentecostal 8%, Methodist 7%, other 12%), Roman Catholic 4%, none 17%, other 12%

Belarus Eastern Orthodox 80%, other (including Roman Catholic, Protestant, Jewish, and Muslim) 20% (1997 est.)

Belgium Roman Catholic 75%, Protestant or other 25%

Belize Roman Catholic 49.6%, Protestant 27% (Anglican 5.3%, Methodist 3.5%, Mennonite 4.1%, Seventh-Day Adventist 5.2%, Pentecostal 7.4%, Jehovah's Witnesses 1.5%), none 9.4%, other 14% (2000)

Benin indigenous beliefs 50%, Christian 30%, Muslim 20%

Bermuda non-Anglican Protestant 39%, Anglican 27%, Roman Catholic 15%, other 19%

Bhutan Lamaistic Buddhist 75%, Indian- and Nepalese-influenced Hinduism 25%

Bolivia Roman Catholic 95%, Protestant (Evangelical Methodist)

Bosnia and Herzegovina Muslim 40%, Orthodox 31%, Roman Catholic 15%, other 14%

Botswana indigenous beliefs 85%, Christian 15%

Brazil Roman Catholic (nominal) 80%

British Virgin Islands Protestant 86% (Methodist 33%, Anglican 17%, Church of God 9%, Seventh-Day Adventist 6%, Baptist 4%, Jehovah's Witnesses 2%, other 15%), Roman Catholic 10%, none 2%, other 2% (1991)

Brunei Muslim (official) 67%, Buddhist 13%, Christian 10%, indigenous beliefs and other 10%

Bulgaria Bulgarian Orthodox 82.6%, Muslim 12.2%, Roman Catholic 1.7%, Jewish 0.1%, Protestant, Gregorian-Armenian, and other 3.4% (1998)

Burkina Faso indigenous beliefs 40%, Muslim 50%, Christian (mainly Roman Catholic) 10%

Burma Buddhist 89%, Christian 4% (Baptist 3%, Roman Catholic 1%), Muslim 4%, animist 1%, other 2%

Burundi Christian 67% (Roman Catholic 62%, Protestant 5%), indigenous beliefs 23%, Muslim 10%

Cambodia Theravada Buddhist 95%, other 5%

Cameroon indigenous beliefs 40%, Christian 40%, Muslim 20%

Canada Roman Catholic 46%, Protestant 36%, other 18% note: based on the 1991 census

Cape Verde Roman Catholic (infused with indigenous beliefs); Protestant (mostly Church of the Nazarene)

Cayman Islands United Church (Presbyterian and Congregational), Anglican, Baptist, Church of God, other Protestant, Roman Catholic

Central African Republic indigenous beliefs 35%, Protestant 25%, Roman Catholic 25%, Muslim 15% note: animistic beliefs and practices strongly influence the Christian majority

Chad Muslim 51%, Christian 35%, animist 7%, other 7%

Chile Roman Catholic 89%, Protestant 11%, Jewish negligible

China Daoist (Taoist), Buddhist, Muslim 1%-2%, Christian 3%-4% note: officially atheist (2002 est.)

Christmas Island Buddhist 36%, Muslim 25%, Christian 18%, other 21% (1997)

Cocos (Keeling) Islands Sunni Muslim 80%, other 20% (2002 est.)

Colombia Roman Catholic 90%

Comoros Sunni Muslim 98%, Roman Catholic 2%

Congo, Democratic Republic of the Roman Catholic 50%, Protestant 20%, Kimbanguist 10%, Muslim 10%, other syncretic sects and indigenous beliefs 10%

Congo, Republic of the Christian 50%, animist 48%, Muslim 2%

Cook Islands Christian (majority of populace are members of the Cook Islands Christian Church)

Costa Rica Roman Catholic 76.3%, Evangelical 13.7%, Jehovah's Witnesses 1.3%, other Protestant 0.7%, other 4.8%, none 3.2%

Cote d'Ivoire Christian 20-30%, Muslim 35-40%, indigenous 25-40% (2001) note: the majority of foreigners (migratory workers) are Muslim (70%) and Christian (20%)

Croatia Roman Catholic 87.8%, Orthodox 4.4%, Muslim 1.3%, Protestant 0.3%, others and unknown 6.2% (2001)

Cuba nominally 85% Roman Catholic prior to CASTRO assuming power; Protestants, Jehovah's Witnesses, Jews, and Santeria are also represented

Cyprus Greek Orthodox 78%, Muslim 18%, Maronite, Armenian Apostolic, and other 4%

Czech Republic Roman Catholic 39.2%, Protestant 4.6%, Orthodox 3%, other 13.4%, atheist 39.8%

Denmark Evangelical Lutheran 95%, other Protestant and Roman Catholic 3%, Muslim 2%

Djibouti Muslim 94%, Christian 6%

Dominica Roman Catholic 77%, Protestant 15% (Methodist 5%, Pentecostal 3%, Seventh-Day Adventist 3%, Baptist 2%, other 2%), none 2%, other 6%

Dominican Republic Roman Catholic 95%

East Timor Roman Catholic 90%, Muslim 4%, Protestant 3%, Hindu 0.5%, Buddhist, Animist (1992 est.)

Ecuador Roman Catholic 95%

Egypt Muslim (mostly Sunni) 94%, Coptic Christian and other 6%

El Salvador Roman Catholic 83% note: there is extensive activity by Protestant groups throughout the country; by the end of 1992, there were an estimated 1 million Protestant evangelicals in El Salvador

Equatorial Guinea nominally Christian and predominantly Roman Catholic, pagan practices

Eritrea Muslim, Coptic Christian, Roman Catholic, Protestant

Estonia Evangelical Lutheran, Russian Orthodox, Estonian Orthodox, Baptist, Methodist, Seventh-Day Adventist, Roman Catholic, Pentecostal, Word of Life, Jewish

Ethiopia Muslim 45%-50%, Ethiopian Orthodox 35%-40%, animist 12%, other 3%-8%

European Union Roman Catholic, Protestant, Orthodox, Muslim, Jewish

Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas) primarily Anglican, Roman Catholic, United Free Church, Evangelist Church, Jehovah's Witnesses, Lutheran, Seventh-Day Adventist

Faroe Islands Evangelical Lutheran

Fiji Christian 52% (Methodist 37%, Roman Catholic 9%), Hindu 38%, Muslim 8%, other 2% note: Fijians are mainly Christian, Indians are Hindu, and there is a Muslim minority (1986)

Finland Evangelical Lutheran 89%, Russian Orthodox 1%, none 9%, other 1%

France Roman Catholic 83%-88%, Protestant 2%, Jewish 1%, Muslim 5%-10%, unaffiliated 4%

French Guiana Roman Catholic

French Polynesia Protestant 54%, Roman Catholic 30%, other 10%, no religion 6%

Gabon Christian 55%-75%, animist, Muslim less than 1%

Gambia, The Muslim 90%, Christian 9%, indigenous beliefs 1%

Gaza Strip Muslim (predominantly Sunni) 98.7%, Christian 0.7%, Jewish 0.6%

Georgia Georgian Orthodox 65%, Muslim 11%, Russian Orthodox 10%, Armenian Apostolic 8%, unknown 6%

Germany Protestant 34%, Roman Catholic 34%, Muslim 3.7%, unaffiliated or other 28.3%

Ghana Christian 63%, Muslim 16%, indigenous beliefs 21%

Gibraltar Roman Catholic 76.9%, Church of England 6.9%, Muslim 6.9%, Jewish 2.3%, none or other 7% (1991)

Greece Greek Orthodox 98%, Muslim 1.3%, other 0.7%

Greenland Evangelical Lutheran

Grenada Roman Catholic 53%, Anglican 13.8%, other Protestant 33.2%

Guadeloupe Roman Catholic 95%, Hindu and pagan African 4%, Protestant 1%

Guam Roman Catholic 85%, other 15% (1999 est.)

Guatemala Roman Catholic, Protestant, indigenous Mayan beliefs

Guernsey Anglican, Roman Catholic, Presbyterian, Baptist, Congregational, Methodist

Guinea Muslim 85%, Christian 8%, indigenous beliefs 7%

Guinea-Bissau indigenous beliefs 50%, Muslim 45%, Christian 5%

Guyana Christian 50%, Hindu 35%, Muslim 10%, other 5%

Haiti Roman Catholic 80%, Protestant 16% (Baptist 10%, Pentecostal 4%, Adventist 1%, other 1%), none 1%, other 3% (1982) note: roughly half of the population practices Voodoo

Holy See (Vatican City) Roman Catholic

Honduras Roman Catholic 97%, Protestant minority

Hong Kong eclectic mixture of local religions 90%, Christian 10%

Hungary Roman Catholic 67.5%, Calvinist 20%, Lutheran 5%, atheist and other 7.5%

Iceland Evangelical Lutheran 87.1%, other Protestant 4.1%, Roman Catholic 1.7%, other 7.1% (2002)

India Hindu 81.3%, Muslim 12%, Christian 2.3%, Sikh 1.9%, other groups including Buddhist, Jain, Parsi 2.5% (2000)

Indonesia Muslim 88%, Protestant 5%, Roman Catholic 3%, Hindu 2%, Buddhist 1%, other 1% (1998)

Iran Shi'a Muslim 89%, Sunni Muslim 9%, Zoroastrian, Jewish, Christian, and Baha'i 2%

Iraq Muslim 97% (Shi'a 60%-65%, Sunni 32%-37%), Christian or other 3%

Ireland Roman Catholic 91.6%, Church of Ireland 2.5%, other 5.9% (1998)

Israel Jewish 80.1%, Muslim 14.6% (mostly Sunni Muslim), Christian 2.1%, other 3.2% (1996 est.)

Italy predominately Roman Catholic with mature Protestant and Jewish communities and a growing Muslim immigrant community

Jamaica Protestant 61.3% (Church of God 21.2%, Baptist 8.8%, Anglican 5.5%, Seventh-Day Adventist 9%, Pentecostal 7.6%, Methodist 2.7%, United Church 2.7%, Brethren 1.1%, Jehovah's Witness 1.6%, Moravian 1.1%), Roman Catholic 4%, other including some spiritual cults 34.7%

Japan observe both Shinto and Buddhist 84%, other 16% (including Christian 0.7%)

Jersey Anglican, Roman Catholic, Baptist, Congregational New Church, Methodist, Presbyterian

Jordan Sunni Muslim 92%, Christian 6% (majority Greek Orthodox, but some Greek and Roman Catholics, Syrian Orthodox, Coptic Orthodox, Armenian Orthodox, and Protestant denominations), other 2% (several small Shi'a Muslim and Druze populations) (2001 est.)

Kazakhstan Muslim 47%, Russian Orthodox 44%, Protestant 2%, other 7%

Kenya Protestant 45%, Roman Catholic 33%, indigenous beliefs 10%, Muslim 10%, other 2% note: a large majority of Kenyans are Christian, but estimates for the percentage of the population that adheres to Islam or indigenous beliefs vary widely

Kiribati Roman Catholic 52%, Protestant (Congregational) 40%, some Seventh-Day Adventist, Muslim, Baha'i, Latter-day Saints, and Church of God (1999)

Korea, North traditionally Buddhist and Confucianist, some Christian and syncretic Chondogyo (Religion of the Heavenly Way) note: autonomous religious activities now almost nonexistent; government-sponsored religious groups exist to provide illusion of religious freedom

Korea, South no affiliation 46%, Christian 26%, Buddhist 26%, Confucianist 1%, other 1%

Kuwait Muslim 85% (Sunni 70%, Shi'a 30%), Christian, Hindu, Parsi, and other 15%

Kyrgyzstan Muslim 75%, Russian Orthodox 20%, other 5%

Laos Buddhist 60%, animist and other 40% (including various Christian denominations 1.5%)

Latvia Lutheran, Roman Catholic, Russian Orthodox

Lebanon Muslim 59.7% (Shi'a, Sunni, Druze, Isma'ilite, Alawite or Nusayri), Christian 39% (Maronite Catholic, Melkite Catholic, Armenian Orthodox, Syrian Catholic, Armenian Catholic, Roman Catholic, Protestant), other 1.3% note: seventeen religious sects recognized

Lesotho Christian 80%, indigenous beliefs 20%

Liberia indigenous beliefs 40%, Christian 40%, Muslim 20%

Libya Sunni Muslim 97%

Liechtenstein Roman Catholic 76.2%, Protestant 7%, unknown 10.6%, other 6.2% (June 2002)

Lithuania Roman Catholic (primarily), Lutheran, Russian Orthodox, Protestant, Evangelical Christian Baptist, Muslim, Jewish

Luxembourg 87% Roman Catholic, 13% Protestants, Jews, and Muslims (2000)

Macau Buddhist 50%, Roman Catholic 15%, none and other 35% (1997 est.)

Macedonia Macedonian Orthodox 70%, Muslim 29%, other 1%

Madagascar indigenous beliefs 52%, Christian 41%, Muslim 7%

Malawi Protestant 55%, Roman Catholic 20%, Muslim 20%, indigenous beliefs 3%, other 2%

Malaysia Muslim, Buddhist, Daoist, Hindu, Christian, Sikh; note - in addition, Shamanism is practiced in East Malaysia

Maldives Sunni Muslim

Mali Muslim 90%, indigenous beliefs 9%, Christian 1%

Malta Roman Catholic 98%

Man, Isle of Anglican, Roman Catholic, Methodist, Baptist, Presbyterian, Society of Friends

Marshall Islands Christian (mostly Protestant)

Martinique Roman Catholic 85%, Protestant 10.5%, Muslim 0.5%, Hindu 0.5%, other 3.5% (1997)

Mauritania Muslim 100%

Mauritius Hindu 52%, Christian 28.3% (Roman Catholic 26%, Protestant 2.3%), Muslim 16.6%, other 3.1%

Mayotte Muslim 97%, Christian (mostly Roman Catholic)

Mexico nominally Roman Catholic 89%, Protestant 6%, other 5%

Micronesia, Federated States of Roman Catholic 50%, Protestant 47%

Moldova Eastern Orthodox 98%, Jewish 1.5%, Baptist and other 0.5% (2000)

Monaco Roman Catholic 90%

Mongolia Buddhist Lamaist 50%, none 40%, Shamanist and Christian 6%, Muslim 4% (2004)

Montserrat Anglican, Methodist, Roman Catholic, Pentecostal, Seventh-Day Adventist, other Christian denominations

Morocco Muslim 98.7%, Christian 1.1%, Jewish 0.2%

Mozambique indigenous beliefs 50%, Christian 30%, Muslim 20%

Namibia Christian 80% to 90% (Lutheran 50% at least), indigenous beliefs 10% to 20%

Nauru Christian (two-thirds Protestant, one-third Roman Catholic)

Nepal Hinduism 86.2%, Buddhism 7.8%, Islam 3.8%, other 2.2% note: only official Hindu state in the world (1995)

Netherlands Roman Catholic 31%, Protestant 21%, Muslim 4.4%, other 3.6%, unaffiliated 40% (1998)

Netherlands Antilles Roman Catholic, Protestant, Jewish, Seventh-Day Adventist

New Caledonia Roman Catholic 60%, Protestant 30%, other 10%

New Zealand Anglican 24%, Presbyterian 18%, Roman Catholic 15%, Methodist 5%, Baptist 2%, other Protestant 3%, unspecified or none 33% (1986)

Nicaragua Roman Catholic 85%, Protestant

Niger Muslim 80%, remainder indigenous beliefs and Christian

Nigeria Muslim 50%, Christian 40%, indigenous beliefs 10%

Niue Ekalesia Niue (Niuean Church - a Protestant church closely related to the London Missionary Society) 75%, Latter-Day Saints 10%, other 15% (mostly Roman Catholic, Jehovah's Witnesses, Seventh-Day Adventist)

Norfolk Island Anglican 37.4%, Uniting Church in Australia 14.5%, Roman Catholic 11.5%, Seventh-Day Adventist 3.1%, none 12.2%, unknown 17.4%, other 3.9% (1996)

Northern Mariana Islands Christian (Roman Catholic majority, although traditional beliefs and taboos may still be found)

Norway Evangelical Lutheran 86% (state church), other Protestant and Roman Catholic 3%, other 1%, none and unknown 10% (1997)

Oman Ibadhi Muslim 75%, Sunni Muslim, Shi'a Muslim, Hindu

Pakistan Muslim 97% (Sunni 77%, Shi'a 20%), Christian, Hindu, and other 3%

Palau Christian (Roman Catholics 49%, Seventh-Day Adventists, Jehovah's Witnesses, the Assembly of God, the Liebenzell Mission, and Latter-Day Saints), Modekngei religion (one-third of the population observes this religion, which is indigenous to Palau)

Panama Roman Catholic 85%, Protestant 15%

Papua New Guinea Roman Catholic 22%, Lutheran 16%, Presbyterian/Methodist/London Missionary Society 8%, Anglican 5%, Evangelical Alliance 4%, Seventh-Day Adventist 1%, other Protestant 10%, indigenous beliefs 34%

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