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Seventy-Five Receipts for Pastry Cakes, and Sweetmeats
by Miss Leslie
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Put some flour on your paste-board, take out small portions of the dough, and make it with your hand into long rolls. Then curl up the rolls into round cakes, or twist two rolls together, or lay them in straight lengths or sticks side by side, and touching each other. Put them carefully in buttered pans, and bake them in a moderate oven, not hot enough to burn them. If they should get scorched, scrape off with a knife, or grater, all the burnt parts, before you put the cakes away.

You can, if you choose, cut out the dough with tins, in the shape of hearts, circles, ovals, &c. or you may bake it all in one, and cut it in squares when cold.

If the mixture appears to be too thin, add, gradually, a little more sifted flour.

LAFAYETTE GINGERBREAD

Five eggs. Half a pound of brown sugar. Half a pound of fresh butter. A pint of sugar-house molasses A pound and a half of flour. Four table-spoonfuls of ginger. Two large sticks of cinnamon, powered and sifted. Three dozen grains of allspice, powdered and sifted. Three dozen of cloves, powdered and sifted. The juice and grated peel of two large lemons. A little pearl-ash or salaeratus.

Stir the butter and sugar to a cream. Beat the eggs very well. Pour the molasses, at once, into the butter and sugar. Add the ginger and other spice, and stir all well together.

Put in the egg and flour alternately, stirring all the time. Stir the whole very hard, and put in the lemon at the last. When the whole is mixed, stir it till very light.

Butter an earthen pan, or a thick tin or iron one, and put the gingerbread in it. Bake it in a moderate oven, an hour or more, according to its thickness. Take care that it do not burn.

Or you may bake it in small cakes, or little tins.

Its lightness will be much improved by a small tea-spoonful of pearl-ash dissolved in a tea-spoonful of vinegar, and stirred lightly in at the last. [Footnote: If the pearl-ash is strong, half a tea-spoonful will be sufficient, or less even will do. It is better stir the pearl-ash in, a little at a time, and you can tell by the taste of the mixture, when there is enough.] Too much pearl-ash, will give it an unpleasant taste.

If you use pearl-ash, you must omit the lemon, as its taste will be entirely destroyed by the pearl-ash. You may substitute for the lemon, some raisins and currants, well floured to prevent their sinking.

This is the finest of all gingerbread, but should not be kept long, as in a few days it becomes very hard and stale.

A DOVER CAKE.

Half a pint of milk. A half tea-spoonful of pearl-ash, dissolved in a little vinegar. One pound of sifted flour. One pound of powdered white sugar. Half a pound of butter. Six eggs. One glass of brandy. Half a glass of rose-water. One grated nutmeg. A tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon.

Dissolve the pearl-ash in vinegar. Stir the sugar and butter to a cream, and add to it gradually, the spice and liquor. Beat the eggs very light, and stir them into the butter and sugar, alternately, with the flour. Add, gradually, the milk, and stir the whole very hard.

Butter a large tin pan, and put in the mixture. Bake it two hours or more, in a moderate oven. If not thick, an hour or an hour and a half will be sufficient.

Wrap it in a thick cloth, and keep it from the air, and it will continue moist and fresh for two weeks. The pearl-ash will give it a dark colour.

It will be much improved by a pound of raisins, stoned and cut in half, and a pound of currants, well washed and dried.

Flour the fruit well, and stir it in at the last.

CRULLERS.

Half a pound of butter. Three quarters of a pound of powdered white sugar. Six eggs, or seven if they are small. Two pounds of flour, sifted. A grated nutmeg. A tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon. A table-spoonful of rose-water.

Cut the butter into the flour, add the sugar and spice, and mix them well together.

Beat the eggs and pour them into the pan of flour, &c. Add the rose water, and mix the whole into a dough. If the eggs and rose-water are not found sufficient to wet it, add a very little cold water. Mix the dough very well with a knife.

Spread some flour on your paste-board, take the dough out of the pan, and knead it very well. Cut it into small pieces, and knead each separately. Put all the pieces together, and knead the whole in one lump. Roll it out into a large square sheet, about half an inch thick. Take a jagging-iron, or, If you have not one, a sharp knife; run it along the sheet, and cut the dough into long narrow slips. Twist them up in various forms. Have ready an iron pan with melted lard. Lay the crullers lightly in it, and fry them of a light brown, turning them with a knife and fork, so as not to break them, and taking care that both sides are equally done.

When sufficiently fried, spread them on a large dish to cool, and grate loaf-sugar over them.

Crullers may be made in a plainer way, with the best brown sugar, (rolled very fine.) and without spice or rose-water.

They can be fried, or rather boiled, in a deep iron pot. They should be done in a large quantity of lard, and taken out with a skimmer that has holes in it, and held on the skimmer till the lard drains from them. If for family use, they can be made an inch thick.

DOUGH-NUTS.

Three pounds of sifted flour. A pound of powdered sugar. Three quarters of a pound of butter. Four eggs. Half a large tea-cup full of best brewer's yeast. A pint and a half of milk. A tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon. A grated nutmeg. A table-spoonful of rose-water.

Cut up the butter in the flour. Add the sugar, spice, and rose-water. Beat the eggs very light, and pour them into the mixture. Add the yeast, (half a tea-cup or two wine-glasses full,) and then stir in the milk by degrees, so as to make it a soft dough. Cover it, and set it to rise.

When quite light, cut it in diamonds with a jagging-iron or a sharp knife, and fry them in lard. Grate loaf sugar over them when done.

WAFFLES.

Six eggs. A pint of milk. A quarter of a pound of butter. A quarter of a pound of powdered white sugar. A pound and a half of flour, sifted. A tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon.

Warm the milk slightly. Cut up the butter in it and stir it a little. Beat the eggs well, and pour them into the butter and milk. Sprinkle in half the flour, gradually. Stir in the sugar, by degrees, and add the spice. Stir in, gradually, the remainder of the flour, so that it becomes a thick batter. Heat your waffle-iron; then grease it well, and pour in some of the butter. Shut the iron tight, and bake the waffle on both sides, by turning the iron.

As the waffles are baked, spread them out separately on a clean napkin. When enough are done for a plate-full, lay them on a plate in two piles, buttering them, and sprinkling each with beaten cinnamon.

SOFT MUFFINS.

Five eggs. A quart of milk. Two ounces of butter. A tea-spoonful of salt. Two large table-spoonfuls of brewer's yeast or four made of home-made yeast. Enough of sifted flour to make a stiff batter.

Warm the milk and butter together, and add to them the salt. Beat the eggs very light and stir them into the milk and butter. Then stir in the yeast, and lastly, sufficient flour to make a thick batter.

Cover the mixture, and set it to rise, in a warm place, about three hours.

When it is quite light, grease your baking-iron, and your muffin rings. Set the rings on the iron, and pour the batter into them. Bake them a light brown. When you split them to put on the butter, do not cut them with a knife, but pull them open With your hands. Cutting them while hot will make them heavy.

INDIAN BATTER CAKES.

A quart of sifted indian meal. A handful of wheat flour sifted. }mixed. Three eggs, well beaten. / Two table-spoonfuls of fresh brewer's yeast, or four of home-made yeast. A tea-spoonful of salt. A quart of milk.

Make the milk quite warm, and then put into it the yeast and salt, stirring them well. Beat the eggs, and stir them into the mixture. Then, gradually stir in the flour and indian meal.

Cover the batter, and set it to rise four or five hours. Or if the weather is cold, and you want the cakes for breakfast, you may mix the batter late the night before.

Should you find it sour in the morning, dissolve a small tea-spoonful of pearl-ash in as much water as will cover it, and stir it into the batter, letting it set afterwards at least half an hour. This will take off the acid.

Grease your baking-iron, and pour on it a ladle-full of the batter. When brown on one side, turn the cake on the other. [Footnote: Indian batter cakes may be made in a plain and expeditious way, by putting three pints of cold water or cold milk into a pan, and gradually sifting into it (stirring all the time) a quart of indian meal mixed with half a pint of wheat-flour, and a small spoonful of salt. Stir it very hard, and it may be baked immediately, as it is not necessary to set it to rise.]

FLANNEL CAKES OR CRUMPETS.

Two pounds of flour, sifted. Four eggs. Three table-spoonfuls of the best brewer's yeast, or four and a half of home-made yeast. A pint of milk.

Mix a tea-spoonful of salt with the flour, and set the pan before the fire. Then warm the milk, and stir into it the flour so as to make a stiff batter. Beat the eggs very light, and stir them into the yeast. Add the eggs and yeast to the batter, and beat all well together. If it is too stiff, add a little more warm milk.

Cover the pan closely and set it to rise near the fire. Bake it, when quite light.

Have your baking-iron hot. Grease it, and pour on a ladle-full of batter. Let it bake slowly, and when done on one side, turn it on the other.

Butter the cakes, cut them across, and send them to table hot.

ROLLS.

Three pints of flour, sifted. Two tea-spoonfuls of salt. Four table-spoonfuls of the best brewer's yeast, or six of home-made yeast. Half a pint more of warm water, and a little more flour to mix in before the kneading.

Mix the salt with the flour, and make a deep hole in the middle. Stir the warm water into the yeast, and pour it into the hole in the flour. Stir it with a spoon just enough to make a thin batter, and sprinkle some flour over the top. Cover the pan, and set it in a warm place for several hours.

When it is light, add half a pint more of lukewarm water; and make its with a little more flour, into a dough. Knead it very well for ten minutes. Then divide it into small pieces, and knead each separately. Make them into round cakes or rolls. Cover them, and set them to rise about an hour and a half.

Bake them, and when done, let them remain in the oven, without the lid, for about ten minutes.



PART THE THIRD

SWEETMEATS.

GENERAL DIRECTIONS.

In preparing sugar for sweetmeats, let it be entirely dissolved, before you put it on the fire. If you dissolve it in water, allow about half a pint of water to a pound of sugar.

If you boil the sugar before you add the fruit to it, it will be improved in clearness by passing it through a flannel bag. Skim off the brown scum, all the time it is boiling.

If sweetmeats are boiled too long, they lose their flavour and become of a dark colour.

If boiled too short a time, they will not keep well.

You may ascertain when jelly is done, by dropping a small spoonful into a glass of water.

If it spreads and mixes with the water, it requires more boiling. If it sticks in a lump to the bottom, it is sufficiently done. This trial must be made after the jelly is cold.

Raspberry jelly requires more boiling than any other sort. Black currant jelly less.

APPLE JELLY.

Take the best pippin, or bell-flower apples. No others will make good jelly. Pare, core, and quarter them. Lay them in a preserving kettle, and put to them as much water only, as will cover them, and as much lemon-peel as you choose. Boil them till they are soft, but not till they break. Drain off the water through a colander, and mash the apples with the hack of a spoon. Put them into a jelly bag, set a deep dish or pan under it, and squeeze out the juice.

To every pint of juice, allow a pound of loaf-sugar, broken up, and the juice of two lemons. Put the apple-juice, the sugar, and the lemon-juice into the preserving kettle. Boil it twenty minutes, skimming it well. Take it immediately from the kettle, and pour it warm into your glasses, but not so hot as to break them. When cold, cover each glass with white paper dipped in brandy, and tie it down tight with another paper. Keep them in a cool place.

Quince Jelly is made in the same manner, but do not pare the quinces. Quarter them only.

RED CURRANT JELLY.

Wash your currants, drain them, and pick them from the stalks. Mash them with the back of a spoon. Put them in a jelly-bag, and squeeze it till all the juice is pressed out.

To every pint of juice, allow a pound of the best loaf-sugar. Put the juice and the sugar into your kettle, and boil them twenty minutes, skimming all the while. Pour it warm into your glasses, and when cold, tie it up with brandy paper. Jellies should never be allowed to get cold in the kettle. If boiled too long, they will lose their flavour, and become of a dark colour.

Strawberry, raspberry, blackberry, and grape jelly may be made in the same manner, and with the same proportion of loaf-sugar.

Red currant jelly may also be made in a very simple manner, by putting the currants whole into the kettle, with the sugar; allowing a pound of sugar to a pound of currants. Boil them together twenty minutes, skimming carefully. Then pour them into a sieve, with a pan under it. Let them drain through the sieve into the pan, pressing them down with the back of a spoon.

Take the jelly, while warm, out of the pan, and put it into your glasses. Tie it up with brandy paper when cold.

BLACK CURRANT JELLY.

Pick the currants from the stalks, wash and drain them. Mash them soft with a spoon, put them in a bag, and squeeze out the juice. To each pint of juice, allow three quarters of a pound of loaf-sugar, Put the juice and sugar into a preserving kettle, and boil them about ten minutes, skimming them well. Take it immediately out of the kettle. Put it warm into your glasses. Tie it up with brandy paper.

The juice of black currants is so very thick, that it requires less sugar and less boiling than any other jelly.

GOOSEBERRY JELLY

Cut the gooseberries in half, (they must be green) and put them in a jar closely covered. Set the jar in an oven, or pot filled with boiling water. Keep the water boiling round the jar till the gooseberries are soft, take them out, mash them with a spoon, and put them into a jelly bag to drain. When all the juice is squeezed out, measure it, and to a pint of juice, allow a pound of loaf-sugar. Put the juice and sugar into the preserving kettle, and boil them twenty minutes, skimming carefully. Put the jelly warm into your glasses. Tie them up with brandy paper.

Cranberry jelly is made in the same manner.

GRAPE JELLY.

Pick the grapes from the stems, wash and drain them. Mash them with a spoon. Put them in the preserving kettle, and cover them closely with a large plate. Boil them ten minutes. Then pour them into your jelly bag, and squeeze out the juice.

Allow a pint of juice to a pound of sugar. Put the sugar and juice into your kettle, and boil them twenty minutes, skimming them well.

Fill your glasses while the jelly is warm, and tie them up with brandy papers.

PEACH JELLY

Wipe the wool off your peaches, (which should be free-stones and not too ripe) and cut them in quarters, Crack the stones, and break the kernels small.

Put the peaches and the kernels into a covered jar, set them in boiling water, and let them boil till they are soft.

Strain them through a jelly-bag, till all the juice is squeezed out. Allow a pound of loaf-sugar to a pint of juice. Put the sugar and juice into a preserving kettle, and boil them twenty minutes, skimming carefully.

Put the jelly warm into your glasses, and when cold, tie them up with brandy paper.

Plum, and green-gage jelly may be made in the same manner, with the kernels, which greatly improve the flavour.

PRESERVED QUINCES

Pare and core your quinces, carefully taking out the parts that are knotty and defective. Cut them into quarters, or into round slices. Put them into a preserving kettle and cover them with the parings and a very little water. Lay a large plate over them to keep in the steam, and boil them till they are tender.

Take out the quinces, and strain the liquor through a bag. To every pint of liquor, allow a pound of loaf-sugar. Boil the juice and sugar together, about ten minutes, skimming it well. Then put in the quinces, and boil them gently twenty minutes. When the sugar seems to have completely penetrated them, take them out, put them in a glass jar, and pour the juice over them warm. Tie them up, when cold, with brandy paper.

In preserving fruit that is boiled first without the sugar, it is generally better (after the first boiling) to let it stand till next day before you put the sugar to it.

PRESERVED PIPPINS.

Pare and core some of the largest and finest pippins. Put them in your preserving kettle, [Footnote: The use of brass or bell-metal kettles is now most entirely superseded by the enamelled kettles of iron lined with china, called preserving kettles; brass and bell-metal having always been objectionable on account of the verdigris which collects in them.] with some lemon-peel, and all the apple-parings. Add a very little water, and cover them closely. Boil them till they are tender, taking care they do not burn. Take out the apples, and spread them on a large dish to cool. Poor the liquor into a bag, and strain it well. Put it into your kettle with a pound of loaf-sugar to each pint of juice, and add lemon juice to your taste. Boil it five minutes, skimming it well. Then put in the whole apples, and boil them slowly half an hour, or till they are quite soft and clear. Put them with the juice, into your jars, and when quite cold, tie them up with brandy paper.

Preserved apples are only intended for present use, as they will not keep long.

Pears may be done in the same way, either whole or cut in half. They may be flavoured either with lemon or cinnamon, or both. The pears for preserving should be green.

PRESERVED PEACHES.

Take the largest and finest free-stone peaches, before they are too ripe. Pare them, and cut them in halves or in quarters. Crack the stones, and take out the kernels, and break them in pieces. Put the peaches, with the parings and kernels, into your preserving kettle, with a very little water. Boil them till they are tender. Take out the peaches and spread them on a large dish to cool. Strain the liquor through a bag or sieve. Next day, measure the juice, and to each pint allow a pound of loaf-sugar. Put the juice and sugar into the kettle with the peaches, and boil them slowly half an hour, or till they are quite soft, skimming all the time. Take the peaches out, put them into your jars, and pour the warm liquor over them. When cold, tie them up with brandy paper.

If boiled too long, they will look dull, and be of a dark colour. [Footnote: To preserve peaches whole, pare them and thrust out the stones with a skewer. Then proceed as above, only blanch the kernels and keep them whole. When the peaches are done, stick a kernel into the hole of every peach, before you put them into the jars. Large fruit will keep best in broad shallow stone pots.]

If you do not wish the juice to be very thick, do not put it on to boil with the sugar, but first boil the sugar alone, with only as much water as will dissolve it, and skim it well. Let the sugar, in all cases, be entirely melted before it goes on the fire. Having boiled the sugar and water, and skimmed it to a clear syrup, then put in your juice and fruit together, and boil them till completely penetrated with the sugar.

PRESERVED CRAB APPLES

Wash your fruit. Cover the bottom of your preserving kettle with grape leaves. Put in the apples. Hang them over the fire, with a very little water, and cover them closely. Do not allow them to boil, but let them simmer gently till they are yellow. Take them out, and spread them on a large dish to cool. Pare and core them. Put them again into the kettle, with fresh vine-leaves under and over them, and a very little water. Hang them over the fire till they are green. Do not let them boil.

Take them out, weigh them, and allow a pound of loaf-sugar to a pound of crab-apples. Put to the sugar just water enough to dissolve it. When it is all melted, put it on the fire, and boil and skim it. Then put in your fruit, and boil the apples till they are quite clear and soft. Put them in jars, and pour the warm liquor over them. When cold, tie them up with brandy paper.

PRESERVED PLUMS.

Cut your plums in half, (they must not be quite ripe,) and take am the stones. Weigh the plums and allow a pound of loaf-sugar to a pound of fruit.

Crack the stones, take out the kernels and break them in pieces. Boil the plums and kernels very slowly for about fifteen minutes, in as little water as possible. Then spread them on a large dish to cool, and strain the liquor.

Next day make your syrup. Melt the sugar in as little water as will suffice to dissolve it, (about half a pint of water to a pound of sugar) and boil it a few minutes, skimming it till quite clear. Then put in your plums with the liquor, and boil them fifteen minutes. Put them in jars, pour the juice over them warm, and tie them up, when cold, with brandy paper. [Footnote: Plums for common use, are very good done in molasses. Put your plums into an earthen vessel that holds a gallon, having first slit each plum with a knife. To three quarts of plums put a pint of molasses. Cover them and set them on hot coals in the chimney corner. Let them stew for twelve hours or more, occasionally stirring them, and renewing the coals. Next day put them up in jars. Done in this manner they will keep till the next spring.]

Syrups may be improved in clearness, by adding to the dissolved sugar and water, some white of egg very well beaten, allowing the white of one egg to each pound of sugar. Boil it very hard, and skim it well, that it may be quite clear before you put in your fruit.

PRESERVED STRAWBERRIES.

Weigh the strawberries after you have picked off the stems. To each pound of fruit allow a pound of loaf-sugar, which must be powdered. Strew half of the sugar over the strawberries, and let them stand in a cold place two or three hours. Then put them in a preserving kettle over a slow fire, and by degrees strew on the rest of the sugar. Boil them fifteen or twenty minutes, and skim them well.

Put them in wide-mouthed bottles, and when cold, seal the corks.

If you wish to do them whole, take them carefully out of the syrup, (one at a time) while boiling. Spread them to cool on large dishes, not letting the strawberries touch each other, and when cool, return them to the syrup, and boil them a little longer. Repeat this several times.

Keep the bottles in dry sand, in a place that is cool and not damp.

Gooseberries, currants, raspberries, cherries and grapes may be done in the same manner. The stones must be taken from the cherries (which should be morellas, or the largest and best red cherries;) and the seeds should be extracted from the grapes with the sharp point of a penknife. Gooseberries, grapes, and cherries, require longer boiling than strawberries, raspberries or currants.

PRESERVED CRANBERRIES

Wash your cranberries, weigh them, and to each pound allow a pound of loaf-sugar. Dissolve the sugar in a very little water, (about half a pint of water to a pound of sugar) and set it on the fire in a preserving kettle. Boil it nearly ten minutes, skimming it well. Then put in your cranberries, and boil them slowly, till they are quite soft, and of a fine colour.

Put them warm into your jars or glasses, and tie them up with brandy paper, when cold.

All sorts of sweetmeats keep better in glasses, than in stone of earthen jars. When opened for use, they should be tied up again immediately, as exposure to the air spoils them.

Common glass tumblers are very convenient for jellies, and preserved small fruit. White jars are better than stone or earthen, for large fruit.

PRESERVED PUMPKIN.

Cut slices from a fine high-coloured pumpkin, and cut the slices into chips about the thickness of a dollar. The chips should be of an equal size, six inches in length and an inch broad. Weigh them and allow to each pound of pumpkin chips, a pound of loaf-sugar. Have ready a sufficient number of fine lemons, pare off the yellow rind, and lay it aside. Cut the lemons in half, and squeeze the juice into a bowl. Allow a gill of juice to each pound of pumpkin.

Put the pumpkin into a broad pan laying the sugar among it. Pour the lemon-juice over it, Cover the pan, and let the pumpkin chips, sugar and lemon-juice, set all night.

Early in the morning put the whole into a preserving pan, and boil all together (skimming it well) till the pumpkin becomes clear and crisp, but not till it breaks. It should have the appearance of lemon-candy. You may if you choose, put some lemon-peel with it, cut in very small pieces.

Half an hour's boiling (or a little more) is generally sufficient.

When it is done, take out the pumpkin, spread it On a large dish, and strain the syrup through a bag. Put the pumpkin into your jars or glasses, pour the syrup over it, and tie it up with brandy paper.

If properly done, this is a very fine sweetmeat. The taste of the pumpkin will be lost in that of the lemon and sugar, and the syrup is particularly pleasant. It is eaten without cream, like preserved ginger. It may be laid on puff-paste shells, after they are baked.

PRESERVED PINE-APPLE,

Pare your pine-apples, and cut them in thick slices. Weigh the slices and to each pound allow a pound of loaf-sugar. Dissolve the sugar in a very small quantity of water, stir it, and set it over the fire in a preserving-kettle. Boil it ten minutes, skimming it well. Then put in it the pine-apple slices, and boil them till they are clear and soft, but not till they break. About half an hour (or perhaps less time) will suffice. Let them cool in a large dish or pan, before you put them into your jars, which you must do carefully, lest they break. Pour the syrup over them. Tie them up with brandy paper.

RASPBERRY JAM.

Allow a pound of sugar to a pound of fruit. Mash the raspberries and put them with the sugar into your preserving kettle. Boll it slowly for an hour skimming it well. Tie it up with brandy paper.

All jams are made in the same manner.



APPENDIX.

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS.

CONTENTS.

A-la-mode Beef Chicken Pudding A boned Turkey Collared Pork Spiced Oysters Stewed Oysters Oyster Soup Fried Oysters Baked Oysters Oyster Patties Oyster Sauce Pickled Oysters Chicken Salad Lobster Salad Stewed Mushrooms Peach Cordial Cherry Bounce Raspberry Cordial Blackberry Cordial Ginger Beer Jelly Cake Rice Cakes for Breakfast Ground Rice Pudding Tomata Ketchup Yeast

A-LA-MODE BEEF

A pound of fresh beef weighing from eighteen to twenty pounds. A pound of the fat of bacon or corned pork. The marrow from the bone of the beef, chopped together A quarter of a pound of beef-suet, / Two bundles of pot herbs, parsley, thyme, small onions, &c. chopped fine. Two large bunches of sweet marjoram,sufficient when powdered to make Two bunches of sweet basil, /make four table-spoonfuls of each. Two large nutmegs, Half an ounce of cloves } beaten to a powder. Half an ounce of mace, / One table-spoonful of salt. One table-spoonful of pepper. Two glasses of madeira wine.

If your a-la-mode beef is to be eaten cold, prepare it three days before it is wanted.

Take out the bone. Fasten up the opening with skewers, and tie the meat all round with tape. Rub it all over on both sides with salt. A large round of beef will be more tender than a small one.

Chop the marrow and suet together. Pound the spice. Chop the pot-herbs very fine. Pick the sweet-marjoram and sweet-basil clean from the stalks, and rub the leaves to a powder. You must have at least four table-spoonfuls of each. Add the pepper and salt, and mix well together all the ingredients that compose the seasoning.

Cut the fat of the bacon or pork into pieces about a quarter of an inch thick and two inches long. With a sharp knife make deep incisions all over the round of beef and very near each other. Put first a little of the seasoning into each hole, then a slip of the bacon pressed down hard and covered with more seasoning. Pour a little wine into each hole.

When you have thus stuffed the upper side of the beef, turn it over and stuff in the same manner the under side. If the round is very large, you will require a larger quantity of seasoning.

Put it in a deep baking dish, pour over it some wine, cover it, and let it set till next morning. It will be much the better for lying all night in the seasoning.

Next day put a little water in the dish, set it in a covered oven, and bake or stew it gently for twelve hours at least, or more if it is a large round. It will be much improved by stewing it in lard. Let it remain all night in the oven.

If it is to be eaten hot at dinner, put it in to stew the evening before, and let it cook till dinner-time next day. Stir some wine and a beaten egg into the gravy.

If brought to table cold, cover it all over with green parsley, and stick a large bunch of something green in the centre.

What is left will make an excellent hash the next day.

CHICKEN PUDDING

Cut up a pair of young chickens, and season them with pepper and salt and a little mace and nutmeg. Put them into a pot with two large spoonfuls of butter, and water enough to cover them. Stew them gently; and when about half cooked, take them out and set them away to cool. Pour off the gravy, and reserve it to be served up separately.

In the mean time, make a batter as if for a pudding, of eight table-spoonfuls of sifted flour stirred gradually into a quart of milk, six eggs well beaten and added by degrees to the mixture, and a very little salt. Put a layer of chicken in the bottom of a deep dish, and pour over it some of the batter; then another layer of chicken, and then some more batter; and so on till the dish is full, having a cover of batter at the top. Bake it till it is brown. Then break an egg into the gravy which you have set away, give it a boil, and send it to table in a sauce-boat to eat with the pudding.

A BONED TURKEY.

A large turkey. Three sixpenny loaves of stale bread. One pound of fresh butter. Four eggs. One bunch of pot-herbs, parsley, thyme, and little onions. Two bunches of sweet marjoram. Two bunches of sweet basil. Two nutmegs. Half an ounce of cloves. } pounded fine. A quarter of an ounce of mace. / A table-spoonful of salt. A table-spoonful of pepper.

Skewers, tape, needle, and coarse thread will be wanted.

Grate the bread, and put the crusts in water to soften. Then break them up small into the pan of crumbled bread. Cut up a pound of butter in the pan of bread. Rub the herbs to powder, and have two table-spoonfuls of sweet-marjoram and two of sweet basil, or more of each if the turkey is very large. Chop the pot-herbs, and pound the spice. Then add the salt and pepper, and mix all the ingredients well together. Beat slightly four eggs, and mix them with the seasoning and bread crumbs.

After the turkey is drawn, take a sharp knife and, beginning at the wings, carefully separate the flesh from the bone, scraping it down as you go; and avoid tearing or breaking the skin. Next, loosen the flesh from the breast and back, and then from the thighs. It requires great care and patience to do it nicely. When all the flesh is thus loosened, take the turkey by the neck, give it a pull, and the skeleton will come out entire from the flesh, as easily as you draw your hand out of a glove. The flesh will then be a shapeless mass. With a needle and thread mend or sew up any holes that may be found in the skin.

Take up a handful of the seasoning, squeeze it hard and proceed to stuff the turkey with it, beginning at the wings, next to the body, and then the thighs.

If you stuff it properly, it will again assume its natural shape. Stuff it very hard. When all the stuffing is in, sew up the breast, and skewer the turkey into its proper form, so that it will look as if it had not been boned.

Tie it round with tape and bake it three hours or more. Make a gravy of the giblets chopped, and enrich it with some wine and an egg.

If the turkey is to be eaten cold, drop spoonfuls of red currant jelly all over it, and in the dish round it.

A large fowl may be boned and stuffed in the same manner.

COLLARED PORK.

A leg of fresh pork, not large. Two table-spoonfuls of powdered sage. Two table-spoonfuls of sweet marjoram, powdered. One table-spoonful of sweet basil, / A quarter of an ounce of mace, Half an ounce of cloves, } powdered. Two nutmegs, / A bunch of pot-herbs, chopped small. A sixpenny loaf of stale bread, grated. Half a pound of butter, cut into the bread. Two eggs. A table-spoonful of salt. A table-spoonful of black pepper.

Grate the bread, and having softened the crust in water, mix it with the crumbs. Prepare all the other ingredients, and mix them well with the grated bread and egg,

Take the bone out of a leg of pork, and rub the meat well on both sides with salt. Spread the seasoning thick all over the meat. Then roll it up very tightly and tie it round with tape.

Put it into a deep dish with a little water, and bake it two hours. If eaten hot, put an egg and some wine into the gravy. When cold, cut it down into round slices.

SPICED OYSTERS.

Two hundred large fresh oysters. Four table-spoonfuls of strong vinegar. A nutmeg, grated. Three dozen of cloves, whole. Eight blades of mace, whole. Two tea-spoonfuls of salt if the oysters are fresh. Two tea-spoonfuls of whole allspice. As much cayenne pepper as will lie on the point of a knife.

Put the oysters, with their liquor, into a large earthen pitcher. Add to them the vinegar and all the other ingredients. Stir all well together. Set them in the stove, or over a slow fire, keeping them covered. Take them off the fire several times, and stir them to the bottom. As soon as they boil completely they are sufficiently done; if they boil too long they will be hard.

Pour them directly out of the pitcher into a pan, and set them away to cool. They must not be eaten till quite cold, or indeed till next day.

If you wish to keep them a week, put a smaller quantity of spice, or they will taste too much of it by setting so long. Let them be well covered.

Oysters in the shell may be kept all winter by laying them in a heap in the cellar, with the concave side upwards to hold in the liquor. Sprinkle them every day with strong salt and water, and then with Indian meal. Cover them with matting or an old carpet.

STEWED OYSTERS.

Open the oysters and strain the liquor. Put to the liquor some grated stale bread, and a little pepper and nutmeg, adding a glass of white wine. Boil the liquor with these ingredients, and then pour it scalding hot over the dish of raw oysters. This will cook them sufficiently.

Have ready some slices of buttered toast with the crust cut off. When the oysters are done, dip the toast in the liquor, and lay the pieces round the sides and in the bottom of a deep dish. Pour the oysters and liquor upon the toast, and send them to table hot.

OYSTER SOUP

Three pints of large fresh oysters. Two table-spoonfuls of butter, rolled in flour. A bunch of sweet herbs. A saucer full of chopped celery. A quart of rich milk. Pepper to your taste.

Take the liquor of three pints of oysters. Strain it, and set it on the fire. Put into it, pepper to your taste, two table-spoonfuls of butter rolled in flour, and a bunch of sweet marjoram and other pot-herbs, with a saucer full of chopped celery. When it boils, add a quart of rich milk-and as soon as it boils again, take out the herbs, and put in the oysters just before you send it to table. Boiling them in the soup will shrivel them and destroy their taste.

FRIED OYSTERS

For frying, choose the largest and finest oysters. Beat some yolks of eggs and mix with them grated bread, and a small quantity of beaten nutmeg and mace and a little salt. Having stirred this batter well, dip your oysters into it, and fry them in lard, till they are of a light brown colour. Take care not to do them too much. Serve them up hot.

For grated bread, some substitute crackers pounded to a powder, and mixed with yolk of egg and spice.

BAKED OR SCOLLOPED OYSTERS.

Grate a small loaf of stale-bread. Butter a deep dish well, and cover the sides and bottom with bread crumbs. Put in half the oysters with a little mace and pepper. Cover them with crumbs and small bits of butter strewed over them. Then put in the remainder of the oysters. Season them. Cover them as before with crumbs and butter. If the oysters are fresh, pour in a little of the liquor. If they are salt, substitute a little water. Bake them a very short time. You may cook them in the small scolloped dishes made for the purpose.

OYSTER PATTIES.

Make some rich puff-paste, and bake it in very small tin patty pans. When cool, turn them out upon a large dish.

Stew some large fresh oysters with a few cloves, a little mace and nutmeg, some yolk of egg boiled hard and grated, a little butter, and as much of the oyster liquor as will cover them. When they have stewed a little while, take them out of the pan, and set them away to cool. When quite cold, lay two or three oysters in each shell of puff-paste.

OYSTER-SAUCE.

When your oysters are opened, take care of all the liquor, and give them one boil in it. Then take the oysters out, and put to the liquor three or four blades of mace. Add to it some melted butter, and some thick cream or rich milk. Put in your oysters and give them a boil. As soon as they come to a boil, take them of the fire.

PICKLED OYSTERS.

Four hundred large fresh oysters. A pint of vinegar. Eight spoonfuls of salt. A pint of white wine. Six table-spoonfuls of whole black pepper. Eight blades of mace.

Strain the liquor of the oysters and boil it. Then pour it hot over the oysters, and let them lie in it about ten minutes. Then take them out, and cover them. Boil the liquor with the salt, pepper, mace, vinegar and wine. When cold, put the oysters in a close jar, and pour the liquor over them. Cover the jar very tight, and the oysters will keep a long time.

If the oysters are salt, put no salt to the liquor.

CHICKEN SALAD.

Two large cold fowls, either boiled or roasted. The yolks of nine hard-boiled eggs. Half a pint of sweet oil. Half a pint of vinegar. A gill of mixed mustard. A small tea-spoonful of cayenne pepper. A small tea-spoonful of salt. Two large heads, or four small ones, of fine celery.

Cut the meat of the fowls from the bones, in pieces not exceeding an inch in size.

Cut the white part of the celery into pieces about an inch long. Mix the chicken and celery well together. Cover them and set them away.

With the back of a wooden spoon, mash the yolks of eggs till they are a perfectly smooth paste. Mix them with the oil, vinegar, mustard, cayenne, and salt. Stir them for a long time, till they are thoroughly mixed and quite smooth. The longer they are stirred the better. When this dressing is sufficiently mixed, cover it, and set it away.

Five minutes before the salad is to be eaten pour the dressing over the chicken and celery, and mix all well together. If the dressing is put on long before it is wanted, the salad will be tough and hard.

This salad is very excellent made of cold turkey instead of chicken.

LOBSTER SALAD.

Take two large boiled lobsters. Extract all the meat from the shell, and cut it up into very small pieces.

For lobster salad, you must have lettuce instead of celery. Cut up the lettuce as small as possible.

Make a dressing as for a chicken-salad, with the yolks of nine hard-boiled eggs, half a pint of sweet oil, half a pint of vinegar, a gill of mustard, a tea-spoonful of cayenne, and a tea-spoonful of salt. Mix all well together with a wooden spoon.

A few minutes before it is to be eaten, pour the dressing over the lobster and lettuce and mix it very well.

STEWED MUSHROOMS.

Take a quart of fresh mushrooms. Peel them and cut off the stems. Season them with pepper and salt. Put them in a sauce-pan or skillet, with a lump of fresh butter the size of an egg, and sufficient cream or rich milk to cover them. Put on the lid of the pan, and stew the mushrooms about a quarter of an hour, keeping them well covered or the flavour will evaporate.

When you take them off the fire, have ready one or two beaten eggs. Stir the eggs gradually into the stew, and send it to table in a covered dish.

PEACH CORDIAL.

Take a peck of cling-stone peaches; such as come late in the season, and are very juicy. Pare them, and cut them from the stones. Crack about half the stones and save the kernels. Leave the remainder of the stones whole, and mix them with the cut peaches; add also the kernels. Put the whole into a wide-mouthed demi-john, and pour on them two gallons of double-rectified whiskey. Add three pounds of rock-sugar candy. Cork it tightly, and set It away for three months: then bottle it, and it will be fit for use. This cordial is as clear as water, and nearly equal to noyau.

CHERRY BOUNCE.

Take a peck of morella cherries, and a peck of black hearts. Stone the morellas and crack the stones. Put all the cherries and the cracked stones into a demi-john, with three pounds of loaf-sugar slightly pounded or beaten. Pour in two gallons of double-rectified whiskey. Cork the demi-john, and in six months the cherry-bounce will be fit to pour off and bottle for use; but the older it is, the better.

RASPBERRY CORDIAL.

To each quart of raspberries allow a pound of loaf-sugar. Mash the raspberries and strew the sugar over them, having first pounded it slightly, or cracked it with the rolling-pin. Let the raspberries and sugar set till next day, keeping them well covered, then put them in a thin linen bag and squeeze out the juice with your hands. To every pint of juice allow a quart of double-rectified whiskey. Cork it well, and set it away for use. It will be ready in a few days.

Raspberry Vinegar (which, mixed with water, is a pleasant and cooling beverage in warm weather) is made exactly in the same manner as the cordial, only substituting the best white vinegar for the whiskey.

BLACKBERRY CORDIAL.

Take the ripest blackberries. Mash them, put them in a linen bag and squeeze out the juice. To every quart of juice allow a pound of beaten loaf-sugar. Put the sugar into a large preserving kettle, and pour the juice on it. When it is all melted, set it on the fire, and boil it to a thin jelly. When cold, to every quart of juice allow a quart of brandy. Stir them well together, and bottle it for use. It will be ready at once.

GINGER BEER.

Put into a kettle, two ounces of powdered ginger,(or more if it is not very strong,) half an ounce of cream of tartar, two large lemons cut in slices, two pounds of broken loaf-sugar, and one gallon of soft water. Simmer them over a slow fire for half an hour. When the liquor is nearly cold, stir into it a large table-spoonful of the best yeast. After it has fermented, bottle for use.

JELLY CAKE.

Stir together till very light, half a pound of fresh butter and half a pound of powdered white sugar. Beat twelve eggs very light, and stir them into the butter and sugar, alternately with a pound of sifted flour. Add a beaten nutmeg, and half a wine-glass of rose-water. Have ready a flat circular plate of tin, which must be laid on your griddle, or in the oven of your stove, and well greased with butter. Pour on it a large ladle-full of the batter, and bake it as you would a buck-wheat cake, taking care to have it of a good shape. It will not require turning. Bake as many of these cakes as you want, laying each on a separate plate. Then spread jelly or marmalade all over the top of each cake, and lay another upon it. Spread that also with jelly, and so on till you have a pile of five or six, looking like one large thick cake. Trim the edge nicely with a penknife, and cover the top with powdered sugar. Or you may ice it; putting on the nonpareils or sugar-sand in such a manner as to mark out the cake in triangular divisions. When it is to be eaten, cut it in three-cornered slices as you would a pie.

COLOURING FOR ICING, &c.

To make a red colouring for icing. Take twenty grains of cochineal powder, twenty grains of cream of tartar, and twenty grains of powdered alum. Put them into gill of cold soft water, and boil it very slowly till reduced to one half. Strain it through thin muslin, and cork it up for use. A very small quantity of this mixture will colour icing of a beautiful pink. With pink icing, white nonpareils should be used.

RICE CAKES FOR BREAKFAST.

Put half a pound of rice in soak over night. Early in the morning boil it very soft, drain it from the water, mix with it a quarter of a pound of butter, and set it away to cool. When it is cold, stir it into a quart of milk, and add a very little salt. Beat six eggs, and sift half a pint of flour. Stir the egg and flour alternately into the rice and milk. Having beaten the whole very well, bake it on the griddle in cakes about the size of a small dessert-plate. Butter them, and send them to table hot.

GROUND RICE PUODIJVG.

Take five table-spoonfuls of ground rice and boil it in a quart of new milk, with a grated nutmeg or a tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon, stirring it all the time. When it has boiled, pour it into a pan and stir in a quarter of a pound of butter, and a quarter of a pound of powdered sugar, a nutmeg and half a pint of cream. Set it away to get cold. Then heat eight eggs, omitting the whites of four. Have ready a pound of dried currants well cleaned, and sprinkled with flour; stir them into the mixture alternately with the beaten egg. Add half a glass of rose-water, or half a glass of mixed wine and brandy. Butter a deep dish, put in the mixture, and hake it of a pale brown. Or you may bake it in saucers.

TOMATA KETCHUP.

Slice the tomatas. Put them in layers into a deep earthen pan, and sprinkle every layer with salt. Let them stand in this state for twelve hours. Then put them over the fire in a preserving kettle, and simmer them till they are quite soft. Pour them into a linen bag, and squeeze the juice from them. Season the liquor to your taste, with grated horse-radish, a little garlic, some mace, and a few cloves. Boil it well with these ingredients—and, when cold, bottle it for use.

YEAST

Have ready two quarts of boiling water; put into it a large handful of hops, and let them boil twenty minutes. Sift into a pan a pound and a half of flour. Strain the liquor from the hops, and pour half of it over the flour. Let the other half of the liquid stand till it is cool, and then pour it gradually into the pan of flour, mixing it well. Stir into it a large tea-cup full of good yeast,(brewer's yeast if you can get it.) Put it immediately into bottles, and cork it tightly. It will be fit for use in an hour. It will be much improved and keep longer, by putting into each bottle a tea-spoonful of pearl-ash.

FINIS

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