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Recipes Tried and True
by the Ladies' Aid Society
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CAKES.

"With weights and measures just and true, Oven of even heat, Well buttered tins and quiet nerves, Success will be complete."

In making cake, the ingredients used should be of the best quality—the flour super-fine, and always sifted; the butter fresh and sweet, and not too much salted. Coffee A, or granulated sugar is best for all cakes. Much care should be taken in breaking and separating the eggs, and equal care taken as regards their freshness. One imperfect egg would spoil the entire lot. Break each egg separately in a teacup; then into the vessels in which they are to be beaten. Never use an egg when the white is the least discolored. Before beating the whites, remove every particle of yolk. If any is allowed to remain, it will prevent them becoming as stiff and dry as required. Deep earthen bowls are best for mixing cake, and should be kept exclusively for that purpose. After using, wash well, dry perfectly, and keep in a dry place. A wooden spoon or paddle is best for beating batter. Before commencing to make your cake, see that all the ingredients required are at hand. By so doing, the work may be done in much less time.

The lightness of a cake depends not only upon the making, but the baking, also. It is highly important to exercise judgment respecting the heat of the oven, which must be regulated according to the cake you bake, and the stove you use. Solid cake requires sufficient heat to cause it to rise, and brown nicely without scorching. If it should brown too fast, cover with thick brown paper. All light cakes require quick heat, and are not good if baked in a cool oven. Those having molasses as an ingredient scorch more quickly, consequently should be baked in a moderate oven. Every cook should use her own judgment, and by frequent baking she will, in a very short time, be able to tell by the appearance of either bread or cake whether it is sufficiently done.



DELICATE CAKE. MRS. C. H. WILLIAMS.

One cup of white sugar, one-half cup of butter, whites of four eggs (well beaten), one-half cup of sweet milk, two cups of flour, one teaspoonful of cream tartar, and one-half teaspoonful of soda. Flavor with lemon.



WHITE CAKE. MRS. ALICE KRANER AND MISS ROSA OWENS.

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, one cup of sweet milk, three cups of flour, whites of five or six eggs, two teaspoons of baking powder. This is easy to make, and very good.



WHITE CAKE. MRS. DELL W. DE WOLFE.

Two cups sugar, two-thirds cup butter, the whites of seven eggs (well beaten), two thirds cup sweet milk, three cups flour, three teaspoonfuls baking powder. Bake in square or round tins.



WHITE CAKE. MRS. WM. HOOVER.

Whites of five eggs, two cups of sugar, two-thirds cup of butter, two and one-half cups of flour, one cup of sweet milk, two and one-half teaspoons of baking powder. Flavor to suit taste.



WHITE CAKE. MRS. A. C. AULT.

Two cups white sugar, one cup butter, one cup sweet milk, two cups flour, one cup corn starch, whites of six eggs, two teaspoonfuls baking powder. Flavor to taste.



SNOW CAKE. MRS. JOHN KISHLER.

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup milk, one and one-half cups flour, one teaspoonful baking powder, whites of four eggs. Flavor to taste.



LOAF CAKE. MRS. JOHN LANDON.

Whites of five eggs, two cups of white sugar, one cup of butter, one cup of sweet milk, two and a half cups of flour, one cup of corn starch dissolved in some of the milk, half teaspoonful of soda, and one teaspoonful of cream tartar.



SILVER CAKE. MRS. JOHN LANDON.

Whites of eight eggs, two cups of butter, two cups of sugar, one cup of milk, one cup of corn starch, two cups of flour, one and one-half teaspoonfuls of baking powder; mix corn starch, flour, and baking powder together; add the butter and sugar alternately, then the milk; add the whites of seven eggs last. Flavor to taste.



GOLD CAKE. MRS. JOHN LANDON.

The yolks eight eggs, one whole egg, one-half cup of butter, one and one-half cups of sugar, three-fourths of a cup of milk, two cups of flour, one teaspoonful of cream tartar, and one-half teaspoonful of soda.



ANGELS FOOD CAKE. FLORENCE ECKHART.

The whites of ten eggs, one and a half tumblers of granulated sugar, one tumbler of flour; a heaping teaspoon of cream tartar, a pinch of salt. Put through the sieve twice. Take one-half of eggs, and stir in one-half the sugar; beat until they have a gloss; then add the other half of eggs, and the rest of the sugar. Beat again; then add the flour and cream tartar. Stir up lightly. Flavor with almond. Bake one hour in slow oven.



ANGEL CAKE. MRS. C. C. STOLTZ.

Whites of nine large or ten small fresh eggs, one and one-fourth cups sifted granulated sugar, one cup sifted flour, one-half teaspoonful cream tartar; a pinch of salt added to eggs before beating. After sifting flour four or five times, measure and set aside one cup; then sift and measure one and one fourth cups granulated sugar; beat whites of eggs about half; add cream tartar and beat until very, very stiff. Stir in sugar, and then flour, very lightly. Put in pan in moderate oven at once, and bake from thirty-five to fifty minutes.



ANGEL FOOD CAKE. MISS NELLIE LINSLEY.

Whites of eleven eggs, one cup of flour, one and one-half cups of granulated sugar, one teaspoonful of cream tartar, one teaspoonful of almond extract, one-half teaspoonful of salt. Sift sugar once; flour three times; add cream tartar to flour, and sift three times. Bake forty minutes.



SUNSHINE CAKE. MRS. FRANK ARROWSMITH AND MAUD STOLTZ.

Whites of seven small eggs, yolks of five eggs, one cup of granulated sugar, two-thirds cup of flour, one-third teaspoon of cream tartar, and a pinch of salt. Sift the flour and sugar five times; measure, and set aside, as for angel cake. Beat yolks of eggs thoroughly; then, after washing beater, beat the whites about half; add cream tartar, and beat until very, very stiff. Stir in sugar lightly; then the beaten yolks thoroughly; then add flour and flavoring, and put in tube pan in the oven at once. It will bake in thirty-five to fifty minutes.



COLD WATER CAKE. MISS ANNA BARTH.

One and one-half cups of sugar, one-quarter cup of butter, two and one-half cups of flour, two eggs, one cup of water, two teaspoons of baking powder. Flavor with vanilla or lemon.

Longest established in Marion—Jennie Thomas, milliner.



BRIDES CAKE. MRS. J. J. SLOAN.

Two cups of butter, four cups of pulverized sugar, two cups of sweet milk, two scant cups of corn starch, four heaping cups of flour, whites of twelve eggs, one tablespoon of lemon extract, three heaping teaspoons of baking powder. Cream the butter and sugar; add the well beaten whites; then the milk, the corn starch, and the flour in which baking powder has been sifted. This should be as stiff as pound cake. Bake in a moderate oven. It makes a very large cake, or two moderate-sized ones. Sometimes you will have to use more or less flour, according to the size of your eggs.



SPONGE CAKE. MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

The yolks of four eggs, one cup of sugar, one cup of flour, four tablespoonfuls of cold water, one teaspoonful of baking powder; add the whites of four eggs. Bake in a quick oven, but not too hot.



SPONGE CAKE. MRS. HARRY TRUE.

One cup of sugar, one and a half cups of flour, three eggs, two tablespoons of water, one heaping teaspoon of baking powder.



SPONGE CAKE. MRS. P. O. SHARPLESS.

Four eggs, one and a third cups of sugar, three tablespoonfuls of water, and two cups of flour, through which has been sifted two small teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Flavor with lemon extract.

The best cooks buy millinery goods of Jennie Thomas.



SPONGE CAKE. MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

One cup of sugar, one cup of flour, three eggs. Beat altogether fifteen minutes; add one-half cup of milk, and one teaspoonful of baking powder.



LEMON CAKE. MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

Three cups of powdered sugar, and one cup of butter rubbed to a cream. Stir in the yolks of five well-beaten eggs. Dissolve one teaspoon of salaratus in a teacup of milk; add this, and then the juice and grated rind of one lemon, and the whites of the eggs. Sift in as lightly as possible four teacups of flour, and put in pan. Bake about one-half hour.



MARBLE CAKE. MRS. C. H. WILLIAMS AND MRS. ELIZABETH McCURDY.

LIGHT PART.—One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup sweet milk, one-half teaspoon soda, one teaspoon cream tartar, whites of four eggs, two and one-half cups flour.

DARK PART.—One cup brown sugar, one cup molasses, one-half cup butter, one half cup milk, one-half teaspoon soda, one teaspoon cream tartar, two and one-half cups flour, yolks of four eggs, one-half tablespoon each of ground cloves, allspice, cinnamon, and nutmeg.

When both parts are ready, drop a spoon of light and then one of dark in the pan.



POUND CAKE. MRS. U. F. SEFFNER.

One pound of butter, one pound of sugar, one pound of flour (sifted), ten eggs (beaten separately), one-half teacup of rose water, one nutmeg (grated), one pound of citron. Wash the citron; chop it fine. Beat the butter and sugar to a cream; add the rose water and nutmeg, then the yolks of eggs, and part of the flour; then the whites of eggs and remainder of the flour; lastly, the fruit, lightly floured. Bake in a moderate oven about two or two and one-half hours. Line the pan with white paper.



HICKORY NUT CAKE. MRS. C. C. CAMPBELL.

One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, three-fourths cup sweet milk, three cups flour, two teaspoonfuls baking powder, two eggs, one cup hickory nut meats.



MOTHER'S OLD-FASHIONED CAKE. MRS. O. W. WEEKS.

One and a half cups of brown sugar, two eggs, one teacup of sour cream, one even teaspoon of soda, about two and a half cups of flour. If sour cream is not used, take instead one cup of milk, and one-half cup of butter.



LOAF CAKE. MRS. R. H. JOHNSON.

One pint bread dough; one cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one egg, one-half teaspoonful baking powder. Spice, raisins, and citron to taste.



LOAF CAKE. MRS. ELIZA BOWEN.

Mix one pint of milk with two quarts of flour and one cup of yeast, let stand in a warm place all night. In morning, beat until very light four eggs, one pound of sugar, three-eighths pound of butter, one teaspoon of salt, one teaspoon cinnamon, half a nutmeg; mix with the dough thoroughly, and beat for a long time. When raised again, dredge with flour, a cup of seeded raisins, half a pound of currants, one-fourth pound of citron; add to dough; put into the pan, and let stand to rise again for half an hour. Bake in an oven suitable for bread. This cake will keep a long time.



RAISIN CAKE. MRS. FRANK ARROWSMITH.

Two cups of brown sugar, one scant cup of butter, one cup of sweet milk, four eggs, one and one-half teaspoons of baking powder, three cups of flour, one teaspoon each of cinnamon and cloves, one pound of raisins. This makes two cakes. Pour boiling water on the raisins, and let stand a few minutes before stoning them.



DRIED APPLE FRUIT CAKE. MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Take three cups of dried apples, and soak over night; then chop them fine, and cook slowly for three hours in three cups of baking molasses, stirring often; let cool over night. Then take two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, three eggs, four cups of flour, two teaspoons of baking powder, two teaspoons of ground cinnamon, two teaspoons of ground cloves, one grated nutmeg, two cups of raisins, one cup of citron (cut fine), and one pound of figs (chopped). Lastly, add the cooked apples. Stir all together, and bake as you would other fruit cake for two hours or longer in rather slow oven.

"ELECTRIC LIGHT FLOUR" is pure, white, and nutritious.



APPLE FRUIT CAKE. MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, one cup of sweet milk, two eggs, one teaspoon of soda, three and one-half cups of flour, two cups of raisins, two cups of dried apples, soaked over night, chopped fine, and then stewed in two cups of molasses. Beat butter and sugar to a cream; add milk, in which dissolve the soda; then the beaten eggs, the flour, and lastly, stir in well the raisins and apples. Bake one and a half hours.



COFFEE CAKE. MAUD STOLTZ.

One cup brown sugar, one cup molasses, one cup boiling coffee, one-half cup lard, one-half cup butter, one egg, one teasponful soda, one teaspoonful salt, one tablespoonful cloves, one tablespoonful cinnamon, one tablespoonful allspice, one tablespoonful vanilla, one tablespoonful lemon, one nutmeg, one cup chopped raisins, four cups flour.



COFFEE CAKE. MRS. BECKIE SMITH AND MRS. JOSIE C. YAGER.

One cup brown sugar, one cup molasses, one-half cup butter, one cup strong liquid coffee, one or two eggs, four cups flour, one teaspoon soda, one tablespoon cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves, one nutmeg, one pound raisins, one-half pound currants, citron as you like. Mix the cake part, adding soda last. Dredge the fruit with flour before putting in. Bake in one large loaf, or two smaller ones.

Use "ELECTRIC LIGHT FLOUR" with these cake recipes.



COFFEE CAKE. MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

One cup butter, two cups brown sugar, one cup liquid coffee, six eggs, one cup currants, one cup raisins, two teaspoons ground cinnamon, two teaspoons ground cloves, one teaspoon soda, and three cups flour.



HICKORY NUT CAKE. MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

One cup butter, two cups sugar, five eggs, one cup sweet milk, one pint hickory nut meats, one pound raisins or currants, one pound flour, one heaping teaspoon baking powder.



HICKORY NUT CAKE. MRS. W. C. RAPP.

Two cups of sugar, one-half cup of butter, one cup of sweet milk, two and a half cups of flour, three teaspoons of baking powder, two eggs, and one pint of nut kernels.



RAISED CAKE. MRS. JENNIE HERSHBERGER, TIFFIN, OHIO.

Three cups bread sponge, three cups sugar, one cup butter, three eggs, one teaspoonful soda dissolved in a little water, one pound raisins, one teaspoonful each of cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice; flour enough to stiffen.



FRUIT CAKE. MRS. A. A. LUCAS.

One pound of brown sugar, one pound of browned flour, three-quarters of a pound of butter, one cup of molasses, twelve eggs, two pounds of stoned raisins, two pounds of currants, one-half pound of citron cut in strips, one-half pound of figs chopped fine, one-half pound of almonds chopped fine, two wine glasses of boiled cider, two ounces of vanilla, one tablespoon of ground cinnamon, one small tablespoon of ground cloves, one tablespoon of ground mace, one grated nutmeg, a little pepper, and three teaspoons of baking powder. Bake three hours.



FRUIT CAKE. MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

One cup butter, one cup brown sugar, two-thirds cup molasses, three cups flour, one-half cup sour milk, one cup raisins, one cup currants, one teaspoon soda in milk, four eggs, citron and spice to taste.



FRUIT CAKE. MRS. G. H. WRIGHT.

One pound flour, one pound brown sugar, one pound citron, two pounds raisins, two pounds currants, three-fourths pound butter, one pound almonds, one ounce mace, one cup molasses, one-half teaspoon soda stirred in molasses, ten eggs. Stir sugar and butter to a cream; then add whites and yolks of eggs, beaten separately. Stir in flour gradually, and molasses and spices; lastly, the fruit. This makes three loaves. Bake in a moderate oven.



FRUIT CAKE. MRS. JOHN EVANS.

Two cups butter, two and one-half cups sugar, two and one-half cups molasses, eight cups flour, two cups sour milk, eight eggs, two teaspoonfuls soda, three pounds raisins, three pounds currants, one pound citron, one pound figs, two lemons (grate the rind and squeeze the juice), two glasses of jelly, cloves, mace, cinnamon, and nutmegs. Mix flour and fruit alternately. Bake three and one-half hours.



PLAIN FRUIT CAKE. MRS. R. H. JOHNSON.

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, three cups flour, one cup water, two eggs, one teaspoonful baking powder, one pound seeded and chopped raisins; nutmeg, cinnamon, and citron to taste.



BLACK WEDDING CAKE. MRS. J. J. SLOAN.

One cup butter, one and one-half cups brown sugar, one cup molasses, one cup sweet milk, three cups flour, two teaspoonfuls baking powder sifted into flour, five well beaten eggs, two pounds raisins, one pound currants, one-half pound chopped citron, one-half teaspoonful ground allspice, one-half teaspoonful cinnamon, one-half a nutmeg. Put flour in oven, and brown—be careful not to burn. Dredge fruit, and add last.



WHITE FRUIT CAKE. MRS. SAMUEL SAITER.

Cream one pound butter and one pound powdered sugar together; to this add the beaten yolks of twelve eggs, one pound sifted flour, and two teaspoons baking powder. Grate one cocoanut, blanch and chop one half pound almonds; slice one and one-half pounds citron; add to batter and stir in beaten whites of eggs. Put in a pan lined with greased paper, and bake two hours. When cold, ice.

If you use "ELECTRIC LIGHT FLOUR" with the recipes in this book, you have no trouble.



LAYER CAKES.



EXCELLENT WHITE CAKE. MRS. W. C. BUTCHER.

Beat two cups of sugar and three-fourths cup of butter to a cream, and then add three-fourths cup of water, three heaping cups of flour, the whites of six eggs beaten to a stiff froth, three teaspoons of baking powder, and one teaspoon of vanilla. Bake in layer pans, and put together with frosting.



WHITE LAYER CAKE. MRS. A. C. AULT.

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup sweet milk, four cups sifted flour, four teaspoonfuls baking powder, whites of four eggs. Flavor to taste.



YELLOW LAYER CAKE. MRS. A. C. AULT.

One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup milk, one and one-half cups flour, one-half cup corn starch, two teaspoonfuls baking powder, three eggs (separate whites). Flavor to taste.



BLACKBERRY JAM CAKE. OZELLA SEFFNER.

Two-thirds cup of butter, one full cup of brown sugar, one cup of blackberry jam, one-half cup of sweet milk, three eggs, two cups of flour, two teaspoons of baking powder, one teaspoon each of cinnamon and allspice, one-half teaspoon of cloves, one-quarter cup of chopped citron, one cup of either walnuts or hickory nuts, vanilla flavoring. Bake in layers and fill between with either frosting or fig paste.



BLACKBERRY JAM CAKE. MRS. M. S. LEONARD, MRS. EVA L. FLETCHER, GAIL HAMILTON.

One cup coffee A or light brown sugar, one-half cup butter, two cups flour, one cup blackberry jam, three eggs, three tablespoons sour cream, one teaspoon soda, two teaspoons cinnamon, one-half a nutmeg. Put in the ingredients in the order given. Bake in layers, and finish with boiled icing.



BLACKBERRY JAM CAKE. MRS. ALICE KRANER.

One cup brown sugar, one-half cup butter, one cup jam, one-half cup seeded raisins, two cups flour, three eggs, two teaspoons baking powder, four tablespoons sweet milk, one teaspoonful cinnamon, one-half nutmeg. Bake like jelly cake, with icing between layers.



GRAPE JAM CAKE. MRS. J. EDD THOMAS.

This may be made like blackberry jam cake, only substituting grape jam for the blackberry.



CHOCOLATE CAKE. WINONA HUGHES.

One cup brown sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup sweet milk, two eggs, two cups flour, one teaspoon soda dissolved in a little warm water and then added to the milk.

Make a cream of one cup grated chocolate, two-thirds cup brown sugar, one-half cup sweet milk, yolk of one egg, and one teaspoon vanilla. Cook up until like cream, and mix into above cake. Bake in slow oven in two layers, or in one shallow pan; frost with a white frosting, or the following—

CHOCOLATE FROSTING.—Put enough water over a cup of white sugar to dissolve it; grate into it two squares of chocolate, and boil until thick enough to spread. Put on cake when cool.



CHOCOLATE CAKE. MRS. HARRY TRUE.

One scant cup butter, two cups sugar, two cups flour, one-half cup sweet milk, three eggs, two teaspoons baking powder, one-half teaspoon vanilla; add a small quarter cake of chocolate, grated and dissolved in one-half cup boiling water. Allow this to cool before adding it to the cake. Leave out the white of one egg for icing between the layers of cake.



CHOCOLATE CAKE. MRS. JOHN D. STOKES.

Grate one-half cup chocolate; mix with one-half cup milk, yolk of one egg, one cup pulverized sugar, one teaspoon vanilla. Boil until chocolate and sugar are melted. Let this cool while making cake from one cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup milk, two cups flour, two eggs, two teaspoons baking powder; add to this the boiled chocolate, and bake in layers.

FILLING.—Boil two cups granulated sugar and six tablespoons water until it threads; then stir into it the whites of two eggs, well beaten. Flavor with vanilla.

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DELICIOUS CHOCOLATE CAKE. MIRIAM DE WOLFE.

Three-fourths cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup sweet milk, three scant cups flour, three teaspoonfuls baking powder; lastly, the whites of five eggs, beaten to a stiff froth. Bake in layers.

ICING.—Boil two cups of sugar to a taffy; add the white of one egg, beaten to a stiff froth and one ten cent cake of German chocolate, grated. Beat the icing continually while stirring in the white of egg and until it is almost cold.



CHOCOLATE CAKE. MRS. J. C. WALTER.

One and one-half cups sugar, two-thirds cup butter, one teaspoonful vanilla, two thirds cup milk, two cups flour, three level teaspoonfuls baking powder, whites of five eggs, well beaten.

ICING.—One and one half cups sugar, one half cup milk (or a little more), a lump of butter the size of a walnut, one teaspoonful vanilla. Boil until waxy; remove from fire; beat until stiff. Spread melted chocolate on bottom and top of layers, and put the cream icing between.



CREAM CAKE. MRS. JOSIE YAGER.

One cup sugar, three eggs, one and one-half cups flour, three tablespoons water, two teaspoons baking powder, flavoring to taste. Bake in about three layers and put between them this—

CREAM.—Three-quarters pint milk, one egg, two tablespoons corn starch, three tablespoons sugar. Put milk on to boil; mix other ingredients together; put in milk, and boil until it thickens. Flavor to taste when cool.



CREAM CAKE. MRS. FENTON FISH.

Two tablespoons butter, two teacups sugar, three eggs, one-half teacup sweet milk, two tablespoons cold water, two teacups flour, two teaspoons baking powder. Bake quickly in three or four round tins.

CREAM.—One-half pint milk, one-half teacup sugar, a small piece butter, one egg, one tablespoon corn starch, boil until very thick. When nearly cold, flavor with vanilla. When the cakes are cool, put them together with it.



CREAM CAKE. MRS. NED THATCHER.

Two cups white sugar, one-half cup butter, one cup sweet milk, one cup corn starch, two cups flour, two teaspoonfuls baking powder, whites of seven eggs, beaten and added last.

FILLING.—Whip one pint cream; sweeten and flavor to taste, and spread between layers.



CREAM CAKE. MRS. G. H. WRIGHT.

Two cups granulated sugar, three-fourths cup butter, one cup sweet milk, three cups sifted flour, three teaspoons baking powder sifted in the flour, the well beaten whites of eight eggs. Bake in three layers.

One pint rich sweet cream, whipped with one small teacup sugar. Flavor to taste, and put between layers.



CUSTARD CAKE. MISS ANN THOMPSON.

Four eggs, one and one-half cups sugar, two tablespoons water, two cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder.

FILLING.—One egg, one-half pint sweet milk, one-half cup sugar, two tablespoons flour, butter size of hickory nut. Flavor to taste.



LEMON CREAM CAKE. MRS. C. H.

One-half cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup sweet milk, three eggs (yolks and whites beaten separately), three cups flour, three teaspoonfuls baking powder.

FILLING.—One cup sugar, two teaspoonfuls butter, two eggs, and the grated rind and juice of two lemons; mix all together, and boil to consistency of jelly. Spread between layers, and dust powdered sugar on top.



ICE-CREAM CAKE. MRS. C. H.

One cup butter rubbed with two cups white sugar to a cream, one cup sweet milk, three and one-half cups flour, three level teaspoons baking powder, and whites of eight eggs. Bake in jelly tins, and put together with boiled icing flavored with orange.



ROLL JELLY CAKE. GAIL HAMILTON.

Four eggs (yolks and whites beaten separately), one and one-half cups sugar, one and one-half cups flour, two tablespoonfuls water, one-half teaspoonful baking powder mixed with the flour. Bake in dripping pan; spread with jelly, and roll.



LEMON JELLY CAKE. IVA FISH.

Yolks of three eggs, and one cup of sugar, well beaten; one cup of flour, one heaped teaspoon of baking powder; about one-half cup of water, a little salt, whites of three eggs, well beaten.

JELLY.—Juice and grated rind of one lemon, one cup of sugar, one egg, one cup of water, one tablespoon of corn starch dissolved in part of the water. Put all together, and boil in a pail of water until it thickens.



FIG CAKE. MRS. C. C. CAMPBELL.

Whites of six eggs, two cups white sugar, one cup butter, one cup sweet milk, two teaspoonfuls baking powder, three scant cups flour.

FILLING.—One pound cut figs, one pint cream, whipped and sweetened. Put a layer of fig; then one of cream.



NEAPOLITAN CAKE. MRS. A. C. AULT.

DARK PART.—One cup brown sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup molasses; one-half cup strong coffee, two eggs, two and one-half cups flour, one cup raisins, one teaspoon each of soda, cinnamon, and cloves, one and one-half teaspoons mace.

WHITE PART.—Two cups sugar, one-half cup butter, one cup sweet milk, two cups flour, one cup corn starch, white of two eggs, one teaspoon baking powder.



MAPLE CAKE. MRS. C. C. CAMPBELL.

One cup sugar, two tablespoonfuls butter, two eggs (leaving out the white of one), three-fourths cup cold water, two and one-half cups flour, three teaspoonfuls baking powder.

FROSTING.—One-half cup maple syrup or sugar; boil to a taffy; pour over the beaten white of one egg.



VANITY CAKE. MRS. JOHN LANDON.

One and a half cups sugar, half cup butter, half cup sweet milk, one and one-half cups flour, half cup corn starch, teaspoonful baking powder, whites of six eggs; bake in two cakes, putting a frosting between and on top. Grate cocoanut all over.



DEVILS FOOD CAKE. MRS. FENTON FISH.

Two cups darkest brown sugar, one-half cup butter, two eggs, one-half cup sour milk, three cups flour, one pinch salt; mix thoroughly together. Take one-half cup boiling water; stir into this one teaspoon soda, and one-half cup grated Baker's chocolate; stir into batter.

FILLING.—Two cups dark brown sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup sweet milk or cream. Cook until it threads.



DEVILS FOOD CAKE. MRS. G. H. WRIGHT.

PART I.—One cup brown sugar, three quarters of a cup butter, one-half cup sour milk, two and one-half cups sifted flour, one level teaspoon soda, yolks of three eggs, whites of two. Stir this together, and then add—

PART II.—One cup brown sugar, one-half cup sweet milk, one cup grated chocolate, put this on the stove, let it dissolve, and add while still warm to Part I. Bake in two layers, and put icing between.



DELMONICO'S CAKE. MRS. M. S. LEONARD.

One-half cup of butter, two cups of sugar, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, two-thirds of a cup of sweet milk, three cups of sifted flour, the whites of eight eggs, beaten stiff. Cream the butter and sugar; add the milk; then the flour; beat thoroughly; then add the eggs; and flour, with vanilla.

FILLING.—Two cups of maple or brown-sugar, one cup of milk, a lump of butter the size of a walnut, a tablespoonful of vanilla, or any flavor. Boil till it gets like candy; beat to a cream.



ENGLISH WALNUT CAKE. MRS. MARY W. WHITMARSH.

One and one-half cups of sugar, one-half cup of butter, one-half cup of water, one and one-half cups of flour, one-half cup of corn starch, two teaspoons of baking powder, the whites of six eggs. Flavor with lemon. Bake in layers.

FILLING.—Two cups of light brown sugar, one-half cup of water. Boil until it threads, and stir in the whites of two eggs, beating until it creams; them stir in one pound of English walnuts, chopped fine.



COLUMBIA CAKE. OZELLA SEFFNER.

Two cups of coffee A sugar and one cup of butter creamed together; add slowly one cup of sweet milk, three full cups of flour, in which three teaspoons of baking powder have been stirred, and the whites of eight eggs. Flavor to suit taste. Bake in layers, and put together with boiled frosting and chocolate creams, or stir into the frosting one pound of seeded raisins, or a glass of currant jelly. Any one of these will make a delicious cake.



FAVORITE SNOW CAKE. MRS. CARRIE OWENS.

Beat one cup butter to a cream; add one and one-half cups flour, and stir thoroughly together; then add one cup corn starch, and one cup sweet milk, in which three teaspoons baking powder have been dissolved; lastly, add the whites of eight eggs, and two cups sugar, beaten together. Flavor to taste. Bake in sheets, and put together with icing.



ORANGE CAKE. MRS. CARRIE OWENS.

Two-thirds cup butter, two small cups sugar, one cup milk, three teaspoons baking powder, the yolks of five eggs, three small cups flour. Bake in jelly tins.

FILLING.—Whites of three eggs, beaten to a stiff froth, juice and grated rind of one orange, sugar to give the right consistency to spread between the layers; put white frosting on the top.



TEA CAKE. MRS. GEO. TURNER.

One egg, one cup sour cream, one-half teaspoon soda in one pint flour, butter the size of half an egg, one cup sugar.

CARAMEL DRESSING.—One pint light brown sugar, butter the size of an egg, one-half cup sweet milk. Cream the butter and sugar; then add milk, and cook until it hardens in water like taffy; beat until cool enough to spread smoothly.



RIBBON CAKE. MRS. LIZZIE MARTIN.

One small half cup of butter, one cup of sugar, two eggs, two-thirds cup of water, two cups of flour, two teaspoons of baking powder. Take out two layers in tins; leave enough for a third layer, and put in it one teaspoon of cinnamon, and one teaspoon of cloves. Bake; put dark layer in middle, and icing between all.



JELLY CAKE. MRS. ELIZABETH McCURDY.

One cup sugar, two tablespoons butter, five tablespoons sweet milk, three eggs, one teaspoon soda, two teaspoons cream tartar. Flavor with lemon. Bake in layers, and spread with jelly.



ALMOND JELLY CAKE. MRS. GEORGE KLING.

Three coffee-cups sugar, one heaping coffee-cup butter, and the yolks of six eggs, beaten together to a cream; five even cups sifted flour, four teaspoonfuls baking powder; one and one-half cups sweet milk; the whites of the six eggs beaten to a stiff froth, and added last; with one teaspoonful lemon flavoring. Bake in layers.

ALMOND SAUCE FOR FILLING.—Three pounds almonds, blanched and pounded to a paste, one and one-half coffee-cups fresh, pure sour cream, one and one-half coffee-cups sugar, four eggs (whites and yolks beaten thoroughly together). Stir all together, and add vanilla enough to drown the taste of sour cream.



WHITE LAYER CAKE. MRS. MARY DICKERSON.

One-half cup butter, two cups sugar, whites of five eggs, one cup milk, two and one-half cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder, one teaspoon vanilla.



ICING FOR CAKE. MRS. G. A. LIVINGSTON.

One cup sugar, one cup grated pineapple, one heaping teaspoon corn starch, a pinch of salt; stir together well; add a small cup boiling water. Set on the stove, and boil until quite thick. Let it cool before using.



CHOCOLATE ICING. ETHEL CLARK.

Beat together three cups of four X sugar; add the white of one egg, beaten stiff; thin it with milk, so it will spread; melt one-fourth cake of Bakers chocolate, and stir into the icing.



FROSTING WITHOUT EGGS.

One cupful of granulated sugar, five tablespoonfuls of milk. Boil four or five minutes till it threads from the spoon. Flavor as desired. Stir till right thickness for spreading. This is fine grained, white, and delicious.



FIG FILLING FOR CAKE.

Stew one-half pound of chopped figs in a syrup made of one-fourth cupful of water and half cupful of sugar. Spread this when it is quite thick. It is excellent. Another nice filling may be made by using raisins instead of figs, treating them in the same way.



LEMON JELLY FOR CAKE.

Lemon jelly, to spread between layers of cake, or on the top of sago or custard pudding, is made by grating the rinds of two lemons and squeezing out the juice; add a heaping cup of sugar, a tablespoonful of butter. Stir these together and then add three eggs, beaten very light; set the basin or little pail in which you have this in another of boiling water; stir it constantly until it thickens. When it is cold, it is ready for use.



GINGERBREAD AND SMALL CAKES.



GINGERBREAD. MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

One and one-half cups Orleans molasses, one cup brown or granulated sugar, one-half cup lard, one cup boiling water, one teaspoon soda dissolved in the water, two teaspoons ginger, one teaspoon each of cloves and cinnamon, three cups flour, one egg. Put all in the vessel, excepting the water and egg; beat well; then add the water and soda; after stirring this well together, add the beaten egg. Bake in quick oven. Put greased paper in pan before pouring in the mixture. Let cool in the pans.



SOFT GINGERBREAD. MRS. E. A SEFFNER.

One quart of flour, one cup of sugar, one cup of molasses, one cup of butter, one cup of sour milk, two teaspoonfuls of soda, three eggs, one tablespoon of ginger, one teaspoon of cinnamon.



SOFT GINGERBREAD. MISS KITTIE M. SMITH.

One cup New Orleans molasses, one teaspoon ginger, one teaspoon soda, one tablespoon melted butter; stir this together; then pour on half a cup boiling water, and stir in one pint flour. Be sure and have the water boiling, and beat well. Pour into the pan one inch deep.



SOFT GINGERBREAD. GAIL HAMILTON.

One-half cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one cup molasses, two and one-half cups flour, one teaspoonful cinnamon, one teaspoonful ginger, one teaspoonful cloves, two eggs, two teaspoonfuls soda in a cup of boiling water (put this in last).



SOFT GINGERBREAD. MRS. G. E. SALMON.

One cup molasses, one-half cup sugar, one-half cup butter or lard, one-half cup sour milk, two and one-half cups flour, two eggs, one teaspoon ginger, one teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon soda dissolved in the milk. Bake in a moderate oven about half an hour.



EXCELLENT SOFT GINGERBREAD. MRS. CARRIE OWENS.

One and a half cups Orleans molasses, half cup brown sugar, half cup butter, half cup sweet milk, teaspoon soda, teaspoon allspice, half teaspoon ginger; mix all together; add three cups sifted flour, and bake in shallow pans.



GINGERBREAD FOR TWO. MRS. M. LEONARD.

Six tablespoons sweet milk, five tablespoons molasses, one tablespoon of sugar, one-half scant teaspoon soda, one and one-fourth cups flour.



SOFT GINGERBREAD. MRS. M. VOSE.

One cup molasses, one-half cup shortening, one cup sour milk, one teaspoon soda, just a pinch of ginger, flour to make as stiff as sponge cake.



FRIED CAKES. MRS. J. C. JOHNSTONE.

Two cups of coffee A sugar, a small teaspoon of lard, one-half teaspoon of ginger; rub all together; add two eggs, one cup of sweet milk, three teaspoons of baking powder. Mix in enough flour so you can work it nicely on the board. Cut out with cutter having hole in the center. Have your lard hot when you drop cakes in, and do not turn but once.



FRIED CAKES. MRS. LOUISE JONES.

One cup sugar, one cup sweet milk, two eggs, two teaspoonfuls baking powder, two tablespoonfuls melted butter, flour enough to roll and cut.



DOUGHNUTS. MRS. G. H. WRIGHT.

One cup sugar, one cup sour milk, one level teaspoon soda in milk, two eggs, butter or lard the size of a small egg, a little nutmeg, and a pinch of salt, flour to roll out. Cut in rings and fry in hot lard.



DOUGHNUTS. MRS. R. H. JOHNSON.

One cup sugar, one cup sweet milk, two eggs, butter size of a small egg, one teaspoonful baking powder, a little salt. Mix in enough flour to roll in your hand. Always put a piece of apple or potato in the lard when frying doughnuts.



DOUGHNUTS. MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

Yolks of four eggs, one cup of sugar, one cup of sweet milk, a little nutmeg, two teaspoons of baking powder; mix soft; cut out, and fry.



DOUGHNUTS. MRS. A. C. AULT.

Two quarts flour, one cup sugar, one cup sweet milk, butter size of a small egg, four eggs, five heaping teaspoonfuls baking powder. Flavor with nutmeg.



DOUGHNUTS. MRS. M. S. LEONARD.

One and one-third cups skimmed sweet milk, one cup sugar, two eggs, four teaspoons melted butter, four teaspoons baking powder. Roll and cut.



DOUGHNUTS. MRS. P. O. SHARPLESS.

One cup sugar, two eggs, one pint equal parts sour cream and buttermilk, one teaspoon soda, cinnamon and nutmeg to taste, flour sufficient for a soft dough. If sour cream is not at hand, use sufficient shortening to make it equal.



DOUGHNUTS. MAUD STOLTZ.

One and one-half cup sugar, two eggs, three tablespoonfuls melted lard, one cup milk, one teaspoon soda.



DOUGHNUTS. MRS. J. S. REED.

One cup sweet milk, one cup sugar, four eggs, two teaspoons baking powder. Beat the eggs and sugar well; then add milk and flour. Mix soft, not stiff. Fry carefully.



CRULLERS. MRS. C. H. WILLIAMS.

One cup sugar, three eggs, one-half cup milk, butter the size of a walnut, three teaspoonfuls baking powder. Fry in lard.



CREAM CRULLERS. MRS. C. H.

One and one-half cups sugar, one cup milk, two eggs, butter the size of an egg, two teaspoonfuls baking powder. Mix in enough flour to roll out soft. Fry in hot lard.



SOFT GINGER CAKES. MRS. J. S. REED.

One cup of molasses, one cup of sugar, one cup of lard or butter, four cups of flour, one cup of sweet milk, one teaspoon of salt, one teaspoon of ginger, two teaspoons of soda, one tablespoon of cinnamon. Bake in gem pans. Add soda the last thing; beat well.



GINGER CAKES. MRS. P. G. HARVEY.

One cup of brown sugar, one cup of molasses, one cup of lard, one and a half cups of boiling water, one tablespoon of soda, one tablespoon of ginger, four cups of flour; mix, and drop from a spoon into a dripping pan.



CHEAP COOKIES. MRS. BELLE BLAND.

One teaspoonful of baking powder mixed in flour, two cups of white sugar, one cup of butter, one cup of sour milk, one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in the milk, one cup of chopped hickory nuts. Take enough flour to mix very stiff, and bake in a quick oven.



COOKIES. MRS. L. M. DENISON.

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, two eggs, one teaspoon soda in two tablespoons boiling water, flavoring to taste, flour sufficient to roll.



COOKIES. MRS. JOHN LANDON.

One cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup cold water, one teaspoonful of saleratus, two teaspoonfuls cream tartar, two eggs, flour enough to roll, and no more.



COOKIES. MRS. W. C. BUTCHER.

Two cups of sugar, three eggs, one cup of butter, one-half cup of lard, four tablespoons of water, one teaspoon of soda, one teaspoon of cream tartar, a pinch of salt, and nutmeg, or vanilla.



COOKIES. MRS. P. G. HARVEY.

Two cups of light brown sugar, one cup of shortening (butter and lard mixed), four eggs, one-half cup of boiling water, one teaspoon of soda dissolved in water, flour to thicken, and roll.



COOKIES. MRS. G. M. BEICHER.

Two cups sugar, one-third cup lard, and two-thirds cup butter; mix like pie crust. Three eggs, three tablespoons water, one small teaspoon soda sifted with sugar; add enough flour to roll. Roll very thin.



CREAM COOKIES. MISS KITTIE SMITH.

One egg, one cup sugar, one cup thick sour cream, a pinch of salt, one teaspoon each of saleratus and cream tartar; mix soft, and bake in a quick oven.



GOOD COOKIES. MRS. L. A. JONES.

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup sour milk, one teaspoon soda in milk, yolks of two eggs, one teaspoonful baking powder in flour. Flavor to taste. Flour enough to roll thin.



GOOD COOKIES. MRS. JENNIE KRAUSE.

Two eggs, one and one half cups brown sugar, one cup butter, three tablespoons sour milk or cream, one teaspoon soda, one-half teaspoon salt, one-half teaspoon lemon extract, flour enough to mix soft.



COOKIES. MRS. H. A. MARTIN

One coffee-cup butter, one coffee-cup sugar, four eggs, four tablespoonfuls sweet milk. Flavor with nutmeg; mix soft. Beat butter and sugar to a cream first. [RB: 2 teaspoons baking powder?]



COOKIES. ANN THOMPSON.

One cup granulated sugar, one cup coffee A sugar, one-half cup butter, two level teaspoonfuls cinnamon, one-half level teaspoonful cloves, one-half small nutmeg; cream together carefully; add two well beaten eggs. Sift the flour, and begin with one pint, and two slightly heaping teaspoonfuls baking powder; add more flour as you beat. When thick enough to handle, take a small piece in the hand, make into a ball, and roll; then place in buttered pans. Bake light brown in a moderate oven.



SPLENDID EGGLESS COOKIES. MRS. E. S. BOALT.

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup sweet milk, teaspoon soda, one teaspoon vanilla, one pinch salt, just enough flour to roll them out.



HARD COOKIES. MRS. SALMON.

One and one-half cups granulated sugar, one cup butter, three eggs, one-fourth cup sweet milk, one-half teaspoon soda dissolved in milk, flour enough to roll out thin; sift granulated sugar on top, and gently roll it in.



COOKIES. MRS. LIZZIE MARTIN.

One cup butter, one pint sugar, three eggs, three tablespoons water, two pints flour, two teaspoons baking powder, nutmeg to taste.



MY GRANDMOTHER'S COOKIES. MRS. J. EDD THOMAS.

Three eggs, two cups sugar, one cup butter and lard, two-thirds cup sour milk, one teaspoon soda, two teaspoons cream tartar. Flavor with vanilla. Use flour enough to roll. Stir only with a spoon.



MOLASSES COOKIES. MRS. C. E. MARTIN.

Whites and yolks of two eggs (beaten separately), one cup brown sugar, one cup melted lard and butter, one cup New Orleans molasses, one dessert spoon of ginger, one dessert-spoon soda, four tablespoons boiling water, flour to stiffen. Do not roll too thin.



GINGER NUTS. MRS. BECKIE SMITH.

Two cups molasses, one cup sugar, one cup shortening, one tablespoonful soda in a little milk, ginger to taste, flour to stiffen, and roll.



GINGER SNAPS. MRS. HARRY TRUE.

One cup molasses (scalded), one cup brown sugar, one cup butter, one tablespoon ginger, two even teaspoons soda dissolved in one-fourth cup water, flour to roll out stiff.



GINGER COOKIES. MRS. JACOB HOBERMAN.

One pint of molasses, one cup of sugar, one cup of lard, one pint of sour milk, one tablespoon of soda, one tablespoon of ginger, one tablespoon of cinnamon, three eggs.



GINGER COOKIES. MRS. CHAS. MOORE.

One pint New Orleans molasses, and one cup butter; let come to a boil; take from fire, and cool, then dissolve an even tablespoonful soda in hot water. Pour into molasses, and stir. Mix in enough flour to roll, and two tablespoons ginger.



GINGER COOKIES. FLORENCE ECKHART.

One cup brown sugar, one pint molasses, one-half pint lard, one-half ounce alum, one-half pint warm water, one ounce soda, two tablespoons ginger, flour enough to stiffen, and roll. Beat an egg well, and spread on the top of cakes just before baking.



SUGAR SNAPS. MRS. SUSIE SEFFNER.

One cup butter, two cups sugar, three eggs, one teaspoon soda, one tablespoon ginger.



SAND CAKES. MRS. ABBIE A. LUCAS.

One pound corn starch, one-half pound butter, one pound sugar, eight eggs, two teaspoonfuls baking powder. Beat the butter and sugar to a cream; then add one egg and a little corn starch alternately until the whole is in. Bake a light brown in patty pans, in a quick oven. They are improved by frosting.



COCOANUT COOKIES. MRS. A. A. LUCAS.

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one-half cup sour cream, one-fourth teaspoon soda, two eggs; mix as soft as you can; roll thin, and bake quick. Make an icing of whites of four eggs, one pound of sugar, and as much grated or desiccated cocoanut as you can stir in. Spread on cookies after they are baked.



LEMON CRACKERS. MRS. A. O. JOHNSON.

Three cups of sugar, one cup of lard, one pint of sweet milk, two eggs, five cents worth of lemon oil, five cents worth of baking ammonia. Pound the ammonia fine, and pour on it half a teacup of boiling water. Mix as stiff as bread; roll out, and cut.



HICKORY NUT MACAROONS. MRS. W. C. RAPP AND MRS. ABBIE A. LUCAS.

One cup of nut kernels (chopped fine), one cup of light brown sugar; rub well together one-half cup flour, one egg (beaten light); mix well, and drop with a spoon on buttered dripping pan. Bake with a slow fire.

Mrs. Josie Yager adds to this a pinch of baking powder.



HICKORY MACAROONS. MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Two eggs, two coffee-cups brown sugar, two cups flour, two tablespoons water, one-half teaspoon baking powder, two cups hickory nut meats.



COCOANUT MACAROONS. MRS. J. C. WALTERS.

Two-thirds cup white sugar, one-half cup water; boil as for candy; remove from the fire; stir in one-half pound crystallized cocoanut; then add by degrees the beaten whites of three eggs. Mix thoroughly with a spoon; drop and spread in small cakes on buttered tins; bake until slightly browned.



CHOCOLATE MACAROONS. MRS. ECKHART.

One cake German sweet chocolate, one egg, one cup sugar, one-half cup milk, one lump butter size of a walnut.



HICKORY NUT COOKIES. OZELLA SEFFNER.

Two cups coffee A sugar, three eggs, one cup butter, one cup sweet milk, one pint nut kernels (chopped fine), two large teaspoonfuls baking powder, one tablespoon vanilla, flour to roll out. Bake in moderate oven.



HICKORY NUT COOKIES. ANN THOMPSON.

Two cups brown sugar, two eggs, one-fourth cup butter, two cups hickory nuts, three tablespoons water, one teaspoon baking powder, flour to stiffen very stiff.



HICKORY NUT CAKES. MRS. O. W. WEEKS.

One cup meats, one cup sugar, one and one-half cups flour, one egg, a pinch of baking powder; roll thin, and cut into small cakes. Bake in quick oven.



CREAM PUFFS. MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

Two cups water boiled with one cup butter, one and one-half cups flour; let stand until cool; then stir in five eggs, one at a time; drop on tins by the spoonful, and bake. Open one side, and put in this—

CREAM.—Two cups milk, one cup sugar, three eggs, and one-half cup flour. Cook like custard, and flavor with lemon.



KISSES. FLORENCE ECKHART.

White of one egg (beaten stiff), one teaspoonful of baking powder to the white of an egg; thicken with powdered sugar to drop from the spoon; add one small cup of nuts. Flavor to taste. Drop on buttered pans, and bake until light brown on top.



DELICACIES.

"Custards for supper, and an endless host of other such lady-like luxuries." —SHELLEY.

APPLE FLOAT. MRS. M. E. WRIGHT.

To one quart apples, stewed and well mashed, put whites of three eggs (well beaten), and four heaping tablespoons of sugar; beat together for fifteen minutes. Serve with cream.



FLOAT. FLORENCE TURNEY.

One pint milk, one tablespoon corn starch, yolks of two eggs. Beat yolks, and add one tablespoon cream, one cup coffee A sugar. Flavor when cool.



FLOAT. FLORENCE TURNEY.

Put two quarts of milk into a tin bucket, and place in a kettle of boiling water. While waiting for milk to boil, take the yolks of four eggs, beat, and add one tablespoonful of cream or milk, one cup of coffee A sugar, two teaspoonfuls of sifted flour; beat this to a creamy mixture. When the milk boils, take some of it, stir into the mixture, and then slowly pour this mixture into the rest of the boiling milk, stirring all the time. Put on the lid of the bucket; let boil for a few minutes. Flavor with vanilla. When cool, put in dish. Take the whites of four eggs; beat stiff; add granulated sugar; beat quite a while. Flavor with vanilla. Spread this over the top of the float, and on top of this put bits of jelly.



CHARLOTTE RUSSE.

A very nice recipe for charlotte russe made with gelatine is as follows: Use one pint of cream whipped till light, one ounce of gelatine dissolved in one gill of hot milk, the well beaten whites of two eggs, one small teacupful of powdered sugar, and any flavoring preferred. Mix the eggs, sugar and cream together, and then beat in the dissolved gelatine. The milk should be quite cold before it is added to the other ingredients. Line a dish with slices of sponge cake, or with lady fingers, and fill with cream. Set it on ice to cool.



LEMON SPONGE OR SNOW PUDDING. OZELLA SEFFNER.

One-half box gelatine, juice of three lemons, one pint of cold water, one-half pint of hot water, two teacups of sugar, whites of three eggs. Soak one-half box of gelatine in one pint of cold water ten minutes; then dissolve over the fire, adding the juice of the lemons with the hot water and sugar. Boil all together two or three minutes; pour into a dish, and let it remain until nearly cold and beginning to set; then add the whites of eggs, well beaten, and whisk ten minutes. When it becomes the consistency of sponge, wet the inside of cups with the white of egg, pour in the sponge, and set in a cold place. Serve with thin custard, made with the yolks of four eggs, one tablespoonful of corn starch, one-half teacup of sugar, one pint of milk, teaspoonful of vanilla. Boil until sufficiently thick, and serve cold over the sponge.



LEMON JELLY. GAIL HAMILTON.

One-half box gelatine, one-half pint cold water, one-half pint boiling water, one-half cup sugar, juice of two lemons.



ORANGE JELLY. MRS. O. W. WEEKS.

Take six large, juicy oranges, one lemon, one pound loaf sugar, one-half ounce gelatine. Dissolve the sugar in one-half pint of water. Pour one-half pint boiling water over the gelatine, and when dissolved, strain it. Put the sugar and water on the fire. When it boils, add the gelatine, the juice of the oranges, and the lemon, with a little of the peel. Let come to a boil; then strain in molds to cool.



ORANGE JELLY. MRS. L. D. HAMILTON.

Soak one box gelatine in half pint cold water until soft, add one cup boiling water, juice of one lemon, one cup sugar, one pint orange juice; stir until sugar is dissolved; then strain.



ORANGE SOUFFLE. MRS. GEORGE TURNER.

Pare and slice eight oranges, boil one cup sugar, one pint milk, three eggs, one tablespoon corn starch. As soon as thick, pour over the oranges; beat the whites of eggs to a stiff froth; sweeten; put on top, and brown in oven. Serve cold.



ORANGE CREAM. MRS. S. E. BARLOW.

Take half a box of gelatine, and cover with eight tablespoonfuls of cold water, and soak a half hour. Stand the gelatine over the teakettle for a few minutes to melt; then add it to a pint of orange juice, and a cup of sugar, and strain. Turn this mixture into a dish, and stand in a cool place, watching carefully, and stirring occasionally. Whip a pint of cream to a stiff froth. As soon as the orange gelatine begins to congeal, stir in the whipped cream; turn into a mold, and stand it over in a cold place. Served with angels food, it makes a most delicate dessert.



BAVARIAN CREAM. MRS. CHAS. MOORE.

One can shredded pineapple, and one cup sugar; let come to a boil; one-half box gelatine dissolved in a cup of warm water. When milk becomes warm, stir gelatine into pineapple, and add one pint of whipped cream. Whip all together thoroughly, and set away in a cold place.



AMBROSIA FOR ONE. A. L. OOLAH, OR GEORGE VAN FLEET.

Fill a saucer with fresh peaches, finely sliced, or strawberries, carefully picked and selected; over this, place a measure of ice-cream, vanilla flavor. Cover all with powdered sugar to the depth of one-fourth inch. Eat with spoon (if your income is over twenty thousand dollars, you can use a strawberry fork). Serve with angels food, or almond macaroons.



JELLIED FRUIT. MRS. RETTA LUCAS.

Soak two-thirds box gelatine in one-half cup cold water; stand until dissolved; pour one-half teacup hot water over the dissolved gelatine. Take the juice of two lemons, two oranges, one and one-half cups sugar. Separate one orange into smallest dimensions, removing the seeds. Lay bananas, cut in small pieces, and malaga grapes with the oranges in the bottom of mold; strain the liquid over these, and set to cool.



GELATINE, WITH FRUIT. MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Take one ounce box of gelatine; put to soak in a pint of cold water for an hour. Take the juice of three lemons, and one orange, with three cups of sugar; add this to the gelatine, and pour over all three pints of boiling water; let this boil up once, stirring all the time. Take two molds of the same size, and pour half your jelly into each. Stir into one mold half a cup of candied cherries, and into the other one pound of blanched almonds. The almonds will rise to the top. Let these molds stand on ice, or in a cool place until thoroughly set—twenty-four hours is best. When ready to serve, loosen the sides, and place the almond jelly on top the other, on a fruit platter. Slice down, and serve with whipped cream.



FRUIT RECIPE FOR HOT WEATHER.

Remove the rind of two lemons, and cut the lemons in small pieces; add two cups of sugar, one pint of boiling water, three tablespoons of corn starch; mix with a little milk; put them all together, and boil slowly for five minutes. Cut into small bits four oranges; put in a deep dish, ready for the table, and sprinkle over them a little fine sugar; pour the lemon compound over them. When cold, whip whites of two eggs; add a very little sugar. Flavor with lemon extract. Put in ice box to cool.



FRUIT SALAD. CARRIE LINSLEY.

Place a layer of sliced oranges in the bottom of a glass dish; then a layer of bananas; one of pineapple; sprinkle confectioners sugar between layers; continue this until the dish is nearly full; then pile high with fresh grated cocoanut.



FRUIT SALAD. CARRIE LINSLEY.

Two oranges, two peaches, two bananas, a few slices of pineapple, one-half pound of mixed nuts, one-fourth pound of figs, candied cherries, juice of three lemons, one-half box of gelatine, one pint of boiling water, two cups of sugar, whipped cream to make clear; avoid stirring.



KENTUCKY PUDDING. MAMIE FAIRFIELD.

CUSTARD.—Two quarts milk, six eggs, two tablespoons corn starch, one cup sugar, a pinch salt, one tablespoon vanilla; add to this one quart whipped cream, one pint each candied or preserved cherries, pineapple, and strawberries. Let custard cool before adding cream and fruit. Freeze as ice-cream.



PEACH ICE-CREAM. NELL LINSLEY.

One pint new milk, one pint sweet cream, one cup sugar, one quart peach pulp (peeled ripe or canned peaches, and put through the colander). Let cream and milk come to a boil; add sugar, and cool; add peach pulp, and freeze.



FROZEN ORANGES. Rub the rinds of four oranges in a pound of loaf sugar; peel one dozen oranges; take out the pulp; add it to sugar with the juice of three lemons; set it on ice two hours; then a quart of ice water, and freeze hard, and serve in glasses.



A DAINTY DESSERT.

Frozen fruit makes a dainty and acceptable dessert for dinner or lunch during the summer, and is prepared by mixing and freezing, the same as water ices, then working and cutting the fruits, and using without straining.



FROZEN CHERRIES.

Stone one quart of acid cherries; mix them with two pounds of sugar, and stand aside one hour; stir thoroughly; add a quart of ice water; put in the freezer, and stir rapidly until frozen; heat smooth; set aside half an hour, and serve. That is the way to make frozen cherries.



FROZEN AMBROSIA.

To make frozen ambrosia, pare and slice a dozen sour oranges; lay in a bowl; sprinkle with sugar; cover with grated cocoanut; let stand two hours; mix all together; freeze. Take up in a large glass bowl; lay over the top thin slices of orange; sprinkle with cocoanut and sugar.



FROZEN PEACHES AND PLUMS.

Pare a dozen and a half ripe, soft peaches. Remove the skin and seeds from a quart of sour plums; mash, and add to the peaches. Work the kernels of both to a paste; add them to the sugar and fruit; let stand two hours; then add a quart of ice water; stir, and freeze. This is a delicious dish.



PINEAPPLE SOUFFLE.

Pare, and remove the eyes from two good-sized pineapples; then chop into bits, and sprinkle with one-half pound of sugar; let the whole stand until quite soft; then mash, and strain through a fine sieve. To one quart of juice so obtained, add one quart of water and twelve eggs, which have been rubbed to a cream with one and one-half pounds of sugar. Put the mixture in a farina kettle, and cook till it assumes the thickness of soft custard; then strain, and beat briskly till cold. Freeze, and serve with sweet cream, flavored with fruit juice.



BISQUE ICE-CREAM.

Put in a farina kettle one quart of good sweet cream, three-quarters of a pound of sugar, and one tablespoonful of vanilla extract, and allow the mixture to cook till the water in the outer kettle boils; then remove from the fire. Brown two ounces of macaroons in a moderate oven; cool, and roll to a fine powder; stir into the cream, and when cold, freeze.



LEMON SHERBERT. MRS. G. H. WRIGHT.

To one quart of sweet milk, add one pint of sugar, the well beaten whites of two eggs, and the juice of three lemons. Add the lemon juice after it commences to freeze.



LEMON ICE. MRS. H. T. VAN FLEET.

To one quart of water, add four cups of sugar; let this come to boiling point; let cool; strain through a cloth; add the juice of six lemons, and juice of two oranges; beat the whites of six eggs to a stiff froth. Put the syrup in the freezer; then add the beaten whites. Freeze same as ice-cream. Stir constantly until sufficiently frozen.



APRICOT ICE. ALICE FAIRFIELD.

Make syrup same as lemon ice; add one can of apricots (mashed fine), three lemons, and juice of one orange, if wanted. Freeze same as lemon ice.



ORANGE SHERBERT. M. E. BEALE.

One tablespoon of gelatine, one pint of cold water, one cup of sugar, six oranges or one pint of juice, one-half cup of boiling water. Soak the gelatine in one-half cup of cold water ten minutes. Put the sugar and remainder of cold water in a large pitcher; squeeze the juice into the pitcher; add it to the gelatine after it is dissolved; strain into the can, and freeze.



CONFECTIONS

"Sweet meats, messengers of strong prevailment in an unhardened youth." —SHAKESPEARE.

TO BLANCH ALMONDS.

Put them into cold water, and allow it to come to a boiling point; then remove the skins, and throw them into cold water a few moments to preserve the color.

For salted almonds, prepare as above; put into a dripping pan with some lumps of butter; set into a moderate oven until nicely browned. Sprinkle over them some salt, and toss until thoroughly mixed.

Peanuts may be prepared in same manner.



CHOCOLATE CREAMS. MRS. EDWARD E. POWERS.

Two pounds XXXX confectioners' sugar, one-fourth pound grated cocoanut, one tablespoonful vanilla, a pinch of salt, whites of three eggs (beaten very stiff); mix all together, and roll into small balls; let stand one-half hour; then dip into the chocolate, prepared thus: One-half cake Bakers chocolate (grated fine), two tablespoonfuls butter. Warm the butter; mix in the chocolate. When cool, dip the creams in, and set on a buttered plate to harden.



VANILLA TAFFY. MRS. EDWARD E. POWERS.

Three cups of granulated sugar, one cup of cold water, three tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Cook without stirring until it threads; add one tablespoonful of vanilla; let cool; pull until white; cut into small squares.



DANDY TAFFY. MIRIAM DE WOLFE.

Three cups brown sugar, one cup water, one cup white sugar, one tablespoonful vinegar. When nearly done, add one tablespoonful vanilla. Pour into buttered tins.



CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. MRS. NED THATCHER.

One cup of sweet milk, two cups of brown sugar, two cups of molasses, one pint of water, a tablespoon of butter. Flavor to taste. Two ounces of chocolate just before taking from the fire.



MOLASSES CANDY. MRS. DR. FISHER.

Take one quart of molasses (maple is best); boil until it is crisp when put in water; then stir in one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a little warm water; stir until well mixed. Pour into buttered pans. Pull part until white, and make into sticks. In the remainder put roasted corn, peanuts, walnuts, almonds, or hazelnuts.



COCOANUT DROPS. MRS. DR. FISHER.

Grate the white part of a cocoanut, the whites of four eggs (well beaten), one-half pound of sifted sugar. Flavor with lemon or rose. Mix as thick as can be stirred. Make in balls, putting them about one inch apart on paper on baking tins. Put into a quick oven; take out when they begin to look yellow.



BUTTER SCOTCH. MRS. EDWARD E. POWERS.

Two cups brown sugar, two cups molasses, two tablespoonfuls butter, two tablespoonfuls vinegar. Boil until it threads; then pour into shallow pans to harden.



PICKLES.

"Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers." —MOTHER GOOSE.

FOR SIX HUNDRED PICKLES. MRS. M. E. WRIGHT.

Make a brine of cold water and salt strong enough to bear up an egg; heat boiling hot, and pour over pickles; let stand twenty-four hours; then take out, and wipe dry. Scald vinegar, and put over; let stand twenty-four hours; then pour off, and to fresh vinegar add one quart brown sugar, two large green peppers, one-half pint white mustard seed, six cents worth ginger root, six cents worth cinnamon and allspice, one tablespoon celery seed, alum size butternut. Scald, pour over, and tie up in jars.



CUCUMBER PICKLES. MRS. H. T. VAN FLEET.

Pour enough boiling water over pickles to cover them, and let stand twenty-four hours; measure water so that you may know what quantity of vinegar to use. Take them out of water, wiping each one separately with dry towel; place in close layers in stone jar. To one gallon of vinegar, add one cup of salt, two tablespoons of pulverized alum, same of cloves, allspice, mustard, and cinnamon; put all in vinegar, and let come to boil; pour this over pickles. When cool, place plate over, and add a weight. Pickles prepared in this way will keep nicely a year.



CHOW-CHOW. MRS. ALICE KRANER.

One quart green cucumbers (cut lengthwise), one dozen small cucumbers (whole), one dozen small onions, one large cauliflower, one quart small green tomatoes. Put the cucumbers in brine for three days; the rest scald in salt and water; add pepper and other spices to taste. Two and one-half quarts vinegar, two and one-half cups sugar, one cup flour, six tablespoonfuls mustard. Scald the vinegar, sugar, flour, and mustard. Pour this over the whole bottle; and seal.



CHOW-CHOW. MRS. C. C. STOLTZ.

Two quarts small cucumbers, two quarts small onions, two cauliflowers, six green peppers; cut all, and put in salt and water four hours; then scald, and drain.

PASTE.—Six tablespoonfuls mustard, one tablespoonful turmeric, one and one-half cups sugar, one cup flour. Mix all well together; add cold vinegar to wet it up; pour into two quarts of boiling vinegar.

Pour this on pickles; mix thoroughly, and put in cans.



PICKLED ONIONS. MRS. DR. FISHER.

Peel small white onions, and boil them in milk and water ten minutes; drain off the milk and water, and pour over the onions scalding spiced vinegar.



PICKLED PEACHES. MRS. DR. FISHER.

Wipe ripe but hard peaches until free from down; stick a few cloves into each one; lay in cold spiced vinegar. In three months, they will be nicely pickled, and retain much of their natural flavor.



MANGO PICKLES. MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

[In this recipe, the term "mango" refers to green bell peppers.] Use either small muskmelons or sweet peppers; take out the insides, and lay them in strong salt water twenty-four hours; drain well. For filling, cut cabbage fine; salt it; let it stand one hour; wash with clear water, and drain well; add celery seed and ground cinnamon to taste. Fill the mangoes; tie closely; pack in stone jars. Then to one gallon of good cider vinegar, add three pounds of brown sugar; heat, and pour over the mangoes; repeat the heating of vinegar two or three mornings in succession.



MIXED PICKLES. MAUD STOLTZ.

Two hundred little cucumbers, fifty large cucumbers, three tablespoonfuls black mustard seed, three tablespoonfuls white mustard seed, three tablespoonfuls celery seed, one dozen red peppers, two pounds sugar, one quart French mustard, one bottle English chow-chow, one quart little onions, vinegar to cover. Cook slowly for one hour.



TOMATO CHOW-CHOW. MRS. A. H. KLING.

One-half peck green tomatoes, two large heads of cabbage, fifteen onions, twenty-five ripe cucumbers, one pint of grated horseradish, one-half pound of white mustard seed, one ounce of celery seed, one-half teacup each of ground pepper, turmeric, and cinnamon. Cut tomatoes, cabbage, onions, and cucumbers in small pieces, and salt over night. In the morning, drain off the brine; put on vinegar and water, half and half; let stand twenty-four hours; drain again; put in the spices. Boil two gallons of vinegar with three pounds of brown sugar; pour over while hot; do this three mornings; then add one-half pound of mustard; stir in when nearly cold.



SPANISH PICKLE. MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Four heads of cabbage, one peck of green tomatoes, one dozen large cucumbers, one-half dozen sweet peppers (red), one-half dozen sweet peppers (green), one quart of small white onions; cut all these in small pieces, and let stand in brine over night; wash in cold water, and drain. Cut six bunches of celery in small pieces.

DRESSING FOR THE PICKLE.—Two gallons of good cider vinegar, five pounds of brown sugar, five cents worth of turmeric, five cents worth of white mustard seed, one-half pound of ground mustard, one-half cup of flour, a tablespoon of whole cloves, and the same of stick cinnamon.

Let the vinegar, sugar, and all the spices come to boiling point; add the chopped vegetables, and one hundred small cucumber pickles that have been in brine over night. Cook one-half hour; then add the turmeric, ground mustard and flour mixed to a paste; cook five minutes longer. Bottle, and eat when your stomach craves it.



CELERY, OR FRENCH PICKLE. MRS. F. E. BLAKE.

One gallon each of chopped (very fine) cabbage, celery and sweet peppers; one cupful of salt over peppers after being chopped; mix well; let stand two hours; wash thoroughly till water is clear to prevent coloring cabbage and celery. Mix together cabbage, celery, and peppers; to this add one tablespoonful of salt, one pint of white mustard seed (not ground), four pints of sugar, hot peppers to suit the taste. Put in jars for immediate use; in sealed cans to keep. Be fore putting away, add one gallon of good cider vinegar, cold.



GREEN TOMATO PICKLE. MRS. F. R. SAITER.

Slice one peck of green tomatoes, and four green peppers; place in a stone jar in layers, sprinkling each layer thickly with salt; cover with boiling water; let stand over night; drain in the morning through a colander, and add four large onions sliced, with an ounce of whole cloves, one ounce of cinnamon, two pounds of brown sugar. Place all together in a preserving kettle; nearly cover with vinegar; boil slow until tender. Set away in a jar. Next day, if the syrup seems thin, drain off, and boil down. Cover top of jar with a cloth before setting away.



CUCUMBER PICKLES. KITTIE M. SMITH.

Wash your cucumbers; then pour boiling water on them, and let them stand eighteen hours. Take them out, and make a brine of one pint of salt to one gallon of water; pour on boiling hot; let stand twenty-four hours. Then wipe them dry, and pack them in your jar. Put in slips of horseradish, and what spices you like. Cover with cold cider vinegar. Put grape leaves on the top. They are ready to use in twenty-four hours, and if the vinegar is pure cider vinegar, will keep indefinitely.



CHOPPED PICKLE. MRS. S. A. POWERS.

One peck green tomatoes, one dozen red sweet peppers, chopped fine; cover with salt water; let stand twenty-four hours; drain dry; add one head cabbage, one bunch celery chopped fine, one pint grated horseradish, one teacupful cloves, one teacupful black mustard seed, salt to taste, one pint or more very small cucumbers, or one-half dozen ordinary cucumbers cut into small strips; cover with cold cider vinegar. If desired to keep, seal in self sealers.



CURRANT CATSUP. MRS. E.

Five quarts juice, three pounds sugar; boil juice and sugar until it thickens; then add one pint vinegar, tablespoon ground cinnamon and cloves, teaspoon each of salt and pepper; bottle for use. You can use grape juice.



FLINT PICKLES. MRS. LAURA MARTIN EVERETT.

Use medium-sized cucumbers; wash clean, and lay in jars. Make a brine of water and salt—one teacup of salt to a gallon of water; boil, and pour over the cucumbers; move brine nine mornings in succession; boil, and pour over; then wash in hot water, and put to drain. When cool, place in stone jars, one layer of pickles, and then a layer of grape leaves, some horseradish, and a few sliced onions, if you like the taste of onion. When your jars are full, make a syrup of good vinegar and sugar, sweetened to taste, and add stick of cinnamon, a little celery seed; boil, and pour over the pickles. Invert a plate or saucer, and put on a small weight; tie up closely. They will keep the year round, and are very palatable.



TOMATO CATSUP. MRS. G. LIVINGSTON.

One gallon strained tomatoes, one quart good vinegar, one tablespoon each cloves, mustard, and cinnamon, a little salt, one teaspoon red pepper; cook one hour, and bottle.



TOMATO CATSUP. MRS. ALICE KRANER.

Two and one-half gallons ripe tomatoes; rub through a sieve; eight cups cider vinegar, one and one-half cups salt, two and one-half cups brown sugar, nine teaspoonfuls mustard, four teaspoonfuls ginger, five teaspoonfuls allspice, five teaspoonfuls cloves, five teaspoonfuls black pepper, four teaspoonfuls cayenne pepper.



COLD CATSUP. MRS. F. E. BLAKE.

One peck of tomatoes, sliced fine; sprinkle with salt lightly, and let stand two hours; rub through coarse sieve or colander; to this, add one-half pint grated horseradish, one large cup salt, one and one-half cups white mustard seed, one tablespoonful black pepper, one quart fine chopped celery, one large teacupful chopped onions, one and one-half cups sugar, one tablespoonful ground cloves, one tablespoonful ground cinnamon, three pints good cider vinegar. Mix cold, and use immediately, or can, and it will keep for years.



COMMON CATSUP. MRS. F. E. BLAKE.

Cut up tomatoes, skins and all; cook thoroughly. When cool, rub through a sieve. To one gallon of tomato juice, put a tablespoonful of salt, one tablespoonful of pepper, one tablespoonful of cinnamon, and one quart of good cider vinegar. Cook until thick.



GOOSEBERRY CATSUP. EVELYN GAILEY.

Six quarts berries, nine pounds sugar, one pint vinegar, one tablespoonful each of cloves, cinnamon, and allspice. One-half the vinegar put on berries at first. When nearly done, strain, and add rest of the vinegar, and spices. Boil three or four hours.



SPICED GRAPES. MRS. G. A. LIVINGSTON.

One pound of fruit, one-half pound of sugar, one pint of vinegar, two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, two teaspoonfuls of cloves, one teaspoonful of allspice. Cook pulp and skins separately.



PICKLED PEARS. MRS. F. E. BLAKE.

To one gallon of moderately strong vinegar, add a small handful of cloves (not ground), several sticks of cinnamon, sugar enough to make vinegar quite sweet. Take small pears, and with a small pointed knife remove all blemishes, but do not pare them. Put vinegar on the stove. When it comes to a boil, fill kettle as full of pears as will boil; set on back of stove, and boil slowly for three and one-half hours; fill your cans, and seal while very hot.



ROSA'S SWEET PICKLE.

Nine pounds peaches, three pounds sugar, three quarts good cider vinegar. Peel the peaches; then put them with the sugar and vinegar in a porcelain lined kettle; cook for five to ten minutes; put two cloves in each peach; add a little whole allspice.



SPICED GRAPES. MRS. ELIZA CORWIN, MT. GILEAD, OHIO.

Wash the bunches carefully. Use two or three gallon jars. Put a thick layer of brown sugar on bottom of jar; then a layer of bunches of grapes; sprinkle on a few whole cloves, allspice, and stick cinnamon. Alternate layers of sugar and grapes as above until jar is full. Turn plate on top; put on weight; tie cloth closely over top; put in cool place. The grapes are nice served with cold meats. The syrup can be used for cake, puddings, mince pies, etc. Towards spring, strain all that is left in the jar through a flannel cloth; bottle it, and use through summer; use for dysentery. A few spoonfuls in ice water makes a pleasant drink for hot days.



SPICED GOOSEBERRIES. MRS. C. C. CAMPBELL.

Six quarts berries, nine pounds sugar. Cook one and one-half hours; then add one pint vinegar, one teaspoonful cloves, one tablespoonful cinnamon, one tablespoonful allspice.



CHILI SAUCE. MRS. M. E. WRIGHT.

Twenty-four ripe tomatoes, eight onions, twelve green peppers, four tablespoons salt, eight tablespoons sugar, two tablespoons cinnamon, two tablespoons ginger, one tablespoon cloves, four teacups vinegar; boil slowly two hours.



CANNED FRUIT AND JELLIES.

"Will't please your honor, taste of these conserves?" —Shakespeare

CANNED FRUIT IN GENERAL. MRS. F. E. BLAKE.

For peaches, for instance, set on the stove a kettle of cold water—just enough so the can will not tip over; into this kettle, put one-half dozen nails to keep the can from touching the bottom; then fill the can full of peaches, cut in halves; then fill the can with cold water; add two tablespoonfuls of sugar, and set in kettle to boil; let boil until the fruit is tender, but not enough to break while cooking. When done nicely, put the top on the can, and set away.



RASPBERRY JAM. MRS. E. S.

Weigh equal parts of fruit and sugar. Put the fruit into a preserving pan, and mash with a silver or wooden spoon; let boil up; then add the sugar; stir all the time while cooking. Strawberry or blackberry jam is made the same way. Thirty or forty minutes is sufficient time for cooking.



TO PRESERVE PEACHES. L. D.

Take equal portions of peaches and sugar; pare, stone, and quarter the fruit. Put the sugar with the peaches; let stand over night. In the morning, boil slowly in preserving kettle one hour and three-fourths; skim well.



TO PRESERVE QUINCES. L. D.

Pare and core. Be sure you get out all the seeds. Boil the skins and cores one hour; then strain through a coarse cloth; boil your quinces in this juice until tender; drain them out; add the weight of the quinces in sugar to this syrup; boil, and skim until clear; then put in the quinces. Boil three hours slowly.



TOMATO BUTTER. MRS. J. KISHLER.

To one quart of tomato, add one pint of apple; put both through sieve; one quart of sugar, some ground cinnamon; cook until it begins to look like a preserve.



ORANGE MARMALADE. MRS. DR. TRUE.

To eighteen ripe oranges, use six pounds best white sugar. Grate the peel from four oranges; reserve for marmalade. (The rinds of the remainder will not be used). Pare the fruit, removing the white skin as well as the yellow; slice the oranges; remove all seeds. Put the fruit and grated peel into a preserving kettle; boil until reduced to a smooth mass; rub quickly through a colander; stir in the sugar; return to the stove; boil fast, stirring constantly, one-half hour, or until thick. Put in glasses, or jars; cover closely when cold.



CURRANT JELLY. MISS KITTIE SMITH.

A FRENCH CONFECTIONERS RECIPE.—Allow one pound of sugar to one pint of juice. Boil the juice five minutes, and add the sugar, which has been previously well heated; boil one minute, stirring carefully. Always a success.



CURRANT JELLY. MRS. DR. TRUE.

Weigh the currants on the stems. Do not wash them, but carefully remove all leaves; or whatever may adhere to them. Put a few of the currants into kettle (porcelain lined or granite iron); mash them to secure juice to keep from burning; add the remainder of the fruit, and boil freely for twenty-five minutes, stirring occasionally; strain through a three-cornered bag of strong texture, putting the liquid in earthen or wooden vessels (never in tin). Return the strained liquid to the kettle without the trouble of measuring; let it boil well for a moment or two; add half the amount of granulated or loaf sugar. As soon as the sugar is dissolved, the jelly is done. Put in glasses.



PINEAPPLE JAM.

Peel, grate, and weigh the apple. Put pound to pound of pineapple and sugar. Boil it in a preserving kettle thirty or forty minutes.



CRABAPPLE JELLY.

Boil the apples, with just enough water to cover them, until tender; mash with a spoon, and strain out the juice. Take a pint of juice to a pound of sugar; boil thirty minutes, and strain through a hair sieve.



ROSE GERANIUM JELLY. MRS. SAMUEL BARTRAM.

Drop one large or two small leaves of rose geranium plant into a quart of apple jelly a few moments before it is done, and you will add a novel and peculiarly delightful flavor to the jelly.



CRABAPPLE MARMALADE.

Boil the apples in a kettle until soft, with just enough water to cover them; mash, and strain through a coarse sieve. Take a pound of apple to a pound of sugar; boil half an hour, and put into jars.



CRANBERRY JELLY. MRS. G. A. LIVINGSTON.

One pound of sugar to each pint of juice; boil, and skim. Test by dropping a little into cold water; when it does not mingle with the water, it is done.



APPLE JELLY. MRS. E. SEFFNER.

Ten quarts of sour apples, stewed very soft in sufficient water to cover the fruit; drain over night through a flannel bag, without pressing; add one pint of sugar to each pint of juice, and three sliced lemons; boil twenty minutes; strain into glasses or bowls.



PEAR MARMALADE. MRS. E. SEFFNER.

EXCELLENT FOR TARTS.—Pare and core, then boil the pears to a pulp. Take half their weight of sugar; put it into the kettle with a little water; boil until like taffy; skim while boiling; add the pulp of the pears, about four drops of essence of cloves; boil up once or twice.



PRESERVED STRAWBERRIES. MRS. KATE MARTIN, TIFFIN, OHIO.

Use one pound of granulated sugar to each quart of berries. Make a syrup of the sugar, and sufficient water to moisten it. While boiling, drop in the berries, and let them boil ten minutes. Skim out the fruit, and put it on a platter. Boil the syrup ten minutes longer; then pour it over the berries, and set where it will get the sun for two days. Put in jelly glasses, and seal. Made in this way, the fruit retains both color and flavor.



TO PRESERVE RASPBERRIES AND STRAWBERRIES. L. D.

Put pound to pound of sugar and fruit; let stand over night. In the morning, boil all together fifteen minutes. Skim out the berries; boil the syrup till thick and clear; pour over the fruit.

For millinery go to Jennie Thomas, the oldest and best.



CANNED STRAWBERRIES. MRS. G. A. LIVINGSTON.

For every quart of strawberries, take one pint of sugar; add a tablespoonful or two of water. Let sugar dissolve; then add fruit, and let boil. Can immediately in air-tight glass cans.



CHOPPED QUINCES. MRS. ELIZA DICKERSON.

Pare the quinces; cut in small squares; cover with water, and stew until tender; pour into a colander, and drain. To each pint of the juice, add three-fourths pint of sugar. Let boil, and skim well for ten or fifteen minutes; then put in the quinces; cook until the syrup begins to jell. Put in glasses, and seal same as jelly.



CANNED PINEAPPLE. MRS. LULU DANN.

Take equal measurements of shredded pineapple and sugar. Place in a crock alternately, a layer of shredded pineapple and one of sugar; let this stand over night. In the morning, drain off the juice, and to three cups of juice, add one cup of water. After this mixture comes to a boil, put in the pulp of your pineapple, and let boil up (not cook). Seal in self sealing jars.



BEVERAGES.

"The cup that cheers, but not inebriates."

"Polly, put the kettle on."



COOLING DRINK FOR INVALIDS. MRS. RETTA LUCAS.

Two teaspoonfuls arrow root wet with a little cold water, three tablespoonfuls white sugar, juice of half a lemon, and a small piece of rind; stir quickly while you fill a quart pitcher with boiling water. This is a cooling and nutritious drink for the sick.



RASPBERRY VINEGAR. MRS. E. S.

To nine quarts of mashed berries, add one quart of good vinegar; let stand from four days to a week; then squeeze out the juice. Add one quart of sugar to each quart of juice. Boil fifteen minutes; then bottle tightly.



CHOCOLATE. MRS. W. E. THOMAS.

Scrape fine two ounces (two squares) unsweetened chocolate. Use Walter Baker & Co.s No. 1 chocolate. Put into a granite ware pan, add a small cup or sugar, a pinch of salt, and two tablespoons of hot water; let this boil, stirring it constantly, until it is smooth and glossy, like a caramel; then add one large pint of good rich milk, and one pint of hot water; let this come to a boil, stirring constantly; add a tablespoon of corn starch dissolved in a little cold milk or water. When this boils, serve at once, with whipped cream, flavored with a little vanilla.

If you cannot have the whipped cream, pour your chocolate from one pitcher into another, or beat with a whisk until frothy. If you have to use skimmed milk, take more milk and less water. Never omit the salt, as it is very essential to the flavor.



COFFEE. EUGENE DE WOLFE.

Allow one tablespoonful to each cupful. Moisten with whole or half well beaten egg; pour on half pint cold water; let this come to boiling point; then fill up with boiling water. Stop up the nose of the coffee pot, and let stand on stove fifteen to twenty minutes.



INVALID COFFEE. MRS. S. A. POWERS.

Three cups warm water, one cup baking molasses. Take as much fresh, new bran as this will moisten (not wet); mix thoroughly, and brown in oven exactly like coffee, and to this two pounds of mixed ground Rio and Java coffee; then stir in three well beaten eggs. You will have about ten quarts of mixture when done.

FOR USING.—Take one tablespoonful of this mixture to a cup of boiling water; let boil from fifteen to twenty minutes.



BREAD.

"The very staff of life; the comfort of the husband; the pride of the wife."



DRY YEAST. MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

A large handful of hops put into one quart of water; cover, and let boil five minutes; strain over one pint of flour; beat until your arm aches, and the batter is smooth. When cool, add a cake of good yeast. When perfectly light, mix stiff with white corn meal, and a little flour; roll out on the kneading board; cut in cakes, and dry. Turn them often.



EVER-READY YEAST. MRS. W. H. E.

Four good-sized perfect potatoes; pare and grate them quickly. Pour boiling water over the grated potato until it thickens like starch; let cool a few moments; then stir in flour to thicken. When milk warm, put in one or two cakes of dry yeast, previously dissolved in a cup of water; let stand twenty-four hours. Use one pint of this with four pints of water for four loaves of bread. Make the sponge either at bed time, or early in the morning. Will keep in a cool place two weeks.



SWEET YEAST. MRS. SUSIE SEFFNER.

Boil four large potatoes in two quarts of water. When done, mash the potatoes, and add one cup of sugar, one-half cup of salt, one-half cup of flour. Boil one pint of hops in the water in which the potatoes were boiled until strength is out; then strain in the jar with other ingredients; stir well. When cool, add one cup of yeast, or one cake of dry yeast; let raise, and put in jar. Keep in cool place.



GOOD BREAD. MRS. SUSIE SEFFNER.

Take six good-sized potatoes; cook until very soft; take from the water, and mash until creamy; turn the water over the potato scalding hot, and stir in flour until the consistency of cake batter. When cool, stir in one cup of good yeast dissolved in a little warm water; let rise over night. First thing in the morning, heat two quarts of water milk warm; add to the yeast; then stir in flour to make a thick sponge; let rise; then work to a stiff dough; let rise again; knead down; let rise again; make into loaves. When light, bake from three quarters to one hour. This makes a large baking.



AN EASY WAY TO MAKE GOOD BREAD. MRS. G. E. SALMON.

FOR THREE LOAVES.—Take three medium-sized potatoes; boil, and mash fine; add two tablespoons of flour; scald with potato water; add one tablespoon of salt, one of lard, and two of sugar. Have one quart of this, and when lukewarm, add one cake of yeast, dissolved. Prepare this at noon; let stand till morning, stirring two or three times. In the morning, have the flour warm; mix till stiff enough to knead on the board, and knead thoroughly for half an hour; rub melted lard over top, and set in a warm place to rise. When light, make into loaves, handling as little as possible; rub melted lard over top, and let rise again. Bake fifty minutes. When taken from the oven, rub the tops of loaves over with butter. This will keep the crust soft.

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