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Notes and Queries, Number 208, October 22, 1853
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I previously prepared my paper by brushing it with the same salt solution, and the difference of effect produced may be seen by comparing a proof so obtained, which I inclose, with the others. This latter is of rather a reddish-brown, and not very agreeable tint. I have inclosed the proofs as printed on paper of Whatman, Turner, and Canson Freres, so as to show the effect in each case. The advantages which the mode I have detailed possesses are, I think, these:

Greater sensitiveness in the paper,

A good black tint, and

Greater freedom from spots and blemishes, all very material merits.

C. E. F.

[Our Correspondent has forwarded five specimens, four of which are certainly very satisfactory, the fifth is the one prepared by brushing.]

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Replies to Minor Queries.

The Groaning Elm-plank in Dublin (Vol. viii., p. 309.).—DR. RIMBAULT has given an account of the groaning-board, one of the popular delusions of two centuries ago: the following notice of it, extracted from my memoir of Sir Thomas Molyneux, Bart., M.D., and published in the Dublin University for September, 1841, may interest your readers:

"In one of William Molyneux's communications he mentions the exhibition of 'the groaning elm-plank' in Dublin, a curiosity that attracted much attention and many learned speculations about the years 1682 and 1683. He was, however, too much of a philosopher to be gulled with the rest of the people who witnessed this so-called 'sensible elm-plank,' which is said to have groaned and trembled on the application of a hot iron to one end of it. After explaining the probable cause of the noise and tremulousness by its form and condition, and by the sap being made to pass up through the pores or tubuli of the plank which was in some particular condition, he says: 'But, Tom, the generality of mankind is lazy and unthoughtful, and will not trouble themselves to think of the reason of a thing: when they have a brief way of explaining anything that is strange by saying, "The devil's in it," what need they trouble their heads about pores, and matters, and motion, figure, and disposition, when the devil and a witch shall solve the phenomena of nature.'"

W. R. WILDE.

Passage in Whiston (Vol. viii., p. 244.).—J. T. complains of not being able to find a passage in Whiston, which he says is referred to in p. 94. of Taylor on Original Sin, Lond. 1746. I do not know what Taylor he refers to. Jeremy Taylor wrote a treatise on original sin; but he lived before Whiston. I have looked into two editions of the Scripture Doctrine of Original Sin, by John Taylor, one of Lond. 1741, and another of Lond. 1750; but in neither of these can I find any mention of Mr. Whiston.

[Greek: Halieus].

Dublin.

"When Orpheus went down" (Vol. viii., pp. 196. 281.).—In addition to the information given upon this old song by MR. OLDENSHAW, I beg to add the following. It was written for and sung {398} by Mr. Beard, in a pantomimic entertainment entitled Orpheus and Euridice, acted at the theatre in Lincoln's Inn Fields in 1740. The author of the entertainment was Mr. Henry Sommer, but the song in question was "translated from the Spanish" by the Rev. Dr. Samuel Lisle, who died Rector of Burclere, Hants, 1767. It was long very popular, and is found in almost all the song-books of the latter half of the last century. Mr. Park, the editor of the last edition of Ritson's English Songs (vol. ii. p. 153.), has the following note upon this song:

"An answer to this has been written in the way of echo, and in defence of the fair sex, whom the Spanish author treated with such libellous sarcasm."

As this "echo song" is not given by Ritson or his editor, I have transcribed it from a broadside in my collection. It is said to have been written by a lady.

"When Orpheus went down to the regions below, To bring back the wife that he lov'd, Old Pluto, confounded, as histories show, To find that his music so mov'd: That a woman so good, so virtuous, and fair, Should be by a man thus trepann'd, To give up her freedom for sorrow and care, He own'd she deserv'd to be damn'd.

"For punishment he never study'd a whit, The torments of hell had not pain Sufficient to curse her; so Pluto thought fit Her husband should have her again. But soon he compassion'd the woman's hard fate, And, knowing of mankind so well, He recall'd her again, before 'twas too late, And said, she'd be happier in hell."

EDWARD F. RIMBAULT.

Foreign Medical Education (Vol. viii., p. 341.).—Your correspondent MEDICUS will find some information respecting some of the foreign universities in the Lancet for 1849, and the Medical Times and Gazette for 1852. For France he will find all he wants in Dr. Roubaud's Annuaire Medical et Pharmaceutique de la France, published by Bailliere, 219. Regent Street.

M. D.

"Short red, good red" (Vol. viii., p. 182.).—Sir Walter has probably borrowed this saying from the story of Bishop Walchere, when he related the murder of Adam, Bishop of Caithness. This tragical event is told in the Chronicle of Mailros, under the year 1222; also in Forduni Scotichronicon, and in Wyntoun's Chronicle, book vii. c. ix.; but the words "short red, good red," do not appear in these accounts of the transaction.

J. MN.

Collar of SS. (Vols. iv.-vii. passim).—At the risk of frightening you and your correspondents, I venture to resume this subject, in consequence of a circumstance to which my attention has just been directed.

In the parish church of Swarkestone in Derbyshire there is a monument to Richard Harpur, one of the judges of the Court of Common Pleas in the reign of Elizabeth; on which he is represented in full judicial costume, with the collar of SS., which I am told by the minister of the parish is "distinctly delineated." It may be seen in Fairholt's Costumes of England, p. 278.

As far as I am aware, this is the only instance, either on monuments or in portraits, of a puisne judge being ornamented with this decoration. Can any of your correspondents produce another example? or can they account, from any other cause, for Richard Harpur receiving such a distinction? or may I not rather attribute it to the blunder of the sculptor?

EDWARD FOSS.

Who first thought of Table-turning (Vol. viii., p. 57.).—It is impossible to say who discovered the table-turning experiment, but it undoubtedly had its origin in the United States. It was practised here three years ago, and, although sometimes associated with spirit-rappings, has more frequently served for amusement. On this connexion it may be proper to say that Professor Faraday's theory of unconscious muscular force meets with no concurrence among those who know anything about the subject in this country. It is notorious that large tables have been moved frequently by five or six persons, whose fingers merely touched them, although upon each was seated a stout man, weighing a hundred and fifty or sixty pounds: neither involuntary nor voluntary muscular force could have effected that physical movement, when there was no other purchase on the table than that which could be gained by a pressure of the tips of the fingers.

[Old English W].

Philadelphia.

Passage of Thucydides on the Greek Factions (Vol. vii., p. 594.; Vol. viii., pp. 44. 137.).—My attempt to find the passage attributed by Sir A. Alison to Thucydides in the real Thucydides was unsuccessful for the best of reasons, viz. that it does not exist there. He has probably borrowed it from some modern author, who, as it appears to me, has given a loose paraphrase of the words which I cited from Thucyd. III. 82., and has expanded the thought in a manner not uncommon with some writers, by adding the expression about the "sword and poniard." Some other misquotations of Sir A. Alison from the classical writers may be seen in the Edinburgh Review for April last, No. CXCVIII. p. 275.

L.

Origin of "Clipper" as applied to Vessels (Vol. viii., p. 100.).—For many years the fleetest sailing vessels built in the United States were {399} constructed at Baltimore. They were very sharp, long, low; and their masts were inclined at a much greater angle than usual with those in other vessels. Fast sailing pilot boats and schooners were thus rigged; and in the last war with England, privateers of the Baltimore build were universally famed for their swiftness and superior sailing qualities. "A Baltimore clipper" became the expression among shipbuilders for a vessel of peculiar make; in the construction of which, fleetness was considered of more importance than a carrying capacity. When the attention of naval architects was directed to the construction of swift sailing ships, they were compelled to adopt the clipper shape. Hence the title "Clipper Ship," which has now extended from America to England.

[Old English W].

Philadelphia.

Passage in Tennyson (Vol. viii., p. 244.).—In the third edition of In Memoriam, LXXXIX., 1850, the last line mentioned by W. T. M. is "Flits by the sea-blue bird of March," instead of "blue sea-bird." This reading appears to be a better one. I would suggest that the bird meant by Tennyson was the Tom-tit, who, from his restlessness, may be said to flit among the bushes.

F. M. MIDDLETON.

Huet's Navigations of Solomon (Vol. vii., p. 381.).—This work of the learned Bishop of Avranches was written in Latin, and translated into French by J. B. Desrockes de Parthenay. It forms part of the second volume of a collection of treatises edited by Bruzen de la Martiniere, under the title of Traites Geographiques et Historiques pour faciliter l'intelligence de l'Ecriture Sainte, par divers auteurs celebres, 1730, 2 vols. 12mo.

I am unable to reply to EDINA's second Query, as to the result of Huet's assertions.

HENRY H. BREEN.

St. Lucia.

Sincere (Vol. viii., pp. 195. 328.).—The derivation of this word from sine cera appears very fanciful. If this were the correct derivation, we should expect to find sinecere, for the e would scarcely be dropped; just as we have the English word sinecure, which is the only compound of the preposition sine I know; and is itself not a Latin word, but of a later coinage. Some give as the derivation semel and [Greek: kerao]—that is, once mixed, without adulteration; the [Greek: e] being lengthened, as the Greek [Greek: akeratos]. The proper spelling would then be simcerus, and euphonically sincerus: thus we have sim-plex, which does not mean without a fold, but (semel plico, [Greek: pleko]) once folded. So also singulus, semel and termination. The proper meaning may be from tablets, ceratae tabellae, which were "once smeared with wax" and then written upon; they were then sincerae, without forgery or deception. If they were in certain places covered with wax again, for the purpose of adding something secretly and deceptively, they cease to be sincerae.

J. T. JEFFCOCK.

[Pi]. [Beta]. asks me for some authority for the alleged practice of Roman potters (or crock-vendors) to rub wax into the flaws of their unsound vessels. This was the very burden of my Query! I am no proficient in the Latin classics: yet I think I know enough to predicate that [Pi]. [Beta]. is wrong in his version of the line—

"Sincerum est nisi vas, quodcunque infundis acescit."

I understand this line as referring to the notorious fact, that some liquors turn sour if the air gets to them from without. "Sincerum vas" is a sound or air-tight vessel. In another place (Sat., lib. i. 3.), Horace employs the same figure, where he says that we "call evil good, and good evil," figuring the sentiment thus:

"At nos virtutes ipsas invertimus, atque Sincerum cupimus vas incrustare"—

meaning, of course, that we bring the vessel into suspicion, by treating it as if it were flawed. Dryden, no doubt, knew the radical meaning of sincere when he wrote the lines cited by Johnson:

"He try'd a tough well-chosen spear; Th' inviolable body stood sincere."

C. MANSFIELD INGLEBY.

Birmingham.

The Saltpetre Man (Vol. viii., p. 225.).—In addition to the curious particulars of this office, I send you an extract from Abp. Laud's Diary:

"December 13, Monday. I received letters from Brecknock; that the saltpeter man was dead and buried the Sunday before the messenger came. This saltpeter man had digged in the Colledge Church for his work, bearing too bold upon his commission. The news of it came to me to London about November 26. I went to my Lord Keeper, and had a messenger sent to bring him up to answer that sacrilegious abuse. He prevented his punishment by death."

JOHN S. BURN.

Major Andre (Vol. viii., p. 174.).—There is in the picture gallery of Yale College, New Haven, Conn., an original sketch of Major Andre, executed by himself with pen and ink, and without the aid of a glass. It was drawn in his guard-room on the morning of the day first fixed for his execution.

J. E.

Longevity (Vol. viii., p. 182.).—A DOUBTER is informed that the National Intelligencer (published at Washington, and edited by Messrs. Gales and Seaton) is the authority for my statement respecting Mrs. Singleton, and her advanced age. If A DOUBTER is desirous of satisfying himself more fully respecting its correctness, he has but {400} to write to the above-named gentlemen, or to the English Consul at Charleston, S. C., and his wish will doubtless be gratified. I cannot but hope that your correspondent's "fifty cents worth of reasons" for doubting my statement is now, or shortly will be, removed.

If A DOUBTER intends to be in New York while the present Exhibition is open, he will have an opportunity of seeing a negro of the age of one hundred and twenty-four, who once belonged to General Washington, and from whom he could very possibly obtain some information respecting the aged "nurse" of the first President of the United States mentioned in his note.

W. W.

Malta.

Passage in Virgil (Vol. viii., p. 370.).—The passage for which your correspondent R. FITZSIMONS makes inquiry is to be found in the Eighth Eclogue, at the 44th and following lines:

"Nunc scio quid sit Amor," &c.

The application by Johnson seems to be so plain as to need no explanation.

F. B—W.

Love Charm from a Foal's Forehead (Vol. viii., p. 292.).—Your correspondent H. P. will find the love charm, consisting of a fig-shaped excrescence on a foal's forehead, and called Hippomanes, alluded to by Juvenal, Sat. VI. 133.:

"Hippomanes, carmenque loquar, coctumque venenum, Privignoque datum?"

And again, 615.:

"ut avunculus ille Neronis, Cui totam tremuli frontem Caesonia pulli Infudit."

It was supposed that the dam swallowed this excrescence immediately on the birth of her foal, and that, if prevented doing so, she lost all affection for it.

However, the name Hippomanes was applied to two other things. Theocritus (II. 48.) uses it to signify some herb which incites horses to madness if they eat of it.

And again, Virgil (Geor. III. 280.), Propertius, Tibullus, Ovid, &c., represent it as a certain virus:

"Hippomanes cupidae stillat ab inguine equae."

The subject is an unpleasant one, and H. P. is referred for farther information to Pliny, VIII. 42. s. 66., and XXVIII. 11. s. 80.

H. C. K.

This lump was called Hippomanes; which also more truly designated, according to Virgil, another thing. The following paragraphs from Mr. Keightley's excellent Notes on Virgil's Bucolics and Georgics will fully explain both meanings:

"Hippomanes, horse-rage: the pale yellow fluid which passes from a mare at that season [i. e. when she is horsing] (cf. Tibul. II. 4. 58.), of which the smell (aura, v. 251.) incites the horse.

"Vero nomine. Because the bit of flesh which was said to be on the forehead of the new-born foal, and which the mare was supposed to swallow, was called by the same name (see AEn. IV. 515.); and also a plant in Arcadia (Theocr. II. 48.). With respect to the former Hippomanes, Pliny, who detailed truth and falsehood with equal faith, says (VIII. 42.) that it grows on the foal's forehead; is of the size of a dried fig (carica), and of a black colour; and that if the mare does not swallow it immediately, she will not let the foal suck her. Aristotle (H. A., VIII. 24.) says this is merely an old wives' tale. He mentions, however, the [Greek: polion], or bit of livid flesh, which we call the foal's bit, and which he says the mare ejects before the foal."—Notes, &c., p. 273. on Georgic. III. 280. ff.

With regard to the plant called Hippomanes, commentators, as may be seen from Kiessling's note on Theocritus, ii. 48., are by no means agreed. Certainly Andrews, in his edition of Freund, is wrong in referring Virgil Georgic. III. 283. to that meaning. The use of legere probably misled.

E. S. JACKSON.

Wardhouse, where was? (Vol. viii., p. 78.).—It probably is the same as Wardoehuus or Vardoehus, a district and town in Norwegian Finmark, on the shores of the Arctic Ocean, inhabited principally by fishermen.

W. C. TREVELYAN.

Wallington.

Divining Rod (Vol. viii., p. 293.).—The inquirer should read the statement made by Dr. Herbert Mayo, in his letters On the Truths contained in Popular Superstitions, 1851, pp. 3-21. To the facts there recorded I may add, that I have heard Mr. Dawson Turner relate that he himself saw the experiment of the divining rod satisfactorily carried out in the hands of Lady Noel Byron; and some account of it is to be found, I believe, in an article by Sir F. Palgrave, in the Quarterly Review.

[mu].

Waugh, Bishop of Carlisle (Vol. viii., p. 271.).—His arms are engraved on a plate dedicated to him by Willis, in his Survey of the Cathedrals of England, 1742, vol. i. p. 284., and appear thus, Argent, on a chevron gules, three besants; but in a MS. collection by the late Canon Rowling of Lichfield, relating to bishops' arms, I find his coat thus given,—Argent, on a chevron engrailed gules, three besants. The variation may have arisen from an error of the engraver. It appears from Willis that Dr. Waugh was a fellow of Queen's College, Oxford; and the entry of his matriculation would no doubt show in what part of England his family resided. He was successively Rector of St. Peter's, Cornhill; Prebendary of Lincoln; Dean of Gloucester; and Bishop of {401} Carlisle; to which latter dignity he was promoted in August, 1723.

[mu].

Pagoda (Vol. v., p. 415.).—The European word pagoda is most probably derived, by transposition of the syllables, from da-go-ba, which is the Pali or Sanscrit name for a Budhist temple. It appears probable that the Portuguese first adopted the word in Ceylon, the modern holy isle of Budhism.

PH.

Rangoon.

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* * * * *

Collection of Autograph Letters.

PUTTICK AND SIMPSON, Auctioneers of Literary Property, will SELL by AUCTION, at their Great Room, 191. Piccadilly, on Wednesday, October 26th, a Small but very Interesting Collection of Autograph Letters and Historical Papers: amongst which are Two Holograph Letters of Oliver Cromwell, many others signed by him; a Letter of Richard Cromwell; a Holograph Letter of Martin Luther; many Interesting and Rare Letters connected with the History of Denmark and Sweden, relating to the affair of Count Struensee, &c.—Catalogues will be sent on application.

* * * * *

CHARACTER FROM HANDWRITING.—MR. WARREN, of 9. Great College Street, Westminster, continues, with great success, to Delineate the Character of Individuals from their Handwriting. All Persons desirous of testing his Art, are invited to forward a Specimen of their ordinary Writing, together with Thirteen Postage Stamps, and a mention of their Sex and Age, to the above Address.

* * * * *

DEAFNESS, CHRONIC OR ACUTE NERVOUS DEAFNESS, SINGING NOISES AND PAINS IN THE EARS.

A NEW DISCOVERY FOR RESTORING HEARING, proved to be perfectly infallible, by which many thousands of sufferers have been instantly enabled to hear the human voice in a low tone without causing one instant's pain, inconvenience, or trouble to a child, or aged nervous sufferer of either sex. This truly important discovery for the cure of deafness, obviating as it does all the former dangerous and fatal operations, has been made by the eminent aurist, DR. DAVID THOMAS, ten years Consulting Surgeon, at 14. Stroud Street, Dover, the first application of which gives immediate relief, restoring the hearing in the most confirmed stages of deafness, whether from old age, nervousness, or any predisposing cause, to which children and adults are subject, and from which deafness follows the heavy affliction of noises in the head and ears, immediately removed by its use. Each sufferer can apply it himself: the proof and result being instantly convincing, as it enables the previously deaf person to hear common tone conversation, who before could only be made to hear by loud shouting in the ear, or by means of a powerful ear-trumpet. It has been applied by the Doctor on hundreds of suffering applicants at most of the ear infirmaries and hospitals, with perfect success, and in many thousands of cases to whom he has sent it many had not heard the human voice for half their life, and some not at all, who by its use alone are now perfectly restored to hearing and the society of their fellow-creatures, and enabled to hear distinctly in a place of worship.—Applicants who send a written statement of their case by letter, inclosing postage stamps or money order for 7s. 6d., directed to DR. DAVID THOMAS, M.R.C.S.L., 14. Stroud Street, Dover, Kent, will receive the means of cure by return of post, with full directions for use. Personal consultation for deafness.

* * * * *

Just published, 12mo. cloth, 5s. Second Edition.

MANUAL OF ASTRONOMY, by JOHN DREW, F.R.A.S., Ph. D.—This work, which is illustrated by 70 engravings on wood and stone, is intended for readers who are not extensively acquainted with mathematics. It conveys a general knowledge of the stupendous phenomena of nature, including all the modern discoveries down to the present time; directs those who possess telescopes how to use them, what objects to look for in the heavens, and where they are to be found; and gives familiar directions for the use and adjustment of the transit instrument, astronomical circle, and equatorial. It is peculiarly fitted for a text-book in schools, and is a good introduction for those who wish to obtain a knowledge of the present state of astronomical science.

"A very good little manual, with a number of well-engraved maps and diagrams, and written in a brief and clear style, yet with sufficient fulness to preserve it from dryness."—Guardian.

London: GEORGE BELL, 186. Fleet Street.

* * * * *

Second Edition, considerably enlarged, 14s.

VARRONIANUS: a Critical and Historical Introduction to the Ethnography of Ancient Italy, and the Philological Study of the Latin Language. By J. W. DONALDSON, D.D., Head Master of King Edward's Grammar School, Bury St. Edmund's.

By the same Author, Second Edition, 8vo. much enlarged, 18s.

THE NEW CRATYLUS; Contributions towards a more Accurate Knowledge of the Greek Language.

London: JOHN W. PARKER & SON. Cambridge: DEIGHTON.

* * * * *

Cheap Editions, crown 8vo., 4s. 6d. each, of

ARCHBISHOP WHATELY'S LOGIC.

WHATELY'S RHETORIC.

Also, demy 8vo. Editions of WHATELY'S LOGIC AND RHETORIC (10s. 6d. each); printed uniformly with the Author's other Works.

London: JOHN W. PARKER & SON, West Strand.

* * * * *

Post 8vo., 6s.

THEOPHILI EPISCOPI ANTIOCHENSIS LIBRI TRES AD AUTOLYCUM. Edidit Prolegomenis Versione Notulis Indicibus Instruxit GULIELMUS GILSON HUMPHRY, S.T.B., Collegi Sanctiss. Trin. Ap. Cantabrigienses Socius. Jussu Syndicorum Preli Academici, Cantabrigiae.

London: JOHN W. PARKER & SON, West Strand.

* * * * *

CRABB'S DICTIONARY.

The Fifth Edition, corrected, enlarged, and brought down to the present time, by the REV. HENRY DAVIS, M.A., illustrated with 700 Engravings. Crown 8vo., cloth, price 9s.

A DICTIONARY OF GENERAL KNOWLEDGE, comprising an Explanation of Words and Things connected with Literature and Science, &c., by GEORGE CRABB, A.M.

London: WILLIAM TEGG & CO., 85. Queen Street, Cheapside.

* * * * *

Just published,

THE SHAKSPEARE REPOSITORY, No. IV., price Fourpence; or by post on receipt of Six Stamps, containing the following highly interesting Articles:—-viz. Shakspeare and the Spanish Invasion—Shakspeare, the Poet Catholic—Old Notes on Shakspeare (now first published)—Bartholomew Fair in Edward the Second's Reign—German Works on Shakspeare, &c. &c.

Published by JAMES H. FENNELL, 1. Warwick Court, Holborn, London. {403}

* * * * *

WESTERN LIFE ASSURANCE AND ANNUITY SOCIETY,

3. PARLIAMENT STREET, LONDON.

Founded A.D. 1842.

Directors.

H. E. Bicknell, Esq. T. S. Cocks, Jun. Esq. M.P. G. H. Drew, Esq. W. Evans, Esq. W. Freeman, Esq. F. Fuller, Esq. J. H. Goodhart, Esq. T. Grissell, Esq. J. Hunt, Esq. J. A. Lethbridge, Esq. E. Lucas, Esq. J. Lys Seager, Esq. J. B. White, Esq. J. Carter Wood, Esq.

Trustees.

W. Whateley, Esq., Q.C.; George Drew, Esq.; T. Grissell, Esq.

Physician.—William Rich. Basham, M.D.

Bankers.—Messrs. Cocks, Biddulph, and Co., Charing Cross.

VALUABLE PRIVILEGE.

POLICIES effected in this Office do not become void through temporary difficulty in paying a Premium, as permission is given upon application to suspend the payment at interest, according to the conditions detailed on the Prospectus.

Specimens of Rates of Premium for Assuring 100l., with a Share in three-fourths of the Profits:—

Age L s. d. 17 1 14 4 22 1 18 8 27 2 4 5 32 2 10 8 37 2 18 6 42 3 8 2

ARTHUR SCRATCHLEY, M.A., F.R.A.S., Actuary.

Now ready, price 10s. 6d., Second Edition, with material additions, INDUSTRIAL INVESTMENT and EMIGRATION: being a TREATISE on BENEFIT BUILDING SOCIETIES, and on the General Principles of Land Investment, exemplified in the Cases of Freehold Land Societies, Building Companies, &c. With a Mathematical Appendix on Compound Interest and Life Assurance. By ARTHUR SCRATCHLEY, M.A., Actuary to the Western Life Assurance Society, 3. Parliament Street, London.

* * * * *

PHOTOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION.—An EXHIBITION of PICTURES, by the most celebrated French, Italian, and English Photographers, embracing Views of the principal Countries and Cities of Europe, is now OPEN. Admission 6d. A Portrait taken by MR. TALBOT'S Patent Process, One Guinea; Three extra Copies for 10s.

PHOTOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION, 168. NEW BOND STREET.

* * * * *

DAGUERREOTYPE MATERIALS.—Plates, Cases, Passepartoutes, Best and Cheapest. To be had in great variety at

M^cMILLAN'S Wholesale Depot, 132. Fleet Street.

Price List Gratis.

* * * * *

BENNETT'S MODEL WATCH, as shown at the GREAT EXHIBITION, No. 1. Class X., in Gold and Silver Cases, in five qualities, and adapted to all Climates, may now be had at the MANUFACTORY, 65. CHEAPSIDE. Superior Gold London-made Patent Levers, 17, 15, and 12 guineas. Ditto, in Silver Cases, 8, 6, and 4 guineas. First-rate Geneva Levers, in Gold Cases, 12, 10, and 8 guineas. Ditto, in Silver Cases, 8, 6, and 5 guineas. Superior Lever, with Chronometer Balance, Gold, 27, 23, and 19 guineas. Bennett's Pocket Chronometer, Gold, 50 guineas; Silver, 40 guineas. Every Watch skilfully examined, timed, and its performance guaranteed. Barometers, 2l., 3l., and 4l. Thermometers from 1s. each.

BENNETT, Watch, Clock, and Instrument Maker to the Royal Observatory, the Board of Ordnance, the Admiralty, and the Queen,

65. CHEAPSIDE.

* * * * *

INDIGESTION, CONSTIPATION, NERVOUSNESS, &c.—BARRY, DU BARRY & CO.'S HEALTH-RESTORING FOOD for INVALIDS and INFANTS.

THE REVALENTA ARABICA FOOD, the only natural, pleasant, and effectual remedy (without medicine, purging, inconvenience, or expense, as it saves fifty times its cost in other remedies) for nervous, stomachic, intestinal, liver and bilious complaints, however deeply rooted, dyspepsia (indigestion), habitual constipation, diarrhoea, acidity, heartburn, flatulency, oppression, distension, palpitation, eruption of the skin, rheumatism, gout, dropsy, sickness at the stomach during pregnancy, at sea, and under all other circumstances, debility in the aged as well as infants, fits, spasms, cramps, paralysis, &c.

A few out of 50,000 Cures:—

Cure, No. 71, of dyspepsia; from the Right Hon. the Lord Stuart de Decies:—"I have derived considerable benefit from your Revalenta Arabica Food, and consider it due to yourselves and the public to authorise the publication of these lines.—STUART DE DECIES."

Cure, No. 49,832:—"Fifty years' indescribable agony from dyspepsia, nervousness, asthma, cough, constipation, flatulency, spasms, sickness at the stomach and vomitings have been removed by Du Barry's excellent food.—MARIA JOLLY, Wortham Ling, near Diss, Norfolk."

Cure, No. 180:—"Twenty-five years' nervousness, constipation, indigestion, and debility, from which I had suffered great misery and which no medicine could remove or relieve, have been effectually cured by Du Barry's food in a very short time.—W. R. REEVES, Pool Anthony, Tiverton."

Cure, No. 4,208:—"Eight years' dyspepsia, nervousness, debility, with cramps, spasms, and nausea, for which my servant had consulted the advice of many, have been effectually removed by Du Barry's delicious food in a very short time. I shall be happy to answer any inquiries.—REV. JOHN W. FLAVELL, Ridlington Rectory, Norfolk."

Dr. Wurzer's Testimonial.

"Bonn, July 19, 1852.

"This light and pleasant Farina is one of the most excellent, nourishing, and restorative remedies, and supersedes, in many cases, all kinds of medicines. It is particularly useful in confined habit of body, as also diarrhoea, bowel complaints, affections of the kidneys and bladder, such as stone or gravel; inflammatory irritation and cramp of the urethra, cramp of the kidneys and bladder, strictures, and hemorrhoids. This really invaluable remedy is employed with the most satisfactory result, not only in bronchial and pulmonary complaints, where irritation and pain are to be removed, but also in pulmonary and bronchial consumption, in which it counteracts effectually the troublesome cough; and I am enabled with perfect truth to express the conviction that Du Barry's Revalenta Arabica is adapted to the cure of incipient hectic complaints and consumption.

"DR. RUD WURZER,

"Counsel of Medicine, and practical M. D. in Bonn."

London Agents:—Fortnum, Mason & Co., 182. Piccadilly, purveyors to Her Majesty the Queen; Hedges & Butler, 155. Regent Street; and through all respectable grocers, chemists, and medicine venders. In canisters, suitably packed for all climates, and with full instructions, 1lb. 2s. 9d.; 2lb. 4s. 6d.; 5lb. 11s.; 12lb. 22s.; super-refined, 5lb. 22s.; 10lb. 33s. The 10lb. and 12lb. carriage free, on receipt of Post-office order.—Barry, Du Barry Co., 77. Regent Street, London.

IMPORTANT CAUTION.—Many invalids having been seriously injured by spurious imitations under closely similar names, such as Ervalenta, Arabaca, and others, the public will do well to see that each canister bears the name BARRY, DU BARRY & Co., 77. Regent Street, London, in full, without which none is genuine.

* * * * *

PHOTOGRAPHIC PICTURES.—A Selection of the above beautiful Productions (comprising Views in VENICE, PARIS, RUSSIA, NUBIA, &c.) may be seen at BLAND & LONG'S, 153. Fleet Street, where may also be procured Apparatus of every Description, and pure Chemicals for the practice of Photography in all its Branches.

Calotype, Daguerreotype, and Glass Pictures for the Stereoscope.

*** Catalogues may be had on application.

BLAND & LONG, Opticians, Philosophical and Photographical Instrument Makers, and Operative Chemists, 153. Fleet Street.

* * * * *

PHOTOGRAPHY.—HORNE & CO.'S Iodized Collodion, for obtaining Instantaneous Views and Portraits in from three to thirty seconds, according to light.

Portraits obtained by the above, for delicacy of detail rival the choicest Daguerreotypes, specimens of which may be seen at their Establishment.

Also every description of Apparatus, Chemicals, &c. &c. used in this beautiful Art.—123. and 121. Newgate Street.

* * * * *

IMPROVEMENT IN COLLODION.—J. B. HOCKIN & CO., Chemists, 289. Strand. have, by an improved mode of Iodizing, succeeded in producing a Collodion equal, they may say superior, in sensitiveness and density of Negative, to any other hitherto published; without diminishing the keeping properties and appreciation of half tint for which their manufacture has been esteemed.

Apparatus, pure Chemicals, and all the requirements for the practice of Photography. Instruction in the Art.

* * * * *

PHOTOGRAPHIC CAMERAS.—OTTEWILL'S REGISTERED DOUBLE-BODIED FOLDING CAMERA, is superior to every other form of Camera, for the Photographic Tourist, from its capability of Elongation or Contraction to any Focal Adjustment, its extreme Portability, and its adaptation for taking either Views or Portraits.—The Trade supplied.

Every Description of Camera, or Slides, Tripod Stands, Printing Frames, &c., may be obtained at his MANUFACTORY, Charlotte Terrace, Barnsbury Road, Islington.

New Inventions, Models, &c., made to order or from Drawings.

* * * * *

PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS, in Complete Sets, in Portable Cabinets, at moderate prices.

SMALL SET, price 7l. 7s., containing every requisite for taking Landscapes and Pictures of inanimate objects, to a size not exceeding 7 by 6 inches.

LARGE SET, price 11l., for Pictures up to 10 by 8 inches.—N. B. A Collodion Picture made by each set is given with it, to show the quality of the Lenses.

Every article for taking either Landscapes or Portraits on Silver, Paper, or Glass, may be had of the undersigned. An illustrated priced Catalogue of Photographic Apparatus, price 3d., Post Free.

JOHN J. GRIFFIN, Chemist and Optician. 10. Finsbury Square (Manufactory, 119. and 120. Bunhill Row), removed from Baker Street, London.

* * * * *

CYANOGEN SOAP, for removing all kinds of Photographic Stains. Beware of purchasing spurious and worthless imitations of this valuable detergent. The genuine is made only by the inventor, and is secured with a red label pasted round each pot, bearing this signature and address:—

RICHARD W. THOMAS, Chemist, Manufacturer of Pure Photographic Chemicals, 10. Pall Mall, and may be procured of all respectable Chemists in pots at 1s., 2s., and 3s. 6d. each, through MESSRS. EDWARDS, 67. St. Paul's Churchyard, and MESSRS. BARCLAY & CO., Farringdon Street, Wholesale Agents. {404}

* * * * *

CHEAP AND POPULAR EDITIONS OF STANDARD AUTHORS.

ABERCROMBIE'S INTELLECTUAL POWERS. 6s. 6d.

ABERCROMBIE ON THE MORAL FEELINGS. 4s.

DAVY'S SALMONIA. 6s.

DAVY'S CONSOLATIONS IN TRAVEL. 6s.

REV. GEORGE CRABBE'S LIFE. 3s.

COLERIDGE'S TABLE-TALK. 6s.

COLERIDGE'S GREEK CLASSIC POETS. 5s. 6d.

BELL ON THE HAND. 7s. 6d.

LAYARD'S POPULAR ACCOUNT OF NINEVEH. 5s.

WILKINSON'S POPULAR ACCOUNT OF THE ANCIENT EGYPTIANS. (Shortly.)

JESSE'S GLEANINGS IN NATURAL HISTORY. 6s. 6d.

JESSE'S SCENES AND OCCUPATIONS OF COUNTRY LIFE. (Shortly.)

PHILOSOPHY IN SPORT. 7s. 6d.

SOMERVILLE'S PHYSICAL SCIENCES. 10s. 6d.

SOMERVILLE'S PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY. 12s.

JAMES' EDITION OF AESOP'S FABLES. 2s. 6d.

HEBER'S POETICAL WORKS. 7s. 6d.

REJECTED ADDRESSES. 5s.

BYRON'S POETICAL WORKS. 8 vols. 2s. 6d. each.

MAHON'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND. 5 vols. 6s. each.

JOHN MURRAY, Albemarle Street.

* * * * *

THE QUARTERLY REVIEW, No. CLXXXVI., is published THIS DAY.

Contents:

I. THE INSTITUTE OF FRANCE. II. MURDER OF THOMAS A BECKET. III. THE DAUPHIN IN THE TEMPLE. IV. THE HOLY PLACES. V. DIARY OF CASAUBON. VI. ELECTRO-BIOLOGY, MESMERISM, AND TABLE-TURNING. VII. LIFE OF HAYDON.

JOHN MURRAY, Albemarle Street.

* * * * *

Now ready, MURRAYS MODERN DOMESTIC COOKERY BOOK. A New and Cheaper Edition, most carefully revised and improved. With 100 Woodcuts. Price FIVE SHILLINGS, strongly bound.

*** Of this Popular Work more than 210,000 Copies have been sold.

JOHN MURRAY, Albemarle Street.

* * * * *

NOTICE.

CHEAP RE-ISSUE OF EVELYN'S DIARY AND CORRESPONDENCE.

IN FOUR MONTHLY VOLUMES, price only 6s. each, bound, printed uniformly with the last edition of "Pepys' Diary."

On the 1st of November, with the Magazines, will be published, the First Volume of the Cheap Re-Issue of the New, Revised Edition of "THE DIARY AND CORRESPONDENCE OF JOHN EVELYN, F.R.S.;" comprising all the important additional Notes, Letters, and other Illustrations last made, consequent on the re-examination of the original MS.

"We rejoice to welcome this beautiful and compact edition of Evelyn—one of the most valuable and interesting works in the language—now deservedly regarded as an English classic."—Examiner.

"This work is a necessary companion to the popular histories of our country—to Hume, Hallam, Macaulay, and Lingard."—Sun.

Published for HENRY COLBURN, by his successors, HURST & BLACKETT, 13. Great Marlborough Street.

* * * * *

MURRAY'S RAILWAY READING.

This Day, with Woodcuts, fcap. 8vo., 1s.

HISTORY OF THE GUILLOTINE. By the RIGHT HON. JOHN WILSON CROKER. Reprinted, with Additions, from "The Quarterly Review."

The last Volume published, contained—

ANCIENT SPANISH BALLADS: HISTORICAL AND ROMANTIC. By J. G. LOCKHART.

To be followed by— POPULAR ACCOUNT OF THE ANCIENT EGYPTIANS. By SIR J. G. WILKINSON. With 500 Woodcuts.

JOHN MURRAY, Albemarle Street.

* * * * *

Just published, demy 8vo. pp. 129, price 2s. 6d.

THE PRISON AND THE SCHOOL. The Chief ascertained Causes of Crime considered, with Suggestions for the Care, Relief, and Reformation of the Neglected, Destitute, and Criminal Children of the Metropolis. By EDMUND EDWARD ANTROBUS, F.S.A., Justice of the Peace for the County of Middlesex, and City and Liberty of Westminster; Visiting Justice of the House of Correction, Westminster.

London: STAUNTON & SONS, 9. Strand.

* * * * *

Now ready, post 8vo., cloth, price 6s. 6d.

CURIOSITIES OF LONDON LIFE; or Phases, Physiological and Social, of the Great Metropolis. By C. M. SMITH, Author of "The Working Man's Way in the World." May be had at all the Libraries.

Just published, post 8vo., cloth, price 5s.

THE WORKING MAN'S WAY IN THE WORLD; or the AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A JOURNEYMAN PRINTER.

London: W.& F. G. CASH, 5. Bishopsgate Street Without.

* * * * *

COMPLETION OF THE WORK, cloth 1s.; by post, 1s. 6d., pp. 192.—WELSH SKETCHES, THIRD (and last) SERIES. By the Author of "Proposals for Christian Union." Contents: 1. Edward the Black Prince. 2. Owen Glendower, Prince of Wales. 3. Mediaeval Bardism. 4. The Welsh Church.

"Will be read with great satisfaction, not only by all sons of the principality, but by all who look with interest on that portion of our island in which the last traces of our ancient British race and language still linger."—Notes and Queries.

London: JAMES DARLING, 81. Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields.

* * * * *

NEW EDITION OF THE ANABASIS BY ARNOLD AND BROWNE.

Now ready, in 12mo., price 6s. 6d.

XENOPHON'S ANABASIS. With ENGLISH NOTES, translated (with Additions) from the German of DR. HERTLEIN, by the late REV. T. K. ARNOLD, M.A., Rector of Lyndon, and the REV. HENRY BROWNE, M.A., Canon of Chichester. (Forming a New Volume of Arnold's "School Classics.")

Books IV. to VII. of this Edition are contained in Mr. Arnold's "Fourth Greek Book."

RIVINGTONS, Waterloo Place.

Lately published, by the same Editor, VIRGILII AENEIS. With English Notes from Duebner. 6s.

* * * * *

BISHOP BUTLER'S REMAINS.

In 8vo., price 1s. 6d. (by post 1s. 10d.)

SOME REMAINS (hitherto unpublished) of JOSEPH BUTLER, LL.D., sometime Lord Bishop of Durham, Author of "The Analogy of Religion."

RIVINGTONS, Waterloo Place.

* * * * *

PIFFERI AND TURNER'S NEW INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN.

In 12mo., price 5s. 6d.

THE FIRST ITALIAN BOOK: on the Plan of the REV. T. K. ARNOLD'S First French Book. By SIGNOR PIFFERI, Professor of Italian, and DAWSON W. TURNER, M.A., Head Master of the Royal Institution School, Liverpool.

RIVINGTONS, Waterloo Place.

Of whom may be had, by the late REV. T. K. ARNOLD, M.A.

1. THE FIRST FRENCH BOOK, on the Plan of Henry's First Latin Book. Third Edition. 5s. 6d.

2. THE FIRST GERMAN BOOK, upon the same Plan. Third Edition. 5s. 6d.

* * * * *

Just published, price 1s.

THE STEREOSCOPE,

Considered in relation to the Philosophy of Binocular Vision. An Essay, by C. MANSFIELD INGLEBY, M.A., of Trinity College, Cambridge.

London: WALTON & MABERLEY, Upper Gower Street, and Ivy Lane, Paternoster Row. Cambridge: J. DEIGHTON.

Also, by the same Author, price 1s.,

REMARKS on some of Sir William Hamilton's Notes on the Works of Dr. Thomas Reid.

"Nothing in my opinion can be more cogent than your refutation of M. Jobert."—Sir W. Hamilton.

London: JOHN W. PARKER, West Strand. Cambridge: E. JOHNSON. Birmingham: H. C. LANGBRIDGE.

* * * * *

Printed by THOMAS CLARK SHAW, of No. 10. Stonefield Street, in the Parish of St. Mary, Islington, at No. 5. New Street Square, in the Parish of St. Bride, in the City of London; and published by GEORGE BELL, of No. 186. Fleet Street, in the Parish of St. Dunstan in the West, in the City of London, Publisher, at No. 186. Fleet Street aforesaid.—Saturday, October 22. 1853.

THE END

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