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Miss Parloa's New Cook Book
by Maria Parloa
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Nesselrode Pudding.

One pint of shelled almonds, one pint and a half of shelled chestnuts, one pint of cream, a pint can of pineapple, the yolks of ten eggs, half a pound of French candied fruit, one table-spoonful of vanilla extract, four of wine, one pint of water, one of sugar. Boil the chestnuts half an hour; then rub off the black skins, and pound in the mortar until a paste. Blanch the almonds, and pound in the same manner. Boil the sugar, water and juice from the pineapple for twenty minutes in a sauce-pan. Beat the yolks of the eggs, and stir them into the syrup. Put the sauce-pan in another of boiling water and beat the mixture, with an egg beater, until it thickens. Take off, place in a basin of cold water, and beat for ten minutes. Mix the almonds and chestnuts with the cream, and rub all through a sieve. Add the candied fruit and the pineapple, cut fine. Mix this with the cooked mixture. Add the flavor and half a teaspoonful of salt. Freeze the same as ice cream.

Lemon Sherbet.

The juice of five lemons, one pint of sugar, one quart of water, one table-spoonful of gelatine. Soak the gelatine in a little of the water. Boil one cupful of the water and dissolve the gelatine in it. Mix together the sugar, water, gelatine and lemon juice. Turn into the can, and freeze. This is light and creamy.

Lemon. Sherbet, No. 2.

One pint and a half of sugar, three pints of water, the juice of ten lemons. Boil the sugar and water together twenty-five minutes. Add the lemon juice, and strain and freeze. This makes a smooth, rich sherbet.

Orange Sherbet.

Make this the same as the lemon, using, however, ten oranges. In the spring, when oranges are not very acid, add the juice of a lemon.

Orange Sherbet, No. 2.

Make the same as lemon sherbet, No. 2, but use the juice of twenty oranges instead of ten lemons. Boil the syrup for this dish thirty minutes.

Pineapple Sherbet.

A pint-and-a-half can of pineapple, or, if fresh fruit is used, one large pineapple; a small pint of sugar, a pint of water, one table- spoonful of gelatine. Soak the gelatine one or two hours in cold water to cover. Cut the hearts and eyes from the fruit, chop it fine, and add to the sugar and the juice from the can. Have half of the water hot, and dissolve the gelatine in it. Stir this and the cold water into the pineapple. Freeze. This sherbet will be white and creamy.

Pineapple Sherbet, No. 2.

Two small cans of pineapple, one generous pint of sugar, one quart of water. Pour the juice of the pineapple into a bowl. Put the fruit in a sauce-pan with half the water, and simmer twenty minutes. Put the sugar and the remainder of the water on to boil. Cook fifteen minutes. Rub the cooked pineapple through a sieve and add it to the boiling syrup. Cook fifteen minutes longer. Add the juice, and cool and freeze.

Strawberry Sherbet.

Two quarts of strawberries, one pint of sugar, one pint and a half of water, one table-spoonful of gelatine. Mash the berries and sugar together, and let them stand two hours. Soak the gelatine in cold water to cover. Add one pint of the water to the strawberries, and strain. Dissolve the gelatine in half a pint of boiling water, add this to the strained mixture, and freeze.

Strawberry Sherbet, No. 2.

One pint and a half of strawberry juice, one pint of sugar, one pint and a half of water, the juice of two lemons. Boil the water and sugar together for twenty minutes. Add the lemon and strawberry juice. Strain, and freeze.

Raspberry Sherbet.

This sherbet is made the same as the strawberry. When raspberries are not in season, use the preserved or canned fruit and a smaller quantity of sugar. The juice of a lemon or two is always an improvement, but is not necessary. The sherbet can also be made by following the second rule for strawberry sherbet.

Raspberry Sherbet, No. 2.

One bottle of German raspberries (holding a little more than a pint, and costing about $1.25), one cupful of sugar, one quart of water, the juice of two lemons. Mix all together, strain, and freeze.

Currant Sherbet.

One pint of currant juice, one pint and a half of water, the juice of one lemon, one pint of sugar, one table-spoonful of gelatine. Have the gelatine soaked in cold water, and dissolve it in half a pint of boiling water. Mix it with the pint of cold water, the sugar, lemon and currant juice, and freeze.

Currant Sherbet, No. 2.

One pint of sugar, one quart of water, one pint of currant juice, the juice of a lemon. Boil the water and sugar together half an hour. Add the currant and lemon juice to the syrup. Let this cool, and freeze.

Frozen Strawberries.

Two quarts of fresh strawberries, one pint of sugar, one quart of water. Boil the water and sugar together half an hour; then add the strawberries, and cook fifteen minutes longer. Let this cool, and freeze. When the beater is taken out add one pint of whipped cream. Preserved fruit can be used instead of the fresh. In this case, to each quart of preserves add one quart of water, and freeze.

Frozen Raspberries.

Prepare raspberries the same as strawberries. When cold, add the juice of three lemons; and freeze. All kinds of canned and preserved fruits can be prepared and frozen in any of the three ways given.

Frozen Peaches.

One can of peaches, one heaping pint of granulated sugar, one quart of water, two cupfuls of whipped cream. Boil the sugar and water together twelve minutes; then add the peaches, and cook twenty minutes longer. Rub through a sieve; and when cool, freeze. When the beater is taken out, stir in the whipped cream with a large spoon. Cover, and set away until serving time. It should stand one hour at least.

Frozen Apricots.

One can of apricots, a generous pint of sugar, a quart of water, a pint of whipped cream—measured after being whipped. Cut the apricots in small pieces, add the sugar and water, and freeze. When nearly frozen add the cream.

Biscuit Glace.

Mix together in a deep bowl or pail one pint of rich cream, one-third of a cupful of sugar and one teaspoonful of vanilla extract. Put the mixture in a pan of ice water and whip to a stiff froth. Stir this down, and whip again. Skim the froth into a deep dish. When all the cream has been whipped to a froth, fill paper cases with it, and place these in a large tin box (or, the freezer will do,) that is nearly buried in ice and salt—two quarts of salt to six of ice—and is wholly covered after the cases are put in. Let these remain there two hours. Make a pint of strawberry sherbet. Put a thin layer of it on each case of cream, and return to the freezer. Let the cases stand half an hour longer, and serve. They should be arranged on a bright napkin, spread on a flat dish.

Biscuit Glace, No. 2.

One pint of cream, whipped to a froth; a dozen and a half macaroons, three eggs, half a cupful of water, two-thirds of a cupful of sugar, a teaspoonful of vanilla extract. Boil the sugar and water together for half an hour. Beat the eggs well, and stir into the boiling syrup. Place the sauce-pan containing the mixture in another of boiling water, and beat for eight minutes. Take from the fire, place the sauce-pan in a pan of cold water, and beat the mixture until it is cold; then add the flavor and whipped cream. Stir well, and fill paper cases. Have the macaroons browned and rolled fine. Put a layer of the crumbs on the cream in the cases, and freeze as directed in the other recipe.

Chocolate Souffle.

Two cupfuls of milk, one and a half squares of Baker's chocolate, three-fourths of a cupful of powdered sugar, two table-spoonfuls of corn-starch, three eggs, one-fourth of a teaspoonful of salt, half a teaspoonful of vanilla extract. Boil the milk in the double boiler, leaving out a third of a cupful to mix with the corn-starch. After mixing, stir into the boiling milk, and cook eight minutes. Dissolve the chocolate with half a cupful of the sugar and two table-spoonfuls of boiling water. Add to the other mixture. Beat the yolks and add them and the salt. Cook two minutes. Set in cold water, and beat until cool; then add the flavor, and pour into a dish. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, add the remaining sugar, and heap on the custard. Dredge with sugar. Brown with a salamander or hot shovel.

Orange Souffle.

A pint of milk, five eggs, one-fourth of a cupful of granulated sugar and three table-spoonfuls of powdered, five Florida oranges and a speck of salt. Put the milk on to boil. Beat the yolks of five eggs and whites of two with the granulated sugar. Pour the milk, gradually, over this, stirring all the while. Return to the sauce-pan, place in a basin of boiling water, and stir until it begins to thicken like soft custard. This will be about two minutes. Add the salt, and set away to cool. Pare the oranges, remove the seeds, cut up fine, and put in a glass dish. Pour on the cold custard. Just before serving beat the three remaining whites of eggs to a stiff froth, and beat in the powdered sugar. Heap this on the custard, and brown with a hot shovel or a salamander.

Surprise Souffle.

One pint of the juice of any kind of fruit, one-third of a package of gelatine, half a cupful of sugar (unless the fruit is very acid, in which case use a little more), one pint of soft custard, ten macaroons, half a cupful of water. Soak the gelatine two hours in a little of the water. Let the remainder of the water come to a boil, and pour it on the soaked gelatine. Place the basin in another of hot water and stir until all the gelatine is dissolved. Strain this into the fruit juice. Add the sugar. Place the basin in a pan of ice water, and as soon as the mixture begins to thicken, beat with a whisk until it hardens; then place in the ice chest for a few hours. Brown the macaroons in a cool oven. Let them cool and roll them fine. At serving time put the custard in a souffle dish. Heap the jelly on this, and cover all with the macaroon crumbs.

Omelet Souffle a la Creme.

Four eggs, two table-spoonfuls of sugar, a speck of salt, half a teaspoonful of vanilla' extract, one cupful of whipped cream. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, and gradually beat the sugar and the flavor into them. When well beaten, add the yolks, and lastly the whipped cream. Have a dish, holding about one quart, slightly buttered. Pour the mixture into this and bake just twelve minutes. Serve the moment it is taken from the oven.

Omelet Souffle a la Poele.

The whites of eight and yolks of four eggs, two table-spoonfuls of sugar, a speck of salt, two table-spoonfuls of butter, half a teaspoonful of any kind of flavor. Beat the yolks of the eggs, the sugar, salt and flavor together. Beat the whites to a stiff froth. Stir this in with the beaten yolks. Have a large omelet pan very hot. Put one table-spoonful of butter in this, and pour in half the mixture. Shake rapidly for a minute; then fold, and turn on a hot dish. Put the remainder of the butter and mixture in the pan, and proceed as before. Turn this omelet on the dish by the side of the other. Dredge lightly with sugar, and place in the oven for eight minutes. Serve the moment it comes from the oven.

Charlotte Russe.

Ten eggs, one cupful of sugar, four table-spoonfuls of wine, one of vanilla extract, a package of gelatine, one and a half cupfuls of milk, one pint of cream. Soak the gelatine in half a cupful of the milk. Beat the yolks of the eggs and the sugar together, and put in the double boiler with the remaining milk. Stir until the mixture begins to thicken; then add the gelatine, and strain into a large tin basin. Place this in a pan of ice water, and when it begins to cool, add the whites of the eggs, well beaten, the wine and flavor, and the whipped cream. Mix thoroughly, and pour into moulds that have been lined with sponge cake. Set away to harden. With the quantities given two quart moulds can be filled. The lining may be one piece of sponge cake, or strips of it, or lady-fingers. The wine may be omitted.

Charlotte Russe, No. 2.

One pint of rich cream, one teaspoonful of vanilla flavor, one- third of a cupful of sugar. Mix all together in a tin pail and place in a basin of ice water. Whip the cream to a stiff froth, and skim, into a colander. When nearly whipped, return to the pail that which has drained through the colander, and whip it again. Have a quart mould lined with stale sponge cake. Fill it with whipped cream and set in the ice chest for an hour or two.

Apple Charlotte.

One scant pint of apples, steamed, and rubbed through a sieve; one- third of a box of gelatine, soaked an hour in one-third of a cupful of cold water; one cupful of sugar, the juice of a large lemon, the whites of three eggs. Pour half a cupful of boiling water upon the gelatine, stir until thoroughly dissolved, and pour upon the apple; then add the sugar and lemon juice. Place in a basin of ice water, and beat until it begins to thicken. Add the whites of the eggs, beaten to a stiff froth. Pour into a two-quart mould, which has been lined with sponge cake, and put on ice to harden. Make a soft custard of the yolks of the eggs, one pint of milk and three table-spoonfuls of sugar. When the charlotte is turned out on a dish, pour this around.

Calf's Foot Jelly.

Four calf's feet, six quarts of water, the juice of two lemons and rind of one, two cloves, a two-inch piece of stick cinnamon, two cupfuls of sugar, a pint of wine, the whites and shells of two eggs. Wash the feet very carefully and put them on with the cold water. Boil gently until the water is reduced to two quarts; then strain through a napkin, and set away to harden. In the morning scrape off all the fat and wipe the jelly with a clean towel. Break it up and put in a kettle with the other ingredients, having first beaten the whites of the eggs and the shells with half a cupful of cold water. Let the mixture come to a boil slowly, and set back for twenty minutes where it will keep at the boiling point. Strain through a napkin, mould, and set away to harden.

Wine Jelly.

One box of gelatine, half a pint of cold water, a pint and a half of boiling water, one pint of sherry, one of sugar, the juice of a lemon. Soak the gelatine two hours in the cold water. Pour the boiling water on it, and stir until dissolved. Add the lemon juice, sugar and wine. Strain through a napkin, turn into moulds, and, when cold, place in the ice chest for six or eight hours.

One good way to mould this jelly is to pour some of it into the mould, harden it a little, put in a layer of strawberries, pour in jelly to set them, and then enough to make another layer, then put in more berries, and a third layer of jelly, and so continue, until all the jelly has been used.

Cider Jelly.

A box of gelatine, one pint of sugar, a quart and half a pint of cider, half a pint of cold water. Soak the gelatine in the cold water for two hours. Let the cider come to a boil, and pour it on the gelatine. Add the sugar, strain through a napkin, and turn into moulds. When cold, place in the refrigerator for six or eight hours.

Lemon Jelly.

Two cupfuls of sugar, one of lemon juice, one quart of boiling water, one cupful of cold water, a box of gelatine. Soak the gelatine in the cold water for two hours. Pour the boiling water on it, add the sugar and lemon juice, strain through a napkin, mould and harden.

Orange Jelly.

One box of gelatine, one pint of orange juice, the juice of a lemon, one pint of sugar, a pint and a half of boiling water, half a pint of cold water, the white and shell of an egg. Soak the gelatine as for the other jellies. Add the boiling water, sugar, the fruit juice, and the white and shell of the egg, beaten with two table-spoonfuls of cold water. Let the mixture come to a boil, and set back for twenty minutes where it will keep hot, but will not boil. Strain through a napkin. A pretty way to mould this jelly is to fill the mould to the depth of two inches with liquid jelly, and, when this is hardened, put on a layer of oranges, divided into eighths; to pour on a little more jelly, to set the fruit, and then fill up with jelly. Keep in the ice chest for six or eight hours.

Currant Jelly.

Make the same as wine jelly, using a pint of currant juice instead of wine.

Strawberry Jelly.

Three pints of ripe strawberries, a box of gelatine, a pint of sugar, one pint of boiling water, half a pint of cold water, the juice of a lemon. Soak the gelatine for two hours in the cold water. Mash the berries with the sugar, and let them stand two hours. Pour the boiling water on the fruit and sugar. Press the juice from the strawberries and add it and the lemon juice to the dissolved gelatine. Strain through a napkin, pour into moulds, and harden. Raspberry jelly is made in the same way.

Pineapple Jelly.

A pint-and-a-half can of pineapple, a scant pint of sugar, the white and shell of an egg, a box of gelatine, the juice of a lemon, one quart of boiling water, half a pint of cold water. Cut the pineapple in fine pieces, put with the boiling water and simmer gently twenty minutes. Soak the gelatine in the cold water for two hours. Add it, the sugar, lemon and pineapple juice, and the white and shell of the egg to the boiling mixture. Let this boil up once, and set back for twenty minutes where it will keep hot, but will not boil. Strain through a napkin, turn into moulds and set away to harden.

Coffee Jelly.

One pint of sugar, one of strong coffee, a pint and a half of boiling water, half a pint of cold water, a box of gelatine. Soak the gelatine two hours in the cold water. Pour the boiling water on it, and when it is dissolved, add the sugar and coffee. Strain, turn into moulds, and set away to harden. This is to be served with sugar and cream.

Soft Custard.

One quart of milk, one scant half teacupful of sugar, half a teaspoonful of salt, the yolks of eight eggs and whites of two, one teaspoonful of lemon or vanilla flavor, or half as much of almond. Beat the sugar and eggs together, and add one cupful of milk. Let the remainder of the milk come to a boil, pour it on the beaten mixture, and put this on the fire in the double boiler. Stir until it begins to thicken, which will be in about five minutes, when add the salt, and set away to cool. When cold, add the flavor. Serve in custard glasses.

Soft Caramel Custard.

One quart of milk, half a cupful of sugar, six eggs, half a teaspoonful of salt. Put the milk on to boil, reserving a cupful. Beat the eggs, and add the cold milk to them. Stir the sugar in a small frying-pan until it becomes liquid and just begins to smoke. Stir it into the boiling milk; then add the beaten eggs and cold milk, and stir constantly until the mixture begins to thicken. Set away to cool. Serve in glasses.

Chocolate Whips.

One quart of milk, one (ounce) square of Baker's chocolate, one generous half cupful of sugar, six eggs, a speck of salt. Scrape the chocolate fine and put it in a small frying-pan with two table- spoonfuls of the sugar and one of boiling water. When dissolved, add it to a pint and a half of the milk, which should be hot in the double boiler. Beat the eggs and the remainder of the sugar together, add the cold milk, and stir into the boiling milk. Stir constantly until it begins to thicken. Add the salt, and set away to cool. Season one pint of cream with two table-spoonfuls of sugar and half a teaspoonful of vanilla extract. Whip to a stiff froth. When the custard is cold, half fill glasses with it, and heap whipped cream upon it. Or, it can be served in one large dish, with the whipped cream on top.

Kisses.

Beat the whites of six eggs to a stiff froth. They should be beaten until so light and dry that they begin to fly off of the beater. Stir in a cupful of powdered sugar, gently and quickly. Spread paraffin paper over three boards, which measure about nine by twelve inches. Drop the mixture by spoonfuls on the boards, having perhaps a dozen on each one. Dry in a warm oven for about three-quarters of an hour; then brown them slightly. Lift from the paper and stick them together at the base by twos. A dozen and a half can be made from the quantities given.

Cream Meringues.

These are made similar to kisses, but are pat on the paper in oblong shape, and dried two hours. Take from the board and, with a spoon, remove all the soft part. Season half a pint of rich cream with a table-spoonful of sugar and one of wine, or a speck of vanilla, and whip it to a stiff froth. Fill the shells with this, and join them. Or, they may be filled with ice cream. If the meringues are exposed to much heat they are spoiled.

Kiss Wafers.

Half a pint of blanched bitter almonds, one heaping cupful of powdered sugar, the whites of six eggs, one-third of a cupful of flour, two table-spoonfuls of corn-starch. Blanch the almonds and pound them in a mortar. As soon as they are a little broken add the white of an egg. Pound until very fine. When there is a smooth paste add the sugar, a little at a time, the whites of two eggs, one at a time, and the flour and corn-starch. When thoroughly mixed, add, by degrees, the three remaining whites. Butter the bottom of a flat baking pan and put the mixture on it in spoonfuls. Spread it very thin, especially in the centre, and bake in a quick oven. The moment the cakes are taken from the oven, roll into the shape of cornucopias. If allowed to cool, they cannot be rolled, and for this reason it is best to bake only half a dozen at a time. When all are shaped, fill with the kiss mixture, made by beating the whites of three eggs to a stiff froth, and stirring into them, lightly, four table-spoonfuls of powdered sugar. Place the wafers in a warm oven for twenty minutes or half an hour, to dry. With the quantities given two dozen can be made.

Brier Hill Dessert.

Stew one quart of blackberries with one quart of sugar and half a cupful of water. They should cook only fifteen minutes. When cold, serve with powdered cracker and sugar and cream. The cracker and berries should be in separate dishes.

Richmond Maids of Honor.

In the little town of Richmond, England, is a small pastry shop widely known for its cheese cakes. It is said that the original recipe for them was furnished by a maid of Queen Elizabeth, who had a palace at Richmond. In the neighboring city of London the cakes are in great demand, and the popular opinion there is that the only place to get them is the shop mentioned, where they are made somewhat as follows:

One cupful of sweet milk, one of sour, one of sugar, a lemon, the yolks of four eggs, a speck of salt. Put all the milk in the double boiler and cook until it curds; then strain. Rub the curd through a sieve. Beat the sugar and yolks of eggs together, and add the rind and juice of the lemon and the curd. Line little patty pans with puff or chopped paste, rolled very thin. Put a large spoonful of the mixture in each one, and bake from fifteen to twenty minutes in a moderate oven. Do not remove from the pans until cold. These are nice for suppers or lunches as well as for dessert.

Fanchonettes.

One cupful of sugar, half a cupful of water, one table-spoonful of corn-starch, one teaspoonful of butter, the yolks of four eggs, the juice and rind of two lemons. Mix the cornstarch with a little cold water, and stir in half a cupful of boiling water. Beat the sugar, eggs and lemon together, and stir into the boiling corn-starch. Place the basin in another of boiling water, and stir (over the fire) until it thickens, perhaps from eight to ten minutes; then add the butter and set away to cool. Line little patty pans with puff paste, or any rich paste, rolled very thin. Put a spoonful of the mixture in each one, and bake in a slow oven from twelve to twenty minutes. When cool, slip out of the pans, and serve on a napkin. They are nice for lunch, tea or children's parties, only for parties make them small. The mixture for fanchonettes will keep a number of weeks in a cool place, so that if one makes a quantity at one time, portions can be used with the trimmings of pastry left from pies.

Fruit Glace.

Boil together for half an hour one cupful of granulated sugar, one of water. Dip the point of a skewer in the syrup, after it has been boiling the given time, and then in water. If the thread formed breaks off brittle the syrup is done. Have oranges pared, divided into eighths and wiped free of moisture. Pour part of the hot syrup into a small cup, which keep in boiling water. Take the pieces of orange on the point of a large needle or skewer and dip them in the syrup. Place them on a dish that has been buttered lightly. Grapes, cherries, walnuts, etc., can be prepared in the same way. Care must be taken not to stir the syrup, as that spoils it.

Gateau Saint Honore.

Make a paste the same as for eclairs. Butter three pie plates. Roll puff or chopped paste very thin, and cover the plates with it. Cut off the paste about an inch from the edge all round the plates. Spread a thin layer of the cooked paste over the puff paste. Put a tube, measuring about half an inch in diameter, in a pastry bag. Turn the remainder of the paste into the bag and press it through the tube on to the edges of the plates, where the puff paste has been cut off. Care must be taken to have the border of equal thickness all round the plates. With a fork, prick holes in the paste in the centre of the plate. Bake half an hour in a moderate oven. When the plates have been put in the oven, make what paste is left in the bag into balls about half the size of an American walnut. There will be enough for three dozen. Drop them into a pan that has been buttered lightly, and bake fifteen or twenty minutes. While they are baking, put half a cupful of water and half a cupful of granulated sugar in a small sauce-pan, and boil twenty-five minutes.

When the little balls and the paste in the plate is done, take the balls on the point of a skewer or large needle, dip them in the syrup and place them on the border of paste (the syrup will hold them), about two inches apart. A word of caution just here: Do not stir the syrup, as that will make it grain, and, of course, spoil it. A good plan is to pour part of the syrup into a small cup, which place in hot water. That remaining in the sauce-pan should be kept hot, but it should not boil, until needed. When all the balls have been used, dip four dozen French candied cherries in the syrup, and stick them between the balls. Reserve about fifteen cherries, with which to garnish the centre of the cake. Whip one pint and a half of cream to a froth. Soak half a package of gelatine in half a cupful of milk for two hours. Pour on this half a cupful of boiling milk. Place the pan of whipped cream in another of ice water, and sprinkle over it two- thirds of a cupful of sugar and nearly a teaspoonful of vanilla flavor. Strain the gelatine on this, and stir gently from the bottom until it begins to thicken. When it will just pour, fill the three plates with it, and set them in the ice chest for half an hour. Garnish the top with the remaining cherries, and serve. This is an excellent dish for dessert or party suppers.



CAKE.

Rice Cake.

One cupful of butter, two of sugar, two and one-fourth of rice flour, six eggs, the juice and rind of a lemon. Beat the butter to a cream; then gradually beat in the sugar, and add the lemon. Beat the yolks and whites separately, and add them to the beaten sugar and butter. Add also the rice flour. Pour into a shallow pan, to the depth of about two inches. Bake from thirty-five to forty-five minutes in a moderate oven.

Silver Cake.

One cupful of sugar, half a cupful of butter, the whites of three eggs, half a cupful of corn-starch, dissolved in nearly half a cupful of milk;—one and a fourth cupfuls of flour, half a teaspoonful of cream of tartar, one-fourth of a teaspoonful of soda, and vanilla or almond flavor. Beat the butter to a cream, and gradually beat in the sugar. Add the flavor. Mix the flour, cream of tartar and soda together, and sift. Beat the whites to a stiff froth. Add the corn- starch and milk to the beaten sugar and butter; then add the whites of the eggs and the flour. Mix quickly and thoroughly. Have the batter in sheets, and about two inches deep. Bake in a moderate oven for about half an hour. A chocolate frosting is nice with this cake. [Mrs. L. C. A.]

Gold Cake.

One cupful of sugar, half a cupful of butter, the yolks of three eggs and one whole egg, half a cupful of milk, one-fourth of a teaspoonful each of soda and cream of tartar, one and three-fourths cupfuls of flour. Mix the butter and sugar together, and add the eggs, milk, flavor and flour, in the order named. Bake the same as the silver cake. A white frosting is good with this cake. [Mrs. L. C. A.]

Angel Cake.

The whites of eleven eggs, one and a half cupfuls of granulated sugar, one cupful of pastry flour, measured after being sifted four times; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, one of vanilla extract. Sift the flour and cream of tartar together. Beat the whites to a stiff froth. Beat the sugar into the eggs, and add the seasoning and flour, stirring quickly and lightly. Beat until ready to put the mixture in the oven. Use a pan that has little legs at the top corners, so that when the pan is turned upside down on the table, after the baking, a current of air will pass under and over it. Bake for forty minutes in a moderate oven. Do not grease the pan.

Sunshine Cake.

This is made almost exactly like angel cake. Have the whites of eleven eggs and yolks of six, one and a half cupfuls of granulated sugar, measured after one sifting; one cupful of flour, measured after sifting; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar and one of orange extract. Beat the whites to a stiff froth, and gradually beat in the sugar. Beat the yolks in a similar manner, and add to them the whites and sugar and the flavor. Finally, stir in the flour. Mix quickly and well. Bake for fifty minutes in a slow oven, using a pan like that for angel cake.

Demon Cake.

One cupful of butter, one of sugar, one of molasses, two eggs, four and one-fourth cupfuls of flour, one table-spoonful of ginger, one of cinnamon, four of brandy, half a grated nutmeg, one teaspoonful of soda, dissolved in two table-spoonfuls of milk; one cupful of currants, and one of preserved ginger, cut in fine strips. Beat the butter to a cream; then beat in the sugar, molasses, brandy and spice. Have the eggs well beaten, and add them. Stir in the soda and flour. Have two pans well buttered, or lined with paraffin paper. Pour the cake mixture, to the depth of about two inches, in each pan. Sprinkle a layer of fruit on it. Cover with a thin layer of the mixture, and add more fruit. Continue this until all the batter and fruit is used. Bake two hours in a moderate oven.

Ames Cake.

One generous cupful of butter, two of sugar, three cupfuls of pastry flour, one small cupful of milk, the yolks of five eggs and whites of three, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, half a teaspoonful of soda, or one and a half teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one teaspoonful of lemon extract, or the juice of one fresh lemon. Beat the butter to a cream. Add the sugar, gradually, then the seasoning, the eggs, well beaten, next the milk and then the flour, in which the soda and cream of tartar are mixed. Mix thoroughly, but quickly, and bake in two sheets in a moderate oven for twenty-five or thirty minutes. Cover with a frosting made by stirring two small cupfuls of powdered sugar into the whites of two eggs, and seasoning with lemon.

Black Cake.

Three cupfuls of butter, one quart of sugar, three pints of flour, half a pint of molasses, half a pint of brandy, half a pint of wine, one teaspoonful of saleratus, one ounce each of all kinds of spices, twelve eggs, three pounds of raisins, two of currants, half a pound of citron. Bake in deep pans, in a moderate oven, between three and four hours. This is one of the best of rich cakes.

Fruit Cake.

One cupful of butter, two of sugar, three of flour, the whites of eight eggs, half a wine-glass of white wine, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one-fourth of a pound of citron, cut fine; half a pound of chopped almonds, one tea-cupful of dessicated cocoanut. Beat the butter to a cream, and gradually beat in the sugar, and then the wine. Beat the eggs to a stiff froth, and stir into the butter and sugar. Add the flour, which is thoroughly mixed with the baking powder, and lastly the fruit. Bake, in two loaves, forty minutes in a moderate oven.

Wedding Cake.

Nine cupfuls of butter, five pints of sugar, four quarts of flour, five dozen of eggs, seven pounds of currants, three and a half of citron, four of shelled almonds, seven of raisins, one and a half pints of brandy, two ounces of mace. Bake in a moderate oven for two hours or more. This will make eight loaves, which will keep for years.

Lady's Cake.

Three-fourths of a cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, half a cupful of milk, three cupfuls of pastry flour, the whites of six eggs, one teaspoonful of baking powder, one teaspoonful of essence of almond. Beat the butter to a cream. Add the sugar, gradually, then the essence, milk, the whites of eggs, beaten to a stiff froth, and the flour, in which the baking powder has been mixed. Bake in one large pan or two small ones, and frost, or not, as you please. If baked in sheets about two inches deep, it will take about twenty-five minutes in a moderate oven.

Queen's Cake.

One cupful of butter, a pint of sugar, a quart of flour, four eggs, half a gill of wine, of brandy and of thin cream, one pound of fruit, spice to taste. Warm the liquids together, and stir quickly into the beaten sugar, butter and egg; add the flour; finally add the fruit. Bake in deep pans in a moderate oven.

Composition Cake.

One and one-half quarts of flour, half a pint of sour milk, one pint of butter, three-fourths of a quart of sugar, eight eggs, one wine- glass of wine and one of brandy, one scant teaspoonful of soda, one cupful of raisins, stoned and chopped; two pounds of currants, half a pound of citron, a nutmeg, two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, one of allspice, one of mace, half a teaspoonful of clove. Beat the butter to a cream, and add the sugar, gradually, the well-beaten eggs, the spice, wine and brandy. Dissolve the soda in a table-spoonful of hot water; stir into the sour milk, and add to the other ingredients. Then add the flour, and lastly the fruit. Bake two hours in well-buttered pans in a moderate oven. This will make three loaves.

Ribbon Cake.

Two cupfuls of sugar, one of butter, one of milk, four of flour (rather scant), four eggs, half a teaspoonful of soda, one of cream of tartar. Beat the butter to a cream. Add the sugar, gradually, beating all the while; then the flavoring (lemon or nutmeg). Beat the eggs very light. Add them and the milk. Measure the flour after it has been sifted. Return it to the sieve, and mix the soda and cream of tartar with it. Sift this into the bowl of beaten ingredients. Beat quickly and vigorously, to thoroughly mix, and then stop. Take three sheet pans of the same size, and in each of two put one-third of the mixture, and bake. To the other third add four teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, a cupful of currants and about an eighth of a pound of citron, cut fine. Bake this in the remaining pan. When done, take out of the pans. Spread the light cake with a thin layer of jelly, while warm. Place on this the dark cake, and spread with jelly. Place the other sheet of light cake on this. Lay a paper over all, and then a thin sheet, on which put two irons. The cake will press in about two hours.

Regatta Cake.

Two pounds of raised dough, one pint of sugar, one cupful of butter, four eggs, a nutmeg, a glass of wine, a teaspoonful of saleratus, one pound of raisins. Mix thoroughly, put in deep pans that have been thoroughly greased, and let it rise half an hour, if in very warm weather, or fifteen minutes longer, if in cold weather. Bake in a moderate oven.

Nut Cake.

One cupful of sugar, half a cupful of butter, half a cupful of milk, two cupfuls of pastry flour, two eggs, one coffee-cupful of chopped raisins, one of chopped English walnuts, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, half a teaspoonful of soda. Beat the butter to a cream. Add the sugar, gradually, and when light, the eggs, well beaten, then the milk and the flour, in which the soda and cream of tartar have been thoroughly mixed. Mix quickly, and add the raisins and nuts. Bake in rather deep sheets, in a moderate oven, for thirty-five minutes. Frost, if you please. The quantities given are for one large or two small sheets. If you use baking powder, instead of cream of tartar and soda, take a teaspoonful and a half.

Snow Flake Cake.

Half a cupful of butter, one and a half of sugar, two of pastry flour, one-fourth of a cupful of milk, the whites of five eggs, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, half a teaspoonful of soda, or a teaspoonful and a half of baking-powder, the juice of half a lemon. Beat the butter to a cream. Gradually add the sugar, then the lemon, and when very light, the milk, and whites of the eggs, beaten to a stiff froth; then the flour, in which the soda and cream of tartar are well mixed. Bake in sheets in a moderate oven. When nearly cool, frost.

Frosting: The whites of three eggs, two large cupfuls of powdered sugar, half a grated cocoanut, the juice of half a lemon. Beat the whites to a stiff froth. Add the sugar, gradually, and the lemon and cocoanut. Put a layer of frosting on one sheet of the cake. Place the other sheet on this, and cover with frosting. Or, simply frost the top of each sheet, as you would any ordinary cake. Set in a cool place to harden.

Federal Cake.

One pint of sugar, one and a half cupfuls of butter, three pints of flour, four eggs, two wine-glasses of milk, two of wine, two of brandy, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, half a teaspoonful of saleratus, fruit and spice to taste. Bake in deep pans, the time depending on the quantity of fruit used.

Sponge Rusks.

Two cupfuls of sugar, one of butter, two of milk, one of yeast, three eggs. Rub the butter, sugar and eggs together. Add the milk and yeast, and flour enough to make a thick batter. Let this stand in a warm place until light, and then add flour enough to make as thick as for biscuit. Shape, and put in a pan in which they are to be baked, and let them stand two or three hours (three hours unless the weather is very warm). Bake about forty minutes in a moderate oven. It is always best to set the sponge at night, for it will then be ready to bake the following forenoon. If the rusks are wanted warm for tea, the sponge must, of course, be set early in the morning.

Taylor Cake.

Half a cupful of butter, two and a half of sugar, one of milk, three and a half of pastry flour, three eggs, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, half a teaspoonful of soda, flavor to taste. Beat the butter to a cream, then beat in the sugar, next the eggs, well beaten; the seasoning, the milk, and lastly the flour, in which the soda and cream of tartar have been thoroughly mixed. Bake in a moderate oven, either in loaves or sheets. If in sheets, twenty-five minutes; if in loaves, forty-five. The quantities given are for two loaves or sheets. This cake is nice for Washington or chocolate pies, and is good baked in sheets and frosted.

Loaf Cake.

Two quarts of sugar, seven cupfuls of butter, six quarts of sifted flour, six pounds of fruit, one pint of wine, one pint of yeast, eight nutmegs, mace, twelve eggs, one quart of milk. It should be made at such an hour (being governed by the weather) as will give it time to get perfectly light by evening. It should stand about six hours in summer and eight in whiter.

Put in half the butter and eggs, and the milk, flavor and yeast, and beat thoroughly. In the evening add the remainder of the butter, rubbing it with the sugar, the rest of the eggs, and the spice. Let the cake rise again, until morning; then add the fruit. Put in deep pans, and let rise about half an hour. Bake from two to three hours in a slow oven.

Chocolate Cake.

One and a half cupfuls of sugar, half a cupful of butter, half a cupful of milk, one and three-fourths cupfuls of flour, a quarter of a pound of Baker's chocolate, three eggs, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, half a teaspoonful of soda. Scrape the chocolate fine, and add five table-spoonfuls of sugar to it (this in addition to the cupful and a half). Beat the butter to a cream. Gradually add the sugar, beating all the while. Add three table-spoonfuls of boiling water to the chocolate and sugar. Stir over the fire until smooth and glossy; then stir into the beaten sugar and butter. Add to this mixture the eggs, well beaten, then the milk and the flour, in which the soda and cream of tartar have been thoroughly mixed. Bake twenty minutes in a moderate oven. This will make two sheets. Frost it, if you like.

Chocolate Cake, No. 2.

One cupful of butter, two of sugar, three and a half of Sour, one of milk, five eggs—the whites of two being left out, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar and half a teaspoonful of soda, or one and a half of baking powder. Beat the butter to a cream. Add the sugar, gradually, then the eggs, well beaten, the milk, next the flour, in which the soda and cream of tartar have been well mixed. Bake in two sheets for thirty minutes in a moderate oven, and ice.

Icing: The whites of two eggs, one and a half cupfuls of powdered sugar, six table-spoonfuls of grated chocolate, one teaspoonful of vanilla. Put the chocolate and six table-spoonfuls of the sugar in a sauce-pan with two spoonfuls of hot water. Stir over a hot fire until smooth and glossy. Beat the whites to a froth, and add the sugar and chocolate.

Orange Cake.

Two cupfuls of sugar, a small half cupful of butter, two cupfuls of flour, half a cupful of water, the yolks of five eggs and whites of four, half a teaspoonful of soda, a teaspoonful of cream of tartar, the rind of one orange and the juice of one and a half. Beat the butter to a cream. Add the sugar, gradually, then the orange, the eggs, well beaten, the water and the flour, in which the soda and cream of tartar have been well mixed. Bake in sheets for twenty-five minutes, in a moderate oven, and when cool, frost.

Frosting: The white of an egg, the juice of one and a half oranges and the grated rind of one, one cupful and a half of powdered sugar, unless the egg and oranges are very large, in which case use two cupfuls.

Railroad Cake.

Two cupfuls of sugar, two of flour, six table-spoonfuls of butter, two of milk, six eggs, one teaspoonful of saleratus, two of cream of tartar, lemon peel. Bake in shallow pans in a quick oven.

Hot Water Sponge Cake.

Six eggs, two cupfuls of sugar, two of pastry flour, half a cupful of boiling water, the grated rind of half a lemon, and one teaspoonful of the juice. Beat the yolks and sugar to a froth; also, beat the whites to a stiff froth. Add the lemon to the yolks and sugar, then add the boiling water, next the whites, and, last of all, the flour. Mix quickly, and bake in two sheets for half an hour, in a moderate oven.

Sponge Cake.

Ten eggs, two and a half cupfuls of sugar, two and a half of pastry flour, the juice and grated rind of one lemon. Beat the yolks and sugar together until very light. Add the lemon. Beat the whites to a stiff froth. Stir the flour and this froth alternately into the beaten yolks and sugar. Have the batter about three inches deep in the pan. Sprinkle with sugar, and bake three-quarters of an hour in a moderate oven. If the batter is not so deep in the pan it will not take so long to bake.

Sponge Cake, No. 2.

The yolks of a dozen eggs and whites of eight, one and three-fourths cupfuls of sugar, the same quantity of flour, the rind of one lemon and juice of two. Beat the yolks and sugar together. Add the lemon rind and juice and beat a little longer. Beat the whites to a stiff froth, and add them to the mixture. Gradually stir in the flour. Pour the mixture into a baking pan to the depth of about two inches. Bake from thirty-five to forty minutes in a slow oven.

Viennois Oakes.

Cut any kind of plain cake into small squares. Cut a small piece from the centre of each square, and fill the cavity with some kind of marmalade or jelly. Replace the crust part that was removed, and cover with icing. These cakes are nice for dessert.

Dominos.

Have any kind of sponge cake baked in a rather thin sheet. Cut this into small oblong pieces, the shape of a domino. Frost the top and sides of them. When the frosting is hard, draw the black lines and make the dots with a small brush that has been dipped in melted chocolate. These are particularly good for children's parties.

Lady-Fingers.

Four eggs, three-fourths of a cupful of pastry flour, half a cupful of powdered sugar. Have the bottom of three large baking pans covered with paraffin paper or sheets of buttered note paper. Beat the yolks of the eggs and the sugar to a froth. Beat the whites to a stiff, dry froth, and add to the yolks and sugar. Add the flour, and stir quickly and gently. Pour the mixture into the pastry bag, and press it through on to the paper in the shape and of the size you wish. When all the mixture has been used, sprinkle powdered sugar on the cakes, and bake from twelve to sixteen minutes in a very slow oven.

Caution. The mixture must be stirred, after the flour is added, only enough to mix the flour lightly with the sugar and eggs. Much stirring turns the mixture liquid. If the oven is hot the fingers will rise and fall, and if too cool they will spread. It should be about half as hot as for bread.

You will not succeed in using the pastry bag the first time, but a little practice will make it easy to get the forms wished. There are pans especially for baking lady-fingers. They are quite expensive.

Sponge Drops.

Make the batter the same as for lady-fingers, and drop on the paper in teaspoonfuls. Sprinkle with sugar. Bake in a slow oven from twelve to sixteen minutes.

Sponge Drops, No. 2.

Three eggs, one and a half cupfuls of sugar, two of flour, half a cupful of cold water, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, half a teaspoonful of saleratus. Beat the sugar and eggs together. Add the water when they are light, and then the flour, in which mix the saleratus and cream of tartar. Flavor with lemon. Have muffin cups very lightly buttered, and drop a teaspoonful of the mixture into each one. Bake in a quick oven. These drops are nice for dessert or tea.

Sponge Cake for Charlotte Russe.

Line the bottoms of two shallow baking pans with paraffin Paper or buttered paper, and spread the lady-finger mixture on it. Bake slowly eighteen minutes. Cut paper to fit the sides of the mould. When the cake is cold, lay this pattern on it and cut with a sharp knife.

Jelly Roll.

Make the sponge cake mixture as for lady-fingers, and bake in one shallow pan twenty minutes. While it is yet warm, cut off the edges, and spread the cake with any kind of jelly. Roll up, and pin a towel around it. Put in a cool place until serving time. Cut in slices with a sharp knife.

Molasses Pound Coke.

One quart of molasses, one pint of water, six and a half pints of flour, one ounce of soda, half an ounce of alum, one heaping cupful of butter, six eggs, one ounce of cinnamon, one pound of raisins. Boil the alum in part of the pint of water, and let it cool before mixing with the other ingredients. Instead of alum, one ounce of cream of tartar may be used.

Soft Gingerbread.

Six cupfuls of flour, three of molasses, one of cream, one of lard or butter, two eggs, one teaspoonful of saleratus, and two of ginger. This is excellent.

Hard Gingerbread.

One cupful of sugar, one of butter, one-third of a cupful of molasses, half a cupful of sour milk or cream, one teaspoonful of saleratus, one table-spoonful of ginger, flour enough to roll. Roll thin, cut in oblong pieces, and bake quickly. Care must be taken that too much flour is not mixed in with the dough. All kinds of cakes that are rolled should have no more flour than is absolutely necessary to work them.

Canada Gingerbread.

One cupful of butter, two of sugar, one of molasses, five of flour, three eggs, one nutmeg, one teaspoonful of ginger, one of soda, one tea-cupful of cream or rich milk, one table-spoonful of cinnamon, one pound of currants. Beat the butter to a cream. Add the sugar, molasses and spice; next the eggs, well beaten; then the milk, in which the soda has been dissolved, next the flour; and lastly the currants. This will make three sheets, or two very thick ones. Bake in a moderately- quick oven, if in three sheets, twenty five minutes; if in two sheets, ten minutes longer.

Fairy Gingerbread.

One cupful of butter, two of sugar, one of milk, four of flour, three- fourths of a teaspoonful of soda, one table-spoonful of ginger. Beat the butter to a cream. Add the sugar, gradually, and when very light, the ginger, the milk, in which the soda has been dissolved, and finally the flour. Turn baking pans upside down and wipe the bottoms very clean. Butter them, and spread the cake mixture very thin on them; Bake in a moderate oven until brown. While still hot, cut into squares with a case-knife and slip from the pan. Keep in a tin box. This is delicious. With the quantities given a large dish of gingerbread can be made. It must be spread on the bottom of the pan as thin as a wafer and cut the moment it comes from the oven.

Shewsbury Cake.

Two cupfuls of butter, one pint of sugar, three pints of flour, four eggs, half a teaspoonful of mace. Roll thin, cut into small cakes, and bake in a quick oven. Not a particle more of flour than what is given above must be used. The cakes should be made in a rather cool room, and they cannot be made in very warm weather. They can be kept a long time, and are delicious.

Jumbles.

Three cupfuls of sugar, two of butter, five of flour, one egg, half a teaspoonful of soda, flavor to taste. Roll thin, sprinkle with sugar, cut in round cakes, and cut a small piece from the centre of each. Bake in a quick oven.

Seed Cakes.

Three-fourths of a pint of sugar, one cupful of butter, a quart and half a pint of flour, one teaspoonful of saleratus, two eggs, and seeds. Roll thin, cut in round cakes, and bake quickly.

Cookies.

One cupful of butter, two of sugar, five of flour, a teaspoonful of saleratus, dissolved in four of milk; one egg, flavor to taste. Roll and bake like seed cakes.

Hermits.

Two cupfuls of sugar, one of butter, one of raisins (stoned and chopped), three eggs, half a teaspoonful of soda, dissolved in three table-spoonfuls of milk; a nutmeg, one teaspoonful each of clove and cinnamon, and six cupfuls of flour. Roll about one-fourth of an inch thick, and cut with a round cake cutter. Bake in a rather quick oven. It will take about twelve minutes. [Mrs. L. C. A.]

Kneaded Plum Cake.

Two and a half cupfuls of sugar, half a cupful of butter, half a cupful of sour milk, two spoonfuls of cream, a teaspoonful of saleratus, half a spoonful of cinnamon and of nutmeg, a cupful of chopped raisins, and flour enough to knead (about six cupfuls). Roll an inch thick, and cut in oblong pieces. Bake on sheets in a quick oven.

Eclairs.

Put one cupful of boiling water and half a cupful of butter in a large sauce-pan, and when it boils up, turn in one pint of flour. Beat well with the vegetable masher. When perfectly smooth, and velvety to the touch, remove from the fire. Break five eggs into a bowl. When the paste is nearly cold, beat the eggs into it with the hand. Only a small part of the eggs should be added at a time. When the mixture is thoroughly beaten (it will take about twenty minutes), spread on buttered sheets in oblong pieces about four inches long and one and a half wide. These must be about two inches apart. Bake in a rather quick oven for about twenty-five minutes. As soon as they are done, ice with either chocolate or vanilla frosting. When the icing is cold, cut the eclairs on one side and fill them.

Chocolate Eclairs.

Put one cupful and a half of milk in the double boiler. Beat together two-thirds of a cupful of sugar, one-fourth of a cupful of flour, two eggs, and one-fourth of a teaspoonful of salt. Stir the mixture into the boiling milk. Cook fifteen minutes, stirring often. When cold, flavor with one teaspoonful of vanilla extract. Put two squares of scraped chocolate with five table-spoonfuls of powdered sugar and three of boiling water. Stir over the fire until smooth and glossy. Dip the tops of the eclairs in this as they come from the oven. When the chocolate icing is dry, cut open, and fill with the cream, which should be cold. If a chocolate flavor is liked with the cream, one table-spoonful of the dissolved chocolate may be added to it.

Vanilla Eclairs.

Make an icing with the whites of two eggs and a cupful and a half of powdered sugar. Flavor with one teaspoonful of vanilla extract. Frost the eclairs; and when dry, open, and fill with a cream, the same as chocolate eclairs. They may be filled with cream sweetened, flavored with vanilla and whipped to a stiff froth. Strawberry and raspberry preserves are sometimes used to fill eclairs. They are then named after the fruit with which they are filled.

Frosting.

The white of one egg, one tea-cupful of powdered sugar, one table- spoonful of lemon juice. Put the white of the egg in a bowl and add the sugar by degrees, beating with a spoon. When all has been added, stir in the lemon juice. If the white of the egg is large it will require a very full cup of sugar, and if small, a rather scant cupful. The egg must not be beaten until the sugar is added. This gives a smooth, tender frosting, which will cover one small sheet of cake. The same amount of material, prepared with the whites of the eggs unbeaten, will make one-third less frosting than it will if the eggs are beaten to a stiff froth before adding the sugar; but the icing will be enough smoother and softer to pay for the extra quantity. It may be flavored with half a teaspoonful of vanilla.

Chocolate Icing.

Two squares of Baker's chocolate, the whites of two eggs, two cupfuls of powdered sugar, four table-spoonfuls of boiling water. Beat one and two-thirds cupfuls of the sugar into the unbeaten whites of the eggs. Scrape the chocolate, and put it and the remaining third of a cupful of sugar and the water in a small frying-pan. Stir over a hot fire until smooth and glossy, and then stir into the beaten whites and sugar. With the quantity given two sheets of cake can be iced.

Chocolate Icing, No. 2.

Soak a teaspoonful of gelatine one or two hours in three table- spoonfuls of water. Pour on it one-fourth of a cupful of boiling water, and stir into it one and two-thirds cupfuls of powdered sugar. Prepare two squares of chocolate as for the first icing, and stir them into this mixture. Use immediately.

Caramel Frosting.

One cupful of brown sugar, one square of Baker's chocolate, scraped fine; one table-spoonful of water. Simmer gently twenty minutes, being careful not to let it burn. Spread on the cake while hot.

Golden Frosting.

Into the yolks of two eggs stir powdered sugar enough to thicken, and flavor strongly with lemon. This does not have so good a flavor as other kinds of frosting, but it makes a change.

Marking Cakes in Gold.

Bake round cakes for the children, and when the frosting on them is hard, dip a small brush into the yolk of an egg, and write a word or name upon the cake. It pleases the little ones very much.



PRESERVING.

In using self-sealing glass jars great care must be taken. If the work is properly done the fruit can be kept for years. Have a kettle of hot water on the stove beside the preserving kettle, and also a small dipper of hot water. Plunge a jar into the hot water, having the water strike both inside and outside the jar at the same time. If you set it down instead of plunging it, it will break. Put the cover in the dipper. When the jar is hot, lift it up and pour the water from it into the kettle. Stand the jar in the hot water and fill it with hot fruit from the preserving kettle. Fill to the brim with the hot syrup. Take the cover from the dipper of hot water and screw it on very tightly. In using the jars a second time have the right cover and band for each one. A. large-mouthed tunnel, such as grocers have, is almost indispensible in the work of preserving.

Jellies and jams should be put in tumblers or bowls. A paper should be cut to fit the top, and then wet in brandy, and another paper should be pasted over it Jelly tumblers with glass covers are more convenient than the old-fashioned ones, and where they are used the second paper cover is not necessary. It is better not to cover until some weeks after the jelly is made. White crushed sugar is much the nicest for preserving. If jelly does not seem hard, as it should be the day after it is made, it can be set in the sun for several hours, which will help it greatly.

Strawberries.

To each pound of berries allow half a pound of sugar. Put the berries in a kettle, and mash them a little, so that there will be juice enough to cook them without using water. Stir them to prevent scorching. Cook fifteen minutes; then add the sugar, and let them boil hard one minute. Put them in the jars as directed. More or less sugar may be used, as one prefers.

Raspberries.

To each pound of berries allow three-fourths of a pound of sugar, and cook the same as the strawberries.

Cherries.

Cherries may be preserved either with or without stones. Many think the stones give a richer flavor. To each pound of cherries allow one third of a pound of sugar. Put the sugar in the kettle with half a pint of water to three pounds of sugar. Stir it until it is dissolved. When boiling, add the cherries, and cook three minutes; then put in the jars.

Currants.

Currants should be prepared the same as raspberries.

Pineapple.

Pare the fruit, and be sure you take out all the eyes and discolored parts. Cut in slices, and cut the slices in small bits, taking out the core. Weigh the fruit, and put in a pan with half as many pounds of sugar as of fruit. Let it stand over night In the morning put it over the fire and let it boil rapidly for a minute only, as cooking long discolors it. Put it in the jars as directed.

Grated Pineapple.

Pare the fruit clean; then grate it on a coarse grater, rejecting the cores. Weigh it, and put to each pound of fruit a pound of sugar. Let it stand over night. In the morning boil for a minute, and it is done. Put it in jars as directed.

Blackberries.

Blackberries are prepared like strawberries. If they are quite ripe, not quite so much sugar is needed.

Whortleberries.

To each quart of berries allow one-third of a pound of sugar, and half a pint of water to three pounds of sugar. Put the water and sugar over the fire, and when boiling hot, add the berries. Cook three minutes. Put in the jars as directed.

Crab-Apples.

To each pound of fruit allow half a pound of sugar, and a pint of water to three pounds of sugar. When the syrup is boiling hot, drop in the apples. They will cook very quickly. When done, fill a jar with the fruit, and fill it up with syrup.

Pears.

Pare the fruit and cut in halves. Throw into cold water, or they will be discolored. Use one pound of sugar for three of fruit, and one quart of water for three pounds of sugar. When the syrup is boiling, take the pears from the water, and drop into the syrup. Cook until they can be pierced easily with a silver fork. Fill the jars with fruit, and fill up to the brim with syrup, using a small strainer in the tunnel, that the syrup may look clear. Bartlett pears are delicious, as are, also, Seckel; but many other varieties are good.

Peaches.

Have ready a kettle of boiling water. Fill a wire basket with peaches and plunge them into the boiling water. In two minutes take them out, and the skins will come off easily. Drop the fruit into cold water, to keep the color. For three pounds of fruit use one pound of sugar, and one pint of water for three pounds of sugar. When the syrup is boiling hot, take the fruit from the water, and drop into it. Put but a few in at a time, as they cook very quickly. Take them from the syrup with a silver fork, fill the jar, and fill up with strained syrup. Peaches are much nicer preserved whole, as the stones give a rich flavor.

Brandied Peaches.

The Morris white peaches are the best. Take off the skins with boiling water. To each pound of fruit allow one pound of sugar, and half a pint of water to three pounds of sugar. When the syrup is boiling hot, put in the peaches, and as fast as they cook, take them out carefully and spread on platters. When cool, put them in jars, and fill up these with syrup, using one-half syrup and one-half pale brandy. First-proof alcohol, diluted with an equal quantity of water, can be used, instead of brandy, but it is not, of course, so nice.

Plums.

The large white plums must be skinned by using boiling water, as for peaches, and then throwing them into cold water. For one pound of fruit allow half a pound of sugar, and half a pint of water for three pounds of sugar. Cook but few at a time, and take them out carefully. Fill up the jar with hot syrup.

Damsons.

Wash the fruit, and for one pound of it use half a pound of sugar, and half a pint of water for three pounds of sugar. When the syrup is boiling hot, put in the fruit, and cook three minutes. Dip the plums and syrup together into the jars.

Quinces.

Pare and quarter the fruit, and take out all the cores and the hard place around them. Boil the fruit in clear water until tender; then spread it on towels to dry. For one pound of fruit allow half a pound of sugar, and one pint of water for three pounds of sugar. When the syrup is boiling hot, put in the fruit, and let it cook very slowly; or, set it back on the stove so that it hardly cooks at all, and keep it on for an hour or more, if you can without its cooking to pieces— as the longer it cooks, the brighter red color it will be. Put it in jars, and strain the syrup over it, as with other fruits.

Sour Oranges.

Grate off the rind, cut the orange into two parts, and remove the pulp. Weigh the peel, place it in a large stone pot, and cover with brine made of three gallons of water and a quart of salt. Let it stand twenty-four hours, and drain off the brine. Again cover the peel with brine made of the same quantity of water and half as much salt as was first used, and let it stand another day. Drain, cover with clear cold water, and let it stand a third day. Drain again, and put in a boiler and cover with fresh cold water. Let it come to a boil, and boil fifteen minutes; then take out and drain. Make a syrup of three quarts of sugar and one of water, for every six pounds of peel. When the syrup is clear, drop in the peel and boil until it is clear and tender—perhaps four hours of slow boiling. Great care must be taken that it is not scorched. It must be stirred every fifteen minutes. The sugar may be either white or brown. The orange used is not the common orange, but the wild, sour fruit, found in Florida. The pulp may be used for marmalade.

Grapes.

Squeeze the pulp of the grapes out of the skins. Cook fee pulp (a few minutes) until you can press it all through a sieve. Reject the seeds. Add a little water to the skins, and cook until they are quite tender. Then put the skins and pulp together. Measure; and to each pint add a pound of sugar, and boil fifteen minutes.

Apple Ginger.

Four pounds each of apple and sugar. Make a syrup of the sugar, adding a pint of water. Chop the apple very fine—with one ounce of green ginger; or, if you cannot get the green ginger, use white ginger root Put in the syrup with the grated rind of four lemons, and boil slowly for two hours, or until it looks clear.

Raspberry or Strawberry Jam.

For each pound of fruit allow a pound of sugar. Mash the fruit in the kettle. Boil hard for fifteen minutes; then add the sugar, and boil five minutes.

Orange Marmalade.

Take equal weights of sour oranges and sugar. Grate the yellow rind from a fourth of the oranges. Cut all the fruit in halves at what might be called the "equator." Pick out the pulp, and free it of seeds. Drain off as much juice as you conveniently can, and put it on to boil with the sugar. Let it come to a boil. Skim, and simmer for about fifteen minutes; then put in the pulp and grated rind and boil fifteen minutes longer. Put away in jelly tumblers.

Quince Marmalade.

Cut up quinces—skins, cores and all, cover with water and boil until tender. Rub through a sieve, and to every pint of pulp add one pint of sugar. Boil two hours, stirring often. Peach, crab-apple and, in feet, all kinds of marmalade may be made in the same manner.

Currant Jelly.

Wash the currants clean. Put them in the preserving kettle and mash them, and boil twenty minutes or more, or until they are thoroughly cooked. Dip them, a quart or more at a time, into a strainer cloth, and squeeze out all the juice. Measure this, and for each pint allow one pound of sugar. Put the juice over the fire, and let it boil rapidly for five minutes; then add the sugar, and let it boil rapidly one minute longer. Take off of the fire, skim clear, and put in tumblers.

Barberry Jelly.

The barberries need not be stripped from the stems. Put the fruit in a kettle with water enough to come just to the top of the fruit, and boil until thoroughly cooked. Put in a strainer cloth and get out all the juice. To each pint of it allow one pound of sugar. Boil the juice hard for fifteen minutes. Add the sugar, and boil rapidly five or ten minutes, or until it is thick.

Grape Jelly.

Mash the grapes in a kettle, put them over the fire, and cook until thoroughly done. Drain through a sieve, but do not press through. To each pint of the juice allow one pound of sugar. Boil rapidly for five minutes. Add the sugar, and boil rapidly three minutes more.

Cider Apple Jelly.

Cut good, ripe apples in quarters, put them in a kettle, and cover them with sweet cider, just from the press. (It should, if possible, be used the day it is made—or, at any rate, before it has worked at all.) Boil until well done, and drain, through a sieve. Do not press it through. Measure the liquor, and to each pint add one pound of sugar. Boil from twenty minutes to half an hour.

Crab-Apple Jelly.

Wash the fruit clean, put in a kettle, cover with water, and boil until thoroughly cooked. Then pour it into a sieve, and let it drain. Do not press it through. For each pint of this liquor allow one pound of sugar. Boil from twenty minutes to half an hour.

Other Jellies.

Jellies can be made from quinces, peaches and Porter apples by following the directions for crab-apple jelly.



PICKLES AND KETCHUP.

Pickled Blueberries.

Nearly fill a jar with ripe berries, and fill up with good molasses. Cover, and set away. In a few weeks they will be ready to use.

Sweet Melons.

Use ripe citron melons. Pare them, cut them in slices and remove the seeds. To five pounds of melon allow two and one-half pounds of sugar and one quart of vinegar. The vinegar and sugar must be heated to the boiling point and poured over the fruit six times, or once on each of six successive days. In the last boiling of the syrup add half an ounce of stick cinnamon, half an ounce of white ginger root and a few cloves. When the syrup boils, put in the melon, and boil ten minutes; then put in jars. Skim the syrup clear and pour it over the melon.

Peaches, Pears and Sweet Apples.

For six pounds of fruit use three of sugar, about five dozen cloves and a pint of vinegar. Into each apple, pear or peach, stick two cloves. Have the syrup hot, and cook until tender.

Sweet Tomato Pickle.

One peck of green tomatoes and six large onions, sliced. Sprinkle with one cupful of salt, and let them stand over night. In the morning drain. Add to the tomatoes two quarts of water and one quart of vinegar. Boil fifteen minutes; then drain again, and throw this vinegar and water away. Add to the pickle two pounds of sugar, two quarts of vinegar, two table-spoonfuls of clove, two of allspice, two of ginger, two of mustard, two of cinnamon, and one teaspoonful of cayenne, and boil fifteen minutes.

Spiced Currants.

Make a syrup of three pounds of sugar, one pint of vinegar, two table- spoonfuls of cinnamon, two table-spoonfuls of clove, and half a teaspoonful of salt. Add six pounds of currants, and boil half an hour.

Spiced Plums.

Make a syrup, allowing one pound of sugar to one of plums, and to every three pounds of sugar, a scant pint of vinegar. Allow one ounce each of ground cinnamon, cloves, mace and allspice, to a peck of plums. Prick the plums. Add the spices to the syrup, and pour, boiling, over the plums. Let these stand three days; then skim them out, and boil down the syrup until it is quite thick, and pour hot over the plums in the jar in which they are to be kept. Cover closely.

Pickled Cucumbers.

Six hundred small cucumbers, two quarts of peppers, two quarts of small onions. Make enough brine to cover the pickles, allowing one pint of salt to four quarts of water, and pour it, boiling, over the pickles. Let them stand until the next morning; then pour off the brine, throw it away, make a new one, and scald again. The third morning scald this same brine and pour it over again. The fourth morning rinse the pickles well in cold water, and cover them with boiling vinegar. Add a little piece of alum and two table-spoonfuls each of whole cloves and allspice, tied in a bit of muslin, if you like the spice.

Pickled Cucumbers, No. 2.

Wash and wipe six hundred small cucumbers and two quarts of peppers. Put them in a tub with one and a half cupfuls of salt and a piece of alum as large as an egg. Heat to the boiling point three gallons of cider vinegar and three pints of water. Add a quarter of a pound each of whole cloves, whole allspice and stick cinnamon, and two ounces of white mustard seed, and pour over the pickles. Cover with cabbage leaves.

Stuffed Peppers.

Get large bell peppers. Cut around the stem, remove it, and take out all the seeds. For the stuffing use two quarts of chopped cabbage, a cupful of white mustard seed, three table-spoonfuls of celery seed, two table-spoonfuls of salt, half a cupful of grated horse-radish. Fill each pepper with part of this mixture, and into each one put a small onion and a little cucumber. Tie the stem on again, put the peppers in a jar, and cover with cold vinegar.

Mangoes.

Get small green musk-melons or cantelopes. Cut a small square from the side of each one, and, with a teaspoon, scrape out all the seeds. Make a brine of one pint of salt to a gallon of water. Cover the mangoes with it while it boils. Let them stand two days; then drain them, and stuff with the same mixture as is used for peppers. Pour boiling vinegar over them, using in it a bit of alum.

Chopped Pickle.

One peck of green tomatoes, two quarts of onions and two of peppers. Chop all fine, separately, and mix, adding three cupfuls of salt. Let them stand over night, and in the morning drain well. Add half a pound of mustard seed, two table-spoonfuls of ground allspice, two of ground cloves and one cupful of grated horse-radish. Pour over it three quarts of boiling vinegar.

Pickled Tomato.

One peck of green tomatoes, a dozen onions, sliced thin; two cupfuls of salt, a small (quarter of a pound) box of mustard, one quarter of a pound of mustard seed, one ounce each of ground allspice, clove and pepper. Cut the tomatoes in thin slices, sprinkle with the salt, and let them stand two days; then drain them. Mix the spices. Put layers of tomato, onion and spice in the kettle, and cover with vinegar. Cook slowly until the tomato looks clear—about half an hour.

Pickled Cauliflowers.

Two cauliflowers, cut up; one pint of small onions, three medium-sized red peppers. Dissolve half a pint of salt in water enough to cover the vegetables, and let these stand over night. In the morning drain them. Heat two quarts of vinegar with four table-spoonfuls of mustard, until it boils. Add the vegetables, and boil for about fifteen minutes, or until a fork can be thrust through the cauliflower.

Tomato Ketchup.

Twelve ripe tomatoes, peeled; two large onions, four green peppers, chopped fine; two table-spoonfuls of salt, two of brown sugar, two of ginger, one of cinnamon, one of mustard, a nutmeg, grated; four cupfuls of vinegar. Boil all together till thoroughly cooked (about three hours), stirring frequently. Bottle while hot.

Tomato Ketchup, No, 2.

Skin the tomatoes, and cook them well. Press them through a sieve, and to each five pints add three pints of good cider vinegar. Boil slowly a long while (about two hours), until it begins to thicken; then add one table-spoonful of ground clove, one of allspice, one of cinnamon and one of pepper, and three grated nutmegs. Boil until very thick (between six and eight hours), and add two table-spoonfuls of fine salt. When thoroughly cold, bottle, cork and seal it.

Barberry Ketchup.

Three quarts of barberries, stewed and strained; four quarts of cranberries, one cupful of raisins, a large quince and four small onions, all stewed with a quart of water, and strained. Mix these ingredients with the barberries, and add half a cupful of vinegar, three-fourths of a cupful of salt, two cupfuls of sugar, one dessert- spoonful of ground dove and one of ground allspice, two table- spoonfuls of black pepper, two of celery seed, and one of ground mustard, one tea-spoonful of cayenne, one of cinnamon and one of ginger, and a nutmeg. Let the whole boil one minute. If too thick, add vinegar or water. With the quantities given, about three quarts of ketchup can be made.



POTTING.

For potting, one should have small stone or earthen jars, a little larger at the top than at the bottom, so that the meat may be taken out whole, and then cut in thin slices. All kinds of cooked meats and fish can be potted. The meat must, of course, be well cooked and tender, so that it can be readily pounded to a paste. Of the fish, salmon and halibut are the best for potting. When the potted meat or fish is to be served, scrape off all the butter, run a knife between the meat and the jar, and, when the meat is loosened, turn it out on a dish. Cut it in thin slices, and garnish with parsley; or, serve it whole, and slice it at the table. The butter that covered meats can be used for basting roasted meats, and that which covered fish can be used for basting baking fish.

Beef.

Three pounds of the upper part of the round of beef, half a cupful of butter, one table-spoonful of salt, one-fourth of a teaspoonful of pepper, a speck of cayenne, one-eighth of a teaspoonful of mace, the same quantity of clove, a bouquet of sweet herbs, three table- spoonfuls of water. Cut the meat in small pieces and put it in a jar with the water, herbs and seasoning. Mix one cupful of flour with water enough to make a stiff paste. Cover the mouth of the jar with paper, and spread over this the paste. Place the jar in a pan of hot water and put in a moderate oven for five hours. Take up and remove the cover and herbs. Pound the meat to a paste, add half of the butter to it, and when thoroughly mixed, pack solidly in small jars. Melt the remainder of the butter and pour it over the meat. Paste paper over the jars, put on the covers, and set away in a cool, dry place. Veal may be potted in the same manner, omitting the clove.

Chicken.

One quart of cold roasted chicken, one cupful of cold boiled ham, four table-spoonfuls of butter, a speck of cayenne, a slight grating of nutmeg, and two teaspoonfuls of salt. Free the chicken of skin and bones. Cut it and the ham in fine pieces. Chop, and pound to a paste. Add the butter and seasoning, and pack solidly in small stone pots. Cover these, and place them in a pan of hot water, which put in a moderate oven for one hour. When the meat is cold, cover with melted butter, and put away in a cool, dry place.

Tongue.

Pound cold boiled tongue to a paste, and season with salt, pepper and a speck of cayenne. To each pint of the paste add one table-spoonful of butter and one teaspoonful of mixed mustard. Pack closely in little stone jars. Place these in a moderate oven in a pan of hot water. Cook half an hour. When cool, cover the tongue with melted butter. Cover, and put away.

Ham.

Cut all the meat, fat and lean, from the remains of a boiled ham, being careful not to mix with it either the outside pieces or the gristle. Chop very fine, and pound to a paste with the vegetable masher. To each pint of the paste add one teaspoonful of mixed mustard and a speck of cayenne, and, if there was not much fat on the meat, one table-spoonful of butter, Pack this smoothly in small earthen jars. Paste paper over these, and put on the covers. Place the pots in a baking pan, which, when in the oven, should be filled with hot water. Bake slowly two hours. Cool with, the covers on. When cold, take off the covers and pour melted butter over the meat. Cover again, and set away in a cool place. The ham will keep for months. It is a nice relish for tea, and makes delicious sandwiches.

Marbled Veal.

Trim all the roots and tough parts from a boiled pickled tongue, which chop and pound to a paste. Have two quarts of cold roasted or boiled veal chopped and pounded to a paste. Mix two table-spoonfuls of butter and a speck of cayenne with the tongue, and with the veal mix four table-spoonfuls of butter, one of salt, one-fourth of a teaspoonful of pepper and a speck of mace. Butter a deep earthen dish. Put a layer of the veal in it and pack down solidly; then put spoonfuls of the tongue here and there on the veal, and fill in the spaces with veal. Continue this until all the meat has been used, and pack very solidly. Cover the dish, and place it in the oven in a pan of water. Cook one hour. When cold, pour melted butter over it. Cover, and set away.

Fish.

Take any kind of cooked fish and free it of skin and bones. To each quart of fish add one table-spoonful of essence of anchovy, three of butter, two teaspoonfuls of salt, a little white pepper and a speck of cayenne. Pound the fish to a paste before adding the butter and anchovy. When all the ingredients are thoroughly mixed, pack the fish closely in little size jars. Place these in a pan of water and put in a moderate oven. Cook forty-five minutes. When cold, pour melted butter over the fish. Paste paper over the top, and set way.

Lobster.

Prepare and pot lobster the same as fish. If there is "coral" in the lobster, pound it with the meat.

Mackerel.

Nine pounds of small mackerel (about twenty-five in number), one ounce of whole cloves, one of pepper-corns, one of whole allspice, six teaspoonfuls of salt, three pints of vinegar. Wash the mackerel and pack them in small, deep earthen or stone pots. Three will be needed for the quantities given. Divide the spice into six parts. Put each portion in a small piece of muslin, and tie. Sprinkle two teaspoonfuls of salt on the fish in each pot, and put two of the little bags of spice in each pot. Cover the fish with the vinegar; and if there should not be enough, use more. Cover the pots with old plates, and place in a moderate oven. Bake the fish four hours. Cool, and put away in the pots in which they were baked. They will keep five or six months. Where oil is liked, half a cupful can be added to each pot with the vinegar. Any kind of small fish can be potted in this manner.

Smelts.

Six dozen smelts, one pint of olive oil, three pints of vinegar, or enough to cover the smelts; three table-spoonfuls of salt. Spice the same as potted mackerel, and prepare and cook the same as mackerel. More or less oil can be used. Smelts are almost as nice as sardines.



BREAKFAST AND TEA.

Meat Hash.

Chop rather fine any kind of cold meat; corned beef is, however, the best. To each pint add one pint and a half of cold boiled potatoes, chopped fine; one table-spoonful of butter and one cupful of stock; or, if no stock is on hand, two-thirds of a cupful of hot water. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Put the mixture in a frying-pan, and stir over the fire for about eight minutes, being careful not to burn. Spread smoothly. Cover the pan and set back where the hash will brown slowly. It will take about half an hour. When done, fold it like an omelet and turn on to a hot dish. Garnish with points of toast and parsley. Serve hot. If there are no cold potatoes, the same quantity of hot mashed potatoes may be used.

Vegetable Hash.

Chop, not very fine, the vegetables left from a boiled dinner, and season them with salt and pepper. To each quart of the chopped vegetables add half a cupful of stock and one table-spoonful of butter. Heat slowly in the frying-pan. Turn into a hot dish when done, and serve immediately. If vinegar is liked, two or more table- spoonfuls of it can be stirred into the hash while it is heating.

Breaded Sausages.

Wipe the sausages dry. Dip them in beaten egg and bread crumbs. Put them in the frying-basket and plunge into boiling fat. Cook ten minutes. Serve with a garnish of toasted bread and parsley.

Meat Fritters.

Cut any kind of cold meat into dice. Season well with salt and pepper. Make a fritter batter. Take up some of it in a large spoon, put a small spoonful of the meat in the centre, cover with batter, and slide gently into boiling fat. Cook about one minute. Drain on brown paper, and serve on a hot dish.

Lyonnaise Tripe.

About one pound of cooked tripe, cut in small pieces; two table- spoonfuls of butter, one of chopped onion, one of vinegar, salt, pepper. Put the onion and butter in a frying-pan, and when the onion turns yellow, put in the tripe. Cook five minutes. Season with the salt, pepper and vinegar. Serve on slices of toast.

Meat and Potato Sandwiches.

Any kind of cold meat, cut in slices and seasoned with salt and pepper; four large potatoes, two eggs, salt, pepper, one-forth of a cupful of boiling milk, one table-spoonful of butter. Have the meat cut in thin slices and seasoned with salt and pepper. Pare, boil and mash the potatoes. Add the milk, butter, salt, pepper and one well- beaten egg. Cover the slices of meat on both sides with this preparation, and dip in well-beaten egg. Put in the frying-basket and fry till a light brown. Serve on a hot dish.

Minced Veal and Eggs.

One quart of cold veal, chopped rather coarse; one teaspoonful of lemon juice, one cupful of stock or water, two table-spoonfuls of butter, one teaspoonful of flour, salt, pepper. Melt the butter in a frying-pan. Add the flour to it. Stir until smooth, and add the stock and seasoning. When it boils up, add the chopped veal. Heat thoroughly, and dish on slices of toast. Put a dropped egg in the centre of each slice, and serve very hot.

Mutton, Rechauffe.

Cut cold roasted or boiled mutton in slices about half an inch thick, and cover both sides with sauce made in this way: Put two table- spoonfuls of butter in the frying-pan, and when melted, add one of flour. Stir until smooth. Add, gradually, one cupful of stock, and two table-spoonfuls of glaze. Boil for one minute, and stir in the yolks of two eggs. Season with salt, pepper and one table-spoonful of lemon juice, and remove from the fire at once. Season the mutton with salt and pepper, and as soon as the sauce begins to cool, dip both sides of the slices in it, and roll them in fine bread crumbs. Beat one whole egg and the two whites together. Dip the sauced mutton in this and again in the crumbs. Fry in boiling fat for two minutes. Drain on brown paper, and serve with either tomato, Tartare or Hollandaise sauce. Any kind of cold meat can be served in this manner.

Chicken In Jelly.

A little cold chicken (about one pint), one cupful of water or stock, one-fifth of a box of gelatine, half a teaspoonful of curry powder, salt, pepper. Cut the meat from the bones of a chicken left from dinner. Put the bones on with water to cover, and boil down to one cupful Put the gelatine to soak in one-fourth of a cupful of cold water. When the stock is reduced as much as is necessary, strain and season. Add the curry and chicken. Season, and simmer ten minutes; then add the gelatine, and stir on the table until it is dissolved. Turn all into a mould, and set away to harden. This makes a nice relish for tea or lunch. If you have mushrooms, omit the curry, and cut four of them into dice. Stir into the mixture while cooking. This dish can be varied by using the whites of hard-boiled eggs, or bits of boiled ham. To serve: Dip the mould in warm water, and turn out on the dish. Garnish with parsley.

Chicken Cutlets.

Season pieces of cold chicken or turkey with salt and pepper. Dip in melted butter; let this cool on the meat, and dip in beaten egg and in fine bread crumbs. Fry in butter till a delicate brown. Serve on slices of hot toast, with either a white or curry sauce poured around. Pieces of cold veal make a nice dish, if prepared in this manner.

Broiled Liver.

Cut in slices and dip in melted butter, and lightly in flour. Broil over a bright fire eight or ten minutes.

Liver, Fried in Crumbs.

Season slices with salt and pepper. Dip in beaten egg and very fine cracker crumbs. Fry six minutes in boiling lard.

Liver and Bacon.

Cut in slices, season with salt and pepper, and cut again into small squares. Place on a skewer pieces of liver and bacon, alternating. Fry five minutes in boiling fat. Slip off of the skewer on to toasted bread, and serve immediately.

Liver, Saute.

Cut the liver in thin slices. Season with salt and pepper. Heat together in a small frying-pan two table-spoonfuls of butter and a large one of flour. Lay in the liver, and brown it on both sides. Add a teaspoonful of chopped parsley, two table-spoonfuls of water and one of wine. Taste to see if salt enough. Boil up once, and serve.

Liver, Saute, with Piquant Sauce.

Cut the liver in slices about one-third of an inch thick, and if beef liver, let it stand in warm water ten minutes (calves' livers will not need this). Drain dry, and put in the frying-pan with enough beef or pork drippings to prevent its sticking, and cook very slowly for eight minutes, turning constantly. Take up on a hot dish and pour a piquant sauce over it. Serve immediately.

Curry of Liver.

Cut the liver in small, thin pieces, and for every pound have four table-spoonfuls of butter, two slices of onion, two table-spoonfuls of flour, a speck of cayenne, salt, pepper, one teaspoonful of curry powder. Let the butter get hot; then cook the liver in it slowly for four minutes. Add the flour and other ingredients. Cook two minutes, and add, slowly, one cupful of stock. Let this boil up. Dish, and serve.

Chicken Livers, Saute.

Wash and wipe six livers. Put two table-spoonfuls of butter in the frying-pan, and when hot, add a large slice of onion, which cook slowly ten minutes, and then take out. Dredge the livers with salt, pepper and flour, and fry for ten minutes in the butter; add one teaspoonful of flour, and cook a minute longer. Pour in half a cupful of stock, one tea-spoonful of lemon juice, one of vinegar and one- fourth of a spoonful of sugar, and boil up once. Serve with a garnish of toasted bread.

Chicken Livers and Bacon.

Cut the livers in pieces the size of a half dollar, and have thin slices of bacon of the same size. Nearly fill a small wire skewer with these, alternating. Place in the frying basket and plunge into boiling fat for about one minute. Serve on the skewers, or on toast, with thin slices of lemon for a garnish. Or, the skewers can be rested on the sides of a narrow baking pan and placed in a hot oven for five minutes. Serve as before. The livers of all other kinds of poultry can be cooked the same as chicken.

Chicken Livers in Papillotes.

Wash the livers and drop them into boiling water for one minute. Take them up; and when drained, split them. For eight livers put two table- spoonfuls of butter in the frying-pan, and when hot, add one table- spoonful of flour. Stir until smooth; then gradually add half a cupful of cold water. Stir into this two spoonfuls of glaze, if you have it. Season with pepper and salt, and stir into the sauce half a cupful of finely-chopped ham. Spread this mixture on the livers, place them in papillotes the same as cutlets, lay them in a pan, and put in a slow oven for fifteen minutes. Have little squares of toast or of fried brown bread. Heap these in the centre of a hot dish, and arrange the livers around them. Serve very hot.

Stewed Kidneys.

Cut the kidneys in thin round slices. Cover them with cold water and let them stand half an hour; then wash them clean, and put them in a stew-pan with one quart of water or stock, a clove, two table- spoonfuls of onion juice, and salt and pepper. Simmer two hours. Put one table-spoonful of butter in the frying-pan, and when hot, add one of flour. Stir until it is brown and smooth, and add to the kidneys. Put a small bouquet of sweet herbs in the stew-pan, and simmer half an hour longer. Taste to see if seasoned enough; if not, add more salt and pepper, and, if you like, one table-spoonful of lemon juice. Take out the bouquet, and serve. This dish can be prepared any time in the day, as it is quite as good warmed over as when first prepared.

Kidneys, Saute.

Skin, wash and wipe the kidneys, cut in thin, round slices, and season with salt and pepper. Put one table-spoonful of butter and half a table-spoonful of flour in the frying-pan, and when hot, put in the kidneys. Stir two minutes, then add half a cupful of stock or water. When the dish boils up, add half a table-spoonful of lemon juice. Serve with a garnish of points of toast.

Broiled Kidneys.

Skin, wash, wipe and split sheep's or lambs' kidneys. Run a small skewer through each, to keep it open. Season with salt and pepper, dip in melted butter and in flour, place in the double broiler and cook six minutes over a bright fire. Serve on a hot dish.

Kidneys a la Maitre d'Hotel.

Split and cut in two, lengthwise, lambs' or sheep's kidneys. Wash and wipe them. Season with salt and pepper, and dip in melted butter and fine bread crumbs. Run a small skewer through each, to keep it open. Put them in the double broiler and cook about six minutes over a bright fire. Serve on a hot dish with maitre d'hotel butter.

Ham and Eggs on Toast.

Chop fine the trimmings from cold boiled or roasted ham. Toast and butter slices of stale bread. Spread the ham on these, and place in the oven for about three minutes. Beat six eggs with half a cupful of milk, a little pepper and one teaspoonful of salt. Put this mixture in a sauce-pan with two table-spoonfuls of butter, and stir over the fire until it begins to thicken. Take off, and beat for a moment; then spread on the ham and toast. Serve immediately.

Ham Croquettes.

One cupful of finely-chopped cooked ham, one of bread crumbs, two of hot mashed potatoes, one large table-spoonful of butter, three eggs, a speck of cayenne. Beat the ham, cayenne, butter, and two of the eggs into the potato. Let the mixture cool slightly, and shape it like croquettes. Roll in the bread crumbs, dip in beaten egg and again in crumbs, put in the frying-basket and plunge into boiling fat. Cook two minutes. Drain, and serve.

Canapees.

After cutting the crust from a loaf of stale bread, cut the loaf in very thin slices, and toast to a delicate brown. Butter lightly, and spread with any kind of potted meat or fish. Put two slices together, and, with a sharp knife, cut them in long strips. Arrange these tastefully on a dish and serve at tea or evening parties. Sardines may be pounded to a paste and mixed with the yolks of hard-boiled eggs, also pounded to a paste, and used instead of potted meats. In this case, the slices of bread may be fried in salad oil.

Welsh Rare-Bit.

Half a pound of cheese, two eggs, a speck of cayenne, a table-spoonful of butter, one teaspoonful of mustard, half a teaspoonful of salt, half a cupful of cream. Break the cheese in small pieces and put it and the other ingredients in a bright sauce-pan, which put over boiling water. Stir until the cheese melts; then spread the mixture on slices of crisp toast. Serve immediately. A cupful of ale or beer can be used instead of the cream.

Welsh, Rare-Bit, No. 2.

Grate one pint of cheese. Sprinkle on it half a teaspoonful of mustard, one-fourth of a teaspoonful of salt and a speck of cayenne. Heap this on slices of buttered toast. Put in the hot oven for a few moments, and when the cheese begins to melt, serve at once.

Corn Pie.

Four ears of cold boiled corn, two eggs, one table-spoonful of butter, one of flour, half a cupful of milk, half a teaspoonful of salt, a little pepper. Cut the corn from the cobs. Mix the milk, gradually, with the flour. Beat the yolks and whites of the eggs separately, and add them and the other ingredients to the flour and milk. The butter should be melted. Bake twenty minutes in two squash pie plates. This is a dish for breakfast.

Hominy.

Wash a cupful of hominy in two waters; then stir it into one quart of boiling water, with a teaspoonful of salt, and boil from thirty to sixty minutes. The latter time is the better. Be careful that the hominy does not burn. It can be used more than oatmeal, as it is good with any kind of meat. It is appropriate for any meal, and is nice eaten warm or cold with milk.

Oatmeal.

Oatmeal, Indian meal and hominy an require two things for perfection— plenty of water when put on to boil, and a long time for boiling. Have about two quarts of boiling water in a large stew-pan, and into it stir a cupful of oatmeal, which has been wet with cold water. Boil one hour, stirring often, and then add half a spoonful of salt, and boil an hour longer. If it should get too stiff, add more boiling water; or, if too thin, boil a little longer. You cannot boil too much. The only trouble in cooking oatmeal is that it takes a long time, but surely this should not stand in the way when it is so much better for having the extra time. If there is not an abundance of water at first the oatmeal will not be very good, no matter how much maybe added during the cooking. Cracked wheat is cooked in the same way.

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