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Miss Parloa's New Cook Book
by Maria Parloa
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Potato Souffle.

Six large, smooth potatoes, half a cupful of boiling milk, one table- spoonful of butter, the whites of four eggs, salt and pepper to taste. Wash the potatoes clean, being, careful not to break the skin. Bake forty-five minutes. Take the potatoes from the oven, and with a sharp knife, cut them in two, lengthwise. Scoop out the potato with a spoon, and put it in a hot bowl. Mash light and fine. Add the seasoning, butter and milk, and then half the whites of the eggs. Fill the skins with the mixture. Cover with the remaining white of the egg, and brown in the oven. Great care must be taken not to break the skins.

Sweet Potatoes.

Sweet potatoes require from forty-five to fifty-five minutes to boil, and from one hour to one and a quarter to bake. The time given will make the potatoes moist and sweet If, however, they are preferred dry and mealy, fifteen minutes less will be enough.

French Fried Sweet Potatoes.

Prepare and fry the same as the white potatoes. Or, they can first be boiled half an hour, and then pared, cut and fried as directed. The latter is the better way, as they are liable to be a little hard if fried when raw.

Cold Boiled Sweet Potatoes.

Cut cold boiled sweet potatoes in thick slices, and season well with salt and pepper. Have the bottom of the frying-pan covered with either butter, or pork, ham or chicken fat. Put enough of the sliced potatoes in the pan to just cover the bottom. Brown one side, and turn, and brown the other. Serve in a hot dish. Cold potatoes can be served in cream, cut in thick slices and toasted, cut in thick slices, dipped in egg and bread crumbs and fried brown, and can be fried in batter.

Plain Boiled Macaroni.

Two quarts of boiling water, one table-spoonful of salt, and twelve sticks of macaroni. Break and wash the macaroni, throw it into the salt and water, and boil rapidly for twenty-five minutes. Pour off the water, season with salt, pepper and butter, and serve.

Macaroni in Gravy.

Twelve sticks of macaroni, one and a half pints of stock, one scant table-spoonful of flour, one generous table-spoonful of butter, salt, pepper. Break and wash the macaroni. Put it in a sauce-pan with the stock. Cover, and simmer half an hour. Mix the butter and flour together. Stir this and the seasoning in with the macaroni. Simmer ten minutes longer, and serve. A table-spoonful of grated cheese may be added.

Macaroni with Cream Sauce.

Boil the macaroni as directed for the plain boiled dish. Drain, and serve with half a pint of cream sauce.

Macaroni with Tomato Sauce.

Boil and drain as directed for plain boiled macaroni. Pour over it one pint of tomato sauce.

Macaroni with Cheese.

Prepare the macaroni with the cream sauce. Turn into a buttered escalop dish. Have half a cupful of grated cheese and half a cupful of bread crumbs mixed. Sprinkle over the macaroni, and place in the oven and brown. It will take about twenty minutes.

Macaroni a l'Italienne.

Twelve sticks of macaroni (a quarter of a pound), half a pint of milk, two table-spoonfuls of cream, two of butter, one of flour, some salt, white pepper and cayenne, and a quarter of a pound of cheese. Break and wash the macaroni, and boil it rapidly for twenty minutes in two quarts of water. Put the milk on in the double boiler. Mix the butter and flour together, and stir into the boiling milk. Add the seasoning, cream and cheese. Drain, and dish the macaroni. Pour the sauce over it, and serve immediately. One table-spoonful of mustard can be stirred into the sauce if you like. If the sauce and macaroni are allowed to stand long after they are put together the dish will be spoiled. If they cannot be served immediately, keep both hot in separate dishes.

Stuffed Tomatoes.

Twelve large, smooth tomatoes, one teaspoonful of salt, a little pepper, one table-spoonful of butter, one of sugar, one cupful of bread crumbs, one teaspoonful of onion juice. Arrange the tomatoes in a baking pan. Cut a thin slice from the smooth end of each. With a small spoon, scoop out as much of the pulp and juice as possible without injuring the shape. When all have been treated in this way, mix the pulp and juice with the other ingredients, and fill the tomatoes with this mixture. Put on the tops, and bake slowly three- quarters of an hour. Slide the cake turner under the tomatoes and lift gently on to a flat dish. Garnish with parsley, and serve.

Stuffed Tomatoes, No 2.

Twelve tomatoes, two cupfuls of bread crumbs, one of stock, four table-spoonfuls of butter, one of flour, salt, pepper, one teaspoonful of onion juice. Cut slices from the stem end of the tomatoes. Remove the juice and pulp with a spoon, and dredge the inside with salt and pepper. Put two table-spoonfuls of the butter in a frying-pan, and when hot, stir in the bread crumbs. Stir constantly until they are brown and crisp, and fill the tomatoes with them. Cover the openings with fresh crumbs and bits of butter. Bake slowly half an hour. Fifteen minutes before the tomatoes are done, make the sauce in this manner: Put one table-spoonful of butter in the frying-pan, and when hot, add the flour. Stir until brown and smooth; then add the stock, tomato juice and pulp. Stir until it boils up, and add the onion juice, salt and pepper. Simmer ten minutes, and strain. Lift the tomatoes on to a flat dish, with the cake turner. Pour the sauce around, garnish with parsley, and serve. Any kind of meat, chopped fine and seasoned highly, can be used in place of the crumbs.

Escaloped Tomatoes.

One pint of fresh or canned tomatoes, one generous pint of bread crumbs, three table-spoonfuls of butter, one of sugar, one scant table-spoonful of salt, one-fourth of a teaspoonful of pepper. Put a layer of the tomato in an escalop dish. Dredge with salt and pepper, and dot butter here and there. Now put in a layer of crumbs. Continue this until all the ingredients are used, having crumbs and butter for the last layer. If fresh tomatoes have been used, bake one hour, but if canned, bake half an hour.

Broiled Tomatoes.

Cut the tomatoes in halves. Sprinkle the inside of the slices with fine bread crumbs, salt and pepper. Place them in the double broiler, and broil over the fire for ten minutes, having the outside next the fire. Carefully slip them on a hot dish (stone china), and put bits of butter here and there on each slice. Put the dish in the oven for ten minutes, and then serve. Or, if you have a range or gas stove, brown before the fire or under the gas.

Fried Tomatoes.

Slice ripe tomatoes and dip them in well-beaten eggs, which have been seasoned with salt, pepper and sugar (one teaspoonful of sugar to each egg), and then, in fine bread or cracker crumbs. Have two table- spoonfuls of butter in a frying-pan, and when hot, put in as many slices of tomato as will cover the bottom. Fry for ten minutes, five for each side. Serve on thin slices of toast.

To Peel Tomatoes.

Put the tomatoes in a frying basket and plunge them into boiling water for about three minutes. Drain, and peel.

Baked Onions.

Peel large onions, and boil one hour in plenty of water, slightly salted. Butter a shallow dish or a deep plate, and arrange the onions in it. Sprinkle with pepper and salt, put a teaspoonful of butter in the centre of each onion, and cover lightly with crumbs. Bake slowly one hour. Serve with cream sauce.

Stuffed Onions.

Boil as for baking. Cut out the heart of the onions, and fill the space with any kind of cold meat, chopped fine, and highly seasoned. To each pint of meat add one egg and two-thirds of a cupful of milk or cream. When the onions are filled put a bit of butter (about a teaspoonful) on each one. Cover with crumbs, and bake one hour. Serve with cream sauce.

Parsnips Fried in Butter.

Scrape the parsnips, and boil gently forty-five minutes. When cold, cut in long slices about one-third of an inch thick. Season with salt and pepper. Dip in melted butter and in flour. Have two table- spoonfuls of butter in the frying pan, and as soon as hot, put in enough parsnips to cover the bottom. Fry brown on both sides, and serve on a hot dish.

Parsnips Fried in Molasses.

Have one cupful of molasses in a large frying-pan. When boiling, put in slices of parsnips that have been seasoned with salt, and cooled. Fry brown, and serve hot.

Parsnip Balls.

Mash one pint of boiled parsnips. Add two table-spoonfuls of butter, one heaping teaspoonful of salt, a little pepper, two table-spoonfuls of cream or milk and one beaten egg. Mix all the ingredients except the egg. Stir on the fire until the mixture bubbles; then add the egg, and set away to cool. When cold, make into balls one-third the size of an egg. Dip them in beaten egg and in crumbs. Put in the frying basket and plunge into boiling fat. Cook till a rich brown.

Escaloped Parsnip.

Prepare the parsnips as for the balls, omitting the egg. Turn into a buttered dish, cover with crumbs, dot with butter, and brown in the oven.

Asparagus with Cream.

Have the asparagus tied in bundles. Wash, and plunge into boiling water in which there is a teaspoonful of salt for every quart of water. Boil rapidly for fifteen minutes. Take up, and cut off the tender heads. Put them in a clean sauce-pan with one generous cupful of cream or milk to every quart of asparagus. Simmer ten minutes. Mix one tablespoonful of butter and a generous teaspoonful of flour together. When creamy, stir in with the asparagus. Add salt and pepper to taste, and simmer five minutes longer.

Green, Peas a la Francaise.

Boil green peas until tender, and drain. For every quart, put in a sauce-pan two table-spoonfuls of butter, one of flour, and half a teaspoonful of sugar. Stir until all are thoroughly mixed. Add the peas, and stir over the fire for five minutes. Add one cupful of white stock or cream, and simmer ten minutes. The canned peas can be prepared in the same manner.

Minced Cabbage.

Drain boiled cabbage in the colander. Put it in the chopping tray and chop fine. For each quart of the chopped cabbage, put two table- spoonfuls of butter and one of flour in the frying-pan. As soon as smooth and hot, put in the cabbage, which season well with salt, pepper, and, if you like it, two table-spoonfuls of vinegar. Stir constantly for five or eight minutes. When done, heap on a dish. Make smooth with a knife, and garnish with hard-boiled eggs.

Minced Spinach.

Boil the spinach in salt and water until tender. Drain in the colander, and chop fine in the tray. Season well with pepper and salt. For each quart of the chopped spinach, put two tablespoonfuls of butter and one of flour in a frying-pan. When this has cooked smooth, and before it has become browned, add the spinach. Stir for five minutes; then add half a cupful of cream or milk, and stir three minutes longer. Arrange in a mound on a hot dish. Garnish with a wreath of slices of hard-boiled eggs at the base, and finish the top with another wreath. Serve hot. Lettuce can be cooked and served in the same manner. It must be boiled about twenty minutes to be tender.

Cauliflower with Cream Sauce.

Take off the green leaves and the stalk of the cauliflower. Wash, and put on to cook in boiling water. Boil gently for half an hour. Turn off the water, and add one pint of milk, one pint of boiling water and one table-spoonful of salt. Simmer half an hour longer. Take up with, a skimmer, being careful not to break it. Pour over this a cream sauce, and serve.

Escaloped Cauliflower.

Cook the cauliflower one hour in salt and water. Drain, and break apart. Put a layer of the cauliflower in an escalop dish, moisten it with Bechamel or cream sauce, and sprinkle in a little grated cheese. Put in another layer of cauliflower, and continue, as directed before, until all of the vegetable is used. There should be two tablespoonfuls of grated cheese and one pint of sauce to each head of cauliflower. Cover with bread crumbs and cheese, and dot with bits of batter. Bake half an hour in a moderate oven.

Stewed Celery with Cream Sauce.

Wash and scrape the tender white part of two heads of celery. Cut them in pieces about two inches long. Cover with boiling water and simmer gently half an hour. Season well with salt. Drain off the water in which the celery was cooked. Add a pint of cream sauce, and serve.

Celery Stewed in Stock.

Scrape, wash and cut the white part of two heads of celery. Put in a stew-pan with one pint of stock, and simmer half an hour. Mix together two table-spoonfuls of butter and one of flour. Stir this in with the celery. Season with salt, and simmer five minutes longer.

Stewed Okra.

After the ends of the pods have been cut off, wash, and put on with just enough water to prevent burning (about a cupful to a quart of the okra) and a teaspoonful of salt. Simmer gently thirty minutes. Season with pepper and butter, and with more salt, if necessary.

Okra Stewed with Tomatoes.

Cut the okra in thin slices, and pare and slice the tomatoes. Have one pint of tomatoes to two of okra. Put the vegetables in a stew-pan with one teaspoonful of salt and a little pepper. Simmer half an hour. Add one table-spoonful of butter, and more salt, if needed.

Scalloped Okra and Tomatoes.

Prepare the same as stewed okra and tomatoes. When they have been stewing fifteen minutes add the butter and pepper, and turn into a deep dish. Cover with bread or cracker crumbs, dot with butter, and bake half an hour.

Fried Egg Plant.

Cut the plant in slices about one-third of an inch thick. Pare these, and lay in a flat dish. Cover with boiling water, to which has been added one table-spoonful of salt for every quart of water. Let this stand one hour. Drain, and pepper the slices slightly, and dip in beaten egg and bread crumbs (two eggs and a pint of crumbs for a good- sized plant). Fry in boiling fat for eight or ten minutes. The slices will be soft and moist when done. Or, the slices can be seasoned with pepper, and fried in just enough pork fat to brown them. The egg plant is sometimes stewed, and sometimes baked, but there is no other mode so good as frying.

Boiled Rice.

One cupful of rice, one quart of boiling water, one scant table- spoonful of salt. Wash the rice in three waters, and put in the double kettle with the salt and boiling water. Boil rapidly fifteen minutes; then pour off all the water. Cover tightly, return to the fire, and cook twenty minutes longer. The water in the under boiler must boil rapidly all the time. Rice cooked in this manner will have every grain separate.

Corn Oysters.

One cupful of flour, half a cupful of melted butter, three table- spoonfuls of milk, two teaspoonfuls of salt, one-fourth of a teaspoonful of pepper, one pint of grated corn. Pour the corn on the flour, and beat well; then add the other ingredients, and beat rapidly for three minutes. Have fat in the frying-pan to the depth of about two inches. When smoking hot, put in the batter by the spoonful. Hold the spoon close to the fat and the shape of the oyster will be good. Fry about five minutes.

New Bedford Corn Pudding.

Twelve ears of corn, four eggs, a generous pint and a half of milk, a generous teaspoonful of salt, four table-spoonfuls of sugar. Grate the corn, beat the eggs with a spoon, and mix all the ingredients together. Butter a deep earthen dish, and pour the mixture into it. Bake slowly two hours. Serve hot. When the corn is old it will take one quart of milk. If very young and milky, one pint of milk will be sufficient.

Pickled Beets.

Cut boiled beets in slices. Lay these in a large glass jar or earthen pot. For every beet, put in one slice of onion, one table-spoonful of grated horse-radish, six cloves, and vinegar enough to cover. The beets will be ready to use in ten or twelve hours. They will not keep more than a week.

Baked Beans.

Pick one quart of beans free from stones and dirt. Wash, and soak in cold water over night. In the morning pour off the water. Cover with hot water, put two pounds of corned beef with them, and boil until they begin to split open, (the time depends upon the age of the beans, but it will be from thirty to sixty minutes). Turn them into the colander, and pour over them two or three quarts of cold water. Put about half of the beans in a deep earthen pot, then put in the beef, and finally the remainder of the beans. Mix one tea-spoonful of mustard and one table-spoonful of molasses with a little water. Pour this over the beans, and then add boiling water to just cover. Bake slowly ten hours. Add a little water occasionally.



PIES AND PUDDINGS.

Puff Paste.

One quart of pastry flour, one pint of butter, one table-spoonful of salt, one of sugar, one and a quarter cupfuls of ice water. Wash the hands with soap and water, and dip them first in very hot, and then in cold, water. Rinse a large bowl or pan with boiling water and then with cold. Half fill it with cold water. Wash the butter in this, working it with the hands until it is light and waxy. This frees it of the salt and butter-milk, and lightens it, so that the pastry is more delicate. Shape the butter into two thin cakes, and put in a pan of ice water, to harden. Mix the salt and sugar with the flour. With the hands, rub one-third of the butter into the flour. Add the water, stirring with a knife. Stir quickly and vigorously until the paste is a smooth ball. Sprinkle the board lightly with flour. Turn the paste on this, and pound quickly and lightly with the rolling pin. Do not break the paste. Roll from you and to one side; or, if easier to roll from you all the while, turn the paste around. When it is about one-fourth of an inch thick, wipe the remaining butter, break it in bits, and spread these on the paste. Sprinkle lightly with flour. Fold the paste, one-third from each side, so that the edges meet. Now fold from the ends, but do not have these meet. Double the paste, pound lightly, and roll down to about one-third of an inch in thickness. Fold as before, and roll down again. Repeat this three times if for pies, and six times if for vol-au-vents, patties, tarts, etc. Place on the ice, to harden, when it has been rolled the last time. It should be in the ice chest at least an hour before being used. In hot weather if the paste sticks when being rolled down, put it on a tin sheet and place on ice. As soon as it is chilled it will roll easily. The less flour you use in rolling out the paste the tenderer it will be. No matter how carefully every part of the work may be done, the paste will not be good if much flour is used.

Chopped Paste.

One quart of pastry flour, two cupfuls of unwashed butter, one teaspoonful of salt, one table-spoonful of sugar, and a scant cupful of ice water. Put the flour, salt, sugar and butter in the chopping- tray. Chop all together until the butter is thoroughly mixed with the flour; then add the water, and continue chopping. When well mixed, sprinkle the board with flour, turn the paste on it, and roll into a flat piece. Place in a pan on the ice. When hard, use the same as puff paste. It can be used as soon as mixed, but will not, of course, be so nice.

French Paste for Raised Pies.

One quart of pastry flour, one table-spoonful of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt, one scant cupful of butter, one egg, one tea- cupful of water. Rub the butter, salt and sugar into the flour. Beat the egg, and add the water to it. Stir this into the flour and butter. Stir this mixture until it is a smooth paste; then put on the board and roll the same as puff paste. This paste must be rolled eight times.

To Make a Pie.

Butter the pie plate (tin is the best), and cover with paste that has been rolled very thin. Roll a strip of paste long enough to go around the plate, and cut in strips an inch wide. Wet the edge of the plate with water, and put a strip of paste on it. Fill with any kind of prepared fruit Have the paste in a roll, and cut enough from the end to cover the pie. Sprinkle the board lightly with flour, and place the paste up-on it. Flour the rolling pin with, the hand. Roll from you and to one side until the paste is the right size. It must be much larger than the plate. In the centre cut a slit about halt an inch long. Cover the pie, having the paste "fulled" on, as it shrinks in the baking. The oven must be hot at first, and after the first fifteen minutes the drafts must be closed. A mince pie will require one hour to bake, and an apple pie fifty minutes. Peach, and nearly all other fruit pies, require the same time.

Mince Pie Meat.

Boil a beef tongue, weighing six pounds, and six pounds of the vein of a round of beef (these should just simmer). After skinning the tongue, chop it and the beef very fine, and add five pounds of beef suet, chopped fine; five pounds of stoned raisins, three of dried currants, one and a half of citron, cut fine; nine of sugar, one and a half pints of molasses, two quarts of the liquor in which the meat was boiled, one quart of brandy, one pint of white wine, a cupful of salt, half a cupful of cinnamon, one-fourth of a cupful of cloves, one- fourth of a cupful of allspice, three nutmegs, a table-spoonful of mace. Put all in a large pan, and let stand over night. Put what you wish to bake in another pan with half as much stewed and sweetened apple as you have meat, and let it stand one hour. Put the remainder of the meat in a jar. Cover with a paper dipped in brandy, and then cover tightly, to exclude the air. Set in a cool place for future use, [Mrs. M. L. W.]

Squash pies.

Five pints of stewed and strained squash, two quarts of boiling milk, one and a half nutmegs, four teaspoonfuls of salt, five cupfuls of sugar, nine eggs, four table-spoonfuls of Sicily Madeira and two of rose-water. Gradually pour the boiling milk on the squash, and stir continually. Add the nutmeg, rose-water and sugar. When cold, add the eggs, well beaten; and just before the mixture is put in the plates, add the Madeira. Butter deep plates, and line with a plain paste. Fill with the mixture, and bake in a moderate oven for forty minutes. [Mrs. M. L. W.]

Sweet Potato Pies.

When the potatoes are dry and mealy, take a quart after they have been pared, boiled and mashed, a quart of milk, four eggs, salt, nutmeg, cinnamon and sugar to taste. Bake the same as squash pies. If the potatoes are very moist, use less milk.

Lemon Pie.

The juice and rind of one lemon, two eggs, eight heaping table- spoonfuls of sugar, one small tea-cupful of milk, one teaspoonful of corn-starch. Mix the corn-starch with a little of the milk. Put the remainder on the fire, and when boiling, stir in the corn-starch. Boil one minute. Let this cool, and add the yolks of the eggs, four heaping table-spoonfuls of the sugar, and the grated rind and juice of the lemon, all well beaten together. Have a deep pie plate lined with paste, and fill with this mixture. Bake slowly half an hour. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, and gradually beat into them the remainder of the sugar. Cover the pie with this, and brown slowly.

Orange Pies.

Two cupfuls of sugar, two of flour, five eggs, one tea-spoonful of cream of tartar, half a teaspoonful of soda, the juice and rind of one orange. These are for the cake. Beat the eggs very light; then add the sugar, and beat until frothy. Now add the orange. Mix the soda and cream of tartar with the flour, and rub through a sieve on to the beaten eggs and sugar. Stir well, and bake in deep tin plates. There will be enough for six plates. When baked, put a thin layer of the icing between the cakes, and cover the pie with icing. There should be three cakes in a pie. Icing: The whites of four eggs, one tea-cupful of powdered sugar, the juice and rind of two oranges. After beating the whites to a stiff froth, beat in the sugar and then the rind and juice of the oranges. When the pies are iced, dry them in the heater.

Chocolate Pies.

Make plain cup cake, and bake in Washington-pie plates, having the cake thick enough to split. After splitting, spread one half with a filling made as below, place the top piece on, and sprinkle with powdered sugar. The cake should always be fresh.

Filling: One square of Baker's chocolate, one cupful of sugar, the yolks of two eggs, one-third of a cupful of boiling milk. Mix scraped chocolate and sugar together; then add, very slowly, the boiling milk, and then the eggs, and simmer ten minutes, being careful that it does not burn. Flavor with vanilla. Have fully cold before using.



HOT PUDDINGS.

Custard Souffle.

Two scant table-spoonfuls of butter, two table-spoonfuls of flour, two table-spoonfuls of sugar, one cupful of milk, four eggs. Let the milk come to a boil. Beat the flour and butter together; add to them, gradually, the boiling milk, and cook eight minutes, stirring often. Beat the sugar and the yolks of the eggs together. Add to the cooked mixture, and set away to cool. When cool, beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, and add to the mixture. Bake in a buttered pudding dish for twenty minutes in a moderate oven. Serve immediately with creamy sauce.

Cabinet Pudding.

One quart of milk, four eggs, four table-spoonfuls of sugar, half a teaspoonful of salt, one table-spoonful of butter, three pints of stale sponge cake, one cupful of raisins, chopped citron and currants. Have a little more of the currants than of the two other fruits. Beat the eggs, sugar and salt together, and add the milk. Butter a three- pint pudding mould (the melon shape is nice), sprinkle the sides and bottom with the fruit, and put in a layer of cake. Again sprinkle in fruit, and put in more cake. Continue this until all the materials are used. Gradually pour on the custard. Let the pudding stand two hours, and steam an hour and a quarter. Serve with wine or creamy sauce.

English Plum Pudding.

A pound of suet, chopped fine; a pint of sugar, one pound of grated stale bread, one pound of raisins, two of currants, a glass of brandy, two teaspoonfuls of ginger, two nutmegs, half a pint of milk, a little salt Beat well, and steam five hours. Serve with rich sauce.

Rachel Pudding.

One quart of breadcrumbs, one of apples, cut very fine; half a cupful of suet, chopped very fine; one cupful of English currants, the rind and juice of two lemons, four eggs, well beaten. Mix thoroughly. Grease a pudding mould, and put the mixture in it. Steam three hours, and serve with rich wine sauce.

Chocolate Pudding.

One quart of milk, four table-spoonfuls of corn-starch, four of sugar, four of scraped chocolate, two of boiling water, two eggs, one teaspoonful of salt. Reserve one cupful of the milk, and put the remainder on to boil. Put the sugar, chocolate and water in a sauce- pan or, better still, a small frying-pan, and stir over a hot fire for about a minute, when the mixture should be smooth and glossy. Stir this into the boiling milk. Mix the corn-starch with cold milk. Beat the egg, and add to the corn-starch and milk; add, also, the salt. Stir this into the boiling milk, and beat well for about three minutes. Turn the mixture into a melon mould that has been dipped in cold water. Let the pudding stand in the mould about fifteen minutes. Turn into the pudding dish, and heap whipped cream around it. Serve sugar and cream with it; or, vanilla sauce will answer.

Chocolate Roll Pudding.

This pudding consists of cake, frosting and sauce. It is very nice. Beat the whites of three eggs to a stiff froth, and add the yolks. Beat into the eggs one cupful of sugar and one of flour. As soon as all are thoroughly mixed, stir in half a cupful of cold water, in which has been dissolved soda about the size of a pea. Pour thin into a buttered pan, and bake in a moderate oven from twelve to fifteen minutes. When baked, sprinkle the top with two table-spoonfuls of milk.

Frosting: Beat the whites of six eggs to a froth, and divide into two parts. Put a teaspoonful of sugar to one half, and one teaspoonful of sugar and three of grated chocolate to the other. Take the cake from the pan and put it on a flat dish or tin sheet. Spread half of each mixture over the top. Return to the oven for about five minutes, to harden the frosting. Take out and roll up. Put the remainder of the frosting on the top and sides of the roll. Put again in the oven to harden the frosting. Take out, and slide on a flat dish. Pour the sauce around, and serve. The yolks of the eggs may be used for puddings or custards.

Sauce: One egg, one tea-cupful of powdered sugar, five table-spoonfuls of boiling milk, one teaspoonful of vanilla extract. Beat the white of the egg to a stiff froth, and gradually beat in the sugar. Add the yolk of the egg, the vanilla, and lastly the boiling milk.

Ground Rice Pudding.

One quart of milk, five table-spoonfuls of ground rice, four of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt, six eggs, half a cupful of butter. Put the milk in the double boiler, reserving half a cupful. Mix the rice and cold milk together, and stir into the milk in the boiler when this is hot. Stir constantly for five minutes. Add the salt, butter and sugar, and set away to cool. When cold, add the eggs, well beaten. Bake one hour in a moderate oven. Serve with creamy sauce.

Rice Pudding.

One cupful of rice, one quart of milk, one cupful of raisins, one heaping teaspoonful of salt, one cupful of water, one quart of soft custard. Wash the rice, and let it soak two hours in cold water. Turn off the water, and put the rice in the double boiler with the cupful of water. Cook half an hour; then add the salt, raisins and milk, and cook an hour longer. Butter a melon mould and pack the rice in it. Let it stand twenty minutes. Turn out on a deep dish, decorate with bits of bright jelly, pour the custard around, and serve. The custard should be cold and the pudding hot. The raisins can be omitted if not liked.

German Puffs.

The yolks of six eggs, five table-spoonfuls of flour, one of melted butter, one pint of milk, half a teaspoonful of salt. Beat the yolks of the eggs light, add the milk to them, and pour part of this mixture on the flour. Beat light and smooth; then add the remainder of the eggs and milk, and the salt and butter. Butter muffin pans, and half fill them with the batter. The quantities given will make twelve puffs. Bake twenty minutes in a quick oven. Serve on a hot platter with the sauce poured over them.

Sauce: The whites of six eggs, one cupful of powdered sugar, the juice of two oranges or of one lemon. After beating the whites to a stiff froth, gradually beat in the sugar, and then the juice of the fruit.

Down-East Pudding.

One pint of molasses, one quart of flour, one table-spoonful of salt, one teaspoonful of soda, three pints of blackberries. Boil three hours, and serve with sauce made in the following manner:

One tea-cupful of powdered sugar, half a cupful of butter, one egg, two teaspoonfuls of boiling water, one of brandy. Beat the butter to a cream, and add, very gradually, the sugar and brandy. Beat in the yolk of the egg, and, when perfectly creamy, add the white, which has been beaten to a froth; then add the water, and stir very carefully.

Amber Pudding.

One dozen large, tart apples, one cupful of sugar, the juice and rind of two lemons, six eggs, four table-spoonfuls of butter, enough puff or chopped paste to line a three-pint pudding dish. Pare and quarter the apples. Pare the thin rind from the lemon, being careful not to cut into the white part. Put the butter, apple, and lemon rind and juice in a stew-pan with half a cupful of water. Cover tightly, and simmer about three-quarters of an hour. Rub through a sieve, add the sugar, and set away to cool. Line the dish with thin paste. Beat the yolks of the eggs, and stir into the cooled mixture. Turn this into the lined dish. Bake slowly for half an hour. Beat the whites to a stiff froth, and gradually beat into them three table- spoonfuls of powdered sugar. Cover the pudding with this. Return to the oven and cook twelve minutes with the door open. Serve either hot or cold.

Fig Pudding.

One cupful of molasses, one of chopped suet, one of milk, three and a quarter of flour, two eggs, one teaspoonful of soda, one of cinnamon, half a teaspoonful of nutmeg, one pint of figs. Mix together the molasses, suet, spice, and the figs, cut fine. Dissolve the soda with a table-spoonful of hot water, and mix with the milk. Add to the other ingredients. Beat the eggs light, and stir into the mixture. Add the flour, and beat thoroughly. Butter two small or one large brown bread mould. Turn the mixture into the mould or moulds, and steam five hours. Serve with creamy or wine sauce.

Date Pudding.

Make the same as fig pudding, but use a pint of dates instead of the figs.

Apple Tapioca Pudding.

One large cupful of tapioca, three pints of water, one cupful of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt, one teaspoonful of essence of lemon, three pints of pared and quartered apples. Wash the tapioca and soak over night in three pints of cold water (three hours will do if there is no more time). Put the tapioca in the double boiler and cook until it looks clear. It will take from twenty to thirty minutes. When cooked enough, add the sugar, salt and lemon, and then the apples. Turn into a buttered dish and bake an hour and a quarter. Let it stand in a cool room half an hour before serving. Serve with sugar and cream.

Baked Apple Pudding.

Fill a three-quart earthen dish with pared and quartered apples. Sprinkle on these one cupful of sugar, a slight grating of nutmeg, one table-spoonful of butter, and half a cupful of water. Cover, and bake thirty minutes. Make half the rule for chopped paste. Roll a piece of the paste into a strip that will reach around the pudding dish. This strip should be about two inches deep. Roll the remainder of the paste to cover the dish. Take the pudding dish from the oven, slip the strip of paste between the apple and the dish, and put on the top crust. Return to the oven, and bake one hour longer. Serve with a cream sauce.

Dutch Apple Pudding.

One pint of flour, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, half a teaspoonful of soda, half a teaspoonful of salt, an egg, a generous two-thirds of a cupful of milk, two table-spoonfuls of butter, four large apples. Mix the salt, soda and cream of tartar with the flour, and rub through the sieve. Beat the egg light, and add the milk. Rub the butter into the flour. Pour the milk and egg on this, and mix quickly and thoroughly. Spread the dough about half an inch deep on a buttered baking pan. Have the apples pared, cored and cut into eighths. Stick these pieces in rows into the dough. Sprinkle with two table-spoonfuls of sugar. Bake in a quick oven for about twenty-five minutes. This pudding is to be eaten with sugar and cream or a simple sauce.

Apple Souffle.

One pint of steamed apple, one table-spoonful of melted butter, half a cupful of sugar, the whites of six eggs and the yolks of three, a slight grating of nutmeg. Stir into the hot apple the butter, sugar and nutmeg, and the yolks of the eggs, well beaten. When this is cold, beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, and stir into the mixture. Butter a three-pint dish, and turn the souffle into it. Bake thirty minutes in a moderate oven. Serve immediately with any kind of sauce.

Apple and Rice Pudding.

One cupful and a half of uncooked rice, and two dozen apples. Wash the rice well, and soak two hours in cold water. Peel and quarter the apples. Wet the pudding cloth and spread it in the colander. Cover with two-thirds of the rice. Lay in the apples, having them packed as closely as possible. Sprinkle the remainder of the rice over them. Tie as tightly as possible, and plunge into boiling water. Boil one hour. Serve with molasses sauce.

Eve's Pudding.

Six eggs, six apples, six ounces of bread, six ounces of currants, half a teaspoonful of salt, nutmeg. Boil three hours, or steam four. Serve with wine sauce.

Batter and Fruit Pudding.

One pint of milk, one pint of flour, four eggs, one table-spoonful of butter, one teaspoonful of salt, one pint of fruit, pared and quartered, (apples or peaches are best). Beat the eggs well with a spoon, and add the milk to them. Turn part of this mixture on the flour, and beat to a light, smooth batter. Add the remainder of the milk and eggs, and the salt. Butter a pudding dish and pour in the batter. Sprinkle in the fruit. Bake half an hour. Serve with foaming sauce the moment it comes from the oven.

Amherst Pudding.

Three-fourths of a cupful of butter, three-fourths of a pint of sugar, four eggs, five table-spoonfuls of strained apple, the grated rind and the juice of a lemon, and nutmeg and rose-water, if you like. Bake half an hour, in a moderate oven, in a shallow pudding dish that has been lined with a rich pasts, rolled very thin. Let it become partially cooled before serving.

Swiss Pudding.

One tea-cupful of flour, four table-spoonfuls of butter, three of sugar, one pint of milk, five eggs, the rind of a lemon. Grate the rind of the lemon (the yellow part only, remember,) into the milk, which put in the double boiler. Rub the flour and butter together. Pour the boiling milk on this, and return to the boiler. Cook five minutes, stirring the first two. Beat the yolks of the eggs and the sugar together, and stir into the boiling mixture. Remove from the fire immediately. When cold, add the whites of the eggs, beaten to a stiff froth. Have a three-quart mould, well buttered. Turn the mixture into this, and steam forty minutes. Turn on a hot dish, and serve without delay. Creamy sauce, or a tumbler of currant jelly, melted with the juice of two lemons, should be served with it.

Delicate Indian Pudding.

One quart of milk, two heaping table-spoonfuls of Indian meal, four of sugar, one of butter, three eggs, one teaspoonful of salt. Boil the milk in the double boiler. Sprinkle the meal into it, stirring all the while. Cook twelve minutes, stirring often. Beat together the eggs, salt, sugar and half a teaspoonful of ginger. Stir the butter into the meal and milk. Pour this gradually on the egg mixture. Bake slowly one hour.

Indian and Apple Pudding.

One cupful of Indian meal, one cupful of molasses, two quarts of milk, two teaspoonfuls of salt, three table-spoonfuls of butter, or one of finely-chopped suet; one quart of pared and quartered apples (sweet are best, but sour will do), half a teaspoonful of ginger, half a teaspoonful of grated nutmeg. Put the milk on in the double boiler. When it boils, pour it gradually on the meal. Pour into the boiler again and cook half an hour, stirring often. Add the molasses, butter, seasoning and apples. Butter a deep pudding dish, pour the mixture into it, and bake slowly three hours. Make half the rule if the family is small.

COLD PUDDINGS.

Royal Pudding.

One quart of milk, half a cupful of sago, two table-spoonfuls of butter, one tea-cupful of granulated sugar, half a teaspoonful of salt, four eggs, four table-spoonfuls of raspberry jam, four table- spoonfuls of wine. Put the milk in the double boiler, and just before it comes to a boil, stir in the sago. Cook until it thickens (about half an hour), stirring frequently; then add the butter, sugar and salt. Let it cool; and when cold, add the yolks of the eggs, well beaten, and the wine. Turn into a buttered pudding dish, and bake half an hour. Set away to cool. When cold, spread the jam over it. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, and stir into them four table- spoonfuls of powdered sugar. Spread this on the pudding. Brown quickly, and serve. The pudding can be made the day before using. In this case, put the whites of the eggs in the ice chest, and make the meringue and brown just before serving.

Cold Tapioca Pudding.

Soak a cupful of tapioca over night in a quart of cold water. In the morning drain off all the water. Put the tapioca and a quart and half a pint of milk in the double boiler. After cooking forty-five minutes, add a teaspoonful of salt Stir well, and cook fifteen minutes longer. Wet a mould or bowl in cold water. Turn the pudding into this, and set away to cool. Serve with sugar and cream. This. pudding is also nice hot.

Danish Pudding.

One cupful of tapioca, three generous pints of water, half a teaspoonful of salt, half a tea-cupful of sugar, one tumbler of any kind of bright jelly. Wash the tapioca, and soak in the water all night. In the morning put on in the double boiler, and cook one hour. Stir frequently. Add the salt, sugar and jelly, and mix thoroughly. Turn into a mould that has been dipped in cold water, and set away to harden. Serve with cream and sugar.

Black Pudding.

One quart of blueberries, one pint of water, one cupful of sugar, a five-cent baker's loaf, butter. Stew the berries, sugar and water together. Cut the bread in thin slices, and butter these. Put a layer of the bread in a deep dish, and cover it with some of the hot berries. Continue this until all the bread and fruit is used, and set away to cool. The pudding should be perfectly cold when served. Serve with cream and sugar. Any other small berries can be used instead of blueberries.

Almond Pudding.

One pint of shelled almonds, two dozen macaroons, the grated rind of a lemon, half a cupful of sugar, half a cupful of butter, the yolks of six eggs, one quart of milk, one pint of cream, one table-spoonful of rice flour. Blanch the almonds and pound them in a mortar. Put the milk in a double boiler, reserving half a cupful. Add the pounded almonds to it. Mix the rice flour with the half cupful of cold milk, and stir into the boiling milk. Cook six minutes, and put away to cool. When about half cooled, add the sugar and butter, which should have been beaten together until light When cold, add the yolks of the eggs, well beaten, the macaroons, which have been dried and rolled fine, and the cream. Butter a pudding dish that will hold a little more than two quarts; or, two small ones will do. Turn the mixture into this, and bake slowly forty-five minutes. Serve cold.

Jenny Lind Pudding.

One dozen sponge fingers, one dozen macaroons, one dozen cocoanut cakes, one quart of custard, two cupfuls of freshly-grated cocoanut. Make a quart of soft custard, and season with one teaspoonful of lemon extract or two table-spoonfuls of wine. When cold, pour on the cakes, which have been arranged in a deep glass dish. Sprinkle the grated cocoanut over this, and serve. If you have not the fresh cocoanut use one cupful of the prepared.

Peach Meringue Pudding.

Three dozen ripe peaches, one and a third cupfuls of granulated sugar, six table-spoonfuls of powdered sugar, one quart of milk, three teaspoonfuls of corn-starch, six eggs. Put one cupful of the granulated sugar and one pint of water on to boil. Peel and quarter the peaches. When the sugar and water begins to boil, put in one-third of the peaches, and simmer eight minutes. Take them up, and put in another third. Continue this until all the fruit is done. Boil the syrup until it becomes thick. Pour over the peaches and set away to cool. Separate the whites and yolks of the six eggs, and put the whites in the ice chest. Beat together the yolks and one-third of a cupful of sugar. Put a pint and a half of milk in the double boiler. Mix three teaspoonfuls of corn-starch with half a pint of cold milk, and when the other milk is boiling, stir this into it Stir for three minutes; then put on the cover and cook three minutes longer. Pour the boiling mixture gradually on the beaten eggs and sugar. Return to the boiler and cook four minutes, stirring all the while. Take from the fire, add half a teaspoonful of salt, and set away to cool. This is the sauce. Twenty minutes before serving heap the peaches in the centre of a shallow dish. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, and gradually beat in five table-spoonfuls of powdered sugar. Cover the peaches with this. Place a board in the oven, put the dish on it, and cook until a light brown. Season the sauce with one-fourth of a teaspoonful of almond extract, and pour around the pudding. Serve.

The peaches and sauce must be cold. If the oven is hot, and the board is placed under the dish, the browning of the meringue will not heat the pudding much.

Apple Meringue Pudding.

Two quarts of pared and quartered apples, a lemon, two cupfuls of granulated sugar and six table-spoonfuls of powdered, six eggs, one quart of milk, three teaspoonfuls of corn-starch. Pare the thin yellow rind off of the lemon, being careful not to cut into the white part, and put it in a sauce-pan with one and two-thirds cupfuls of the granulated sugar. Boil ten minutes; then put in the apples and juice of the lemon. Cover, and simmer half an hour. The apples should be tender, but not much broken. Take them up, and boil the syrup until thick. When it is reduced enough, pour it over the apples, and put these away to cool. Make the sauce and finish the pudding the same as for peach meringue, flavoring the sauce, however, with extract of lemon.

Frozen Cabinet Pudding.

Two dozen stale lady-fingers, one cupful of English currants, one pint of cream, one pint of milk, one small tea-cupful of sugar, three eggs, three table-spoonfuls of wine. Put the milk in the double boiler. Beat the eggs and sugar together, and gradually pour the hot milk on them. Return to the boiler and cook two minutes, stirring all the while. Pour the hot custard on the lady-fingers, add the currants, and set away to cool. When cold, add the wine and the cream, whipped to a froth. Freeze the same as ice cream. When frozen, wet a melon mould in cold water, sprinkle a few currants on the sides and bottom, and pack with the frozen mixture. Pack the mould in salt and ice for one hour. At serving time, wipe it, and dip in warm water for a moment Turn out the pudding on a dish, pour apricot sauce around it, and serve.

Frozen Cabinet Pudding, No. 2.

One dozen macaroons, one dozen and a half sponge fingers, one dozen cocoanut cakes, one cupful of English currants, one quart of custard. Wet a melon mould in cold water. Sprinkle the sides and bottom with currants. Arrange layers of the mixed cakes, which sprinkle with currants. Continue this until all the cake and currants are used. Put a pint and a half of milk in the double boiler. Beat together four eggs and two table-spoonfuls of sugar. When the milk is hot, stir in one-third of a package of gelatine, which has been soaking one hour in half a cupful of milk. Add the beaten egg and sugar, and cook four minutes, stirring all the while. Take off, and add one-fourth of a teaspoonful of salt and one teaspoonful of vanilla, or two table- spoonfuls of wine. Pour this, a few spoonfuls at a time, on the cake. Set away to cool. When cold, cover with thick white paper, and put on the tin cover. Pack the mould in salt and ice for four or six hours. At serving time, wipe the mould free of salt and ice and dip for a moment in warm water. Take off the cover and paper, and turn out. Serve with quince sauce.

Peach Pudding.

Pare and cut fine one dozen ripe peaches. Sprinkle with three table spoonfuls of sugar, and let them stand one hour. Make a custard the same as for frozen cabinet pudding, No. 2. Have the peaches in a deep glass dish, and, as soon as the custard is partly cooled, turn it on them. Set away in a cold place for six or eight hours. When convenient, it is well to make this pudding the day before using.

Orange Pudding.

One pint of milk, the juice of six oranges and rind of three, eight eggs, half a cupful of butter, one large cupful of granulated sugar, a quarter of a cupful of powdered sugar, one table-spoonful of ground rice, paste to line the pudding dish. Mix the ground rice with a little of the cold milk. Put the remainder of the milk in the double boiler, and when it boils, stir in the mixed rice. Stir for five minutes; then add the butter, and set away to cool. Beat together the sugar, the yolks of the eight eggs and whites of four. Grate the rind and squeeze the juice of the oranges into this. Stir all into the cooked mixture. Have a pudding dish, holding about three quarts, lined with paste. Pour the preparation into this, and bake in a moderate oven for forty minutes. Beat the remaining four whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, and gradually beat in the powdered sugar. Cover the pudding with this. Return to the oven, and cook ten minutes, having the door open. Set away to cool. It must be ice cold when served.

Orange Pudding, No. 3.

One cupful and a half of granulated sugar, six table-spoonfuls of the powdered, six eggs, six large, or eight small, sweet oranges, half a package of gelatine, one quart of boiling milk. Soak the gelatine for two hours in one cupful of the milk. Put the remaining milk in the double boiler. Beat together the yolks of the eggs and the granulated sugar. When the milk boils, stir in the gelatine, and then the beaten yolks and sugar. Stir constantly until the mixture begins to thicken (which will be about five minutes); then remove from the fire and put away to cool. Pare the oranges, and free them of seeds and tough parts. Put them in a large glass dish, and when the custard has cooled, pour it over the fruit. Let this stand in a cold place six or eight hours. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, and gradually beat in the powdered sugar. Cover the pudding with this, and serve.

Royal Diplomatic Pudding.

Soak half a box of gelatine in half a cupful of cold water one or two hours. Pour on this two-thirds of a pint of boiling water, and add the juice of a lemon, a cupful of sugar and half a pint of wine. Stir, and strain. Have two moulds, one holding two quarts, the other a quart. Put a layer of jelly in the large mould, and place on ice. When hard, garnish with candied cherries, cut in two. Pour in a few spoonfuls of liquid jelly, not hot, to hold the cherries, and then pour in enough to cover them. When the jelly is perfectly hard, set the small mould in the centre of the large one, and fill the space between with jelly. Fill the small mould with ice, and set both in a basin of ice water. When the jelly is again hard, remove the ice from the small mould, which fill with warm water, and lift it out carefully. The vacant space is to be filled with custard made by the following recipe: The yolks of five eggs, half a cupful of sugar, two table- spoonfuls of wine, one teaspoonful of vanilla extract, half a box of gelatine, soaked in half a cupful of cold water, a scant cupful of milk. Put the milk to boil. Add the gelatine, and the eggs and sugar, beaten together. Strain, and add the wine and vanilla. When the custard begins to thicken, add half a pint of cream, whipped to a stiff froth. Pour the custard into the space mentioned, and let it stand until it hardens. Turn the pudding out of the mould, and serve with soft custard poured around it.

Orange Diplomatic Pudding.

Make one quart of orange jelly. Arrange this in the mould and make a filling the same as for royal diplomatic pudding. Flavor the filling, and the custard for the sauce, with orange.

Lemon Diplomatic Pudding.

Make one quart of lemon jelly, and prepare the mould with it the same as for the royal diplomatic pudding. Make a lemon sponge, with which fill the cavity. When hard, serve with a custard flavored with lemon.

Bird's Nest Pudding.

Half a package of Cox's sparkling gelatine, six oranges, three cupfuls and a half of sugar, one pint of blanc-mange. Take the peel from the oranges in quarters. Put it in two quarts of water, and let it stand over night. In the morning drain off the water. Cut the peel in thin strips with the scissors. Put it in cold water and boil until tender. Make a syrup of half a cupful of sugar and a pint of water. Drain the straws of orange peel on a sieve. Put them in this syrup and simmer half an hour. Turn into a bowl, and let stand until next day. Put one pint of sugar and one pint of water on to boil. Cook rapidly for twenty minutes; the syrup will then fall from the spoon in threads. Put the straws in this and boil half an hour. Take out, and drain on a sieve. As they dry, put them in a dish, which place in the warm oven. These are for the nests. For the jelly, soak the gelatine two hours in half a cupful of cold water; then pour on it enough boiling water to make, with the juice of the oranges, two cupfuls and a half. Add one small cupful of sugar and the orange juice. Stir well, and strain through a napkin into a shallow dish. In one end of each of six eggs make a hole, about the size of a cent Break the yolks with a skewer, and pour the eggs into a bowl. (They may be used for puddings and custards.) Wash and drain the shells. Fill them with the blanc-mange. Have a pan filled with meal, in which to stand the shells. Set away to cool. Break the jelly in pieces with a fork, and put in a flat glass dish. Arrange the straws in the form of nests, six in number, and arrange them on the jelly. Place the eggs in these, and serve.

Quince Iced Pudding.

Beat three eggs very light; then add one cupful and a half of powdered sugar, and beat until foamy. Put two cupfuls of sifted pastry flour in the sieve, and add one teaspoonful of cream of tarter and half a teaspoonful of soda. Stir half a cupful of cold water into the beaten eggs and sugar; then sift the flour on this. Mix quickly and thoroughly. Have a tin mould similar to the border moulds shown in the chapter on Kitchen Furnishing, but of oval shape, higher and plain. It should be about four inches high, and six wide and eight long, top measurement—the mould tapering. The space between the outer and inner walls should be an inch and a half. Butter this mould and pour the cake mixture into it. Bake slowly for forty-five minutes. Let it stand in the mould until nearly cold. Turn on a flat dish. Put the whites of two eggs in a bowl, gradually beat into them one cupful and a half of powdered sugar, and season with half a teaspoonful of vanilla extract Ice the cake with this, and set away to dry. In the meantime, make a cream with one generous quart of cream, one cupful of sugar, one table-spoonful of vanilla and one pint of soft custard. Freeze the same as ice cream. Spread the inside of the cake with a large tumbler of quince jelly. At serving time pack the frozen cream in the centre of the cake. Heap whipped cream on the top and at the base, and serve immediately. This is an elegant pudding, and is not difficult to make.

Princess Pudding.

Soak for an hour in a pint of cold water one box of Cox's sparkling gelatine, and add one pint of boiling water, one pint of wine, the juice of four lemons, and three large cupfuls of sugar. Beat the whites of four eggs to a stiff froth, and stir into the jelly when it begins to thicken. Pour into a large mould, and set in ice water in a cool place. When ready to serve, turn out as you would jelly, only have the pudding in a deep dish. Pour one quart of soft custard around it, and serve.

Apple Porcupine.

Sixteen large apples, two large cupfuls of granulated sugar, one lemon, one quart of water, one tea-cupful of powdered sugar, one quart of milk, one table-spoonful of corn-starch, half a teaspoonful of salt, six eggs, one pint of blanched almonds. Put the water and granulated sugar in a sauce-pan. Have ten of the apples pared and cored, and as soon as the sugar and water boils, put in as many of the apples as will cook without crowding. Simmer gently until the fruit is cooked through. When done on one side the fruit must be turned. Drain, and cool them on a dish. Cook ten apples in this manner. Have the six that remain pared and quartered and stewed in one cupful of water. Turn the stewed apples into the syrup left from cooking the others. Add the grated rind and the juice of the lemon. Simmer until a smooth marmalade is formed. It will take about twenty minutes. Set away to cool. Put the milk on in the double boiler, reserving half a cupful. When it boils, stir in the corn-starch, which has been mixed with the cold milk. Stir well, and cook five minutes. Beat the yolks of the six eggs and the whites of two with half of the powdered sugar. Gradually pour the boiling mixture on this. Return to the boiler and cook three minutes, stirring all the time. Add the salt. Turn into a pitcher or bowl, and set away to cool. Heap the cooked apples in a mound, using the marmalade to fill up the spaces between the apples. Beat the four whites of eggs to a stiff froth, and beat the half cupful of powdered sugar into it. Cover the apples with this, and stick the almonds into it. Brown slowly in the oven. Set away to cool. At serving time, season the custard with lemon, and pour it around the porcupine.



SAUCES.

Rich Wine Sauce.

One cupful of butter, two of powdered sugar, half a cupful of wine. Beat the butter to a cream. Add the sugar gradually, and when very light, add the wine, which has been made hot, a little at a time. Place the bowl in a basin of hot water and stir for two minutes. The sauce should be smooth and foamy.

Creamy Sauce.

Half a cupful of butter, one cupful of powdered sugar, one- fourth of a cupful of cream or milk, four table-spoonfuls of wine, or one teaspoonful of vanilla or lemon extract. If lemon or vanilla is used, add four table-spoonfuls of cream. Beat the butter to a cream. Add the sugar, gradually, beating all the while. When light and creamy, gradually add the wine, and then the cream, a little at a time. When all is beaten smooth, place the bowl in a basin of hot water and stir until the sauce is smooth and creamy—no longer. It will take only a few minutes. This is a delicious sauce, and if well beaten, and not kept in the hot water long enough to melt the sugar, it will be white and foamy all through.

Foaming Sauce.

One cupful of butter, two of powdered sugar, the whites of two eggs, five table-spoonfuls of wine or three of brandy, one-fourth of a tea- cupful of boiling water. Beat the butter to a cream, and gradually beat the sugar into it. Add the whites of the eggs, unbeaten, one at a time, and then the brandy or wine. When all is a light, smooth mass, add the water, beating in a little at a time. Place the bowl in a basin of hot water and stir until smooth and frothy, which will be about two minutes. This sauce is for rich puddings.

German Sauce.

One cupful of sugar, half a cupful of water, three eggs, one table- spoonful of butter, three of brandy, or a teaspoonful of any extract you like. Put the sugar and water in a sauce-pan and boil for fifteen minutes. Beat the yolks of the eggs, and stir them into the boiling syrup. Put the basin in another of hot water and beat the mixture with the whisk until it begins to thicken; then add the butter, the whites of the eggs, beaten to a stiff froth, and the brandy. Stir one minute longer, and serve.

German Sauce, No. 2.

The yolks of five and whites of three eggs, one cupful of powdered sugar, one pint of cream, and any flavor you choose. Beat together the yolks of the eggs and the sugar, and add the cream. Put this mixture in the double boiler (having first beaten the whites to a stiff froth), and stir until it begins to thicken; then add the whites and seasoning. Beat thoroughly, and serve.

Lemon Sauce.

One cupful of sugar, half a cupful of water, the rind and juice of two lemons, the yolks of three eggs. Boil together the sugar, water, lemon juice and grated rind for twenty minutes. Beat the yolks of the eggs. Put the basin containing the boiling syrup in another of boiling water. Stir the yolks of the eggs into this, and beat rapidly for three minutes. Take up the sauce-pan and continue the beating for five minutes; then serve.

Cream Sauce.

One cupful of powdered sugar, one egg, two cupfuls of whipped cream. Beat the white of the egg to a stiff froth. Add the yolk and sugar, and beat well. Flavor with vanilla, lemon or wine, and add the cream last of all. This sauce is excellent for a light pudding.

Vanilla Sauce.

The whites of two eggs and the yolk of one, half a cupful of powdered sugar, one teaspoonful of vanilla, three table-spoonfuls of milk. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, next beat in the sugar, and then the yolk of the egg and the seasoning. Serve immediately. This sauce is for light puddings.

Molasses Sauce.

One cupful of molasses, half a cupful of water, one table-spoonful of butter, a little cinnamon or nutmeg (about half a teaspoonful), one- fourth of a teaspoonful of salt, three table-spoonfuls of vinegar. Boil all together for twenty minutes. The juice of a lemon can be used instead of the vinegar. This sauce is nice for apple or rice puddings.

Caramel Sauce.

Put one cupful of sugar in a small frying-pan and stir on the fire until a dark brown, if you like a strong caramel flavor, or till a light brown, if you like a delicate flavor. Add a cupful of boiling water, and simmer fifteen minutes. Set away to cool.

Quince Sauce.

One cupful of quince preserve, one of milk, one table-spoonful of corn-starch, half a cupful of sugar. Mix the corn-starch with a little of the cold milk, and put the remainder in the double boiler. When it boils, stir in the corn-starch, and cook ten minutes; then add the sugar and the preserve, mashed fine. Cook ten minutes longer and rub through a strainer. This sauce is usually served cold, but when used with hot pudding, it too should be hot.

Apricot Sauce.

One cupful of canned apricot, one of sugar, one of milk, one table- spoonful of corn-starch, half a cupful of water. Put the milk in the double boiler. Mix the corn-starch with a few spoonfuls of cold milk, and stir into the boiling milk. Cook ten minutes. Boil the sugar and water together for twenty minutes. Rub the apricot through a sieve, and stir it into the syrup. Beat well, and then beat in the boiled milk and corn-starch. Place the sauce-pan in a dish of cold water and stir for about eight minutes. Set away to cool. If you have cream, use it instead of the milk. All kinds of fruit can be used in pudding sauces by following this rule. If the fruit is preserved, use less sugar; and if very acid, use more.

If it is necessary to make the wine, creamy or foamy sauce any considerable time before dinner, do not add the hot water or hot wine, and do not place the bowl in hot water, until serving time. The vanilla and cream sauces are spoiled by standing after being made.



DESSERT.

Blanc-Mange Made with Sea Moss Farina.

One quart of milk, one level table-spoonful of sea moss farina, half a teaspoonful of salt, three table-spoonfuls of sugar, one teaspoonful of flavor. Put the milk in the double boiler and sprinkle the farina into it, stirring all the while. Let this heat slowly. Stir often. When it boils up, and looks white, add the sugar, salt and flavor. Strain, and turn into a mould that has been dipped in cold water. Set away to harden. It will take about three hours for this. The blanc- mange is ready to use as soon as cold.

Blanc-Mange Made with Gelatine.

One package of gelatine, three pints of milk, four table-spoonfuls of sugar, half a teaspoonful of salt, one teaspoonful of extract of vanilla or of lemon. Put the gelatine with the milk and let it stand in a cold place for two hours; then put it in the double boiler, and heat quickly. Do not let it boil. Stir often; and as soon as the gelatine is melted, take off, and add the sugar, salt and flavor. Strain, and partially cool, before putting into the moulds. It should stand six hours before serving, and it is even better, especially in summer, to make it the day before using.

Blanc-Mange Made with Isinglass.

One quart of milk, three and a half sheets of Cooper's isinglass, half a teaspoonful of salt, three table-spoonfuls of sugar and a four-inch piece of stick cinnamon. Break up the isinglass, put it and the cinnamon with the milk, and let stand in a cold place two hours; then put it in the double boiler and let it come, gradually, to the boiling point. It must not boil. Stir often while heating. As soon as the isinglass is dissolved, take from the fire, and add the salt and sugar. Strain into a tin basin, which place in a pan of cold water. Stir occasionally while cooling. When nearly cold, turn into a mould and place in the ice chest. It can be poured into the mould as soon as strained, but the cream will rise to the top in that case, unless the mixture is stirred carefully in the centre of the mould. The sheets of isinglass vary in thickness, so that it is best to take part of die thick sheets and part of the thin.

Chocolate "Blanc"-Mange.

One package of gelatine, four table-spoonfuls of sugar, one (ounce) square of Baker's chocolate, three pints of milk. Soak the gelatine two hours in the milk, and then put it in the double boiler. Scrape the chocolate fine and put it in a small frying-pan with two spoonfuls of the sugar and two of boiling water. Stir this over a hot fire until smooth and glossy (it will take about a minute), and stir into the milk. Add the remainder of the sugar, and strain. Turn into moulds, and set away to harden. This dish should be made at least eight hours before being used. If you please, you can add a teaspoonful of vanilla extract. By adding the chocolate to any of the preparations for blanc-mange while they are hot, you have a chocolate "blanc"-mange.

Cream a la Versailles.

One quart of milk, half a cupful of sugar, half a teaspoonful of vanilla extract, half a teaspoonful of salt, seven eggs, two table- spoonfuls of water. Put the sugar in a small frying-pan and stir until a very light brown. Add the water, stir a moment longer, and mix with the milk. Beat the eggs and salt with a spoon. Add this mixture and the vanilla to the milk. Butter a two-quart charlotte russe mould lightly, and put the custard in it Put the mould in a basin of warm (not hot) water and bake slowly until the custard is firm in the centre. It should take forty minutes; but if the oven is quite hot, it will be done in thirty minutes. Test by putting a knife down into the centre, for if the custard is not milky, it is done. Set away in a cold place until serving time. It must be ice cold when eaten. Turn out on a flat dish, and pour caramel sauce over it.

Royal Cream.

One quart of milk, one-third of a box of gelatine, four table- spoonfuls of sugar, three eggs, vanilla flavor. Put the gelatine in the milk, and let it stand for half an hour. Beat the yolks well with sugar, and stir into the milk. Set the kettle in a pan of hot water and stir until the mixture begins to thicken like soft custard. Have ready the whites of the eggs, beaten to a stiff froth; and the moment the kettle is taken from the fire, stir them in, quickly, and turn into the moulds. Set away in a cold place to harden.

When you cannot get cream, to make charlotte russe, this is a good filling, if you omit the whites of eggs, and fill the moulds when the cream is perfectly cold, but not hardened.

Lemon Sponge.

The juice of four lemons, four eggs, one cupful of sugar, half a package of gelatine, one generous pint of cold water. Soak the gelatine two hours in half a cupful of the water. Squeeze the lemons, and strain the juice on the sugar. Beat the yolks of the eggs and mix them with the remainder of the water. Add the sugar and lemon to this, and cook in the double boiler until it begins to thicken; then add the gelatine. Strain this mixture into a tin basin, which place in a pan of ice water. Beat with the whisk occasionally, until it has cooled, but not hardened. Now add the unbeaten whites of the eggs, and beat all the time until the mixture begins to thicken. Let it thicken almost to the point where it cannot be poured, and then turn into a mould and set away to harden. Remember that the whites of the eggs must be added as soon as the mixture cools, which should be in about six or eight minutes, and that the mixture must be beaten until it begins to harden. The hardening is rapid after it once begins, so that it will be necessary to have the moulds all ready. The sponge will not be smooth and delicate if not poured into the moulds. If for any reason you should get the mixture too hard before pouring, place the basin in another of hot water, and let the sponge melt a little; then beat it up again. Serve with powdered sugar and cream.

Orange Sponge.

Make orange sponge the same as lemon, using a small pint of water and the juice of six large oranges.

Peach Sponge.

One pint of canned peaches, half a package of gelatine, the whites of five eggs, one scant cupful of sugar, one and a half cupfuls of water. Soak the gelatine for two hours in half a cupful of the water. Boil the cupful of water, and the sugar fifteen minutes. Hash the peaches fine, rub through a sieve, and put in the syrup. Cook five minutes, stirring all the time. Place the sauce-pan in another of boiling water and add the gelatine. Stir for five or eight minutes, to dissolve the gelatine; then place the sauce-pan in a dish of ice water and beat the syrup until it begins to cool. Add the whites of the eggs, and beat until the mixture begins to harden. When it will just pour, turn it into the mould, and set away to harden. Serve with sugar and cream. Apricot and pear sponges can be made in the same manner.

Strawberry Sponge.

One quart of strawberries, half a package of gelatine, one cupful and a half of water, one cupful of sugar, the juice of a lemon, the whites of four eggs. Soak the gelatine two hours in half a cupful of the water. Mash the strawberries, and add half the sugar to them. Boil the remainder of the sugar and the cupful of water gently twenty minutes. Rub the strawberries through a sieve. Add the gelatine to the boiling syrup and take from the fire immediately; then add the strawberries. Place in a pan of ice water and beat five minutes. Add the whites of eggs and beat until the mixture begins to thicken. Pour into the moulds and set away to harden. Serve with sugar and cream. Raspberry and blackberry sponges are made in the same way.

Pineapple Sponge.

One small fresh pineapple, or a pint-and-a-half can of the fruit; one small cupful of sugar, half a package of gelatine, one cupful and a half of water, the whites of four eggs. Soak the gelatine two hours in half a cupful of the water. Chop the pineapple, and put it and the juice in a sauce-pan with the sugar and the remainder of the water. Simmer ten minutes. Add the gelatine, take from the fire immediately, and strain into a tin basin. When partially cooled, add the whites of the eggs, and beat until the mixture begins to thicken. Pour into a mould and set away to harden. Serve with soft custard flavored with wine.

Strawberry Bavarian Cream.

One quart of strawberries, one pint of cream, one large cupful of sugar, half a cupful of boiling water, half a cupful of cold water. Soak the gelatine two hours in the cold water. Mash the berries and sugar together, and let them stand one hour. Whip the cream to a froth. Strain the juice from the berries, pressing through as much as possible without the seeds. Pour the hot water on the gelatine, and when dissolved, strain it into the strawberry juice. Place the basin (which should be tin) in a pan of ice water and beat until the cream begins to thicken. When as thick as soft custard, stir in the whipped cream; and when this is well mixed, turn into the mould (it will make nearly two quarts), and set away to harden. Serve with whipped cream heaped around it, or, if the border mould is used, have the cream in the centre.

Raspberry and blackberry Bavarian creams are made the same as the strawberry.

Orange Bavarian Cream.

A pint and a half of cream, the juice of five oranges and grated rind of two, one large cupful of sugar, the yolks of six eggs, half a package of gelatine, half a cupful of cold water. Soak the gelatine two hours in the cold water. Whip the cream, and skim off until there is less than half a pint unwhipped. Grate the rind of the oranges on the gelatine, Squeeze and strain the orange juice, and add the sugar to it. Put the unwhipped cream in the double boiler. Beat the yolks of the eggs and add to the milk. Stir this mixture until it begins to thicken, and add the gelatine. As soon as the gelatine is dissolved, take off, and place in a pan of ice water. Stir until it begins to cool (about two minutes), and add the orange juice and sugar. Beat about as thick as soft custard, and add the whipped cream. Stir until well mixed, and pour into the moulds. Set away to harden. There will be about two quarts. Serve with whipped cream heaped around the orange cream.

Peach Bavarian Cream.

One quart of canned peaches, one large cupful of sugar, one pint of cream, half a box of gelatine, half a cupful of cold water. Mash the peaches and rub them and the juice through a sieve. Add the sugar. Soak the gelatine two hours in the cold water. Whip the cream to a froth. Put the peaches in a sauce-pan and let them simmer twenty minutes. Stir often. Add the gelatine to the hot peaches and remove from the fire immediately. Place the sauce-pan in a pan of ice water and beat until the mixture begins to thicken; then stir in the cream. Mix thoroughly, and pour into the mould. Set away to harden. Serve with whipped cream. Apricot and pear Bavarian creams are made in the same way.

Pineapple Bavarian Cream.

One pint of canned pineapple, one small tea-cupful of sugar, one pint of cream, half a package of gelatine, half a cupful of cold water. Soak the gelatine two hours in the water. Chop the pineapple fine and put it on with the sugar. Simmer twenty minutes. Add the gelatine, and strain immediately into a tin basin. Rub as much of the pineapple as possible through the sieve. Beat until it begins to thicken, and add the cream, which has been whipped to a froth. When well mixed, pour into the mould, and put away to harden. Serve with whipped cream.

Almond Bavarian Cream.

One pint and a half of cream, one pint of blanched sweet almonds, one- fourth of a teaspoonful of essence of almond, half a package of gelatine, three eggs, one small cupful of sugar, half a cupful of milk. Soak the gelatine two hours in the milk. Whip the cream to a stiff froth, until about half a pint is left unwhipped. Pound the almonds to a paste in the mortar. Put the almonds and unwhipped cream in the double boiler. Beat the sugar and eggs together and stir in with the cream and almonds. Cook until the mixture begins to thicken; then stir in the gelatine, and remove from the fire. Strain this into a tin basin, and add the essence of almond. Beat until it begins to thicken, and add the whipped cream. Mix well, pour into the moulds, and set away. Serve with whipped cream. Pistachio Bavarian cream is made in the same way, using one pint of pistachio nuts instead of the almonds, and omitting the essence of almond.

Chocolate Bavarian Cream.

One pint of cream, one cupful of milk, half a cupful of sugar, half a box of gelatine, one square of Baker's chocolate (an ounce). Soak the gelatine in half a cupful of the milk. Whip the cream to a stiff froth. Scrape the chocolate, and add two table-spoonfuls of the sugar to it. Put in a small frying-pan with one table-spoonful of hot water. Stir over a hot fire until smooth and glossy. Have the remaining half cupful of milk boiling. Stir the chocolate into it, and add the gelatine. Strain into a tin basin, and add the remainder of the sugar. Place the basin in a pan of ice water and beat the mixture until it begins to thicken; then add the whipped cream; and when well mixed, turn into the mould. When hard, serve with whipped cream heaped around.

Coffee Bavarian Cream.

One cupful of strong coffee, one pint of cream, half a package of gelatine, one cupful of sugar, one-third of a cupful of cold water. Soak the gelatine two hours in the cold water. Pour on this the coffee, boiling hot, and when the gelatine is dissolved, add the sugar. Strain into a tin basin, which put in a pan of ice water. Beat with a whisk until it begins to thicken; then add the cream, which has been whipped to a froth. When thoroughly mixed, turn into a mould and set away to harden. Serve with sugar and cream.

Directions for Freezing.

Four the mixture that is to be frozen into the tin can, put the beater in this, and put on the cover. Place in the tub, being careful to have the point on the bottom fit into the socket in the tub. Put on the cross-piece, and turn the crank to see if everything is in the right place. Next comes the packing. Ice should be broken in large pieces, and put in a canvas bag, and pounded fine with a mallet. Put a thick layer of it in the tub (about five inches deep), and then a thin layer of salt. Continue this until the tub is full, and pack down solid with a paddle or a common piece of wood. After turning the crank a few times add more salt and ice, and again pack down. Continue in this way until the tub is full. For a gallon can, three pints of salt and perhaps ten quarts of fine ice will be required. Remember that if the freezer is packed solid at first, no more ice or salt is needed. The water must never be let off, as it is one of the strongest elements to help the freezing. If more salt than the quantity given is used, the cream will freeze sooner, but it will not be so smooth and rich as when less is used.

Turn the crank for twenty minutes—not fast at first, but very rapidly the last ten minutes. It will be hard to torn when the mixture is frozen. Turn back the cross-piece, wipe the salt and ice from the cover, and take off the cover, not displacing the can itself. Remove the beater and scrape the cream from it. Work a large spoon up and down in the cream until it is light and the space left by taking out the beater is filled. Cover the can, cork up the hole from which the handle of the beater was taken, put on the cross piece, and set the tub in a cool place until serving time. Then dip the can for a few seconds in water that is a trifle warm, wipe it, and turn on the dish. Rest it for a moment, and lift a little.

If the cream is to be served from a mould, remove it when you do the beater. Fill the mould and work the cream up and down with a spoon. This will press the cream into every part, and lighten it. Cover the top of the mould with thick white paper, put on the tin cover, and bury in fresh ice and salt.

There are a great many good freezers. The Packer is especially suited to family use. It turns so easily that any lady can make her own creams. For the first twelve minutes a child can work it. It is made of the best stock, and will last many years. The cogs on freezers should be oiled occasionally. When you have made cream, see that every part of the freezer is clean and perfectly dry before putting away.

Vanilla Ice Cream.

The foundation given in this rule is suitable for all kinds of ice cream. One generous pint of milk, one cupful of sugar, half a cupful of flour, scant; two eggs, one quart of cream, one table- spoonful of vanilla extract, and when the cream is added, another tea- cupful of sugar. Let the milk come to a boil. Beat the first cupful of sugar, the flour and eggs together, and stir into the boiling milk. Cook twenty minutes, stirring often. Set away to cool, and when cool add the sugar, seasoning and cream, and freeze.

Vanilla Ice Cream, No. 2.

One pint of sugar, one of water, three pints of cream—not too rich, the yolks of five eggs and one large table-spoonful of vanilla extract Boil the sugar and water together for twenty-five minutes. Beat the yolks of the eggs with one-fourth of a teaspoonful of salt Place the basin of boiling syrup in another of boiling water. Stir the yolks of the eggs into the syrup, and beat rapidly for three minutes. Take the basin from the fire, place it in a pan of ice water and beat until cold. Add the vanilla and cream, and freeze.

Lemon Ice Cream.

Make the same as vanilla cream, and flavor with one table-spoonful of lemon extract.

Lemon Ice Cream, No. 2.

Three tea-cupfuls of sugar, the juice of three lemons, three pints of cream, the yolks of eight eggs, one pint of water. Boil the water, sugar and lemon juice together twenty minutes; then proceed as directed for vanilla ice cream, No. 2.

Orange Ice Cream.

Follow the second rule for lemon cream, but use the juice of six oranges instead of that of lemons.

Pineapple Ice Cream.

Make the same as vanilla, and flavor with a teaspoonful of extract of pineapple.

Pineapple Ice Cream, No. 2.

Pare a pineapple and cut it fine. Put it in a sauce-pan with one pint of water and a scant pint of sugar. Simmer gently for thirty minutes. Rub through a sieve, add the cream, gradually, and freeze.

Strawberry Ice Cream.

One quart of cream, one quart of strawberries, one pint of sugar. Mash the sugar and strawberries together, and let them stand one or two hours. Add the cream, rub through a strainer into the freezer, and freeze. Or, the cream can be made the same as the vanilla cream, and when half frozen, the whole berries be stirred in.

Strawberry Ice Cream a la Surprise.

Put three pints of strawberries in a deep dish with one cupful of sugar. Season three pints of cream with a cupful and a half of sugar and two table-spoonfuls of wine. Freeze this. Take out the beater and draw the frozen cream to the sides of the freezer. Fill the space in the centre with the strawberries and sugar, which cover with the frozen cream. Put on the cover and set away for an hour or more. When the cream is turned out, garnish the base, if you please, with strawberries.

Raspberry Ice Cream.

Make raspberry ice cream the same as strawberry, using a little less sugar.

Apricot Ice Cream.

One quart of cream, one generous pint of canned apricot, one pint of sugar, the yolks of three eggs, one pint of water. Boil the sugar and water together twenty minutes. Rub the apricot through a sieve and add it to the boiling syrup; add also the beaten yolks of the eggs, and cook for six minutes, stirring all the while. Take from the fire and place in a pan of cold water. Beat the mixture ten minutes. If cold at the end of that time, add the cream, and freeze.

Peach Ice Cream.

Peach ice cream can be made like the apricot, having the pint of peaches a very generous one.

Banana Ice Cream.

Make this the same as the apricot, using, however, only one cupful and a half of sugar, and six bananas. More bananas can be used if a strong flavor of the fruit is liked.

Chocolate Ice Cream.

Make a foundation with two eggs, one cupful of sugar, half a cupful of flour and a pint of milk, the same as for vanilla ice cream. While this is cooking, scrape one square (an ounce) of Baker's chocolate, and add to it two table-spoonfuls of sugar and one of boiling water. Stir this over the fire until perfectly smooth and glossy, and add it to the boiling mixture. This quantity gives a very delicate flavor. If a stronger one is wished use two squares of the chocolate. Put the mixture in cold water to cool. Stir occasionally. When cold, add one tea-cupful of sugar and one quart of milk. Freeze.

Brown Bread Ice Cream.

Dry the crust of brown bread in a warm oven. Roll fine and sift. Add one pint of the crumbs to the preparation for vanilla ice cream. The vanilla, and two-thirds of the second cupful of sugar must be omitted.

Macaroon Ice Cream.

Make a cream the same as for vanilla, except omit the second cupful of sugar and the vanilla flavor. Brown one dozen and a half macaroons into the oven. Let them cool; then roll them into fine crumbs. Add these and three table-spoonfuls of wine to the cream, and freeze.

Coffee Ice Cream.

Make the same as vanilla, with the addition of one cupful of strong coffee. This gives a strong flavor. Less can be used. The second cupful of sugar should be large.

Caramel Ice Cream.

Make the hot mixture, as for vanilla. Put the small cupful of sugar in a small frying-pan and stir over the fire until the sugar turns liquid and begins to smoke. Turn into the boiling mixture, and put away to cool. When cold, add one quart of cream. Strain the mixture into the freezer, and freeze. The flavor of this cream can be varied by browning the sugar more or less.

Almond Ice Cream.

This is made the same as vanilla, except that one teaspoonful of extract of bitter almond is used for flavoring.

Almond Ice Cream, No. 2.

One pint of blanched almonds, the yolks of five eggs, one quart of cream, one and a half cupfuls of sugar, one pint of milk, one pint of water. Boil the water and sugar together for twenty-five minutes. Put the almonds in a frying-pan and stir over the fire until they are a rich brown. Remove from the fire, and pound to a paste in the mortar. Cook the milk and powdered almonds in the double boiler for twenty minutes. Beat the yolks of the eggs and stir them into the boiling syrup. Beat this for four minutes, having the basin in boiling water. Take from the fire, and gradually beat into it the almonds and milk. Strain the mixture through a sieve, and rub through as much as possible. Stir occasionally while cooling. When cold, add the cream and half a teaspoonful of extract of almond. Freeze.

Pistachio Ice Cream.

One pint of pistachio nuts, half a cupful of blanched almonds, one quart of cream, one pint of water, one scant pint of sugar, the yolks of five eggs, one pint of milk, spinach green enough to give a delicate color (about a heaping teaspoonful-to be cooked with the nuts). Make the same as almond cream.

Walnut Ice Cream.

One pint of the meat of walnuts (the American are the best), pounded fine in a mortar; one pint of milk, one quart of cream, two small cupfuls of sugar, four eggs, one-fourth of a teaspoonful of salt. Beat the eggs with one cupful of sugar. Put them and the milk in the double boiler, and stir constantly until the mixture begins to thicken; then add the salt, and put away to cool. When cold, add the cream and nut meat, and freeze.

Cocoanut Ice Cream.

One quart of cream, one pint of milk, three eggs, one cupful and a half of sugar, one cupful of prepared cocoanut, the rind and juice of a lemon. Beat together the eggs and the grated lemon rind, and put with the milk in the double boiler. Stir until the mixture begins to thicken. Add the cocoanut, and put away to cool. When cool, add the sugar, lemon juice and cream. Freeze.

Fig Ice Cream.

One quart of milk, two table-spoonfuls of corn-starch, one of gelatine, one pint of cream, a cupful and a half of sugar, three eggs, two cupfuls of figs, cut fine; one table-spoonful of vanilla. Put the milk in the double boiler, reserving half a cupful. When it is boiling, stir in the corn-starch, which has been mixed with the cold milk. Cook ten minutes. Beat the eggs and sugar together. Pour the cooked mixture on this, stirring all the time. Return to the fire, add the gelatine, which has been soaking in four table-spoonfuls of cold water, and cook three minutes. Set away to cool. When cold, add the cream and vanilla, and freeze. When the cream has been freezing ten minutes, take off the cover and stir in the figs. Cover again and freeze until hard. Take out the beater, and with a large spoon, pack the cream smoothly. Set away until serving time.

Glace Meringue.

One quart of cream, one large cupful of granulated sugar and six table-spoonfuls of powdered, one table-spoonful of vanilla extract, the whites of six eggs, one cupful of milk, one table-spoonful of gelatine, soaked an hour in four of cold water. Let the milk come to a boil, and stir the gelatine into it. Strain into the cream. Add the vanilla and granulated sugar. Turn into the tin, and freeze. When the mixture is frozen (it will take about fifteen minutes), take out the beater and pack the cream smoothly, being careful to have the top perfectly level. Set away until serving time. It should stand half an hour at least. When ready to serve, beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, and gradually beat into this the powdered sugar. Turn the cream out on an earthen dish and cover every part with the meringue. Brown in a hot oven, and serve immediately. If the dish is flat, put a board under it. This keeps the heat from the bottom. Glace meringue is an elegant dish.

Bombe Glacee.

One quart of strawberry or raspberry sherbet, No. 2, one pint of sugar, one pint and a half of water, the yolks of eighteen eggs, one large table-spoonful of vanilla extract. Boil the sugar and water together twenty minutes. Beat the yolks of the eggs very light. Place the sauce-pan, with the syrup, in another of boiling water. Stir the beaten yolks of eggs into this syrup and beat with a whisk for ten minutes. Take from the fire, place the basin in a pan of cold water, and continue beating for twelve or fifteen minutes. Pack an ice cream mould in salt and ice. Take the sherbet from the freezer and spread on the sides and bottom of the mould. When it is hard, put the cooked mixture in the centre, being careful not to disturb the sherbet. Cover the cream with a piece of thick white paper. Put on the cover, and cover the top of the mould with salt and ice. Bombe glacee can be made with any kind of (No. 2) sherbet, having the centre part flavored to correspond with the sherbet. The handsomest dishes are, of course, made with the brightest-colored sherbets.

Frozen Pudding.

One generous pint of milk, two cupfuls of granulated sugar, a scant half cupful of flour, two eggs, two table-spoonfuls of gelatine, one quart of cream, one pound of French candied fruit—half a pound will do, four table-spoonfuls of wine. Let the milk come to a boil. Beat the flour, one cupful of sugar and the eggs together, and stir into the boiling milk. Cook twenty minutes, and add the gelatine, which has been soaking one or two hours in water enough to cover it. Set away to cool. When cool, add the wine, sugar and cream. Freeze ten minutes; then add the candied fruit, and finish freezing. Take out the beater, pack smoothly, and set away for an hour or two. When ready to serve, dip the tin in warm water, turn out the cream, and serve with whipped cream heaped around.

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