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Lover or Friend
by Rosa Nouchette Carey
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'Oh, Booty, Booty!' she gasped, as the little animal licked her pale face in a most feeling manner; 'to think he has come, Booty!' And if the application of a warm tongue could have given comfort and assurance, Audrey could have had plenty of both.

For a little while she could do nothing but sit there hugging the dog, and making little plaintive speeches to him, until she heard Mollie's step at the door, and then she put him down hastily.

'Oh, Audrey dear!' exclaimed Mollie, breathless with excitement. 'Have you really got back at last? They are all asking for you. Dinner is nearly ready, and you have not begun to dress yet. And who do you think is in the drawing-room?'

For Booty, who always knew when he was not wanted, had pattered softly out of the room, thinking it high time to rejoin his master.

'Is it Michael?' asked Audrey, with her face well hidden in her wardrobe.

'To think of your guessing like that!' returned Mollie in a vexed tone. 'Whatever put Captain Burnett in your head, Audrey? Everyone else is so surprised. Mrs. Ross nearly jumped off her chair when she heard his voice. He has been here two hours, and we have all been so busy getting his room ready.'

'I am very glad he has come,' returned Audrey, trying to speak as usual; 'but now will you go down, Mollie dear? for I shall dress more quickly if you do not talk to me. You may give me my dress if you like. There, that will do.' For Mollie's chatter was unendurable.

'How was she to go down and meet him before them all?' she thought, as her trembling fingers bungled with the fastening. Her cheeks were burning, and yet her hands were cold as ice. Would he see how nervous she was, and how she dreaded to meet him? And yet the thought that he was there—in the house—and that in a few minutes she should hear his beloved voice, made her almost dizzy with happiness. And as she clasped the brilliant cross on her neck she hardly dare look at herself, for fear she should read her own secret in her eyes.

The gong sounded before she was ready, and she dared not linger, for fear Mollie should come again in search of her. Without giving herself time for thought, she hurried down, and stood panting a little before the drawing-room door. Yes, they were all there: her father and mother and Mollie; and someone else—imperfectly seen through a sort of haze—was there too! Audrey never knew what word of greeting came to her lips as Michael took her hand. Her eyes were never lifted, as she felt that strong, warm pressure. His low-toned 'I have come, Audrey,' might mean anything or nothing, and was met by absolute silence on her part. Perhaps Michael felt this meeting embarrassing, for he dropped her hand in another moment and spoke to Mollie, and Audrey took refuge with her father.

But dinner was on the table, and she must take her seat opposite to him. It was Mollie who was beside him. Happily, no one spoke to her for the first few minutes. Dr. Ross was questioning Michael about his route, and Michael seemed to have a great deal to say about his journey.

Audrey recovered herself, and breathed a little more freely. He was talking to her father, and she could venture one glance at him. How well he looked! He was not so pale, and his moustache seemed darker—she had never thought him handsome before. But at this point, and as though aware of her scrutiny, Michael turned his face full on her, and a flash from the keen blue eyes made her head droop over her plate. During the rest of dinner she scarcely spoke, and more than once Mrs. Ross looked at her in some perplexity. Audrey was very strange, she thought. Had she and Michael quarrelled, that they had met so coldly, with not even a cousinly kiss after his long absence. And now they did not speak to each other!

Dinner was later than usual that night, and the prayer-bell sounded before they left the table. Audrey whispered to Mollie to play the hymn; but she was almost sorry she had done so when she found that Michael had no hymn-book, and she must offer him hers. He took it from her, perhaps because he noticed that her hand was not steady; and she could hear his clear, full bass, though she could not utter a note.

He was still beside her as they left the schoolroom; but as she was about to follow her mother and Mollie, she felt his hand on hers.

'Come with me a moment,' he said. 'I want to show you something.'

And there was no resisting the firm grasp that compelled her to obey. He was taking her to her father's study; and there he shut the door, as though to exclude the outer world. She was trembling with the fear of what he would say to her, and how she was to answer him, when he came up to her and said, in his old familiar voice:

'Are you never going to look at me again, Audrey?'

Something amused, and yet caressing, in his tone made her raise her eyes, and the look that met hers said so plainly that he understood everything, that her embarrassment and shyness passed away for ever; and as he took her in his arms, with a word or two that told her of his deep inward gladness, a sense of well-being and utter content seemed to assure her that she had found her true rest at last.



CHAPTER LI

'LOVE'S AFTERMATH'

'I seek no copy now of life's first half: Leave here the pages with long musing curled, And write me new my future's epigraph, New angel mine, unhoped for in the world.'

MRS. BROWNING.

Neither of them spoke for some minutes; perhaps Michael's strong emotion felt the need of silence. But presently he said in a voice that thrilled her with its tenderness:

'Audrey, you must never be afraid of me again.'

'I shall never need to be afraid again,' she returned softly. 'Oh, Michael, if you only knew how dreadful it has been all the week! I would not go through it again for worlds.'

'Has it been so bad as that?' in his old rallying tone, for he saw how greatly she was moved.

'You have no idea how bad it was. I felt that I had done something very bold and unmaidenly in writing that postscript to father's letter. I had longed for your return; but after that I began to dread it: I was so afraid of what you must think of me.'

'I think you have known my opinion on that subject for a great many years,' he replied gently. 'If you had not been different from other girls, if you had not been immeasurably above them all in my eyes, I would never have asked you to send me that message. I knew I could rely on your perfect truth, and you have not disappointed me.'

This delicate flattery soothed her and appeased her sensitiveness. Michael watched her for a moment; then he drew up a chair to the fire in his old way.

'You must sit there and talk to me for a little while,' he said quietly.

And as she looked at him rather doubtfully, and suggested that her mother would be wondering at their absence, he negatived the idea at once.

'By this time your father will have told her everything; he has been in my confidence all these months. No, they will not want us, and I have not seen you yet—at least, you have not seen me; I am quite sure of that.' And as Audrey's dimples came into play at this remark, he very nearly made her feel shy again by saying, 'You have no idea how lovely you have grown, Audrey! Has anyone told you so, I wonder?'

'No, of course not. Who do you think would talk such nonsense to me?'

But her blush made him still more certain of the fact.

'At any rate, it is the dearest face in the world to me,' he went on, still more earnestly. 'Audrey, I think even if you had not written those three little words, I must still have come home. I could not have stayed away from you any longer.'

'If I had only known that, I might have spared myself a great deal of pain,' she replied quickly; 'but they told me that you were going to Greece and the Holy Land, and Mr. Abercrombie had come back alone, and I thought—I thought that I should never see you again.'

'I began to have the same sort of feeling myself, and then I was so tired of waiting. How long have I wanted you, Audrey?—ten or twelve years, at least. I begin to think that there never was such a fellow for constancy.'

'Ten or twelve years! What can you mean, Michael?'

But she knew well enough what he meant, only she was woman enough to love to hear him say it.

'Oh, it was quite twelve years ago! I can remember the occasion quite well. You were in a short white frock, and you had your hair streaming over your shoulders. You were such a pretty little girl, Audrey. I admired you far more than I admired Gage, with all her regular features.'

'Oh, what nonsense, Michael!'

'Nonsense! You will tell me next that you do not remember asking me to give you a kiss. "I want to kiss you, Mike, because you are so nice and smart." Do you think I shall ever forget that? I lost my heart to you then.'

'You must not expect me to remember those things,' she returned, blushing like a rose.

'No, darling, I suppose not; you were only a child then. But, all the same, these memories are very sweet to me. You have been my one and only love, and you know that now.'

'Oh, Michael!' And now the gray eyes filled with tears, for these words sounded like a reproach to her.

'You must not misunderstand me,' he returned, shocked at her evident misconception of his words. 'Do you think that I begrudge the love you gave that poor fellow? Some day, when you are my wife, I will tell you all I think on this subject; but not now—not to-night, of all nights, when I know and feel for the first time that my treasure is in my own keeping.'

And then he stopped, and, in rather an agitated voice, begged her that he might not see tears in her dear eyes to-night.

'I did not mean to be foolish,' she returned, in a low voice; 'only, when I think of all you have suffered, and how patient you have been, and how beautifully you bore it all for our sakes, I feel as though I should never make up to you for all you have gone through. Michael'—and here her look was a little wistful—'are you sure that I shall never disappoint you—that what I have to give will content you?'

But his answer fully satisfied her on this point. He was more than content, he said; he needed no assurances of her affection—he would never need them. The first look at her face had told him all he wanted to know.

'I think I can read your very thoughts, Audrey—that I know you better than you know yourself;' and as Michael said this there was a smile upon his face that seemed to baffle her—a smile so penetrating and sweet that it lingered in her memory long afterwards.

And a few minutes later Michael proved the truth of his words. He was showing her the ring that he had chosen—a half-hoop of diamonds of the finest water, and their lustre and brilliancy almost dazzled Audrey.

'I remember your love for diamonds,' he said, as he took her hand.

But she did not answer him. She was looking rather sadly at a little gold ring she had always worn.

'Do not take it off!' he said hastily, as he read the tender reluctance in her face. 'Dear Audrey, why should not my diamonds keep company with his ring?' And, as her eyes expressed her gratitude, he slipped the brilliant ring into its place. 'They will soon have to make way for another. The diamonds will make a capital guard.'

But though he evidently expected an answer to this, Audrey made no response, except to remark on the lateness of the hour; and then Michael did consent to adjourn to the drawing-room.

They were eagerly expected and heartily welcomed, and as her father folded her in his arms with a murmured blessing, and she received her mother's tearful congratulations, Audrey felt how truly they appreciated her choice. On this occasion there were no drawbacks, no whispered fear of what Geraldine and her husband might say. Mrs. Ross begged that she might be allowed to carry the good news to Hillside. They were coming up to dinner, and she thought that it was due to them that they should be prepared beforehand; and, as everyone assented to this, Mrs. Ross started early the next morning on her delightful embassage.

But she had miscalculated the amount of pleasure that her news would impart. Geraldine cried with joy when she heard the news, and nothing would satisfy her except to put on her bonnet and walk back with her mother to Woodcote.

She interrupted a delightful tete-a-tete between the lovers. Not that either of them minded; for, as Michael sensibly remarked, he expected that they would have plenty of tete-a-tetes in their life, and Audrey was sufficiently fond of her sister to welcome her under any circumstances.

'How did you think I could wait until the evening?' she said, as she threw her arms round Audrey. 'Oh, my darling, do you know how glad I am about this? And to think that no one ever imagined it would be Michael!' And then, as he gave her a brotherly kiss, and begged that he, too, might be congratulated, she continued earnestly: 'Yes, indeed; and we have all been as blind and stupid as possible! And yet, when one comes to think of it, you and Audrey are cut out for each other.'

'I was afraid you might say something about the disparity in our ages—five-and-twenty and forty; and actually I have some gray hairs already, Gage.'

'Nonsense!' she returned indignantly. 'I never saw you look younger and better in your life; and as for disparity, as you call it, isn't it just the same between Percival and myself? and can any couple be happier? If you are only as good to Audrey as Percival is to me, she will be the happiest woman in the world!'

It was a pity Mr. Harcourt could not see his wife as she made this speech, for she looked so lovely in her matronly dignity that Michael and Audrey exchanged an admiring glance. But the climax of their success was felt to be reached when Mr. Harcourt arrived that evening.

'You have done the best day's work that ever you did in your life when you said "Yes" to Burnett!' was his first speech to Audrey; and then he had turned very red, and wrung her hand with such violence that it throbbed with pain.

'I think you ought to give her a kiss, Percy,' suggested his wife a little mischievously; for it was well known that Mr. Harcourt objected to any such demonstration, except to his own wife.

'No, thank you,' returned Audrey, stepping back. 'I am quite sure of Percival's sympathy without putting it to such a painful proof.'

'I shall kiss Audrey on her wedding-day,' replied Mr. Harcourt solemnly; 'that is, if her husband will permit me,' with a bow to Michael.

But this remark drove his sister-in-law to the other end of the room, so that she lost a certain straightforward and complimentary speech that gave a great deal of pleasure to Michael, and which he never could be induced to repeat to her.

No one could doubt Audrey's happiness after the first few days of strangeness had worn off, and she had grown used to her new position as Michael's fiancee. Michael had been very careful not to scare her at first—he had no wish to bring back the shyness that had made their first evening such a misery to them both—and his forbearance was rewarded when he saw the old frankness and joyousness return, and Audrey became her own sweet self again.

Michael was an ardent lover, but he was not an exacting one: Audrey could have had as much freedom as she needed during their brief engagement, but she had ceased to desire such freedom.

She remembered sometimes with faint, unavoidable regret that Cyril's demonstrativeness had at times wearied her; but she had no such feeling with Michael: when he left her for a few days to complete the purchase of a pretty little property he had secured for their future home in one of the loveliest spots in Surrey, she was as restless during his absence as ever Geraldine had been.

Michael was surprised to find how she had missed him, and how overjoyed she was at his return; but he never told her so, or ever alluded to the mistake that had doomed them both to such misery.

'My innocent darling! how could she know that I loved her, when I never told her so? It was I who would have been to blame if she had married Cyril. God grant that in that case she might never have found out her mistake; but I do not know. She would always have cared too much for Michael, and he would have found it out in time;' but he kept such thoughts to himself.

Audrey had no objection to offer when Michael pleaded that they should be married early in August. He had waited long enough, she knew, and there was nothing to gain by waiting.

But she had a long talk with her mother and Geraldine about Mollie, whom she still regarded as her special protegee.

'Michael has Kester,' she suggested; 'so I daresay he will not mind Mollie sharing our home.'

'You will make a great mistake if you ask him any such question,' returned Geraldine, in her practical, matter-of-fact way. 'Kester will be at Oxford, and during the long vacation he will join some reading party or other—Michael told me so; but Mollie would want a home all the year round. Why do you not leave her at Woodcote? Mother will be dreadfully dull without you at first, and, of course, I cannot always be with her. You are very fond of Mollie, are you not, mother?'

'She is a dear, good child, and I should love to have her with me,' was Mrs. Ross's reply. 'That is a clever thought of yours, my love, and Michael certainly will want his wife to himself—men always do.'

'If you really think so, mother, and if Mollie does not mind, she shall stay at Woodcote,' was Audrey's reply.

And when Mollie was consulted she proved quite willing to do as they all wished.

'Of course, dear Mrs. Ross will be dull. And I know I should only be in Captain Burnett's way,' argued Mollie, a little tearfully. 'I knew that from the first. I shall miss you dreadfully, Audrey. No one will ever take your place; but I shall feel as though I were helping you somehow.'

'Yes, and then you will pay me long visits, Mollie; and, of course, Michael will often bring me to see mother.'

And this charming prospect, and the promise that she should be Audrey's bridesmaid, speedily consoled Mollie.

Michael had stipulated that their honeymoon should be spent in Scotland, and to Audrey's amusement Braemar was the place he finally selected, and he would have the very cottage, or rather cottages, that Dr. Ross had taken for his family.

'We can shut up some of the rooms and only use as many as we want,' he said, when Mrs. Ross had complained of the roominess. 'We are rich people, and can afford it; and as Crauford is to be Audrey's maid, she can come with us and see that things are comfortable. Do you remember that sitting-room, Audrey, and the horse-hair sofa, and the rowan-berries and heather in the big china jars? By the bye, you must have a gray tweed dress and a deerstalker cap, and look as you used to look; and there is the little bridge where Gage and I used to meet you all when you had had a day's outing on the moors. Shall you not love to go there again, Audrey?

And in answer Audrey said 'Yes' rather demurely.

But she was not demure at all when two months afterwards she sat on the little bridge in the sunset, watching the very same ducks dibble with their yellow bills in the brook that trickled so musically over the stones, while Michael stood beside her, lazily throwing in pebbles for Booty's amusement; on the contrary, she was laughing and talking with a great deal of animation, and, strange to say, she wore the gray tweed, and the deerstalker cap was on her bright brown hair.

'We have had such a delicious day!' she was saying. 'I think there is nothing, after all, like a Scotch moor. Do look at those ducks, Michael; how angry they are with Booty, and how ridiculous they look waddling over those wet stones!'

'I was thinking of something else,' he replied; and his tone made Audrey look up rather quickly. 'Do you remember your tirade on the subject of single blessedness, my Lady Bountiful, and how freedom outbalanced all the delights of wedded bliss? I recollect we were on the moors then, and Kester was with us, and I took out my pocket-book and wrote down the date. Well, I will be magnanimous and not ask an awkward question. Six weeks of married life is not such a long time, after all.'

But she interrupted him with some impatience:

'Michael, how can you recall such nonsense? But of course you are only doing it to tease me. As though I were not much happier than I was then!'

'Are you really happier, Audrey—really and truly, my darling?'

'Oh, Michael, what a question! Am I not your wife? Is not that answer enough? Do you think I would change places with any other woman in the world, or even with my old self?'

And as he looked at her bright face he knew that she was speaking the truth, and that Audrey Burnett so loved and reverenced her husband that she was likely to be a happier woman than Audrey Ross had been.

THE END

Printed by R. & R. CLARK, LIMITED, Edinburgh.



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4. ROB ROY. With 10 Illustrations by R. W. MACBETH, A.R.A., and SAM BOUGH, R.S.A.

5. OLD MORTALITY. With 10 Illustrations by J. MACWHIRTER, A.R.A., R. HERDMAN, R.S.A., SAM BOUGH, R.S.A., M. L. GOW, D. Y. CAMERON, LOCKHART BOGLE, and ALFRED HARTLEY.

6. THE HEART OF MIDLOTHIAN. With 10 Illustrations by Sir J. E. MILLAIS, Bart., HUGH CAMERON, R.S.A., SAM BOUGH, R.S.A., R. HERDMAN, R.S.A., and WAL. PAGET.

7. A LEGEND OF MONTROSE and THE BLACK DWARF. With 7 Illustrations by Sir GEORGE REID, P.R.S.A., GEORGE HAY, R.S.A., HORATIO MACCULLOCH, R.S.A., W. E. LOCKHART, R.S.A., H. MACBETH-RAEBURN, and T. SCOTT.

8. THE BRIDE OF LAMMERMOOR. With 8 Illustrations by Sir J. E. MILLAIS, Bart., JOHN SMART, R.S.A., SAM BOUGH, R.S.A., GEORGE HAY, R.S.A., and H. MACBETH-RAEBURN.

9. IVANHOE. With 12 Illustrations by AD. LALAUZE.

10. THE MONASTERY. With 10 Illustrations by GORDON BROWNE.

11. THE ABBOT. With 10 Illustrations by GORDON BROWNE.

12. KENILWORTH. With 12 Illustrations by AD. LALAUZE.

13. THE PIRATE. With 10 Illustrations by W. E. LOCKHART, R.S.A., SAM BOUGH, R.S.A., HERBERT DICKSEE, W. STRANG, LOCKHART BOGLE, C. J. HOLMES, and F. S. WALKER.

14. THE FORTUNES OF NIGEL. With 10 Illustrations by JOHN PETTIE, R.A., and R. W. MACBETH, A.R.A.

15. PEVERIL OF THE PEAK. With 15 Illustrations by W. Q. ORCHARDSON, R.A., JOHN PETTIE, R.A., F. DADD, R.I., ARTHUR HOPKINS, A.R.W.S., and S. L. WOOD.

16. QUENTIN DURWARD. With 12 Illustrations by AD. LALAUZE.

17. ST. RONAN'S WELL. With 10 Illustrations by Sir G. REID, P.R.S.A., R. W. MACBETH, A.R.A., W. HOLE, R.S.A., and A. FORESTIER.

18. REDGAUNTLET. With 12 Illustrations by Sir JAMES D. LINTON, P.R.I., JAMES ORROCK, R.I., SAM BOUGH, R.S.A., W. HOLE, R.S.A., G. HAY, R.S.A., T. SCOTT, A.R.S.A., W. BOUCHER, and FRANK SHORT.

19. THE BETROTHED and THE TALISMAN. With 10 Illustrations by HERBERT DICKSEE, WAL. PAGET, and J. LE BLANT.

20. WOODSTOCK. With 10 Illustrations by W. HOLE, R.S.A.

21. THE FAIR MAID OF PERTH. With 10 Illustrations by Sir G. REID, P.R.S.A., JOHN PETTIE, R.A., R. W. MACBETH, A.R.A., and ROBERT HERDMAN, R.S.A.

22. ANNE OF GEIERSTEIN. With 10 Illustrations by R. DE LOS RIOS.

23. COUNT ROBERT OF PARIS and THE SURGEON'S DAUGHTER. With 10 Illustrations by W. HATHERELL, R.I., and W. B. WOLLEN, R.I.

24. CASTLE DANGEROUS, CHRONICLES OF THE CANONGATE, ETC. With 10 Illustrations by H. MACBETH-RAEBURN and G. D. ARMOUR.

The Border Waverley

SOME OPINIONS OF THE PRESS

TIMES.—"It would be difficult to find in these days a more competent and sympathetic editor of Scott than his countryman, the brilliant and versatile man of letters who has undertaken the task, and if any proof were wanted either of his qualifications or of his skill and discretion in displaying them, Mr. Lang has furnished it abundantly in his charming Introduction to 'Waverley.' The editor's own notes are judiciously sparing, but conspicuously to the point, and they are very discreetly separated from those of the author, Mr. Lang's laudable purpose being to illustrate and explain Scott, not to make the notes a pretext for displaying his own critical faculty and literary erudition. The illustrations by various competent hands are beautiful in themselves and beautifully executed, and, altogether, the 'Border Edition' of the Waverley Novels bids fair to become the classical edition of the great Scottish classic."

SPECTATOR.—"We trust that this fine edition of our greatest and most poetical of novelists will attain, if it has not already done so, the high popularity it deserves. To all Scott's lovers it is a pleasure to know that, despite the daily and weekly inrush of ephemeral fiction, the sale of his works is said by the booksellers to rank next below Tennyson's in poetry, and above that of everybody else in prose."

ATHENAEUM.—"The handsome 'Border Edition' has been brought to a successful conclusion. The publisher deserves to be complimented on the manner in which the edition has been printed and illustrated, and Mr. Lang on the way in which he has performed his portion of the work. His introductions have been tasteful and readable; he has not overdone his part; and, while he has supplied much useful information, he has by no means overburdened the volumes with notes."

NOTES AND QUERIES.—"This spirited and ambitious enterprise has been conducted to a safe termination, and the most ideal edition of the Waverley Novels in existence is now completed."

SATURDAY REVIEW.—"Of all the many collections of the Waverley Novels, the 'Border Edition' is incomparably the most handsome and the most desirable.... Type, paper, illustrations, are altogether admirable."

MAGAZINE OF ART.—"Size, type, paper, and printing, to say nothing of the excessively liberal and charming introduction of the illustrations, make this perhaps the most desirable edition of Scott ever issued on this side of the Border."

DAILY CHRONICLE.—"There is absolutely no fault to be found with it, as to paper, type, or arrangement."



THE WORKS OF THOMAS HARDY

Collected Edition

1. TESS OF THE D'URBERVILLES.

2. FAR FROM THE MADDING CROWD.

3. THE MAYOR OF CASTERBRIDGE.

4. A PAIR OF BLUE EYES.

5. TWO ON A TOWER.

6. THE RETURN OF THE NATIVE.

7. THE WOODLANDERS.

8. JUDE THE OBSCURE.

9. THE TRUMPET-MAJOR.

10. THE HAND OF ETHELBERTA.

11. A LAODICEAN.

12. DESPERATE REMEDIES.

13. WESSEX TALES.

14. LIFE'S LITTLE IRONIES.

15. A GROUP OF NOBLE DAMES.

16. UNDER THE GREENWOOD TREE.

17. THE WELL-BELOVED.

18. WESSEX POEMS, and other Verses.

19. POEMS OF THE PAST AND THE PRESENT.

20. A CHANGED MAN, THE WAITING SUPPER, and other Tales.



THE WORKS OF CHARLES KINGSLEY

WESTWARD HO!

HYPATIA; or, New Foes with an old Face.

TWO YEARS AGO.

ALTON LOCKE, Tailor and Poet. An Autobiography.

HEREWARD THE WAKE, "Last of the English."

YEAST: A Problem.

POEMS: including The Saint's Tragedy, Andromeda, Songs, Ballads, etc.

THE WATER-BABIES: A Fairy Tale for a Land-Baby. With Illustrations by LINLEY SAMBOURNE.

THE HEROES; or, Greek Fairy Tales for my Children. With Illustrations by the Author.

GLAUCUS; or, The Wonders of the Shore. With Illustrations.

MADAM HOW AND LADY WHY; or, First Lessons in Earth Lore for Children. With Illustrations.

AT LAST. A Christmas in the West Indies. With Illustrations.

THE HERMITS.

HISTORICAL LECTURES AND ESSAYS.

PLAYS AND PURITANS, and other Historical Essays.

THE ROMAN AND THE TEUTON.

PROSE IDYLLS, New and Old.

SANITARY AND SOCIAL LECTURES AND ESSAYS.

LITERARY AND GENERAL LECTURES AND ESSAYS.

ALL SAINTS' DAY: and other Sermons.

DISCIPLINE: and other Sermons.

THE GOOD NEWS OF GOD. Sermons.

GOSPEL OF THE PENTATEUCH.

SERMONS FOR THE TIMES.

VILLAGE SERMONS, AND TOWN AND COUNTRY SERMONS.

WESTMINSTER SERMONS.



THE NOVELS OF F. MARION CRAWFORD

1. MR. ISAACS: A Tale of Modern India.

2. DOCTOR CLAUDIUS: A True Story.

3. A ROMAN SINGER.

4. ZOROASTER.

5. MARZIO'S CRUCIFIX.

6. A TALE OF A LONELY PARISH.

7. PAUL PATOFF.

8. WITH THE IMMORTALS.

9. GREIFENSTEIN.

10. TAQUISARA: A Novel.

11. A ROSE OF YESTERDAY.

12. SANT' ILARIO.

13. A CIGARETTE-MAKER'S ROMANCE.

14. KHALED: A Tale of Arabia.

15. THE THREE FATES.

16. THE WITCH OF PRAGUE.

17. MARION DARCHE: A Story without Comment.

18. KATHARINE LAUDERDALE.

19. THE CHILDREN OF THE KING.

20. PIETRO GHISLERI.

21. DON ORSINO.

22. CASA BRACCIO.

23. ADAM JOHNSTONE'S SON.

24. THE RALSTONS.

25. CORLEONE: A Tale of Sicily.

26. VIA CRUCIS: A Romance of the Second Crusade.

27. IN THE PALACE OF THE KING: A Love Story of Old Madrid.

28. CECILIA: A Story of Modern Rome.

29. MARIETTA: A Maid of Venice.

30. THE HEART OF ROME.

31. SOPRANO: A Portrait.

32. THE PRIMADONNA.

33. THE DIVA'S RUBY.

34. "WHOSOEVER SHALL OFFEND——"

35. A LADY OF ROME.

36. ARETHUSA.

37. THE WHITE SISTER.

38. STRADELLA: An Old Italian Love Tale.



THE NOVELS OF ROLF BOLDREWOOD

1. ROBBERY UNDER ARMS: A Story of Life and Adventure in the Bush and in the Gold-fields of Australia.

2. A MODERN BUCCANEER.

3. THE MINER'S RIGHT: A Tale of the Australian Gold-fields.

4. THE SQUATTER'S DREAM.

5. A SYDNEY-SIDE SAXON.

6. A COLONIAL REFORMER.

7. NEVERMORE.

8. PLAIN LIVING: A Bush Idyll.

9. MY RUN HOME.

10. THE CROOKED STICK; or, Pollie's Probation.

11. OLD MELBOURNE MEMORIES.

12. WAR TO THE KNIFE; or, Tangata Maori.

13. BABES IN THE BUSH.

14. IN BAD COMPANY, and other Stories.



By H. G. WELLS

THE PLATTNER STORY: and others.

TALES OF SPACE AND TIME.

THE STOLEN BACILLUS: and other Incidents.

THE INVISIBLE MAN. A Grotesque Romance.

LOVE AND MR. LEWISHAM. A Story of a very Young Couple.

WHEN THE SLEEPER WAKES.

THE FIRST MEN IN THE MOON.

TWELVE STORIES AND A DREAM.

THE FOOD OF THE GODS AND HOW IT CAME TO EARTH.

KIPPS: The Story of a Simple Soul.

IN THE DAYS OF THE COMET.

TONO-BUNGAY.



By A. E. W. MASON

THE COURTSHIP OF MORRICE BUCKLER.

THE PHILANDERERS.

MIRANDA OF THE BALCONY.



By EGERTON CASTLE

"LA BELLA": and others.

MARSHFIELD THE OBSERVER.



By AGNES and EGERTON CASTLE

THE BATH COMEDY.



THE NOVELS OF ROSA N. CAREY

WESTMINSTER GAZETTE.—"A clever delineator of character, possessed of a reserve of strength in a quiet, easy, flowing style, Miss Carey never fails to please a large class of readers."

STANDARD.—"Miss Carey has the gift of writing naturally and simply, her pathos is true and unforced, and her conversations are sprightly and sharp."

LADY.—"Miss Carey's novels are always welcome; they are out of the common run, immaculately pure, and very high in tone."

Nearly 800,000 of these works have been printed.

1. NELLIE'S MEMORIES. 58th Thousand.

2. WEE WIFIE. 42nd Thousand.

3. BARBARA HEATHCOTE'S TRIAL. 35th Thousand.

4. ROBERT ORD'S ATONEMENT. 30th Thousand.

5. WOOED AND MARRIED. 40th Thousand.

6. HERIOT'S CHOICE. 29th Thousand.

7. QUEENIE'S WHIM. 34th Thousand.

8. NOT LIKE OTHER GIRLS. 43rd Thousand.

9. MARY ST JOHN. 27th Thousand.

10. FOR LILIAS. 26th Thousand.

11. UNCLE MAX. 36th Thousand.

12. RUE WITH A DIFFERENCE. 24th Thousand.

13. THE HIGHWAY OF FATE. 25th Thousand.

14. ONLY THE GOVERNESS. 40th Thousand.

15. LOVER OR FRIEND? 31st Thousand.

16. BASIL LYNDHURST. 26th Thousand.

17. SIR GODFREY'S GRAND-DAUGHTERS. 27th Thousand.

18. THE OLD, OLD STORY. 30th Thousand.

19. THE MISTRESS OF BRAE FARM. 32nd Thousand.

20. MRS. ROMNEY and "BUT MEN MUST WORK." 14th Thousand.

21. OTHER PEOPLE'S LIVES. 5th Thousand.

22. HERB OF GRACE. 27th Thousand.

23. A PASSAGE PERILOUS. 25th Thousand.

24. AT THE MOORINGS. 21st Thousand.

25. THE HOUSEHOLD OF PETER. 23rd Thousand.

26. NO FRIEND LIKE A SISTER. 21st Thousand.

27. THE ANGEL OF FORGIVENESS. 20th Thousand.

28. THE SUNNY SIDE OF THE HILL. 18th Thousand.

29. THE KEY OF THE UNKNOWN. 17th Thousand.



THE NOVELS AND TALES OF CHARLOTTE M. YONGE

THE HEIR OF REDCLYFFE. With Illustrations by KATE GREENAWAY.

HEARTSEASE; or, the Brother's Wife. New Edition. With Illustrations by KATE GREENAWAY.

DYNEVOR TERRACE; or, the Clue of Life. With Illustrations by ADRIAN STOKES.

THE DAISY CHAIN; or, Aspirations. A Family Chronicle. With Illustrations by J. P. ATKINSON.

THE TRIAL: More Links of the Daisy Chain. With Illustrations by J. P. ATKINSON.

THE PILLARS OF THE HOUSE; or, Under Wode, under Rode. Two Vols. With Illustrations by HERBERT GANDY.

THE YOUNG STEPMOTHER; or, a Chronicle of Mistakes. With Illustrations by MARIAN HUXLEY.

THE CLEVER WOMAN OF THE FAMILY. With Illustrations by ADRIAN STOKES.

THE THREE BRIDES. With Illustrations by ADRIAN STOKES.

MY YOUNG ALCIDES: A Faded Photograph. With Illustrations by ADRIAN STOKES.

THE CAGED LION. With Illustrations by W. J. HENNESSY.

THE DOVE IN THE EAGLE'S NEST. With Illustrations by W. J. HENNESSY.

THE CHAPLET OF PEARLS; or, the White and Black Ribaumont. With Illustrations by W. J. HENNESSY.

LADY HESTER; or, Ursula's Narrative; and THE DANVERS PAPERS. With Illustrations by JANE E. COOK.

MAGNUM BONUM; or, Mother Carey's Brood. With Illustrations by W. J. HENNESSY.

LOVE AND LIFE: an Old Story in Eighteenth Century Costume. With Illustrations by W. J. HENNESSY.

UNKNOWN TO HISTORY. A Story of the Captivity of Mary of Scotland. With Illustrations by W. J. HENNESSY.

THE ARMOURER'S 'PRENTICES. With Illustrations by W. J. HENNESSY.

SCENES AND CHARACTERS; or, Eighteen Months at Beechcroft. With Illustrations by W. J. HENNESSY.

CHANTRY HOUSE. With Illustrations by W. J. HENNESSY.

A MODERN TELEMACHUS. With Illustrations by W. J. HENNESSY.

BYWORDS. A collection of Tales new and old.

BEECHCROFT AT ROCKSTONE.

MORE BYWORDS.

A REPUTED CHANGELING; or, Three Seventh Years Two Centuries Ago.

THE LITTLE DUKE, RICHARD THE FEARLESS. With Illustrations.

THE LANCES OF LYNWOOD. With Illustrations by J. B.

THE PRINCE AND THE PAGE: A Story of the Last Crusade. With Illustrations by ADRIAN STOKES.

TWO PENNILESS PRINCESSES. With Illustrations by W. J. HENNESSY.

THAT STICK.

AN OLD WOMAN'S OUTLOOK IN A HAMPSHIRE VILLAGE.

GRISLY GRISELL; or, The Laidly Lady of Whitburn. A Tale of the Wars of the Roses.

HENRIETTA'S WISH. Second Edition.

THE LONG VACATION.

THE RELEASE; or, Caroline's French Kindred.

THE PILGRIMAGE OF THE BEN BERIAH.

THE TWO GUARDIANS; or, Home in this World. Second Edition.

COUNTESS KATE AND THE STOKESLEY SECRET.

MODERN BROODS; or, Developments Unlooked for.

STROLLING PLAYERS: A Harmony of Contrasts. By C. M. YONGE and C. R. COLERIDGE.

STRAY PEARLS. Memoirs of Margaret de Ribaumont, Viscountess of Bellaise. With Illustrations by W. J. HENNESSY.



Works by Mrs. Craik

Olive: A Novel. With Illustrations by G. BOWERS.

Agatha's Husband: A Novel. With Illustrations by WALTER CRANE.

The Head of the Family: A Novel. With Illustrations by WALTER CRANE.

Two Marriages.

The Laurel Bush.

King Arthur: Not a Love Story.

About Money, and other Things.

Concerning Men, and other Papers.



Works by Mrs. Oliphant

Neighbours on the Green.

Kirsteen: the Story of a Scotch Family Seventy Years Ago.

A Beleaguered City: A Story of the Seen and the Unseen.

Hester: a Story of Contemporary Life.

He that Will Not when He May.

The Railway Man and his Children.

The Marriage of Elinor.

Sir Tom.

The Heir-Presumptive and the Heir-Apparent.

A Country Gentleman and his Family.

A Son of the Soil.

The Second Son.

The Wizard's Son: A Novel.

Lady William.

Young Musgrave.



The Works of Dean Farrar

SEEKERS AFTER GOD. The Lives of Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius.

ETERNAL HOPE. Sermons preached in Westminster Abbey.

THE WITNESS OF HISTORY TO CHRIST.

THE SILENCE AND VOICES OF GOD, with other Sermons.

"IN THE DAYS OF THY YOUTH." Sermons on Practical Subjects.

SAINTLY WORKERS. Five Lenten Lectures.

EPHPHATHA; or, the Amelioration of the World.

MERCY AND JUDGMENT: a few last words on Christian Eschatology.

SERMONS & ADDRESSES DELIVERED IN AMERICA.



THE WORKS OF Frederick Denison Maurice

SERMONS PREACHED IN LINCOLN'S INN CHAPEL. In five vols.

SERMONS PREACHED IN COUNTRY CHURCHES.

CHRISTMAS DAY: and other Sermons.

THEOLOGICAL ESSAYS.

THE PROPHETS AND KINGS OF THE OLD TESTAMENT.

THE PATRIARCHS AND LAWGIVERS OF THE OLD TESTAMENT.

THE GOSPEL OF ST. JOHN.

THE EPISTLES OF ST. JOHN.

THE FRIENDSHIP OF BOOKS: and other Lectures.

THE PRAYER BOOK AND THE LORD'S PRAYER.

THE DOCTRINE OF SACRIFICE. Deduced from the Scriptures.

THE ACTS OF THE APOSTLES.

THE KINGDOM OF CHRIST; or, Hints to a Quaker respecting the Principles, Constitution, and Ordinances of the Catholic Church. 2 vols.



By J. H. SHORTHOUSE

JOHN INGLESANT: A Romance.

SIR PERCIVAL: a Story of the Past and of the Present.

THE LITTLE SCHOOLMASTER MARK.

THE COUNTESS EVE.

A TEACHER OF THE VIOLIN.

BLANCHE, LADY FALAISE.



By GERTRUDE ATHERTON

A DAUGHTER OF THE VINE.

THE CALIFORNIANS.



By HUGH CONWAY

A FAMILY AFFAIR.



By W. CLARK RUSSELL

MAROONED.



By ANNIE KEARY

A YORK AND A LANCASTER ROSE.

CASTLE DALY: the Story of an Irish Home thirty years ago.

JANET'S HOME.

A DOUBTING HEART.

THE NATIONS AROUND ISRAEL.

OLDBURY.



By GEORGE BORROW

LAVENGRO.



By THOMAS HUGHES

TOM BROWN'S SCHOOLDAYS.

TOM BROWN AT OXFORD.

THE SCOURING OF THE WHITE HORSE.

ALFRED THE GREAT.



By ARCHIBALD FORBES

BARRACKS, BIVOUACS, AND BATTLES.



By MONTAGU WILLIAMS

LEAVES OF A LIFE.

ROUND LONDON.



By E. WERNER

FICKLE FORTUNE.



By W. E. NORRIS

THIRLBY HALL.

A BACHELOR'S BLUNDER.



The Works of SHAKESPEARE

VICTORIA EDITION. In Three Volumes. Vol. I. COMEDIES. Vol. II. HISTORIES. Vol. III. TRAGEDIES.



UNIFORM EDITION OF THE NOVELS OF CHARLES LEVER

With all the Original Illustrations.

1. HARRY LORREQUER. Illustrated by PHIZ.

2. CHARLES O'MALLEY. Illustrated by PHIZ.

3. JACK HINTON THE GUARDSMAN. Illustrated by PHIZ.

4. TOM BURKE OF OURS. Illustrated by PHIZ.

5. ARTHUR O'LEARY. Illustrated by G. CRUIKSHANK.

6. LORD KILGOBBIN. Illustrated by LUKE FILDES.



By W. WARDE FOWLER

A YEAR WITH THE BIRDS. Illustrated.

TALES OF THE BIRDS. Illustrated.

MORE TALES OF THE BIRDS. Illustrated.

SUMMER STUDIES OF BIRDS AND BOOKS.



By FRANK BUCKLAND

CURIOSITIES OF NATURAL HISTORY. Illustrated. In four volumes:

FIRST SERIES—Rats, Serpents, Fishes, Frogs, Monkeys, etc.

SECOND SERIES—Fossils, Bears, Wolves, Cats, Eagles, Hedgehogs, Eels, Herrings, Whales.

THIRD SERIES—Wild Ducks, Fishing, Lions, Tigers, Foxes, Porpoises.

FOURTH SERIES—Giants, Mummies, Mermaids, Wonderful People, Salmon, etc.



Works by Various Authors

Hogan, M. P.

Flitters, Tatters, and the Counsellor

The New Antigone

Memories of Father Healy

CANON ATKINSON.—The Last of the Giant Killers

—— Playhours and Half-Holidays; or, further Experiences of Two Schoolboys

SIR S. BAKER.—True Tales for my Grandsons

R. H. BARHAM.—The Ingoldsby Legends

REV. R. H. D. BARHAM.—Life of Theodore Hook

BLENNERHASSET AND SLEEMAN.—Adventures in Mashonaland

LANOE FALCONER.—Cecilia de Noel

W. FORBES-MITCHELL.—Reminiscences of the Great Mutiny

REV. J. GILMORE.—Storm Warriors

MARY LINSKILL.—Tales of the North Riding

S. R. LYSAGHT.—The Marplot

—— One of the Grenvilles

M. M'LENNAN.—Muckle Jock, and other Stories

G. MASSON.—A Compendious Dictionary of the French Language

MAJOR GAMBIER PARRY.—The Story of Dick

E. C. PRICE.—In the Lion's Mouth

LORD REDESDALE.—Tales of Old Japan

W. C. RHOADES.—John Trevennick

MARCHESA THEODOLI.—Under Pressure

ANTHONY TROLLOPE.—The Three Clerks

CHARLES WHITEHEAD.—Richard Savage



ENGLISH MEN OF LETTERS

EDITED BY JOHN MORLEY.

Arranged in 12 Volumes, each containing the Lives of three Authors.

Chaucer. By Dr. A. W. WARD. Spenser. By Dean CHURCH. Dryden. By Prof. SAINTSBURY.

Milton. By MARK PATTISON. Goldsmith. By W. BLACK. Cowper. By GOLDWIN SMITH.

Byron. By Professor NICHOL. Shelley. By J. A. SYMONDS. Keats. By SIDNEY COLVIN.

Charles Lamb. By Canon AINGER. Addison. By W. J. COURTHOPE. Swift. By Sir LESLIE STEPHEN, K.C.B.

Scott. By R. H. HUTTON. Burns. By Principal SHAIRP. Coleridge. By H. D. TRAILL.

Hume. By Professor HUXLEY, F.R.S. Locke. By THOS. FOWLER. Burke. By JOHN MORLEY.

Defoe. By W. MINTO. Sterne. By H. D. TRAILL. Hawthorne. By HENRY JAMES.

Fielding. By AUSTIN DOBSON. Thackeray. By ANTHONY TROLLOPE. Dickens. By Dr. A. W. WARD.

Gibbon. By J. C. MORISON. Carlyle. By Professor NICHOL. Macaulay. By J. C. MORISON.

Sydney. By J. A. SYMONDS. De Quincey. By Prof. MASSON. Sheridan. By Mrs. OLIPHANT.

Pope. By Sir LESLIE STEPHEN, K.C.B. Johnson. By Sir LESLIE STEPHEN, K.C.B. Gray. By EDMUND GOSSE.

Bacon. By Dean CHURCH. Bunyan. By J. A. FROUDE. Bentley. By Sir RICHARD JEBB.



THE GLOBE LIBRARY

Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d. each.

The volumes marked with an asterisk (*) are also issued in limp leather, with full gilt back and gilt edges. 5s. net each.

*Boswell's Life of Johnson. With an Introduction by MOWBRAY MORRIS.

*Burns's Complete Works. Edited from the best Printed and MS. Authorities, with Memoir and Glossarial Index. By A. SMITH.

*The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer. Edited by ALFRED W. POLLARD, H. F. HEATH, M. H. LIDDELL, and W. S. MCCORMICK.

*Cowper's Poetical Works. Edited, with Biographical Introduction and Notes by W. BENHAM, B.D.

Robinson Crusoe. Edited after the original Edition, with a Biographical Introduction by HENRY KINGSLEY, F.R.G.S.

*Dryden's Poetical Works. Edited, with a Memoir, Revised Texts, and Notes, by W. D. CHRISTIE, M.A.

*The Diary of John Evelyn. With an Introduction and Notes by AUSTIN DOBSON, Hon. LL.D. Edin.

Froissart's Chronicles. Translated by Lord BERNERS. Edited by G. C. MACAULAY, M.A.

*Goldsmith's Miscellaneous Works. With Biographical Introduction by Professor MASSON.

The Iliad of Homer. Done into English Prose by ANDREW LANG, M.A., WALTER LEAF, LITT.D., and ERNEST MYERS, M.A.

Horace. Rendered into English Prose, with Introduction, Notes, etc. By J. LONSDALE, M.A., and S. LEE, M.A.

*The Poetical Works of John Keats. Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by WILLIAM T. ARNOLD.

Morte Darthur. With Introduction, Notes, and Glossary by Sir E. STRACHEY.

*Milton's Poetical Works. Edited, with Introduction, by Professor MASSON.

The Diary of Samuel Pepys. With an Introduction and Notes by G. GREGORY SMITH.

*Pope's Poetical Works. Edited, with Notes and Introductory Memoir, by Sir A. W. WARD.

*Sir Walter Scott's Poetical Works. Edited, with Biographical and Critical Memoir, by Prof. F. T. PALGRAVE. With Introduction and Notes.

*Shakespeare's Complete Works. Edited by W. G. CLARK, M.A., and W. ALDIS WRIGHT, M.A. With Glossary.

*Spenser's Complete Works. Edited, with Glossary, by R. MORRIS, and a Memoir by J. W. HALES, M.A.

*Tennyson's Poetical Works. [Also in extra cloth, gilt edges. 4s. 6d.]

Virgil. Rendered into English Prose, with Introductions, Notes Analysis, and Index. By J. LONSDALE, M.A., and S. LEE, M.A.



ILLUSTRATED STANDARD NOVELS

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By JANE AUSTEN

With Introductions by AUSTIN DOBSON, and Illustrations by HUGH THOMSON and C. E. BROCK.

PRIDE AND PREJUDICE. SENSE AND SENSIBILITY. EMMA. MANSFIELD PARK. NORTHANGER ABBEY, AND PERSUASION.

By J. FENIMORE COOPER

With Illustrations by C. E. BROCK and H. M. BROCK.

THE LAST OF THE MOHICANS. With a General Introduction by Mowbray Morris. THE DEERSLAYER. THE PATHFINDER. THE PIONEERS. THE PRAIRIE.

By MARIA EDGEWORTH

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ORMOND. CASTLE RACKRENT, AND THE ABSENTEE. POPULAR TALES. HELEN. BELINDA. PARENT'S ASSISTANT.

By CAPTAIN MARRYAT

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JAPHET IN SEARCH OF A FATHER. JACOB FAITHFUL. PETER SIMPLE. MIDSHIPMAN EASY. THE KING'S OWN. THE PHANTOM SHIP. SNARLEY-YOW. POOR JACK. THE PIRATE, AND THE THREE CUTTERS. MASTERMAN READY. FRANK MILDMAY. NEWTON FORSTER.

By THOMAS LOVE PEACOCK

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HEADLONG HALL, AND NIGHTMARE ABBEY. MAID MARIAN, AND CROTCHET CASTLE. GRYLL GRANGE. MELINCOURT. MISFORTUNES OF ELPHIN AND RHODODAPHNE.

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WESTWARD HO! By CHARLES KINGSLEY. Illustrated by C. E. Brock.

HANDY ANDY. By SAMUEL LOVER. Illustrated by H. M. Brock. With Introduction by Charles Whibley.

ANNALS OF THE PARISH. By JOHN GALT. Illustrated By C. E. Brock. With Introduction by Alfred Ainger.

SYBIL, OR THE TWO NATIONS, ETC. By BENJAMIN DISRAELI. Illustrated by F. Pegram. With Introduction by H. D. Traill.

ADVENTURES OF HAJJI BABA OF ISPAHAN. By JAMES MORIER. Illustrated by H. R. Millar. With Introduction by Lord Curzon.



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The Vicar of Wakefield. With 182 Illustrations by Hugh Thomson, and Preface by Austin Dobson.

Our Village. By MARY RUSSELL MITFORD. Introduction by Anne Thackeray Ritchie, and 100 Illustrations by Hugh Thomson.

Gulliver's Travels. With Introduction by Sir Henry Craik, K.C.B., and 100 Illustrations by C. E. Brock.

The Humorous Poems of Thomas Hood. With Preface by Alfred Ainger, and 130 Illustrations by C. E. Brock.

Sheridan's The School for Scandal and The Rivals. Illustrated by E. J. Sullivan. With Introduction by A. Birrell.

Household Stories. By the Brothers GRIMM. Translated by Lucy Crane. With Pictures by Walter Crane.

Reynard the Fox. Edited by J. JACOBS. With Illustrations by W. Frank Calderon.

Coaching Days and Coaching Ways. By W. OUTRAM TRISTRAM. With Illustrations by H. Railton and Hugh Thomson.

Coridon's Song; and other Verses. With Introduction by Austin Dobson and Illustrations by Hugh Thomson.

The Fables of AEsop. Selected by JOSEPH JACOBS. Illustrated by R. Heighway.

Old Christmas. By WASHINGTON IRVING. With Illustrations by R. Caldecott.

Bracebridge Hall. With Illustrations by R. CALDECOTT.

Rip Van Winkle and the Legend of Sleepy Hollow. With 50 Illustrations and a Preface by George H. Boughton, A.R.A.

The Alhambra. With Illustrations by J. Pennell and Introduction by E. R. Pennell.

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