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Familiar Quotations
by John Bartlett
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Arcadia. Book ii.

My dear, my better half.

Arcadia. Book iii.

Fool! said my muse to me, look in thy heart, and write.[34-4]

Astrophel and Stella, i.

Have I caught my heav'nly jewel.[34-5]

Astrophel and Stella, i. Second Song.

FOOTNOTES:

[34-1] Great thoughts come from the heart.—VAUVENARGUES: Maxim cxxvii.

[34-2] He never is alone that is accompanied with noble thoughts.—FLETCHER: Love's Cure, act iii. sc. 3.

[34-3] Many-headed multitude.—SHAKESPEARE: Coriolanus, act ii. sc. 3.

This many-headed monster, Multitude.—DANIEL: History of the Civil War, book ii. st. 13.

[34-4] Look, then, into thine heart and write.—LONGFELLOW: Voices of the Night. Prelude.

[34-5] Quoted by Shakespeare in Merry Wives of Windsor.



CYRIL TOURNEUR. Circa 1600.

A drunkard clasp his teeth and not undo 'em, To suffer wet damnation to run through 'em.[34-6]

The Revenger's Tragedy. Act iii. Sc. 1.

FOOTNOTES:

[34-6] Distilled damnation.—ROBERT HALL (in Gregory's "Life of Hall").



LORD BROOKE. 1554-1628.

O wearisome condition of humanity!

Mustapha. Act v. Sc. 4.

And out of mind as soon as out of sight.[35-1]

Sonnet lvi.

FOOTNOTES:

[35-1] See Thomas a Kempis, page 7.



GEORGE CHAPMAN. 1557-1634.

None ever loved but at first sight they loved.[35-2]

The Blind Beggar of Alexandria.

An ill weed grows apace.[35-3]

An Humorous Day's Mirth.

Black is a pearl in a woman's eye.[35-4]

An Humorous Day's Mirth.

Exceeding fair she was not; and yet fair In that she never studied to be fairer Than Nature made her; beauty cost her nothing, Her virtues were so rare.

All Fools. Act i. Sc. 1.

I tell thee Love is Nature's second sun, Causing a spring of virtues where he shines.

All Fools. Act i. Sc. 1.

Cornelia. What flowers are these?

Gazetta. The pansy this.

Cor. Oh, that 's for lovers' thoughts.[35-5]

All Fools. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Fortune, the great commandress of the world, Hath divers ways to advance her followers: To some she gives honour without deserving, To other some, deserving without honour.[35-6]

All Fools. Act v. Sc. 1.

Young men think old men are fools; but old men know young men are fools.[36-1]

All Fools. Act v. Sc. 1.

Virtue is not malicious; wrong done her Is righted even when men grant they err.

Monsieur D'Olive. Act i. Sc. 1.

For one heat, all know, doth drive out another, One passion doth expel another still.[36-2]

Monsieur D'Olive. Act v. Sc. 1.

Let no man value at a little price A virtuous woman's counsel; her wing'd spirit Is feather'd oftentimes with heavenly words.

The Gentleman Usher. Act iv. Sc. 1.

To put a girdle round about the world.[36-3]

Bussy D'Ambois. Act i. Sc. 1.

His deeds inimitable, like the sea That shuts still as it opes, and leaves no tracts Nor prints of precedent for poor men's facts.

Bussy D'Ambois. Act i. Sc. 1.

So our lives In acts exemplary, not only win Ourselves good names, but doth to others give Matter for virtuous deeds, by which we live.[36-4]

Bussy D'Ambois. Act i. Sc. 1.

Who to himself is law no law doth need, Offends no law, and is a king indeed.

Bussy D'Ambois. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Each natural agent works but to this end,— To render that it works on like itself.

Bussy D'Ambois. Act iii. Sc. 1.

'T is immortality to die aspiring, As if a man were taken quick to heaven.

Conspiracy of Charles, Duke of Byron. Act i. Sc. 1.

Give me a spirit that on this life's rough sea Loves t' have his sails fill'd with a lusty wind, Even till his sail-yards tremble, his masts crack, And his rapt ship run on her side so low That she drinks water, and her keel plows air.

Tragedy of Charles, Duke of Byron. Act iii. Sc. 1.

He is at no end of his actions blest Whose ends will make him greatest, and not best.

Tragedy of Charles, Duke of Byron. Act v. Sc. 1.

Words writ in waters.[37-1]

Revenge for Honour. Act v. Sc. 2.

They 're only truly great who are truly good.[37-2]

Revenge for Honour. Act v. Sc. 2.

Keep thy shop, and thy shop will keep thee.[37-3] Light gains make heavy purses. 'T is good to be merry and wise.[37-4]

Eastward Ho.[37-5] Act i. Sc. 1.

Make ducks and drakes with shillings.

Eastward Ho.[37-5] Act i. Sc. 1.

Only a few industrious Scots perhaps, who indeed are dispersed over the face of the whole earth. But as for them, there are no greater friends to Englishmen and England, when they are out on 't, in the world, than they are. And for my own part, I would a hundred thousand of them were there [Virginia]; for we are all one countrymen now, ye know, and we should find ten times more comfort of them there than we do here.[37-6]

Eastward Ho. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Enough 's as good as a feast.[38-1]

Eastward Ho. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Fair words never hurt the tongue.[38-2]

Eastward Ho. Act iv. Sc. 1.

Let pride go afore, shame will follow after.[38-3]

Eastward Ho. Act iv. Sc. 1.

I will neither yield to the song of the siren nor the voice of the hyena, the tears of the crocodile nor the howling of the wolf.

Eastward Ho. Act v. Sc. 1.

As night the life-inclining stars best shows, So lives obscure the starriest souls disclose.

Epilogue to Translations.

Promise is most given when the least is said.

Musaeus of Hero and Leander.

FOOTNOTES:

[35-2] Who ever loved that loved not at first sight?—MARLOWE: Hero and Leander.

I saw and loved.—GIBBON: Memoirs, vol. i. p. 106.

[35-3] See Heywood, page 13.

[35-4] Black men are pearls in beauteous ladies' eyes.—SHAKESPEARE: Two Gentlemen of Verona, act v. sc. 2.

[35-5] There is pansies, that 's for thoughts.—SHAKESPEARE: Hamlet, act iv. sc. 5.

[35-6] Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon 'em.—SHAKESPEARE: Twelfth Night, act ii. sc. 5.

[36-1] Quoted by Camden as a saying of one Dr. Metcalf. It is now in many peoples' mouths, and likely to pass into a proverb.—RAY: Proverbs (Bohn ed.), p. 145.

[36-2] One fire burns out another's burning, One pain is lessened by another's anguish.

SHAKESPEARE: Romeo and Juliet, act i. sc. 2.

[36-3] I 'll put a girdle round about the earth.—SHAKESPEARE: Midsummer Night's Dream, act ii. sc. 1.

[36-4] Lives of great men all remind us We can make our lives sublime.

LONGFELLOW: A Psalm of Life.

[37-1] Here lies one whose name was writ in water.—Keats's own Epitaph.

[37-2] To be noble we 'll be good.—Winifreda (Percy's Reliques).

'T is only noble to be good.—TENNYSON: Lady Clara Vere de Vere, stanza 7.

[37-3] The same in Franklin's Poor Richard.

[37-4] See Heywood, page 9.

[37-5] By Chapman, Jonson, and Marston.

[37-6] This is the famous passage that gave offence to James I., and caused the imprisonment of the authors. The leaves containing it were cancelled and reprinted, and it only occurs in a few of the original copies.—RICHARD HERNE SHEPHERD.

[38-1] Dives and Pauper (1493). GASCOIGNE: Memories (1575). FIELDING: Covent Garden Tragedy, act ii. sc. 6. BICKERSTAFF: Love in a Village, act iii. sc. 1. See Heywood, page 20.

[38-2] See Heywood, page 12.

[38-3] See Heywood, page 13.



WILLIAM WARNER. 1558-1609.

With that she dasht her on the lippes, So dyed double red: Hard was the heart that gave the blow, Soft were those lips that bled.

Albion's England. Book viii. chap. xli. stanza 53.

We thinke no greater blisse then such To be as be we would, When blessed none but such as be The same as be they should.

Albion's England. Book x. chap. lix. stanza 68.



SIR RICHARD HOLLAND.

O Douglas, O Douglas! Tendir and trewe.

The Buke of the Howlat.[38-4] Stanza xxxi.

FOOTNOTES:

[38-4] The allegorical poem of The Howlat was composed about the middle of the fifteenth century. Of the personal history of the author no kind of information has been discovered. Printed by the Bannatyne Club, 1823.



SIR JOHN HARRINGTON. 1561-1612.

Treason doth never prosper: what 's the reason? Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.[39-1]

Epigrams. Book iv. Ep. 5.

FOOTNOTES:

[39-1] Prosperum ac felix scelus Virtus vocatur (Successful and fortunate crime is called virtue).

SENECA: Herc. Furens, ii. 250.



SAMUEL DANIEL. 1562-1619.

As that the walls worn thin, permit the mind To look out thorough, and his frailty find.[39-2]

History of the Civil War. Book iv. Stanza 84.

Sacred religion! mother of form and fear.

Musophilus. Stanza 57.

And for the few that only lend their ear, That few is all the world.

Musophilus. Stanza 97.

This is the thing that I was born to do.

Musophilus. Stanza 100.

And who (in time) knows whither we may vent The treasure of our tongue? To what strange shores This gain of our best glory shall be sent T' enrich unknowing nations with our stores? What worlds in the yet unformed Occident May come refin'd with th' accents that are ours?[39-3]

Musophilus. Stanza 163.

Unless above himself he can Erect himself, how poor a thing is man!

To the Countess of Cumberland. Stanza 12.

Care-charmer Sleep, son of the sable Night, Brother to Death, in silent darkness born.

To Delia. Sonnet 51.

FOOTNOTES:

[39-2] The soul's dark cottage, batter'd and decay'd, Lets in new light through chinks that Time has made.

WALLER: Verses upon his Divine Poesy.

[39-3] Westward the course of empire takes its way.—BERKELEY: On the Prospect of Planting Arts and Learning in America.



MICHAEL DRAYTON. 1563-1631.

Had in him those brave translunary things That the first poets had.

(Said of Marlowe.) To Henry Reynolds, of Poets and Poesy.

For that fine madness still he did retain Which rightly should possess a poet's brain.

(Said of Marlowe.) To Henry Reynolds, of Poets and Poesy.

The coast was clear.[40-1]

Nymphidia.

When faith is kneeling by his bed of death, And innocence is closing up his eyes, Now if thou wouldst, when all have given him over, From death to life thou might'st him yet recover.

Ideas. An Allusion to the Eaglets. lxi.

FOOTNOTES:

[40-1] SOMERVILLE: The Night-Walker.



CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE. 1565-1593.

Comparisons are odious.[40-2]

Lust's Dominion. Act iii. Sc. 4.

I 'm armed with more than complete steel,— The justice of my quarrel.[40-3]

Lust's Dominion. Act iii. Sc. 4.

Who ever loved that loved not at first sight?[40-4]

Hero and Leander.

Come live with me, and be my love; And we will all the pleasures prove That hills and valleys, dales and fields, Woods or steepy mountain yields.

The Passionate Shepherd to his Love.

By shallow rivers, to whose falls[41-1] Melodious birds sing madrigals.

The Passionate Shepherd to his Love.

And I will make thee beds of roses And a thousand fragrant posies.

The Passionate Shepherd to his Love.

Infinite riches in a little room.

The Jew of Malta. Act i.

Excess of wealth is cause of covetousness.

The Jew of Malta. Act i.

Now will I show myself to have more of the serpent than the dove;[41-2] that is, more knave than fool.

The Jew of Malta. Act ii.

Love me little, love me long.[41-3]

The Jew of Malta. Act iv.

When all the world dissolves, And every creature shall be purified, All places shall be hell that are not heaven.

Faustus.

Was this the face that launch'd a thousand ships, And burnt the topless towers of Ilium? Sweet Helen, make me immortal with a kiss! Her lips suck forth my soul:[41-4] see, where it flies!

Faustus.

O, thou art fairer than the evening air Clad in the beauty of a thousand stars.

Faustus.

Cut is the branch that might have grown full straight, And burned is Apollo's laurel bough,[41-5] That sometime grew within this learned man.

Faustus.

FOOTNOTES:

[40-2] See Fortescue, page 7.

[40-3] Thrice is he armed that hath his quarrel just, And he but naked, though locked up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted.

SHAKESPEARE: Henry VI. act iii. sc. 2.

[40-4] The same in Shakespeare's As You Like It. Compare Chapman, page 35.

[41-1] To shallow rivers, to whose falls Melodious birds sings madrigals; There will we make our peds of roses, And a thousand fragrant posies.

SHAKESPEARE: Merry Wives of Windsor, act iii. sc. i. (Sung by Evans).

[41-2] Be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves.—Matthew x. 16.

[41-3] See Heywood, page 16.

[41-4] Once he drew With one long kiss my whole soul through My lips.

TENNYSON: Fatima, stanza 3.

[41-5] O, withered is the garland of the war! The soldier's pole is fallen.

SHAKESPEARE: Antony and Cleopatra, act iv. sc. 13.



WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE. 1564-1616.

(From the text of Clark and Wright.)

I would fain die a dry death.

The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 1.

Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground.

The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 1.

What seest thou else In the dark backward and abysm of time?

The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 2.

I, thus neglecting worldly ends, all dedicated To closeness and the bettering of my mind.

The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 2.

Like one Who having into truth, by telling of it, Made such a sinner of his memory, To credit his own lie.

The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 2.

My library Was dukedom large enough.

The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 2.

Knowing I lov'd my books, he furnish'd me From mine own library with volumes that I prize above my dukedom.

The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 2.

From the still-vexed Bermoothes.

The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 2.

I will be correspondent to command, And do my spiriting gently.

The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 2.

Fill all thy bones with aches.

The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 2.

Come unto these yellow sands, And then take hands: Courtsied when you have, and kiss'd The wild waves whist.

The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 2.

Full fathom five thy father lies; Of his bones are coral made; Those are pearls that were his eyes: Nothing of him that doth fade But doth suffer a sea-change Into something rich and strange.

The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 2.

The fringed curtains of thine eye advance.

The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 2.

There 's nothing ill can dwell in such a temple: If the ill spirit have so fair a house, Good things will strive to dwell with 't.

The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 2.

Gon. Here is everything advantageous to life. Ant. True; save means to live.

The Tempest. Act ii. Sc. 1.

A very ancient and fish-like smell.

The Tempest. Act ii. Sc. 2.

Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows.

The Tempest. Act ii. Sc. 2.

Fer. Here 's my hand. Mir. And mine, with my heart in 't.

The Tempest. Act iii. Sc. 1.

He that dies pays all debts.

The Tempest. Act iii. Sc. 2.

A kind Of excellent dumb discourse.

The Tempest. Act iii. Sc. 3.

Deeper than e'er plummet sounded.

The Tempest. Act iii. Sc. 3.

Our revels now are ended. These our actors, As I foretold you, were all spirits, and Are melted into air, into thin air: And, like the baseless fabric of this vision, The cloud-capp'd towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself, Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve, And, like this insubstantial pageant faded, Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff As dreams are made on; and our little life Is rounded with a sleep.

The Tempest. Act iv. Sc. 1.

With foreheads villanous low.

The Tempest. Act iv. Sc. 1.

Deeper than did ever plummet sound I 'll drown my book.

The Tempest. Act v. Sc. 1.

Where the bee sucks, there suck I; In a cowslip's bell I lie.

The Tempest. Act v. Sc. 1.

Merrily, merrily shall I live now, Under the blossom that hangs on the bough.

The Tempest. Act v. Sc. 1.

Home-keeping youth have ever homely wits.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona. Act i. Sc. 1.

I have no other but a woman's reason: I think him so, because I think him so.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona. Act i. Sc. 2.

O, how this spring of love resembleth The uncertain glory of an April day!

The Two Gentlemen of Verona. Act i. Sc. 3.

And if it please you, so; if not, why, so.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona. Act ii. Sc. 1.

O jest unseen, inscrutable, invisible, As a nose on a man's face,[44-1] or a weathercock on a steeple.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona. Act ii. Sc. 1.

She is mine own, And I as rich in having such a jewel As twenty seas, if all their sand were pearl, The water nectar, and the rocks pure gold.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona. Act ii. Sc. 4.

He makes sweet music with th' enamell'd stones, Giving a gentle kiss to every sedge He overtaketh in his pilgrimage.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona. Act ii. Sc. 7.

That man that hath a tongue, I say, is no man, If with his tongue he cannot win a woman.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona. Act iii. Sc. 1.

Except I be by Sylvia in the night, There is no music in the nightingale.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona. Act iii. Sc. 1.

A man I am, cross'd with adversity.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona. Act iv. Sc. 1.

Is she not passing fair?

The Two Gentlemen of Verona. Act iv. Sc. 4.

How use doth breed a habit in a man![44-2]

The Two Gentlemen of Verona. Act v. Sc. 4.

O heaven! were man But constant, he were perfect.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona. Act v. Sc. 4.

Come not within the measure of my wrath.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona. Act v. Sc. 4.

I will make a Star-chamber matter of it.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act i. Sc. 1.

All his successors gone before him have done 't; and all his ancestors that come after him may.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act i. Sc. 1.

It is a familiar beast to man, and signifies love.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act i. Sc. 1.

Seven hundred pounds and possibilities is good gifts.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act i. Sc. 1.

Mine host of the Garter.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act i. Sc. 1.

I had rather than forty shillings I had my Book of Songs and Sonnets here.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act i. Sc. 1.

If there be no great love in the beginning, yet heaven may decrease it upon better acquaintance, when we are married and have more occasion to know one another: I hope, upon familiarity will grow more contempt.[45-1]

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act i. Sc. 1.

O base Hungarian wight! wilt thou the spigot wield?

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act i. Sc. 3.

"Convey," the wise it call. "Steal!" foh! a fico for the phrase!

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act i. Sc. 3.

Sail like my pinnace to these golden shores.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act i. Sc. 3.

Tester I 'll have in pouch, when thou shalt lack, Base Phrygian Turk!

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act i. Sc. 3.

Thou art the Mars of malcontents.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act i. Sc. 3.

Here will be an old abusing of God's patience and the king's English.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act i. Sc. 4.

We burn daylight.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act ii. Sc. 1.

There 's the humour of it.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Faith, thou hast some crotchets in thy head now.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Why, then the world 's mine oyster, Which I with sword will open.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act ii. Sc. 2.

This is the short and the long of it.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act ii. Sc. 2.

Unless experience be a jewel.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act ii. Sc. 2.

Like a fair house, built on another man's ground.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act ii. Sc. 2.

We have some salt of our youth in us.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act ii. Sc. 3.

I cannot tell what the dickens his name is.[46-1]

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act iii. Sc. 2.

What a taking was he in when your husband asked who was in the basket!

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act iii. Sc. 3.

O, what a world of vile ill-favour'd faults Looks handsome in three hundred pounds a year!

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act iii. Sc. 4.

Happy man be his dole!

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act iii. Sc. 4.

I have a kind of alacrity in sinking.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act iii. Sc. 5.

As good luck would have it.[46-2]

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act iii. Sc. 5.

The rankest compound of villanous smell that ever offended nostril.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act iii. Sc. 5.

A man of my kidney.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act iii. Sc. 5.

Think of that, Master Brook.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act iii. Sc. 5.

Your hearts are mighty, your skins are whole.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act iv. Sc. 1.

In his old lunes again.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act iv. Sc. 2.

So curses all Eve's daughters, of what complexion soever.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act iv. Sc. 2.

This is the third time; I hope good luck lies in odd numbers. . . . There is divinity in odd numbers, either in nativity, chance, or death.

The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act v. Sc. 1.

Thyself and thy belongings Are not thine own so proper as to waste Thyself upon thy virtues, they on thee. Heaven doth with us as we with torches do, Not light them for themselves; for if our virtues Did not go forth of us, 't were all alike As if we had them not. Spirits are not finely touch'd But to fine issues, nor Nature never lends The smallest scruple of her excellence But, like a thrifty goddess, she determines Herself the glory of a creditor, Both thanks and use.

Measure for Measure. Act i. Sc. 1.

He was ever precise in promise-keeping.

Measure for Measure. Act i. Sc. 2.

Who may, in the ambush of my name, strike home.

Measure for Measure. Act i. Sc. 3.[47-1]

I hold you as a thing ensky'd and sainted.

Measure for Measure. Act i. Sc. 4.[47-1]

A man whose blood Is very snow-broth; one who never feels The wanton stings and motions of the sense.

Measure for Measure. Act i. Sc. 4.[47-1]

He arrests him on it; And follows close the rigour of the statute, To make him an example.

Measure for Measure. Act i. Sc. 4.[47-1]

Our doubts are traitors, And make us lose the good we oft might win By fearing to attempt.

Measure for Measure. Act i. Sc. 4.[47-1]

The jury, passing on the prisoner's life, May in the sworn twelve have a thief or two Guiltier than him they try.

Measure for Measure. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall.

Measure for Measure. Act ii. Sc. 1.

This will last out a night in Russia, When nights are longest there.

Measure for Measure. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Condemn the fault, and not the actor of it?

Measure for Measure. Act ii. Sc. 2.

No ceremony that to great ones 'longs, Not the king's crown, nor the deputed sword, The marshal's truncheon, nor the judge's robe, Become them with one half so good a grace As mercy does.[47-2]

Measure for Measure. Act ii. Sc. 2.

Why, all the souls that were, were forfeit once; And He that might the vantage best have took Found out the remedy. How would you be, If He, which is the top of judgment, should But judge you as you are?

Measure for Measure. Act ii. Sc. 2.

The law hath not been dead, though it hath slept.

Measure for Measure. Act ii. Sc. 2.

O, it is excellent To have a giant's strength; but it is tyrannous To use it like a giant.

Measure for Measure. Act ii. Sc. 2.

But man, proud man, Drest in a little brief authority, Most ignorant of what he 's most assured, His glassy essence, like an angry ape, Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven As make the angels weep.

Measure for Measure. Act ii. Sc. 2.

That in the captain 's but a choleric word Which in the soldier is flat blasphemy.

Measure for Measure. Act ii. Sc. 2.

Our compell'd sins Stand more for number than for accompt.

Measure for Measure. Act ii. Sc. 4.

The miserable have no other medicine, But only hope.

Measure for Measure. Act iii. Sc. 1.

A breath thou art, Servile to all the skyey influences.

Measure for Measure. Act iii. Sc. 1.

Palsied eld.

Measure for Measure. Act iii. Sc. 1.

The sense of death is most in apprehension; And the poor beetle, that we tread upon, In corporal sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies.

Measure for Measure. Act iii. Sc. 1.

The cunning livery of hell.

Measure for Measure. Act iii. Sc. 1.

Ay, but to die, and go we know not where; To lie in cold obstruction and to rot; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod; and the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside In thrilling region of thick-ribbed ice; To be imprison'd in the viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round about The pendent world.

Measure for Measure. Act iii. Sc. 1.

The weariest and most loathed worldly life That age, ache, penury, and imprisonment Can lay on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death.

Measure for Measure. Act iii. Sc. 1.

The hand that hath made you fair hath made you good.[49-1]

Measure for Measure. Act iii. Sc. 1.

Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful.

Measure for Measure. Act iii. Sc. 1.

There, at the moated grange, resides this dejected Mariana.[49-2]

Measure for Measure. Act iii. Sc. 1.

O, what may man within him hide, Though angel on the outward side!

Measure for Measure. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Take, O, take those lips away, That so sweetly were forsworn; And those eyes, the break of day, Lights that do mislead the morn: But my kisses bring again, bring again; Seals of love, but sealed in vain, sealed in vain.[49-3]

Measure for Measure. Act iv. Sc. 1.

Every true man's apparel fits your thief.

Measure for Measure. Act iv. Sc. 2.

We would, and we would not.

Measure for Measure. Act iv. Sc. 4.

A forted residence 'gainst the tooth of time And razure of oblivion.

Measure for Measure. Act v. Sc. 1.

Truth is truth To the end of reckoning.

Measure for Measure. Act v. Sc. 1.

My business in this state Made me a looker on here in Vienna.

Measure for Measure. Act v. Sc. 1.

They say, best men are moulded out of faults, And, for the most, become much more the better For being a little bad.

Measure for Measure. Act v. Sc. 1.

What 's mine is yours, and what is yours is mine.

Measure for Measure. Act v. Sc. 1.

The pleasing punishment that women bear.

The Comedy of Errors. Act i. Sc. 1.

A wretched soul, bruised with adversity.

The Comedy of Errors. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Every why hath a wherefore.[50-1]

The Comedy of Errors. Act ii. Sc. 2.

Small cheer and great welcome makes a merry feast.

The Comedy of Errors. Act iii. Sc. 1.

One Pinch, a hungry lean-faced villain, A mere anatomy.

The Comedy of Errors. Act v. Sc. 1.

A needy, hollow-eyed, sharp-looking wretch, A living-dead man.

The Comedy of Errors. Act v. Sc. 1.

Let 's go hand in hand, not one before another.

The Comedy of Errors. Act v. Sc. 1.

He hath indeed better bettered expectation.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act i. Sc. 1.

A very valiant trencher-man.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act i. Sc. 1.

He wears his faith but as the fashion of his hat.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act i. Sc. 1.

What, my dear Lady Disdain! are you yet living?

Much Ado about Nothing. Act i. Sc. 1.

There 's a skirmish of wit between them.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act i. Sc. 1.

The gentleman is not in your books.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act i. Sc. 1.

Shall I never see a bachelor of threescore again?

Much Ado about Nothing. Act i. Sc. 1.

Benedick the married man.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act i. Sc. 1.

He is of a very melancholy disposition.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act i. Sc. 1.

He that hath a beard is more than a youth, and he that hath no beard is less than a man.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 1.

As merry as the day is long.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 1.

I have a good eye, uncle; I can see a church by daylight.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Speak low if you speak love.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Friendship is constant in all other things Save in the office and affairs of love: Therefore all hearts in love use their own tongues; Let every eye negotiate for itself And trust no agent.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Silence is the perfectest herald of joy: I were but little happy, if I could say how much.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Lie ten nights awake, carving the fashion of a new doublet. He was wont to speak plain and to the purpose.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 3.

Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more, Men were deceivers ever,— One foot in sea and one on shore, To one thing constant never.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 3.

Sits the wind in that corner?

Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 3.

Shall quips and sentences and these paper bullets of the brain awe a man from the career of his humour? No, the world must be peopled. When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think I should live till I were married.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 3.

Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 1.

From the crown of his head to the sole of his foot,[51-1] he is all mirth.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Every one can master a grief but he that has it.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Are you good men and true?

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.

To be a well-favoured man is the gift of fortune; but to write and read comes by nature.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.

The most senseless and fit man.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.

You shall comprehend all vagrom men.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.

2 Watch. How if a' will not stand?

Dogb. Why, then, take no note of him, but let him go; and presently call the rest of the watch together, and thank God you are rid of a knave.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.

Is most tolerable, and not to be endured.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.

If they make you not then the better answer, you may say they are not the men you took them for.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.

The most peaceable way for you if you do take a thief, is to let him show himself what he is and steal out of your company.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.

I know that Deformed.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.

The fashion wears out more apparel than the man.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.

I thank God I am as honest as any man living that is an old man and no honester than I.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.

Comparisons are odorous.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 5.

If I were as tedious as a king, I could find it in my heart to bestow it all of your worship.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 5.

A good old man, sir; he will be talking: as they say, When the age is in the wit is out.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 5.

O, what men dare do! what men may do! what men daily do, not knowing what they do!

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 1.

O, what authority and show of truth Can cunning sin cover itself withal!

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 1.

I never tempted her with word too large, But, as a brother to his sister, show'd Bashful sincerity and comely love.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 1.

I have mark'd A thousand blushing apparitions To start into her face, a thousand innocent shames In angel whiteness beat away those blushes.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 1.

For it so falls out That what we have we prize not to the worth Whiles we enjoy it, but being lack'd and lost, Why, then we rack the value; then we find The virtue that possession would not show us Whiles it was ours.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 1.

The idea of her life shall sweetly creep Into his study of imagination, And every lovely organ of her life, Shall come apparell'd in more precious habit, More moving-delicate and full of life Into the eye and prospect of his soul.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 1.

Masters, it is proved already that you are little better than false knaves; and it will go near to be thought so shortly.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 2.

The eftest way.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 2.

Flat burglary as ever was committed.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 2.

Condemned into everlasting redemption.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 2.

O, that he were here to write me down an ass!

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 2.

A fellow that hath had losses, and one that hath two gowns and every thing handsome about him.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 2.

Patch grief with proverbs.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act v. Sc. 1.

Men Can counsel and speak comfort to that grief Which they themselves not feel.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act v. Sc. 1.

Charm ache with air, and agony with words.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act v. Sc. 1.

'T is all men's office to speak patience To those that wring under the load of sorrow, But no man's virtue nor sufficiency To be so moral when he shall endure The like himself.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act v. Sc. 1.

For there was never yet philosopher That could endure the toothache patiently.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act v. Sc. 1.

Some of us will smart for it.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act v. Sc. 1.

I was not born under a rhyming planet.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act v. Sc. 2.

Done to death by slanderous tongues.

Much Ado about Nothing. Act v. Sc. 3.

Or, having sworn too hard a keeping oath, Study to break it and not break my troth.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act i. Sc. 1.

Light seeking light doth light of light beguile.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act i. Sc. 1.

Small have continual plodders ever won Save base authority from others' books. These earthly godfathers of heaven's lights That give a name to every fixed star Have no more profit of their shining nights Than those that walk and wot not what they are.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act i. Sc. 1.

At Christmas I no more desire a rose Than wish a snow in May's new-fangled mirth;[54-1] But like of each thing that in season grows.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act i. Sc. 1.

A man in all the world's new fashion planted, That hath a mint of phrases in his brain.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act i. Sc. 1.

A high hope for a low heaven.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act i. Sc. 1.

And men sit down to that nourishment which is called supper.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act i. Sc. 1.

That unlettered small-knowing soul.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act i. Sc. 1.

A child of our grandmother Eve, a female; or, for thy more sweet understanding, a woman.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act i. Sc. 1.

Affliction may one day smile again; and till then, sit thee down, sorrow!

Love's Labour's Lost. Act i. Sc. 1.

The world was very guilty of such a ballad some three ages since; but I think now 't is not to be found.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act i. Sc. 2.

The rational hind Costard.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act i. Sc. 2.

Devise, wit; write, pen; for I am for whole volumes in folio.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act i. Sc. 2.

A man of sovereign parts he is esteem'd; Well fitted in arts, glorious in arms: Nothing becomes him ill that he would well.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act ii. Sc. 1.

A merrier man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Delivers in such apt and gracious words That aged ears play truant at his tales, And younger hearings are quite ravished; So sweet and voluble is his discourse.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act ii. Sc. 1.

By my penny of observation.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act iii. Sc. 1.

The boy hath sold him a bargain,—a goose.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act iii. Sc. 1.

To sell a bargain well is as cunning as fast and loose.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act iii. Sc. 1.

A very beadle to a humorous sigh.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act iii. Sc. 1.

This senior-junior, giant-dwarf, Dan Cupid; Regent of love-rhymes, lord of folded arms, The anointed sovereign of sighs and groans, Liege of all loiterers and malcontents.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act iii. Sc. 1.

A buck of the first head.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act iv. Sc. 2.

He hath never fed of the dainties that are bred in a book; he hath not eat paper, as it were; he hath not drunk ink.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act iv. Sc. 2.

Many can brook the weather that love not the wind.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act iv. Sc. 2.

You two are book-men.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act iv. Sc. 2.

Dictynna, goodman Dull.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act iv. Sc. 2.

These are begot in the ventricle of memory, nourished in the womb of pia mater, and delivered upon the mellowing of occasion.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act iv. Sc. 2.

For where is any author in the world Teaches such beauty as a woman's eye? Learning is but an adjunct to ourself.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act iv. Sc. 3.

It adds a precious seeing to the eye.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act iv. Sc. 3.

As sweet and musical As bright Apollo's lute, strung with his hair;[56-1] And when Love speaks, the voice of all the gods Makes heaven drowsy with the harmony.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act iv. Sc. 3.

From women's eyes this doctrine I derive: They sparkle still the right Promethean fire; They are the books, the arts, the academes, That show, contain, and nourish all the world.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act iv. Sc. 3.

He draweth out the thread of his verbosity finer than the staple of his argument.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act v. Sc. 1.

Priscian! a little scratched, 't will serve.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act v. Sc. 1.

They have been at a great feast of languages, and stolen the scraps.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act v. Sc. 1.

In the posteriors of this day, which the rude multitude call the afternoon.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act v. Sc. 1.

They have measured many a mile To tread a measure with you on this grass.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act v. Sc. 2.

Let me take you a button-hole lower.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act v. Sc. 2.

I have seen the day of wrong through the little hole of discretion.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act v. Sc. 2.

A jest's prosperity lies in the ear Of him that hears it, never in the tongue Of him that makes it.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act v. Sc. 2.

When daisies pied and violets blue, And lady-smocks all silver-white, And cuckoo-buds of yellow hue Do paint the meadows with delight, The cuckoo then, on every tree, Mocks married men.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act v. Sc. 2.

The words of Mercury are harsh after the songs of Apollo.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act v. Sc. 2.

But earthlier happy is the rose distill'd Than that which withering on the virgin thorn[57-1] Grows, lives, and dies in single blessedness.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act i. Sc. 1.

For aught that I could ever read,[57-2] Could ever hear by tale or history, The course of true love never did run smooth.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act i. Sc. 1.

O, hell! to choose love by another's eyes.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act i. Sc. 1.

Swift as a shadow, short as any dream; Brief as the lightning in the collied night, That in a spleen unfolds both heaven and earth, And ere a man hath power to say, "Behold!" The jaws of darkness do devour it up: So quick bright things come to confusion.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act i. Sc. 1.

Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind; And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act i. Sc. 1.

Masters, spread yourselves.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act i. Sc. 2.

This is Ercles' vein.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act i. Sc. 2.

I'll speak in a monstrous little voice.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act i. Sc. 2.

I am slow of study.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act i. Sc. 2.

That would hang us, every mother's son.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act i. Sc. 2.

I will roar you as gently as any sucking dove; I will roar you, an 't were any nightingale.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act i. Sc. 2.

A proper man, as one shall see in a summer's day.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act i. Sc. 2.

The human mortals.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act ii. Sc. 1.[57-3]

The rude sea grew civil at her song, And certain stars shot madly from their spheres To hear the sea-maid's music.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act ii. Sc. 1.

And the imperial votaress passed on, In maiden meditation, fancy-free. Yet mark'd I where the bolt of Cupid fell: It fell upon a little western flower, Before milk-white, now purple with love's wound, And maidens call it love-in-idleness.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act ii. Sc. 1.[58-1]

I 'll put a girdle round about the earth In forty minutes.[58-2]

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act ii. Sc. 1.

My heart Is true as steel.[58-3]

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act ii. Sc. 1.[58-4]

I know a bank where the wild thyme blows, Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows, Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine, With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act ii. Sc. 1.

A lion among ladies is a most dreadful thing.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act iii. Sc. 1.

Bless thee, Bottom! bless thee! thou art translated.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act iii. Sc. 1.

Lord, what fools these mortals be!

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act iii. Sc. 2.

So we grew together, Like to a double cherry, seeming parted, But yet an union in partition.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Two lovely berries moulded on one stem.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act iii. Sc. 2.

I have an exposition of sleep come upon me.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act iv. Sc. 1.

I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what dream it was.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act iv. Sc. 1.

The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen,[58-5] man's hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to report, what my dream was.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act iv. Sc. 1.

The lunatic, the lover, and the poet Are of imagination all compact: One sees more devils than vast hell can hold, That is, the madman: the lover, all as frantic, Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt: The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling, Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven; And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a name. Such tricks hath strong imagination, That if it would but apprehend some joy, It comprehends some bringer of that joy; Or in the night, imagining some fear, How easy is a bush supposed a bear!

A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act v. Sc. 1.

For never anything can be amiss, When simpleness and duty tender it.

A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act v. Sc. 1.

The true beginning of our end.[59-1]

A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act v. Sc. 1.

The best in this kind are but shadows.

A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act v. Sc. 1.

A very gentle beast, and of a good conscience.

A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act v. Sc. 1.

This passion, and the death of a dear friend, would go near to make a man look sad.

A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act v. Sc. 1.

The iron tongue of midnight hath told twelve.

A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act v. Sc. 1.

My ventures are not in one bottom trusted, Nor to one place.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 1.

Now, by two-headed Janus, Nature hath framed strange fellows in her time.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 1.

Though Nestor swear the jest be laughable.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 1.

You have too much respect upon the world: They lose it that do buy it with much care.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 1.

I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano,— A stage, where every man must play a part; And mine a sad one.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 1.

Why should a man, whose blood is warm within, Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster?

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 1.

There are a sort of men whose visages Do cream and mantle like a standing pond.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 1.

I am Sir Oracle, And when I ope my lips, let no dog bark!

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 1.

I do know of these That therefore only are reputed wise For saying nothing.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 1.

Fish not, with this melancholy bait, For this fool gudgeon, this opinion.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 1.

Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff: you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 1.

In my school-days, when I had lost one shaft, I shot his fellow of the selfsame flight The selfsame way, with more advised watch, To find the other forth; and by adventuring both, I oft found both.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 1.

They are as sick that surfeit with too much, as they that starve with nothing.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 2.

Superfluity comes sooner by white hairs, but competency lives longer.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 2.

If to do were as easy as to know what were good to do, chapels had been churches, and poor men's cottages princes' palaces.[60-1]

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 2.

The brain may devise laws for the blood, but a hot temper leaps o'er a cold decree.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 2.

He doth nothing but talk of his horse.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 2.

God, made him, and therefore let him pass for a man.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 2.

When he is best, he is a little worse than a man; and when he is worst, he is little better than a beast.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 2.

I dote on his very absence.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 2.

My meaning in saying he is a good man, is to have you understand me that he is sufficient.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.

Ships are but boards, sailors but men: there be land-rats and water-rats, water-thieves and land-thieves.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.

I will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you, walk with you, and so following; but I will not eat with you, drink with you, nor pray with you. What news on the Rialto?

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.

I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him. He hates our sacred nation, and he rails, Even there where merchants most do congregate.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.

The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.

A goodly apple rotten at the heart: O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath!

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.

Many a time and oft In the Rialto you have rated me.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.

For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.

You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog, And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.

Shall I bend low, and in a bondman's key, With bated breath and whispering humbleness.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.

For when did friendship take A breed for barren metal of his friend?

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.

O Father Abram! what these Christians are, Whose own hard dealings teaches them suspect The thoughts of others!

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.

Mislike me not for my complexion, The shadow'd livery of the burnish'd sun.

The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 1.

The young gentleman, according to Fates and Destinies and such odd sayings, the Sisters Three and such branches of learning, is indeed deceased; or, as you would say in plain terms, gone to heaven.

The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 2.

The very staff of my age, my very prop.

The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 2.

It is a wise father that knows his own child.

The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 2.

An honest exceeding poor man.

The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 2.

Truth will come to sight; murder cannot be hid long.

The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 2.

In the twinkling of an eye.

The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 2.

And the vile squeaking of the wry-necked fife.

The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 5.

All things that are, Are with more spirit chased than enjoy'd. How like a younker or a prodigal The scarfed bark puts from her native bay, Hugg'd and embraced by the strumpet wind! How like the prodigal doth she return, With over-weather'd ribs and ragged sails, Lean, rent, and beggar'd by the strumpet wind!

The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 6.

Must I hold a candle to my shames?

The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 6.

But love is blind, and lovers cannot see The pretty follies that themselves commit.

The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 6.

All that glisters is not gold.[62-1]

The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 7.

Young in limbs, in judgment old.

The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 7.

Even in the force and road of casualty.

The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 9.

Hanging and wiving goes by destiny.[63-1]

The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 9.

If my gossip Report be an honest woman of her word.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 1.

If it will feed nothing else, it will feed my revenge.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 1.

I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions?

The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 1.

The villany you teach me I will execute, and it shall go hard, but I will better the instruction.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 1.

Makes a swan-like end, Fading in music.[63-2]

The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Tell me where is fancy bred, Or in the heart or in the head? How begot, how nourished? Reply, Reply.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.

In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt But being season'd with a gracious voice Obscures the show of evil?

The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.

There is no vice so simple but assumes Some mark of virtue in his outward parts.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Thus ornament is but the guiled shore To a most dangerous sea.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.

The seeming truth which cunning times put on To entrap the wisest.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.

An unlesson'd girl, unschool'd, unpractised; Happy in this, she is not yet so old But she may learn.[64-1]

The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Here are a few of the unpleasant'st words That ever blotted paper!

The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.

The kindest man, The best-condition'd and unwearied spirit In doing courtesies.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Thus when I shun Scylla, your father, I fall into Charybdis, your mother.[64-2]

The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 5.

Let it serve for table-talk.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 5.

A harmless necessary cat.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

What! wouldst thou have a serpent sting thee twice?

The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

I am a tainted wether of the flock, Meetest for death: the weakest kind of fruit Drops earliest to the ground.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

I never knew so young a body with so old a head.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

The quality of mercy is not strain'd, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath. It is twice blest: It blesseth him that gives and him that takes. 'T is mightiest in the mightiest: it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown; His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings; But mercy is above this sceptred sway, It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself; And earthly power doth then show likest God's, When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew, Though justice be thy plea, consider this, That in the course of justice none of us Should see salvation: we do pray for mercy; And that same prayer doth teach us all to render The deeds of mercy.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel!

The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

Is it so nominated in the bond?[65-1]

The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

'T is not in the bond.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

Speak me fair in death.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

An upright judge, a learned judge!

The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

A second Daniel, a Daniel, Jew! Now, infidel, I have you on the hip.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

I thank thee, Jew, for teaching me that word.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

You take my house when you do take the prop That doth sustain my house; you take my life When you do take the means whereby I live.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

He is well paid that is well satisfied.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank! Here we will sit and let the sounds of music Creep in our ears: soft stillness and the night Become the touches of sweet harmony. Sit, Jessica. Look how the floor of heaven Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold: There 's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st But in his motion like an angel sings, Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubins. Such harmony is in immortal souls; But whilst this muddy vesture of decay Doth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it.

The Merchant of Venice. Act v. Sc. 1.

I am never merry when I hear sweet music.

The Merchant of Venice. Act v. Sc. 1.

The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils; The motions of his spirit are dull as night, And his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted.

The Merchant of Venice. Act v. Sc. 1.

How far that little candle throws his beams! So shines a good deed in a naughty world.

The Merchant of Venice. Act v. Sc. 1.

How many things by season season'd are To their right praise and true perfection!

The Merchant of Venice. Act v. Sc. 1.

This night methinks is but the daylight sick.

The Merchant of Venice. Act v. Sc. 1.

These blessed candles of the night.

The Merchant of Venice. Act v. Sc. 1.

Fair ladies, you drop manna in the way Of starved people.

The Merchant of Venice. Act v. Sc. 1.

We will answer all things faithfully.

The Merchant of Venice. Act v. Sc. 1.

Fortune reigns in gifts of the world.

As You Like It. Act i. Sc. 2.

The little foolery that wise men have makes a great show.

As You Like It. Act i. Sc. 2.

Well said: that was laid on with a trowel.

As You Like It. Act i. Sc. 2.

Your heart's desires be with you!

As You Like It. Act i. Sc. 2.

One out of suits with fortune.

As You Like It. Act i. Sc. 2.

Hereafter, in a better world than this, I shall desire more love and knowledge of you.

As You Like It. Act i. Sc. 2.

My pride fell with my fortunes.

As You Like It. Act i. Sc. 2.

Cel. Not a word?

Ros. Not one to throw at a dog.

As You Like It. Act i. Sc. 3.

O, how full of briers is this working-day world!

As You Like It. Act i. Sc. 3.

Beauty provoketh thieves sooner than gold.

As You Like It. Act i. Sc. 3.

We 'll have a swashing and a martial outside, As many other mannish cowards have.

As You Like It. Act i. Sc. 3.

Sweet are the uses of adversity, Which like the toad, ugly and venomous, Wears yet a precious jewel in his head; And this our life, exempt from public haunt, Finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, Sermons in stones, and good in every thing.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 1.

The big round tears Coursed one another down his innocent nose In piteous chase.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 1.

"Poor deer," quoth he, "thou makest a testament As worldlings do, giving thy sum of more To that which had too much."

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Sweep on, you fat and greasy citizens.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 1.

And He that doth the ravens feed, Yea, providently caters for the sparrow, Be comfort to my age!

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 3.

For in my youth I never did apply Hot and rebellious liquors in my blood.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 3.

Therefore my age is as a lusty winter, Frosty, but kindly.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 3.

O, good old man, how well in thee appears The constant service of the antique world, When service sweat for duty, not for meed! Thou art not for the fashion of these times, Where none will sweat but for promotion.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 3.

Ay, now am I in Arden: the more fool I. When I was at home I was in a better place; but travellers must be content.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 4.

I shall ne'er be ware of mine own wit till I break my shins against it.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 4.

Under the greenwood tree Who loves to lie with me.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 5.

I met a fool i' the forest, A motley fool.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 7.

And rail'd on Lady Fortune in good terms, In good set terms.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 7.

And then he drew a dial from his poke, And looking on it with lack-lustre eye, Says very wisely, "It is ten o'clock: Thus we may see," quoth he, "how the world wags."

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 7.

And so from hour to hour we ripe and ripe, And then from hour to hour we rot and rot; And thereby hangs a tale.[68-1]

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 7.

My lungs began to crow like chanticleer, That fools should be so deep-contemplative; And I did laugh sans intermission An hour by his dial.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 7.

Motley 's the only wear.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 7.

If ladies be but young and fair, They have the gift to know it; and in his brain, Which is as dry as the remainder biscuit After a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd With observation, the which he vents In mangled forms.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 7.

I must have liberty Withal, as large a charter as the wind, To blow on whom I please.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 7.

The "why" is plain as way to parish church.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 7.

Under the shade of melancholy boughs, Lose and neglect the creeping hours of time; If ever you have look'd on better days, If ever been where bells have knoll'd to church, If ever sat at any good man's feast.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 7.

True is it that we have seen better days.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 7.

And wiped our eyes Of drops that sacred pity hath engender'd.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 7.

Oppress'd with two weak evils, age and hunger.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 7.

All the world 's a stage, And all the men and women merely players.[69-1] They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. At first the infant, Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms. And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel And shining morning face, creeping like snail Unwillingly to school. And then the lover, Sighing like furnace, with a woful ballad Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier, Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard; Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel, Seeking the bubble reputation Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice, In fair round belly with good capon lined, With eyes severe and beard of formal cut, Full of wise saws and modern instances; And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon, With spectacles on nose and pouch on side; His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice, Turning again toward childish treble, pipes And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all, That ends this strange eventful history, Is second childishness and mere oblivion, Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 7.

Blow, blow, thou winter wind! Thou art not so unkind As man's ingratitude.

As You Like It. Act ii. Sc. 7.

The fair, the chaste, and unexpressive she.

As You Like It. Act iii. Sc. 2.

It goes much against my stomach. Hast any philosophy in thee, shepherd?

As You Like It. Act iii. Sc. 2.

He that wants money, means, and content is without three good friends.

As You Like It. Act iii. Sc. 2.

This is the very false gallop of verses.

As You Like It. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Let us make an honourable retreat.

As You Like It. Act iii. Sc. 2.

With bag and baggage.

As You Like It. Act iii. Sc. 2.

O, wonderful, wonderful, and most wonderful wonderful! and yet again wonderful, and after that out of all hooping.

As You Like It. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Answer me in one word.

As You Like It. Act iii. Sc. 2.

I do desire we may be better strangers.

As You Like It. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Time travels in divers paces with divers persons. I 'll tell you who Time ambles withal, who Time trots withal, who Time gallops withal, and who he stands still withal.

As You Like It. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Every one fault seeming monstrous till his fellow-fault came to match it.

As You Like It. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Neither rhyme nor reason.[70-1]

As You Like It. Act iii. Sc. 2.

I would the gods had made thee poetical.

As You Like It. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Down on your knees, And thank Heaven, fasting, for a good man's love.

As You Like It. Act iii. Sc. 5.

It is a melancholy of mine own, compounded of many simples, extracted from many objects, and indeed the sundry contemplation of my travels, in which my often rumination wraps me in a most humorous sadness.

As You Like It. Act iv. Sc. 1.

I have gained my experience.

As You Like It. Act iv. Sc. 1.

I had rather have a fool to make me merry than experience to make me sad.

As You Like it. Act iv. Sc. 1.

I will scarce think you have swam in a gondola.

As You Like It. Act iv. Sc. 1.

I 'll warrant him heart-whole.

As You Like It. Act iv. Sc. 1.

Good orators, when they are out, they will spit.

As You Like It. Act iv. Sc. 1.

Men have died from time to time, and worms have eaten them,—but not for love.

As You Like It. Act iv. Sc. 1.

Can one desire too much of a good thing?[71-1]

As You Like It. Act iv. Sc. 1.

For ever and a day.

As You Like It. Act iv. Sc. 1.

Men are April when they woo, December when they wed: maids are May when they are maids, but the sky changes when they are wives.

As You Like It. Act iv. Sc. 1.

The horn, the horn, the lusty horn Is not a thing to laugh to scorn.

As You Like It. Act iv. Sc. 2.

Chewing the food[71-2] of sweet and bitter fancy.

As You Like It. Act iv. Sc. 3.

It is meat and drink to me.

As You Like It. Act v. Sc. 1.

"So so" is good, very good, very excellent good; and yet it is not; it is but so so.

As You Like It. Act v. Sc. 1.

The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.

As You Like It. Act v. Sc. 1.

I will kill thee a hundred and fifty ways.

As You Like It. Act v. Sc. 1.

No sooner met but they looked; no sooner looked but they loved; no sooner loved but they sighed; no sooner sighed but they asked one another the reason; no sooner knew the reason but they sought the remedy.

As You Like It. Act v. Sc. 2.

How bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through another man's eyes!

As You Like It. Act v. Sc. 2.

Here comes a pair of very strange beasts, which in all tongues are called fools.

As You Like It. Act v. Sc. 4.

An ill-favoured thing, sir, but mine own.

As You Like It. Act v. Sc. 4.

Rich honesty dwells like a miser, sir, in a poor house; as your pearl in your foul oyster.

As You Like It. Act v. Sc. 4.

The Retort Courteous; . . . the Quip Modest; . . . the Reply Churlish; . . . the Reproof Valiant; . . . the Countercheck Quarrelsome; . . . the Lie with Circumstance; . . . the Lie Direct.

As You Like It. Act v. Sc. 4.

Your If is the only peacemaker; much virtue in If.

As You Like It. Act v. Sc. 4.

Good wine needs no bush.[72-1]

As You Like It. Epilogue.

What a case am I in.

As You Like It. Epilogue.

Look in the chronicles; we came in with Richard Conqueror.

The Taming of the Shrew. Induc. Sc. 1.

Let the world slide.[72-2]

The Taming of the Shrew. Induc. Sc. 1.

I 'll not budge an inch.

The Taming of the Shrew. Induc. Sc. 1.

As Stephen Sly and old John Naps of Greece, And Peter Turph and Henry Pimpernell, And twenty more such names and men as these Which never were, nor no man ever saw.

The Taming of the Shrew. Induc. Sc. 2.

No profit grows where is no pleasure ta'en; In brief, sir, study what you most affect.

The Taming of the Shrew. Act i. Sc. 1.

There 's small choice in rotten apples.

The Taming of the Shrew. Act i. Sc. 1.

Nothing comes amiss; so money comes withal.

The Taming of the Shrew. Act i. Sc. 2.

Tush! tush! fear boys with bugs.

The Taming of the Shrew. Act i. Sc. 2.

And do as adversaries do in law,— Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.

The Taming of the Shrew. Act i. Sc. 2.

Who wooed in haste, and means to wed at leisure.[72-3]

The Taming of the Shrew. Act iii. Sc. 2.

And thereby hangs a tale.

The Taming of the Shrew. Act iv. Sc. 1.

My cake is dough.

The Taming of the Shrew. Act v. Sc. 1.

A woman moved is like a fountain troubled,— Muddy, ill-seeming, thick, bereft of beauty.

The Taming of the Shrew. Act v. Sc. 2.

Such duty as the subject owes the prince, Even such a woman oweth to her husband.

The Taming of the Shrew. Act v. Sc. 2.

'T were all one That I should love a bright particular star, And think to wed it.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act i. Sc. 1.

The hind that would be mated by the lion Must die for love.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act i. Sc. 1.

Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie, Which we ascribe to Heaven.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act i. Sc. 1.

Service is no heritage.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act i. Sc. 3.

He must needs go that the devil drives.[73-1]

All's Well that Ends Well. Act i. Sc. 3.

My friends were poor but honest.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act i. Sc. 3.

Oft expectation fails, and most oft there Where most it promises.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act ii. Sc. 1.

I will show myself highly fed and lowly taught.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act ii. Sc. 2.

From lowest place when virtuous things proceed, The place is dignified by the doer's deed.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act ii. Sc. 3.

They say miracles are past.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act ii. Sc. 3.

All the learned and authentic fellows.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act ii. Sc. 3.

A young man married is a man that 's marr'd.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act ii. Sc. 3.

Make the coming hour o'erflow with joy, And pleasure drown the brim.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act ii. Sc. 4.

No legacy is so rich as honesty.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act iii. Sc. 5.

The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act iv. Sc. 3.

Whose words all ears took captive.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act v. Sc. 3.

Praising what is lost Makes the remembrance dear.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act v. Sc. 3.

The inaudible and noiseless foot of Time.[74-1]

All's Well that Ends Well. Act v. Sc. 3.

All impediments in fancy's course Are motives of more fancy.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act v. Sc. 3.

The bitter past, more welcome is the sweet.

All's Well that Ends Well. Act v. Sc. 3.

If music be the food of love, play on; Give me excess of it, that, surfeiting, The appetite may sicken, and so die. That strain again! it had a dying fall: O, it came o'er my ear like the sweet sound[74-2] That breathes upon a bank of violets, Stealing and giving odour!

Twelfth Night. Act i. Sc. 1.

I am sure care 's an enemy to life.

Twelfth Night. Act i. Sc. 3.

At my fingers' ends.[74-3]

Twelfth Night. Act i. Sc. 3.

Wherefore are these things hid?

Twelfth Night. Act i. Sc. 3.

Is it a world to hide virtues in?

Twelfth Night. Act i. Sc. 3.

One draught above heat makes him a fool; the second mads him; and a third drowns him.

Twelfth Night. Act i. Sc. 5.

We will draw the curtain and show you the picture.

Twelfth Night. Act i. Sc. 5.

'T is beauty truly blent, whose red and white Nature's own sweet and cunning hand laid on: Lady, you are the cruell'st she alive If you will lead these graces to the grave And leave the world no copy.

Twelfth Night. Act i. Sc. 5.

Halloo your name to the reverberate hills, And make the babbling gossip of the air Cry out.

Twelfth Night. Act i. Sc. 5.

Journeys end in lovers meeting, Every wise man's son doth know.

Twelfth Night. Act ii. Sc. 3.

Then come kiss me, sweet and twenty.

Twelfth Night. Act ii. Sc. 3.

He does it with a better grace, but I do it more natural.

Twelfth Night. Act ii. Sc. 3.

Is there no respect of place, parsons, nor time in you?

Twelfth Night. Act ii. Sc. 3.

Sir To. Dost thou think, because thou art virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale?

Clo. Yes, by Saint Anne, and ginger shall be hot i' the mouth too.

Twelfth Night. Act ii. Sc. 3.

My purpose is, indeed, a horse of that colour.

Twelfth Night. Act ii. Sc. 3.

These most brisk and giddy-paced times.

Twelfth Night. Act ii. Sc. 4.

Let still the woman take An elder than herself: so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart: For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's are.

Twelfth Night. Act ii. Sc. 4.

Then let thy love be younger than thyself, Or thy affection cannot hold the bent.

Twelfth Night. Act ii. Sc. 4.

The spinsters and the knitters in the sun And the free maids that weave their thread with bones Do use to chant it: it is silly sooth, And dallies with the innocence of love, Like the old age.

Twelfth Night. Act ii. Sc. 4.

Duke. And what 's her history?

Vio. A blank, my lord. She never told her love, But let concealment, like a worm i' the bud, Feed on her damask cheek: she pined in thought, And with a green and yellow melancholy She sat like patience on a monument, Smiling at grief.

Twelfth Night. Act ii. Sc. 4.

I am all the daughters of my father's house, And all the brothers too.

Twelfth Night. Act ii. Sc. 4.

An you had any eye behind you, you might see more detraction at your heels than fortunes before you.

Twelfth Night. Act ii. Sc. 5.

Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon 'em.

Twelfth Night. Act ii. Sc. 5.

Foolery, sir, does walk about the orb like the sun; it shines everywhere.

Twelfth Night. Act iii. Sc. 1.

Oh, what a deal of scorn looks beautiful In the contempt and anger of his lip!

Twelfth Night. Act iii. Sc. 1.

Love sought is good, but given unsought is better.

Twelfth Night. Act iii. Sc. 1.

Let there be gall enough in thy ink; though thou write with a goose-pen, no matter.

Twelfth Night. Act iii. Sc. 2.

I think we do know the sweet Roman hand.

Twelfth Night. Act iii. Sc. 4.

Put thyself into the trick of singularity.

Twelfth Night. Act iii. Sc. 4.

'T is not for gravity to play at cherry-pit with Satan.

Twelfth Night. Act iii. Sc. 4.

This is very midsummer madness.

Twelfth Night. Act iii. Sc. 4.

What, man! defy the Devil: consider, he is an enemy to mankind.

Twelfth Night. Act iii. Sc. 4.

If this were played upon a stage now, I could condemn it as an improbable fiction.

Twelfth Night. Act iii. Sc. 4.

More matter for a May morning.

Twelfth Night. Act iii. Sc. 4.

Still you keep o' the windy side of the law.

Twelfth Night. Act iii. Sc. 4.

An I thought he had been valiant and so cunning in fence, I 'ld have seen him damned ere I 'ld have challenged him.

Twelfth Night. Act iii. Sc. 4.[76-1]

Out of my lean and low ability I 'll lend you something.

Twelfth Night. Act iii. Sc. 4.[77-1]

Out of the jaws of death.[77-2]

Twelfth Night. Act iii. Sc. 4.[77-1]

As the old hermit of Prague, that never saw pen and ink, very wittily said to a niece of King Gorboduc, That that is, is.

Twelfth Night. Act iv. Sc. 2.

Clo. What is the opinion of Pythagoras concerning wild fowl?

Mal. That the soul of our grandam might haply inhabit a bird.

Twelfth Night. Act iv. Sc. 2.

Thus the whirligig of time brings in his revenges.

Twelfth Night. Act v. Sc. 1.

For the rain it raineth every day.

Twelfth Night. Act v. Sc. 1.

They say we are Almost as like as eggs.

The Winter's Tale. Act i. Sc. 2.

What 's gone and what 's past help Should be past grief.

The Winter's Tale. Act iii. Sc. 2.

A snapper-up of unconsidered trifles.

The Winter's Tale. Act iv. Sc. 3.[77-3]

A merry heart goes all the day, Your sad tires in a mile-a.

The Winter's Tale. Act iv. Sc. 3.

O Proserpina, For the flowers now, that frighted thou let'st fall From Dis's waggon! daffodils, That come before the swallow dares, and take The winds of March with beauty; violets dim, But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes Or Cytherea's breath; pale primroses, That die unmarried, ere they can behold Bright Phoebus in his strength,—a malady Most incident to maids; bold oxlips and The crown imperial; lilies of all kinds, The flower-de-luce being one.

The Winter's Tale. Act iv. Sc. 4.[78-1]

When you do dance, I wish you A wave o' the sea,[78-2] that you might ever do Nothing but that.

The Winter's Tale. Act iv. Sc. 4.

I love a ballad in print o' life, for then we are sure they are true.

The Winter's Tale. Act iv. Sc. 4.

To unpathed waters, undreamed shores.

The Winter's Tale. Act iv. Sc. 4.

Lord of thy presence and no land beside.

King John. Act i. Sc. 1.

And if his name be George, I 'll call him Peter; For new-made honour doth forget men's names.

King John. Act i. Sc. 1.

For he is but a bastard to the time That doth not smack of observation.

King John. Act i. Sc. 1.

Sweet, sweet, sweet poison for the age's tooth.

King John. Act i. Sc. 1.

For courage mounteth with occasion.

King John. Act ii. Sc. 1.

I would that I were low laid in my grave: I am not worth this coil that 's made for me.

King John. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Saint George, that swinged the dragon, and e'er since Sits on his horse back at mine hostess' door.

King John. Act ii. Sc. 1.

He is the half part of a blessed man, Left to be finished by such as she; And she a fair divided excellence, Whose fulness of perfection lies in him.

King John. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Talks as familiarly of roaring lions As maids of thirteen do of puppy-dogs!

King John. Act ii. Sc. 1.[78-3]

Zounds! I was never so bethump'd with words Since I first call'd my brother's father dad.

King John. Act ii. Sc. 2.[78-3]

I will instruct my sorrows to be proud; For grief is proud, and makes his owner stoop.

King John. Act iii. Sc. 1.[79-1]

Here I and sorrows sit; Here is my throne, bid kings come bow to it.

King John. Act iii. Sc. 1.[79-1]

Thou slave, thou wretch, thou coward! Thou little valiant, great in villany! Thou ever strong upon the stronger side! Thou Fortune's champion that dost never fight But when her humorous ladyship is by To teach thee safety.

King John. Act iii. Sc. 1.

Thou wear a lion's hide! doff it for shame, And hang a calf's-skin on those recreant limbs.

King John. Act iii. Sc. 1.

That no Italian priest Shall tithe or toll in our dominions.

King John. Act iii. Sc. 1.

Grief fills the room up of my absent child, Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me, Puts on his pretty looks, repeats his words, Remembers me of all his gracious parts, Stuffs out his vacant garments with his form.

King John. Act iii. Sc. 4.

Life is as tedious as a twice-told tale Vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man.

King John. Act iii. Sc. 4.

When Fortune means to men most good, She looks upon them with a threatening eye.[79-2]

King John. Act iii. Sc. 4.

And he that stands upon a slippery place. Makes nice of no vile hold to stay him up.

King John. Act iii. Sc. 4.

How now, foolish rheum!

King John. Act iv. Sc. 1.

To gild refined gold, to paint the lily, To throw a perfume on the violet, To smooth the ice, or add another hue Unto the rainbow, or with taper-light To seek the beauteous eye of heaven to garnish, Is wasteful and ridiculous excess.

King John. Act iv. Sc. 2.

And oftentimes excusing of a fault Doth make the fault the worse by the excuse.[80-1]

King John. Act iv. Sc. 2.

We cannot hold mortality's strong hand.

King John. Act iv. Sc. 2.

Make haste; the better foot before.

King John. Act iv. Sc. 2.

I saw a smith stand with his hammer, thus, The whilst his iron did on the anvil cool, With open mouth swallowing a tailor's news.

King John. Act iv. Sc. 2.

Another lean unwashed artificer.

King John. Act iv. Sc. 2.

How oft the sight of means to do ill deeds Make deeds ill done!

King John. Act iv. Sc. 2.

Mocking the air with colours idly spread.

King John. Act v. Sc. 1.

'T is strange that death should sing. I am the cygnet to this pale faint swan, Who chants a doleful hymn to his own death,[80-2] And from the organ-pipe of frailty sings His soul and body to their lasting rest.

King John. Act v. Sc. 7.

Now my soul hath elbow-room.

King John. Act v. Sc. 7.

This England never did, nor never shall, Lie at the proud foot of a conqueror.

King John. Act v. Sc. 7.

Come the three corners of the world in arms, And we shall shock them. Nought shall make us rue, If England to itself do rest but true.

King John. Act v. Sc. 7.

Old John of Gaunt, time-honoured Lancaster.

King Richard II. Act i. Sc. 1.

In rage deaf as the sea, hasty as fire.

King Richard II. Act i. Sc. 1.

The daintiest last, to make the end most sweet.

King Richard II. Act i. Sc. 3.

Truth hath a quiet breast.

King Richard II. Act i. Sc. 3.

All places that the eye of heaven visits Are to a wise man ports and happy havens.

King Richard II. Act i. Sc. 3.

O, who can hold a fire in his hand By thinking on the frosty Caucasus? Or cloy the hungry edge of appetite By bare imagination of a feast? Or wallow naked in December snow By thinking on fantastic summer's heat? O, no! the apprehension of the good Gives but the greater feeling to the worse.

King Richard II. Act i. Sc. 3.

The tongues of dying men Enforce attention like deep harmony.

King Richard II. Act ii. Sc. 1.

The setting sun, and music at the close, As the last taste of sweets, is sweetest last, Writ in remembrance more than things long past.

King Richard II. Act ii. Sc. 1.

This royal throne of kings, this sceptred isle, This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars, This other Eden, demi-paradise, This fortress built by Nature for herself Against infection and the hand of war, This happy breed of men, this little world, This precious stone set in the silver sea, Which serves it in the office of a wall Or as a moat defensive to a house, Against the envy of less happier lands,— This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England.

King Richard II. Act ii. Sc. 1.

The ripest fruit first falls.

King Richard II. Act ii. Sc. 1.

Evermore thanks, the exchequer of the poor.

King Richard II. Act ii. Sc. 3.

Eating the bitter bread of banishment.

King Richard II. Act iii. Sc. 1.

Fires the proud tops of the eastern pines.

King Richard II. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Not all the water in the rough rude sea Can wash the balm off from an anointed king.

King Richard II. Act iii. Sc. 2.

O, call back yesterday, bid time return!

King Richard II. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Let 's talk of graves, of worms, and epitaphs.

King Richard II. Act iii. Sc. 2.

And nothing can we call our own but death And that small model of the barren earth Which serves as paste and cover to our bones. For God's sake, let us sit upon the ground And tell sad stories of the death of kings.

King Richard II. Act iii. Sc. 2.

Comes at the last, and with a little pin Bores through his castle wall—and farewell king!

King Richard II. Act iii. Sc. 2.

He is come to open The purple testament of bleeding war.

King Richard II. Act iii. Sc. 3.

And my large kingdom for a little grave, A little little grave, an obscure grave.

King Richard II. Act iii. Sc. 3.

Gave His body to that pleasant country's earth, And his pure soul unto his captain Christ, Under whose colours he had fought so long.

King Richard II. Act iv. Sc. 1.

A mockery king of snow.

King Richard II. Act iv. Sc. 1.

As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-graced actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious.

King Richard II. Act v. Sc. 2.

As for a camel To thread the postern of a small needle's eye.[82-1]

King Richard II. Act v. Sc. 5.

So shaken as we are, so wan with care.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 1.

In those holy fields Over whose acres walked those blessed feet Which fourteen hundred years ago were nail'd For our advantage on the bitter cross.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 1.

Diana's foresters, gentlemen of the shade, minions of the moon.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 2.

Old father antic the law.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 2.

I would to God thou and I knew where a commodity of good names were to be bought.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 2.

Thou hast damnable iteration, and art indeed able to corrupt a saint.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 2.

And now am I, if a man should speak truly, little better than one of the wicked.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 2.

'T is my vocation, Hal; 't is no sin for a man to labour in his vocation.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 2.

He will give the devil his due.[83-1]

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 2.

There 's neither honesty, manhood, nor good fellowship in thee.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 2.

If all the year were playing holidays, To sport would be as tedious as to work.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 2.

Fresh as a bridegroom; and his chin new reap'd Showed like a stubble-land at harvest-home; He was perfumed like a milliner, And 'twixt his finger and his thumb he held A pouncet-box, which ever and anon He gave his nose and took 't away again.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 3.

And as the soldiers bore dead bodies by, He called the untaught knaves, unmannerly, To bring a slovenly unhandsome corse Betwixt the wind and his nobility.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 3.

God save the mark.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 3.

And telling me, the sovereign'st thing on earth Was parmaceti for an inward bruise; And that it was great pity, so it was, This villanous saltpetre should be digg'd Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall fellow had destroy'd So cowardly; and but for these vile guns, He would himself have been a soldier.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 3.

The blood more stirs To rouse a lion than to start a hare!

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 3.

By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap To pluck bright honour from the pale-faced moon, Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line could never touch the ground, And pluck up drowned honour by the locks.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act i. Sc. 3.

I know a trick worth two of that.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 1.

If the rascal have not given me medicines to make me love him, I 'll be hanged.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 2.

It would be argument for a week, laughter for a month, and a good jest for ever.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 2.

Falstaff sweats to death, And lards the lean earth as he walks along.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 2.

Out of this nettle, danger, we pluck this flower, safety.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 3.

Brain him with his lady's fan.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 3.

A Corinthian, a lad of mettle, a good boy.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

A plague of all cowards, I say.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

There live not three good men unhanged in England; and one of them is fat and grows old.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

Call you that backing of your friends? A plague upon such backing!

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

I am a Jew else, an Ebrew Jew.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

I have peppered two of them: two I am sure I have paid, two rogues in buckram suits. I tell thee what, Hal, if I tell thee a lie, spit in my face; call me horse. Thou knowest my old ward: here I lay, and thus I bore my point. Four rogues in buckram let drive at me—

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

Three misbegotten knaves in Kendal green.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

Give you a reason on compulsion! If reasons were as plentiful as blackberries, I would give no man a reason upon compulsion, I.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

Mark now, how a plain tale shall put you down.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

I was now a coward on instinct.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

No more of that, Hal, an thou lovest me!

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

What doth gravity out of his bed at midnight?

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

A plague of sighing and grief! It blows a man up like a bladder.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

In King Cambyses' vein.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

That reverend vice, that grey iniquity, that father ruffian, that vanity in years.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

Banish plump Jack, and banish all the world.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

Play out the play.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

O, monstrous! but one half-pennyworth of bread to this intolerable deal of sack!

King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.

Diseased Nature oftentimes breaks forth In strange eruptions.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iii. Sc. 1.

I am not in the roll of common men.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iii. Sc. 1.

Glen. I can call spirits from the vasty deep.

Hot. Why, so can I, or so can any man; But will they come when you do call for them?

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iii. Sc. 1.

While you live, tell truth and shame the devil![85-1]

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iii. Sc. 1.

I had rather be a kitten and cry mew Than one of these same metre ballad-mongers.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iii. Sc. 1.

But in the way of bargain, mark ye me, I 'll cavil on the ninth part of a hair.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iii. Sc. 1.

A deal of skimble-skamble stuff.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iii. Sc. 1.

Exceedingly well read.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iii. Sc. 1.

A good mouth-filling oath.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iii. Sc. 1.

A fellow of no mark nor likelihood.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iii. Sc. 2.

To loathe the taste of sweetness, whereof a little More than a little is by much too much.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iii. Sc. 2.

An I have not forgotten what the inside of a church is made of, I am a pepper-corn.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iii. Sc. 3.

Company, villanous company, hath been the spoil of me.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iii. Sc. 3.

Shall I not take mine ease in mine inn?

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iii. Sc. 3.

Rob me the exchequer.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iii. Sc. 3.

This sickness doth infect The very life-blood of our enterprise.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iv. Sc. 1.

That daffed the world aside, And bid it pass.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iv. Sc. 1.

All plumed like estridges that with the wind Baited like eagles having lately bathed; Glittering in golden coats, like images; As full of spirit as the month of May, And gorgeous as the sun at midsummer.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iv. Sc. 1.

I saw young Harry, with his beaver on, His cuisses on his thighs, gallantly arm'd, Rise from the ground like feather'd Mercury, And vaulted with such ease into his seat As if an angel dropp'd down from the clouds, To turn and wind a fiery Pegasus And witch the world with noble horsemanship.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iv. Sc. 1.

The cankers of a calm world and a long peace.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iv. Sc. 2.

A mad fellow met me on the way and told me I had unloaded all the gibbets and pressed the dead bodies. No eye hath seen such scarecrows. I 'll not march through Coventry with them, that 's flat: nay, and the villains march wide betwixt the legs, as if they had gyves on; for indeed I had the most of them out of prison. There 's but a shirt and a half in all my company; and the half-shirt is two napkins tacked together and thrown over the shoulders like an herald's coat without sleeves.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iv. Sc. 2.

Food for powder, food for powder; they 'll fill a pit as well as better.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iv. 2.

To the latter end of a fray and the beginning of a feast[87-1] Fits a dull fighter and a keen guest.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act iv. 2.

I would 't were bedtime, Hal, and all well.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act v. Sc. 1.

Honour pricks me on. Yea, but how if honour prick me off when I come on,—how then? Can honour set to a leg? no: or an arm? no: or take away the grief of a wound? no. Honour hath no skill in surgery, then? no. What is honour? a word. What is in that word honour; what is that honour? air. A trim reckoning! Who hath it? he that died o' Wednesday. Doth he feel it? no. Doth he hear it? no. 'T is insensible, then? yea, to the dead. But will it not live with the living? no. Why? detraction will not suffer it. Therefore I 'll none of it. Honour is a mere scutcheon. And so ends my catechism.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act v. Sc. 1.

Two stars keep not their motion in one sphere.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act v. Sc. 4.

This earth that bears thee dead Bears not alive so stout a gentleman.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act v. Sc. 4.

Thy ignominy sleep with thee in the grave, But not remember'd in thy epitaph!

King Henry IV. Part I. Act v. Sc. 4.

I could have better spared a better man.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act v. Sc. 4.

The better part of valour is discretion.[87-2]

King Henry IV. Part I. Act v. Sc. 4.

Full bravely hast thou fleshed Thy maiden sword.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act v. Sc. 4.

Lord, Lord, how this world is given to lying! I grant you I was down and out of breath; and so was he. But we rose both at an instant, and fought a long hour by Shrewsbury clock.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act v. Sc. 4.

I 'll purge, and leave sack, and live cleanly.

King Henry IV. Part I. Act v. Sc. 4.

Even such a man, so faint, so spiritless, So dull, so dead in look, so woe-begone, Drew Priam's curtain in the dead of night, And would have told him half his Troy was burnt.

King Henry IV. Part II. Act i. Sc. 1.

Yet the first bringer of unwelcome news Hath but a losing office, and his tongue Sounds ever after as a sullen bell, Remember'd tolling a departing friend.

King Henry IV. Part II. Act i. Sc. 1.

I am not only witty in myself, but the cause that wit is in other men.

King Henry IV. Part II. Act i. Sc. 2.

A rascally yea-forsooth knave.

King Henry IV. Part II. Act i. Sc. 2.

Some smack of age in you, some relish of the saltness of time.

King Henry IV. Part II. Act i. Sc. 2.

We that are in the vaward of our youth.

King Henry IV. Part II. Act i. Sc. 2.

For my voice, I have lost it with halloing and singing of anthems.

King Henry IV. Part II. Act i. Sc. 2.

It was alway yet the trick of our English nation, if they have a good thing to make it too common.

King Henry IV. Part II. Act i. Sc. 2.

I were better to be eaten to death with a rust than to be scoured to nothing with perpetual motion.

King Henry IV. Part II. Act i. Sc. 2.

If I do, fillip me with a three-man beetle.

King Henry IV. Part II. Act i. Sc. 2.

Who lined himself with hope, Eating the air on promise of supply.

King Henry IV. Part II. Act i. Sc. 2.

When we mean to build, We first survey the plot, then draw the model; And when we see the figure of the house, Then must we rate the cost of the erection.[88-1]

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