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A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln - Condensed from Nicolay & Hay's Abraham Lincoln: A History
by John G. Nicolay
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program, 161-163; letter to Seward offering cabinet appointment, 163; offers Bates and Cameron cabinet appointments, 163; summons Chase to Springfield, 163; withdraws offer to Cameron, 163; editorial in Springfield "Journal," 164; offers cabinet appointments to Gilmer, Hunt, and Scott, 164; letters to W.S. Speer and G.D. Prentiss, 164, 165; correspondence with Alexander H. Stephens, 165, 166; letter to Gilmer, 166; letter to Washburne, 166, 167; writes his inaugural, 167, 168; journey to Washington, 168-174; farewell address at Springfield, 169; speeches on journey to Washington, 169-171; consultation with Judd, 173; night journey to Washington, 173, 174; visits of ceremony, 179, 180; first inauguration of, 180-182; inaugural address, 180-182; calls council to consider question of Sumter, 182, 183; signs order for relief of Sumter, 184; answer to Seward's memorandum of April 1, 1861, 187; instructions to Seward, 1865, 187; notice to Governor Pickens, 188; issues call for 75,000 volunteers, 192; assumes responsibility for war measures, 195; opinion against dispersing Maryland legislature, 198, 199; authorizes Scott to suspend writ of habeas corpus, 199; action in Merryman case, 200; institutes blockade, 205; calls for three years' volunteers, 206; appoints Charles Francis Adams minister to England, 211; modifies Seward's despatch of May 21, 212; his immense duties, 212, 213; calls council of war, 215; message to Congress, July 4, 1861, 218-220; postpones decision about slaves, 222, 223; receives news of defeat at Bull Run, 229; letter to Hunter, 235; letter to Fremont, 237, 238; letter to Browning, 238-240; sends Cameron to visit Fremont, 242; letter to General Curtis about Fremont, 242, 243; draft of despatch about Trent affair, 247, 248; welcomes McClellan to Washington, 250; orders retirement of General Scott, 253; memorandum to McClellan, 253; his grasp of military problems, 255, 256; memorandum after battle of Bull Run, 256; interest in East Tennessee, 256, 257; personally urges on Congress the construction of railroad in East Tennessee, 257, 258; letter to Buell, 258, 259; telegrams and letters to Buell and Halleck, 262-264, 268, 269; places Halleck in command of Department of the Mississippi, 271; calls councils of war, 288, 289; General War Order No. 1, 290; Special War Order No. 1, 291; letter to McClellan about plan of campaign, 291; interview with Stanton, 293, 294; interview with McClellan, 295; President's General War Orders No. 2 and No. 3, 295; receives news of fight between Monitor and Merrimac, 296; relieves McClellan from command of all troops except Army of the Potomac, 298; orders McDowell to protect Washington, 299; letter to McClellan, 299, 300; letter to McClellan, 303, 304; visit to General Scott, 306; assigns General Pope to command of Army of Virginia, 306; orders Burnside and Halleck to reinforce McClellan, 307; letter to governors of free States, 307, 308; accepts 300,000 new troops, 308; letters to McClellan, 308; visit to Harrison's Landing, 308; appoints Halleck general-in-chief, 309; his dispassionate calmness in considering McClellan's conduct, 311; asks McClellan to use his influence with Pope's officers, 313; places McClellan in command of defenses of Washington, 313; orders reinforcements to McClellan, 316; telegram to McClellan, 316; visit to Antietam, 316, 317; directions and letter to McClellan, 317-319; removes him from command, 319; letter to Bancroft, 321; reference to slavery in message to Congress, December 3, 1861, 321, 322; offers Delaware compensated abolishment, 322, 323; special message of March 6, 1862, proposing joint resolution favoring gradual abolishment, 323, 324; letter to McDougall, 324; interview with delegations from border slave States, 324, 325; signs bill for compensated emancipation in District of Columbia, 326; letter to Chase about Hunter's order of emancipation, 327; proclamation revoking Hunter's order, 327, 328; second interview with border State delegations in Congress, 329-331; conversation with Carpenter about emancipation, 331, 332; reads draft of first emancipation proclamation to cabinet, 331, 332; tells Seward and Welles of his purpose to issue emancipation proclamation, 332; letter to Reverdy Johnson, 334; letter to Cuthbert Bullitt, 334, 335; letter to Horace Greeley, 335-337; interview with Chicago clergymen, 337-339; issues preliminary emancipation proclamation, 339-341; annual message of December 1, 1862, 341, 342; issues final emancipation proclamation, January 1, 1863, 342-346; letter to A.G. Hodges, 346, 347; letters about arming negroes, 350; speech about Fort Pillow massacre, 351, 352; interview with Frederick Douglass, 352; letter to Governor Seymour, 356; action in case of Vallandigham, 358, 359; suspends privilege of writ of habeas corpus, 360; attitude toward Knights of the Golden Circle, 361; appoints Burnside to command Army of the Potomac, 363; telegram to Burnside, and letter to Halleck about Burnside, 365; letter to Burnside, 366; relieves Burnside and appoints Hooker to succeed him, 366; letter to Hooker, 366-368; criticism on Hooker's plan of campaign, 368; continued belief in Hooker, 370; instructions to Hooker, 370, 371; telegrams to Hooker, 371; appoints Meade to command Army of the Potomac, 372; urges Meade to active pursuit of Lee, 375; letter to Meade, 375, 376; Gettysburg address, 376, 377; letter to Grant, 384, 385; orders Rosecrans to advance, 385, 386; note to Halleck, 388; telegram to Rosecrans, 388; orders reinforcements to Rosecrans, 388; signs bill making Grant lieutenant-general, 393; address on presenting his commission, 393, 394; letter to Grant, 396; under fire, 403; letter to Sherman, 412, 413; appoints military governors for Tennessee, Louisiana, Arkansas, and North Carolina, 419; his theory of "reconstruction," 419; message to Congress, July 4, 1861, 419; letter to Cuthbert Bullitt, 420, 421; circular letter to military governors, 421, 422; letter to Governor Shepley, 422; letter to General Banks, 423; references to reconstruction in message to Congress, December 8, 1863, 424; amnesty proclamation, December 8, 1863, 424; letter to General Banks, 424, 425; letters to General Steele, 427, 428; letters to Johnson, 428, 429; letter to Drake and others, 430-432; revokes Fremont's proclamation freeing slaves, 432; letter to General Schofield, 433; directs Stanton to issue order regulating raising of colored troops, 434, 435; letter to H.W. Hoffman, 435, 436; Democrats and Fremont Republicans criticize his action on slavery, 437, 438; relations with his cabinet, 438, 439; attitude toward Chase, 439-441, 444; letter to Chase, 441; letter to F.A. Conkling and others, 443; sentiment in favor of his reelection, 443, 444; letter to Washburne about second term, 444; letters to General Schurz, 444, 445; instructions to office-holders, 445; speeches during campaign, 445; renominated for President, 447, 448; refuses to intimate his preference for Vice-President, 448, 449; indorsement on Nicolay's letter, 448, 449; reply to committee of notification, 450; letter accepting nomination, 450, 451; his attitude toward the French in Mexico, 451, 452; opposition to, in Congress, 454; on Davis's reconstruction bill, 454-456; proclamation of July 8, 1864, 456; accepts Chase's resignation, 457; nominates David Tod to succeed him, 457; substitutes name of W.P. Fessenden, 457, 458; correspondence with Greeley, 458-460; criticized because of Niagara conference, 460, 461; draft of letter to C.D. Robinson, 461; indorsement on Jaquess's application to go South, 462; answer to Raymond's proposition, 463; interview with John T. Mills, 464, 465; memorandum, August 23, 1864, 466; speech on morning after election, 469, 470; popular and electoral votes for, 470; summing up of results of the election, 470; suggests key-note of Morgan's opening speech before Baltimore convention, 471; message to Congress, December 6, 1864, 471, 472, 476-478; answer to serenade, 474, 475; opinion on ratification of Thirteenth Amendment, 475; two constitutional amendments offered to the people during his administration, 476; gives Blair permission to go South, 478; letter to Blair in reply to Jefferson Davis, 481; sends Major Eckert to meet peace commissioners, 482; instructions to Seward, 483; instructions to Grant, 483; goes to Fortress Monroe, 484; conference with peace commissioners, 484, 485; pressure upon him to dismiss Montgomery Blair, 487, 489; personal regard for the Blairs, 488; letter to Stanton, 488; lecture to cabinet, 489; requests resignation of Blair, 489; nominates Chase for chief justice, 490, 491; opinion of Chase, 490, 491; offers attorney-generalship to Holt and Speed, 491; offers cabinet appointment to Governor Morgan, 492; appoints Hugh McCulloch Secretary of the Treasury, 492; indorsements on Usher's resignation, 492; his plans for the future, 492, 493; submits to cabinet draft of joint resolution offering the South $400,000,000, 493; his second inauguration, 493-496; the second inaugural, 494-496; letter to Weed, 497; his literary rank, 497; last public address, 498; despatch to Grant, March 3, 1865, 503, 504; at City Point, 506; telegraphs Grant, "Let the thing be pressed," 511; visit to Richmond, 517, 518; interviews with John A. Campbell, 519; gives permission for meeting of Virginia legislature, 519; regret of army for, 529; return to Washington, 530; last cabinet meeting, 531, 532; 14th of April, 532, 533, 536-540; danger from assassination, 533, 534; interest in the theater, 536; attends Ford's Theater, 536, 537; death of, 538-540; his death prevents organized rejoicing at downfall of rebellion, 544; mourning for, 544-548; feeling of radicals at death of, 545; funeral ceremonies of, in Washington, 545, 546; funeral journey to Springfield, Illinois, 546, 547; burial at Springfield, 547, 548; his character and career, 549-555; his place in history, 555

Lincoln, Abraham, grandfather of the President, emigrates from Virginia to Kentucky, 3, 4; killed by Indians, 4

Lincoln, Edward Baker, son of President Lincoln, birth of, 69; death of, 69

Lincoln, Isaac, settles on Holston River, 5

Lincoln, Josiah, uncle of the President, goes to fort for assistance against Indians, 4

Lincoln, Mary, aunt of the President, 4

Lincoln, Mary Todd, wife of the President, engagement to Lincoln, 63, 64; writes "Lost Townships" letters, 66; marriage to Lincoln, November 4, 1842, 68, 69; children of, 69; death of, 69; accompanies Mr. Lincoln to Washington, 168; drive with her husband, April 14, 1865, 532; invites friends to attend Ford's Theater, 536; attends theater with her husband, 538; at Lincoln's death-bed, 539

Lincoln, Mordecai, uncle of the President defends homestead against Indians, 4; inherits his father's lands, 4

Lincoln, Nancy, aunt of the President, 4

Lincoln, Nancy Hanks, mother of the President, marries Thomas Lincoln, June 12, 1806, 5; teaches her husband to sign his name, 5; birth of daughter, 5; birth of Abraham, son of, 6; death of, 9

Lincoln, Robert Todd, son of the President, Secretary of War, minister to England, birth of, 69; public services, 69; accompanies Mr. Lincoln to Washington, 168; on Grant's staff, 517; with his father April 14, 1865, 532; at Lincoln's death-bed, 540

Lincoln, Samuel, ancestor of the President, emigrates to America, 3

Lincoln, Sarah, sister of the President, born, 5; goes to school, 6

Lincoln, Sarah Bush Johnston. See Johnston, Sarah Bush

Lincoln, Thomas, father of the President, 3; narrowly escapes capture by Indians, 4; learns carpenter's trade, 5; marries Nancy Hanks, June 12, 1806, 5; daughter of, born, 5; removes to Rock Spring Farm, 5, 6; Abraham, son of, born, 6; buys farm on Knob Creek, 6; emigrates to Indiana, 7, 8; death of his wife, 9; marries Sally Bush Johnston, 10; emigrates to Illinois, 20

Lincoln, Thomas, son of President Lincoln, birth of, 69; death of, 69; accompanies Mr. Lincoln to Washington, 168

Lincoln, William Wallace, son of President Lincoln, birth of, 69; death of, 69, 293; accompanies Mr. Lincoln to Washington, 168

Lloyd, John M., keeps tavern at Surrattsville, Maryland, 536

Logan, Stephen T., at Springfield, Illinois, 52; law partnership with Lincoln, 70; defeated for Congress, 91

"Long Nine," a power in Illinois legislature, 61

Longstreet, James, Confederate lieutenant-general, besieges Burnside at Knoxville, 391; retreats toward Virginia, 391; reports conversation with Ord, 503; in final defense of Richmond, 509

Louisiana, State of, military governor appointed for, 419; election for members of Congress, 422; contest over slavery clause in new constitution, 422, 423; election of State officers in, 425, 426; adopts new constitution abolishing slavery, 426; slavery in, throttled by public opinion, 473; ratifies Thirteenth Amendment, 475

Lovejoy, Elijah P., murder of, 46

Lovell, Mansfield, Confederate major-general, evacuates New Orleans, 285; sends men and guns to Vicksburg, 286

Lyon, Nathaniel, brigadier-general United States Volunteers, service in Missouri, 202-204; killed at Wilson's Creek, 234, 235

Lyons, Richard Bickerton Pemell, baron, afterward earl, British minister at Washington, instructed to demand apology for Trent affair, 246

McClellan, George B., major-general, general-in-chief, United States army, orders concerning slaves, 221; commissioned by Governor Dennison, 224; his previous career, 224; quick promotion of, 224; successes in western Virginia, 224, 225; ordered to Washington, 229; his ambition, 249-251; organizes Army of the Potomac, 250, 251; his hallucinations, 251, 252; quarrel with General Scott, 251, 252; expresses contempt for the President, 252; answer to President's inquiry, 253; illness of, 253; instructions to Buell, 258-260; unwilling to promote Halleck, 270; attends council of war, 289; explains plan of campaign to Stanton, 290; letter to Stanton, 292; revokes Hooker's authority to cross lower Potomac, 294; council of his officers votes in favor of water route, 295; at gathering of officials to discuss news of fight between Monitor and Merrimac, 296; occupies abandoned rebel position, 297; calls council of corps commanders, 298; relieved from command of all troops save Army of the Potomac, 298; arrives at Fortress Monroe, 299; siege of Yorktown, 301; his incapacity and hallucination, 302-304; retreat to James River, 302; letter to Stanton, 303; protests against withdrawal of Army of the Potomac, 309; reaches Alexandria, 311; suggests leaving Pope to his fate, 311; telegram to Pope's officers, 313; in command of defenses of Washington, 313; follows Lee into Maryland, 314; learns Lee's plans, 315; battle of Antietam, 315; forces under his command, 317, 318; removed from command, 319; mentioned, 328, 329; adopted by Democrats for presidential candidate, 355, 438; nominated for President, 467; letter of acceptance, 468; electoral votes for, 470; resigns from the army, 470

McClernand, John A., member of Congress, major-general United States Volunteers at Springfield, Illinois, 52

McCulloch, Ben, Confederate brigadier-general, defeat at Pea Ridge, 271

McCulloch, Hugh, Secretary of the Treasury, enters Lincoln's cabinet, 492

McDougall, James A., member of Congress, United States senator, at Springfield, Illinois, 52

McDowell, Irvin, brevet major-general United States army, fears junction of Johnston and Beauregard, 216; advances against Beauregard, 226; battle of Bull Run, July 21, 1861, 226-229; advises movement on Manassas, 289; ordered by Lincoln to protect Washington, 299, 305; ordered to form junction with Shields and Fremont, 306; in Army of Virginia, 310

McLean, John, justice United States Supreme Court, vote for, in Chicago convention, 149

McNamar, John, engaged to Anne Rutledge, 54

Magoffin, Beriah, governor of Kentucky, efforts in behalf of secession, 201

Magruder, John B., brevet lieutenant-colonel United States army, Confederate major-general, joins the Confederacy, 196; opposes McClellan with inferior numbers, 301

Maine, State of, admitted as State, 1820, 19

Mallory, S.R., United States senator, Confederate Secretary of the Navy, writes proposition of armistice dictated by Davis and signed by Johnston, 521

Malvern Hill, Virginia, battle of, July 1, 1862, 302

Marcy, R.B., brevet major-general United States army, McClellan's chief of staff, 294

Marshall, Charles, Confederate colonel, present at Lee's surrender, 513

Maryland, State of, secession feeling in, 193; arrest and dispersion of its legislature, 199; refuses offer of compensated abolishment, 434; emancipation party in, 434; abolishes slavery, 435, 436; slavery in, throttled by public opinion, 473; ratifies Thirteenth Amendment, 474

Mason, James M., United States senator, Confederate commissioner to Europe, interview with John Brown, 134; goes to Baltimore, 197; capture of, 246-249

Matthews, J., burns Booth's letter, 537

Maximilian (Ferdinand Maximilian Joseph), Archduke of Austria and Emperor of Mexico, established by Napoleon III in Mexico, 451

Maynard, Horace, member of Congress, minister to Turkey, telegram about East Tennessee, 259; elected to Congress, 419

Meade, George G., major-general United States army, succeeds Hooker in command of Army of the Potomac, 372; battle of Gettysburg, 372-374; pursuit of Lee, 375, 377; offers to give up command of Army of the Potomac, 394; continued in command, 395; reports surrender of Richmond, 510; ordered to pursue Lee, 510; pursuit of Lee, 511; ordered to disregard Sherman's truce, 523

Meigs, Montgomery C., brevet major-general and quartermaster-general United States army, at gathering of officials to discuss news of battle between Monitor and Merrimac, 296

Memphis, Tennessee, river battle at, 286

Merrimac, the, Confederate ironclad, battle with Monitor, 278-282

Merryman, John, arrest of, 199

Minnesota, the, Union steam frigate, in fight between Monitor and Merrimac, 280

Missouri, State of, admitted as State, 1821, 19; action concerning secession, 201-204; provisional State government established, 418; struggle over slavery, 430-434; adopts ordinance of emancipation, 434; resolution in Assembly favoring Lincoln's renomination, 444; votes for Grant in Baltimore convention, 447; slavery in, throttled by public opinion, 473

Missouri Compromise, repeal of, 94, 95

Mobile Bay, Alabama, battle of, August 5, 1864, 468, 525

Monitor, the, Union ironclad, battle with Merrimac, 279-282

Montgomery, Alabama, capital of Confederacy removed from, to Richmond, 207

Moore, Thomas O., governor of Louisiana, arms free colored men, 348, 349

Morgan, Edwin D., governor of New York, United States senator, opens Republican national convention, 1864, 446; declines cabinet appointment, 492

Morris, Achilles, elected to Illinois legislature in 1832, 34

Morrison, James L.D., desires commissionership of General Land Office, 92

Mudd, Samuel, assists Booth and Herold, 542; imprisoned, 544

Mulligan, James A., brevet brigadier-general United States Volunteers, captured by Price, 241

Murfreesboro, Tennessee, battle of, December 31, 1862, to January 3, 1863, 380

Napoleon III, colonial ambitions of, 211; establishes Maximilian in Mexico, 451

Nashville, Tennessee, battle of, December 15, 16, 1864, 410

Neale, T.M., commands troops in Black Hawk War, 31, 32; defeated for Illinois legislature, 1832, 34

Negro soldiers, experiments with, early in the war, 348; governor of Louisiana arms free blacks, 348, 349; reference to, in emancipation proclamation, 349, 350; Lincoln's interest in, 350; attitude of Confederates toward, 350, 351; massacre of, at Fort Pillow, 351; President's conversation with Frederick Douglass about retaliation, 352; Stanton's order regulating raising of, 435; Republican national platform claims protection of laws of war for, 446; take part in second inauguration of Lincoln, 493, 494; Jefferson Davis's recommendation concerning slaves in rebel army, 501; assist in restoring order in Richmond, 517; in Lincoln's funeral procession, 546. See Slavery and Emancipation

Nelson, William, lieutenant-commander United States navy, major-general United States Volunteers, occupies Nashville, 270

New Orleans, Louisiana, capture of, 283-285; Confederate negro regiment in, 348, 349; Union sentiment in, 420

New Salem, Illinois, town of, 22-26

New York City, draft riots in, 356, 357; funeral honors to Lincoln in, 546, 547

Nicolay, John G., Lincoln's private secretary, 158; accompanies Mr. Lincoln to Washington, 168; in attendance at Baltimore convention, 448, 449; letter to Hay, 448

North Carolina, State of, joins Confederacy, 200, 204; military governor appointed for, 419

Offutt, Denton, engages Lincoln to take flatboat to New Orleans, 21; disappears from New Salem, 35

O'Laughlin, Michael, in conspiracy to assassinate Lincoln, 534; imprisoned, 544

Ord, Edward O.C., brevet major-general United States army, conversation with Longstreet, 503

Owens, Mary S., Lincoln's attentions to, correspondence with and proposal of marriage to, 55-60

Palfrey, F.W., Confederate brigadier-general, statement about strength of Army of the Potomac, 315

Parke, John G., brevet major-general United States army, in recapture of Fort Stedman, 505, 506; in assault at Petersburg 509

Patterson, Robert, major-general Pennsylvania militia, turns troops toward Harper's Ferry, 209; part in campaign against Manassas, 216; orders concerning slaves, 220, 221; failure at Harper's Ferry, 228

Paulding, Hiram, rear-admiral United States navy, burns Norfolk navy-yard, 278

Pea Ridge, Arkansas, battle of, 271

Pemberton, John C., Confederate lieutenant-general, surrenders Vicksburg, 383

Pendleton, George H., member of Congress minister to Prussia, nominated for Vice-President, 467

Pendleton, William N., Confederate brigadier-general, advises Lee to surrender 512

Perryville, Kentucky, battle of, October 8, 1862, 379

Peter, Z., defeated for Illinois legislature, 1832, 34

Petersburg, Virginia, operations against, 400-402, 507-510; evacuation of, April 2, 1865, 510

Phelps, John S., member of Congress, appointed military governor of Arkansas, 420

Phelps, J.W., brigadier-general United States Volunteers, mentioned in letter of Lincoln, 334; declared an outlaw by Confederate War Department, 350

Philippi, West Virginia, battle of, June 3, 1861, 214, 225

Phillips, Wendell, letter to Cleveland convention, 442

Pickens, Francis W., member of Congress, minister to Russia, governor of South Carolina, fires on Star of the West, 178

Pickett, George E., Confederate major-general, in battle of Five Forks, 507, 508

Pierce, Franklin, fourteenth President of the United States, recognizes bogus laws in Kansas, 113; appoints governors for Kansas, 113, 114

Pillow, Gideon J., Confederate major-general, stationed at Columbus, 254; escapes from Fort Donelson, 268

Pinkerton, Allen, detective work of, 173

Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee, battle of, April 6, 7, 1862, 272-274

Polk, James K., eleventh President of the United States, sends treaty of peace with Mexico to Senate, 79

Pomeroy, Samuel C., United States senator, secret circular of, 440

Pope, John, brevet major-general United States army, sent to New Madrid, 270; capture of Island No. 10, 274; proceeds to Fort Pillow, 274; joins Halleck, 274; assigned to command Army of Virginia, 306; assumes command of Army of Virginia 310; second battle of Bull Run, 310, 311; despatch announcing his defeat, 312; relieved from command of Army of the Potomac, 314

Porter, David D., admiral United States navy, commands mortar flotilla in expedition with Farragut, 282-287; in second expedition to Vicksburg, 287; in operations about Vicksburg, 382, 383; visits Richmond with Lincoln, 517, 518

Porterfield, G.A., Confederate colonel, routed at Philippi, 225

Port Hudson, Louisiana, siege and surrender of, 383, 384

Port Royal, South Carolina, expedition against, 245, 246

Powell, Lewis, alias Lewis Payne, in conspiracy to assassinate Lincoln, 534; assigned to murder Seward, 535; attack upon Seward, 540, 541; escape and capture of, 541, 542; execution of, 544

Price, Sterling, Confederate major-general retreat to Springfield, Missouri, 234; captures Mulligan, 241; retreats toward Arkansas, 269; defeat at Pea Ridge, 271

Pritchard, Benjamin D., brevet brigadier-general United States Volunteers, captures Jefferson Davis, 526

Quinton, R., defeated for Illinois legislature 1832, 34

Rathbone, Henry R., brevet colonel United States army, attends Ford's Theater with Mrs. Lincoln and Miss Harris, 536; wounded by Booth, 538, 539

Raymond, Henry J., member of Congress letter to Lincoln, 462, 463; visits Washington, 463

Reconstruction, in West Virginia and Missouri, 418, 419; Lincoln's theory of, 419; in Louisiana, 420-426; in Arkansas, 426, 427; in Tennessee, 428, 429; opposition in Congress to Lincoln's action concerning, 454; Henry Winter Davis's bill prescribing method of, 454; Lincoln's proclamation of, July 8, 1864, 456; Wade-Davis manifesto, 456, 457

Republican Party, formation of, 102, 103; nominates Fremont and Dayton, 1856, 103, 104; national convention of, 1860, 144-151; candidates in 1860, 152; campaign of, 1860, 153-160; Fremont faction denounces Lincoln's attitude on slavery, 438; the Chase faction, 439-441; national convention of, 1864, 446-449; gloomy prospects of, 462-466: success in elections of, 1864, 469, 470

Retaliation, rebel threats of, 350, 351; cabinet action on Fort Pillow massacre, 352; conversation between Lincoln and Frederick Douglass about, 352

Reynolds, John, governor of Illinois, issues call for volunteers for Black Hawk War, 31, 32

Richmond, Virginia, becomes capital of Confederate States, 207; panic in, at rumors of evacuation, 481; high prices in, 481; excitement created by Blair's visits, 481, 482; alarm at Grant's advance, 500; surrender of, April 3, 1865, 510; burning of, 515, 516

Rich Mountain, Virginia, battle of, July 11, 1861, 225

Riney, Zachariah, teacher of President Lincoln, 6

Roanoke, the, Union steam frigate, in fight between Monitor and Merrimac, 280

Robinson, E., defeated for Illinois legislature, 1832, 34

Rodgers, John, rear-admiral United States navy, takes part in Port Royal expedition, 245, 246

Romine, Gideon, merchant at Gentryville, 9

Rosecrans, William S., brevet major-general United States army, success at Rich Mountain, 225; succeeds Buell in Kentucky, 380; battle of Murfreesboro, 380; Iuka and Corinth, 380; drives Bragg to Chattanooga, 385; Chattanooga and Chickamauga, 386-388; relieved from command, 388, 389; dilatory movements delay reconstruction in Tennessee, 428

Russell, Lord John, British minister for foreign affairs, interview with Charles Francis Adams, 211

Rutledge, Anne, engagement to Lincoln, 54; death of, 54

Savannah, Georgia, occupied by Sherman, December 21, 1864, 412

Schofield, J.M., brevet major-general, general-in-chief, United States army, ordered to join Sherman, 414; joins Sherman 417

Schurz, Carl, major-general United States Volunteers, United States senator, Secretary of the Interior, asks permission to take part in presidential campaign, 444

Scott Dred, case of, 108, 109

Scott, Robert E., tendered cabinet appointment 164

Scott, Winfield, lieutenant-general United States army, warning to Lincoln about plot in Baltimore, 172; charged with safety of Washington, 172; attempt to reinforce Anderson, 178; advises evacuation of Sumter, 183; orders Washington prepared for a siege, 194; report to President Lincoln, 194, 195; offers Lee command of seventy-five regiments, 196; orders Lyon to St. Louis, 202; loyalty of, 208; occupies Cairo, Illinois, 210; military problem before, 210; plan of campaign 215, 216, 231, 232; refuses to credit news of defeat at Bull Run, 228, 229; welcomes McClellan to Washington, 250; quarrel with McClellan, 251, 252; retirement of, 251-253; rank as lieutenant-general, 393; attends Lincoln's funeral in New York, 547

Seaton, William W., mayor of Washington approves Lincoln's bill abolishing slavery in District of Columbia, 87

Secession, South Carolina, Florida, Mississippi Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas join the movement, 175, 176; action of central cabal, 177; sentiment in Maryland, 193, 194; Virginia passes ordinance of, 194; Tennessee, North Carolina, and Arkansas join the movement, 200; sentiment in Delaware, 201; in Kentucky, 201; in Missouri, 201-204; numerical strength of, 204. See Confederate States of America

Seddon, James A., member of Congress, Confederate Secretary of War, resignation of, 501

Sedgwick, John, major-general United States Volunteers, crosses Rappahannock and takes Fredericksburg, 368, 369

Seven Days' Battles, 302, 306, 307

Seward, Augustus H., brevet colonel United States army, stabbed by Powell, alias Payne, 541

Seward, Frederick W., Assistant Secretary of State, visits Lincoln in Philadelphia, 172; wounded by Powell, alias, Payne, 540, 541

Seward, William H., United States senator, Secretary of State, desires reelection of Douglas to United States Senate, 125; candidate for presidential nomination, 1860, 144; votes for, in Chicago convention, 149-151; accepts cabinet appointment, 163; transmits offers of cabinet appointments, 164; suggestions to Lincoln about journey to Washington, 168; warning to Lincoln about plot in Baltimore, 172, 173; meets Lincoln at railway station in Washington, 174; appointed Secretary of State, 182; reply to Confederate commissioners, 183; reply to Judge Campbell, 183; memorandum of April 1, 1861, 184-187; opinion of Lincoln, 187; despatch of May 21, 211; friendship for Lord Lyons, 247; despatch in Trent affair, 249; at gathering of officials to discuss news of Monitor and Merrimac, 296; goes to New York with President's letter, 307; Lincoln tells him of coming emancipation proclamation, 332; suggests postponement of emancipation proclamation, 332; attitude toward the French in Mexico, 451, 452; agrees with President against making proffers of peace to Davis, 463; proclaims ratification of Thirteenth Amendment, 475; goes to Hampton Roads, 483; relations with Montgomery Blair, 488; plot to murder, 535; attacked by Powell, alias Payne, 540, 541

Seymour, Horatio, governor of New York, opposition to the draft, 355-357; correspondence with Lincoln, 356; notifies McClellan of his nomination, 468

Shepley, G.F., brigadier-general United States Volunteers, military governor of Louisiana, orders election for members of Congress, 422; orders registration of loyal voters, 422, 423

Sheridan, Philip H., lieutenant-general, general-in-chief, United States army, operations in Shenandoah valley, 403, 404; succeeds McClellan, 470; in Shenandoah valley, 502; reaches City Point, 506; advance to Five Forks, 507; reports situation to Grant, 507; battle of Five Forks, 508; ordered to get on Lee's line of retreat, 509, 510; despatch to Grant, 511; captures Appomattox Station, 512; despatch to Grant, 512

Sherman, John, member of Congress, Secretary of the Treasury, United States senator, candidate for Speaker of the House of Representatives, 141

Sherman, William Tecumseh, lieutenant-general, general-in-chief United States army, sent to Nashville, 254; succeeds Anderson, 254; interview with Cameron, 255; asks to be relieved, 255; in operations about Vicksburg, 381, 382; reaches Chattanooga, 389; in battle of Chattanooga, 390, 391; conference with Grant, 395; master in the West, 395; Meridian campaign, 405, 406; concentrates troops at Chattanooga, 406; march on Atlanta, 408, 468; truce with Hood, 408; divides his army, 409; march to the sea, 410-412; telegram to President Lincoln, 412; proposes to march through the Carolinas, 414; from Savannah to Goldsboro, 414-417; visit to Grant, 417; march northward, 502; visit to Lincoln and Grant, 506; admiration for Grant and respect for Lee, 520; enters Raleigh, 521; receives communication from Johnston, 521; meetings with Johnston, 521, 522; agreement between them, 522; agreement disapproved at Washington, 523; report to Grant, 523, 524; receives Johnston's surrender, 524; effect of his march through the South, 524; sent against E. Kirby Smith, 526; soldiers of, in grand review, 528

Shields, James, United States senator, brigadier-general United States Volunteers, at Springfield, Illinois, 52; auditor of Illinois, 65; challenges Lincoln to a duel, 66-68; ordered to form junction with McDowell and Fremont, 306

Short, James, buys Lincoln's surveying instruments and restores them to him, 36

Simpson, M., Bishop of the Methodist Church, oration at Lincoln's funeral, 548

Slavery, agitation in Illinois, 45, 46; Lincoln-Stone protest, 47; Lincoln's bill to abolish, in District of Columbia, 85-87; repeal of Missouri Compromise, 94, 95; Peoria debate of Lincoln and Douglas, 96-98; Lincoln's Chicago banquet speech, 106, 107; Dred Scott case, 108-112; pro-slavery reaction, 113; slavery agitation in Kansas, 113-117; Lincoln's "House divided against itself" speech, 119, 120, 127, 128; Lincoln-Douglas joint debate, 121-125; John Brown raid, 134, 135; Lincoln's speeches in Kansas and the East, 136-140; pro-slavery demands of Democratic leaders, 141, 142; attitude of political parties upon, in 1860, 152, 153; "corner-stone" theory of the Confederate States, 179; dream of the conspirators, 197, 204; dread of slave insurrections in the South, 220, 221; action of Union commanders about, 220-223; Fremont's proclamation, 236-238; Lincoln to Browning about Fremont's proclamation, 238-240; President's interview with border State delegations, 257, 258, 324, 325; references to, in Cameron's report, 320; in Lincoln's message of December 3, 1861, 321, 322; Delaware offered compensated abolishment, 322, 323; Lincoln's special message to Congress, March 6, 1862, 323, 324; President's letter to McDougall, 324; Congress passes bill for compensated emancipation in District of Columbia, 325, 326; bill in Congress to aid emancipation in Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri, 326; Lincoln revokes Hunter's order, 327, 328; measures relating to, in Congress, 1862, 329; President's second interview with border State delegations, 329-331; Lincoln reads first draft of emancipation proclamation to cabinet, 331, 332; President's interview with Chicago clergymen, 337-339; President issues preliminary emancipation proclamation, 339-341; annual message of December 1, 1862, on, 341, 342; President issues final emancipation proclamation, 342-346; President's views on, 346, 347; arming of negro soldiers, 348-350; instructions from War Department about slaves, 349; contest over slavery clause in new Louisiana constitution, 423; slavery abolished in Louisiana, 426; abolished in Arkansas, 427; abolished in Tennessee, 429; abolished in Missouri, 434; abolished in Maryland, 435, 436; attitude of Democratic party on, 437, 438; Republican national platform favors constitutional amendment abolishing, 446; fugitive-slave law repealed, 457; constitutional amendment prohibiting, in United States, 471-476; public opinion on, in certain States, 473; two constitutional amendments offered during Lincoln's term, 475, 476; Lincoln's draft of joint resolution offering South $400,000,000, 493; decline in value of slave property in the South, 501; effect on Lincoln's character, 551. See Emancipation and Negro soldiers

Slidell, John, minister to Mexico, United States senator, Confederate commissioner to Europe, capture of, 246-249; last instructions from Confederate Secretary of State to, 501, 502

Smith, Caleb B., member of Congress, Secretary of the Interior, judge United States District Court, appointed Secretary of the Interior, 182; signs cabinet protest, 311, 312

Smith, E. Kirby, Confederate general, commands forces west of the Mississippi, 525; surrender of, 526, 527

Smith, Melancton, rear-admiral United States navy, at gathering of officials to discuss fight between Monitor and Merrimac, 296

Smith, William F., brevet major-general United States army, service at Chattanooga 389

Spain, joint expedition to Mexico, 451

Spangler, Edward, imprisoned for complicity in Booth's plot, 544

Speed, James, Attorney-General, appointed Attorney-General, 491

Speed, Joshua F., intimacy with Lincoln, 53; Lincoln's letters to, 64, 65, 68; marriage, 65

Spottsylvania, Virginia, battle of, May 8-19, 1864, 398, 399

Springfield, Illinois, its ambition, 26; first newspaper, 26; becomes capital of Illinois, 45, 52; in 1837-39, 53; revival of business in, 61; society in, 62; Lincoln's speech of farewell at, 169; funeral honors to Lincoln in, 547, 548

Stanley, Edward, member of Congress, appointed military governor of North Carolina, 420

Stanton, Edwin M., Attorney-General, Secretary of War, succeeds Cameron as Secretary of War, 289; his efficiency, 289, 290; interview with the President, 293, 294; at gathering of officials to discuss news of Monitor and Merrimac, 296; conveys President's reply to McClellan's plan of campaign, 298; indignation at McClellan, 311; draws up and signs memorandum of protest against continuing McClellan in command, 311; instruction about slaves, 349; faith in Hooker, 370; anxiety for Lincoln during Early's raid, 403; order regulating raising of colored troops, 435; orders suppression of two New York newspapers and arrest of their editors, 453, 454; agrees with President against making proffers of peace to Davis, 463; sends Halleck's letter to President, 488; shows Lincoln Grant's despatch transmitting Lee's overtures, 503; disapproves Sherman's agreement with Johnston, 523; at Lincoln's death-bed, 540

Star of the West, merchant vessel, unsuccessful attempt to reinforce Fort Sumter, 178

Steele, Frederick, brevet major-general United States army, marches from Helena to Little Rock, Arkansas, 427; assists reconstruction in Arkansas, 427

Stephens, Alexander H.; member of Congress, Confederate Vice-President, correspondence with Lincoln, 165, 166; elected Vice-President Confederate States of America, 179; "corner-stone" theory, 179; signs military league, 197; appointed peace commissioner, 482; at Hampton Roads conference, 482-485

Stevens, Thaddeus, member of Congress, criticism of joint resolution offering compensated emancipation, 325

St. Lawrence, the, in fight between Monitor and Merrimac, 280

Stone, Charles P., brigadier-general United States Volunteers, report about danger to Lincoln in Baltimore, 172, 173

Stone, Dan, member of Illinois legislature, protest with Lincoln against resolutions on slavery, 47

Stone, Dr. Robert K., at Lincoln's death-bed, 539, 540

Stringham, Silas H., rear-admiral United States navy, commands Hatteras expedition, 245

Stuart, John T., major Illinois Volunteers, member of Congress, reenlists as private in Black Hawk War, 33; elected to Illinois legislature in 1832, 34; reelected in 1834, 43; encourages Lincoln to study law, 44; at Springfield, Illinois, 52; elected to Congress, 69, 70

Surratt, John H., in conspiracy to assassinate Lincoln, 534; deposits arms in tavern at Surrattsville, 536; escape to Canada, subsequent capture and trial, 544

Surratt, Mrs. Mary E., in conspiracy to assassinate Lincoln, 534; visits tavern at Surrattsville, 536; fate of, 541, 542, 544

Swaney, teacher of President Lincoln, 12

Swett, Leonard, favors Holt for Vice-President, 448

Taney, Roger B., chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, opinion in Dred Scott case, 109; action in Merryman case, 199, 200; death of, 490

Taylor, E.D., elected to Illinois legislature in 1832, 34

Taylor, Richard, Confederate lieutenant-general, surrenders to Canby, 525, 527

Taylor, Zachary, twelfth President of the United States, nominated for President, 80, 81; elected President, 87

Tennessee, the, Confederate ram, in battle of Mobile Bay, 525

Tennessee, State of, joins Confederacy, 200, 204; military governor appointed for, 419; secession usurpation in, 420; delay of reconstruction in, 428; organization of State government and abolishment of slavery, 429; public opinion in, regarding slavery, 473; ratifies Thirteenth Amendment, 475

Terry, Alfred H., brevet major-general United States army, communicates with Sherman, 416

Texas, State of, ratifies Thirteenth Amendment, 475

Thatcher, Henry K., rear-admiral United States navy, receives surrender of Farrand, 525

Thirteenth Amendment, joint resolution proposing, 471-475; ratification of, 475

Thomas, George H., major-general United States army, ordered to oppose Zollicoffer, 254; victory over Zollicoffer, 265; at battle of Chickamauga, 387; succeeds Rosecrans at Chattanooga, 389; in battle of Chattanooga, 390, 391; sent by Sherman to defend Tennessee, 409; Franklin and Nashville, 410; threatens Confederate communications from Tennessee, 502

Thompson, Jacob, member of Congress, Secretary of the Interior, agent of Confederate government in Canada, 361; his visionary plans, 361, 362; account at Montreal Bank, 544

Thompson, Samuel, colonel Illinois Volunteers, commands regiment in Black Hawk War, 32

Tod, David, minister to Brazil, governor of Ohio, declines nomination for Secretary of the Treasury, 457

Todd, Mary, see Lincoln, Mary Todd

Totten, Joseph G., brevet major-general United States army, at gathering of officials to discuss news of fight of Monitor and Merrimac, 296

Treat, Samuel H., United States district judge, at Springfield, Illinois, 52

Trent Brothers, buy store of Lincoln and Berry, 36

Trent, the, British mail-steamer, overhauled by the San Jacinto, 246

Trumbull, Lyman, member of Congress, United States senator, at Springfield, Illinois, 52; elected to United States Senate, 1855, 100

Turnham, David, lends Lincoln "Revised Statutes of Indiana," 14

Usher, John P., Secretary of the Treasury, resigns from cabinet, 492

Vallandigham, Clement L., member of Congress, interview with John Brown, 134; arrest and banishment of, 358; head of Knights of Golden Circle, etc., 360, 361; at Democratic national convention, 467, 468

Van Bergen, sues Lincoln for debt, 36, 41

Vandalia, Illinois, removal of State capital from, to Springfield, 45, 52

Van Dorn, Earl, Confederate major-general, defeat at Pea Ridge, 271

Varuna, the, sunk in expedition against New Orleans, 285

Vicksburg, Mississippi, fortifications of, 287; surrender of, July 4, 1863, 376, 383; situation of 381; operations against, 381-383

Victoria, Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, proclamation of neutrality, 211; kindly feelings toward United States, 247

Vienna Station, ambush at, 214

Virginia, State of, passes ordinance of secession, 194; in the Confederacy, 204; ratifies Thirteenth Amendment, 475

Wade, Benjamin F., United States senator, signs Wade-Davis manifesto, 456

Walker, Leroy Pope, Confederate Secretary of War and brigadier-general, speech at Montgomery, 197

Walker, Robert J., United States senator Secretary of the Treasury, appointed governor of Kansas, 114; letter to Buchanan 114, 115; resigns, 117

Warren, Gouverneur K., brevet major-general United States army, attacked by Lee, 507

Washburne, Elihu B., member of Congress, minister to France, meets Lincoln at railway station in Washington, 174

Washington City, cutoff from the North, 194-197; communication restored, 197; fortifications of, 208, 209; threatened by Early, 403; grand review of Union army in, 527-529

Washington, George, first President of the United States, rank of lieutenant-general, 393; size of his armies compared with Lee's, 524; his place in United States history, 555

Weitzel, Godfrey, brevet major-general United States army, receives surrender of Richmond, 510; sets about work of relief, 516

Welles, Gideon, Secretary of the Navy, appointed Secretary of the Navy, 182; approves course of Captain Wilkes, 246; at gathering of officials to discuss news of fight between Monitor and Merrimac, 296; refuses to sign cabinet protest, 311, 312; Lincoln tells him of coming emancipation proclamation, 332

West Virginia, State of, formation of, 200, 201; true to the Union, 204; effect on, of McClellan's campaign, 225; admission to the Union, 418; slavery in throttled by public opinion, 473

Whig Party, first national convention of, 28; nominates Henry Clay, 28; convention of 1860, 143, 144

White, Albert S., member of Congress, United States senator, judge of District Court of Indiana, reports bill to aid emancipation in Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri, 326

Whitesides, Samuel, general Illinois Volunteers, reenlists as private in Black Hawk War, 33

Wide Awakes, origin and campaign work of, 155, 156

Wilderness, Virginia, battle of, May 5, 6, 1864, 398

Wilkes, Charles, rear-admiral United States navy, capture of the Trent, 246-249

Wilmington, North Carolina, occupation of, February 22, 1865, 525

Wilson, James H., brevet major-general United States army, cavalry raid, and defeat of Forrest, 524, 525

Wilson's Creek, Missouri, battle of, August 10, 1861, 235

Wise, Henry A., minister to Brazil; governor of Virginia, Confederate brigadier-general desires Douglas's reelection to United States Senate, 126; interview with John Brown, 134

Worden, John L., rear-admiral United States navy, commands the Monitor, 282

Wright, Horatio G., brevet major-general United States army, sent to Washington 403; in recapture of Fort Stedman, 505, 506; in assault at Petersburg, 508, 509

Yates, Richard, member of Congress, governor of Illinois, United States senator Lincoln advocates his reelection, 96; commissions Grant, 265; appoints J.F. Jaquess colonel of volunteer regiment, 461

Yorktown, Virginia, siege of, April 5 to May 3, 1862, 301

Zollicoffer, Felix K., member of Congress, Confederate brigadier-general, in eastern Kentucky, 254; defeated by Thomas, 265

* * * * *

THE END

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