HotFreeBooks.com
A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Section 1 (of 3) of Volume 10.
by James D. Richardson
Previous Part     1  2  3  4     Next Part
Home - Random Browse

FEBRUARY 1, 1812.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I lay before Congress a report of the Secretary of the Treasury, containing a statement of proceedings under the "act to regulate the laying out and making a road from Cumberland, in the State of Maryland, to the State of Ohio."

JAMES MADISON.



FEBRUARY 19, 1812.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I lay before the House of Representatives a report[75] of the Secretary of War, in pursuance of their resolution of the 17th of December, 1811.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 75: Transmitting rules and regulations for training and disciplining the regular troops and militia of the United States.]



MARCH 12, 1812.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[76] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 10th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 76: Stating that his Department is not in possession of any names of persons in the United States who entered into or countenanced the project for the fomentation of sectional divisions in the United States and the dissolution of the Union for the execution of which John Henry was in the year 1809 employed by Sir James Craig, then Governor-General of the British Provinces in North America.]



MARCH 13, 1812.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I lay before Congress a letter[77] from the envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of Great Britain to the Secretary of State.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 77: Disclaiming any knowledge of the employment of a secret agent by Great Britain to foment disaffection to the constituted authorities of the United States, etc. (See message of March 9, 1812, Vol. I, p. 498.)]



APRIL 6, 1812.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report of the superintendent of the city,[78] in compliance with their resolution of the 24th of March, to which I add a letter from B.H. Latrobe, connected with that subject.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 78: Washington.]



APRIL 23, 1812.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[79] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 4th of March last.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 79: Relating to captures by belligerent European Governments of American vessels bound to or from the Baltic or within that sea.]



JULY 4, 1812.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit, for the information of Congress, copies of a correspondence of the minister plenipotentiary of Great Britain with the Secretary of State.[80]

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 80: Relating to the revocation of the Berlin and Milan decrees by France, to the British orders in council, etc.]



JUNE 8, 1812.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I lay before Congress copies of letters[81] which have passed between the Secretary of State and the envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of Great Britain.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 81: Relating to impressment of American seamen in British ships of war, detention of British seamen in American ships of war, British orders in council, aid given by American citizens to deserters from British ships, etc.]



JUNE 11, 1812.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit, for the information of Congress, copies of letters[82] which have passed between the Secretary of State and the envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of Great Britain.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 82: Relating to the alleged agency of British authorities in Canada in atrocities committed on the frontiers of the United States by Indians.]



JUNE 15, 1812.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit, for the information of Congress, copies of letters[83] which have passed between the Secretary of State and the envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of Great Britain.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 83: Relating to the revocation of the Berlin and Milan decrees by France, to the British orders in council, etc.]



JUNE 16, 1812.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit, for the information of Congress, copies of a letter to the Secretary of State from the charg d'affaires of the United States at London, accompanied by a letter from the latter to the British minister of foreign affairs.[84]

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 84: Relating to the British declaration and order in council of April 21, 1812, to the hostile attitude of Great Britain toward American commerce, etc.]



JUNE 22, 1812.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I communicate to Congress copies of a letter to the Secretary of State from the charg d'affaires of the United States at London and of a note[85] to him from the British secretary for foreign affairs.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 85: Inclosing copy of a declaration accompanying the British order in council of April 21, 1812.]



JUNE 23, 1812.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[86] of the Secretary of War, complying with their resolution of the 19th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 86: Transmitting extracts from letters of governors of Territories and other agents respecting the hostile and friendly movements and intentions of the Indians toward the United States.]



JULY 6, 1812.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[87] of the Secretary of State of this date, complying with their resolution of the 30th of January last.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 87: Transmitting lists of captures, seizures, and condemnations of the ships and merchandise of citizens of the United States under authority of Governments of Europe.]



NOVEMBER 6, 1812.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to Congress copies of the correspondence between the Department of War and the governors of Massachusetts and Connecticut referred to in my message of the 4th instant.[88]

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 88: Relating to the refusal of the governors of Massachusetts and Connecticut to furnish their quotas of militia.]



NOVEMBER 18, 1812.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to Congress copies of a communication from Mr. Russell to the Secretary of State. It is connected with the correspondence accompanying my message of the 12th instant,[89] but had not at that date been received.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 89: See Vol. I, p. 521.]



DECEMBER 21, 1812.

To the House, of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[90] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 9th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 90: Relating to the conduct of British officers toward persons taken in American armed ships.]



DECEMBER 22, 1812.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[91] of the Secretary of the Navy, complying with their resolution of the 16th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 91: Relating to the presentation to Commodore Edward Preble of a gold medal emblematical of the attacks on the town, batteries, and naval force of Tripoli by the squadron under his command, pursuant to a resolution of Congress of March 3, 1805.]



JANUARY 4, 1813.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I lay before Congress, for their information, a report of the Director of the Mint.

JAMES MADISON.



JANUARY 11, 1813.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to Congress an account of the contingent expenses of the Government for the year 1812.

JAMES MADISON.



JANUARY 11, 1813.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[92] of the Secretary of War, complying with their resolution of the 24th December last.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 92: Transmitting correspondence relative to murders committed by Indians in Tennessee and vicinity.]



JANUARY 13, 1813.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

At the request of the general assembly of Maryland, communicated by the governor of that State, I lay before Congress copies of their act passed on the 2d instant.[93]

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 93: Relating to the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal Company.]



JANUARY 13, 1813.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate copies of the correspondence[94] called for by their resolution of the 7th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 94: Relating to capture of the British brigs Detroit and Caledonia on Lake Erie October 8, 1812.]



JANUARY 14, 1813.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[95] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 22d December.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 95: Relating to East Florida.]



JANUARY 23, 1813.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[96] of the Secretary of the Treasury, complying with their resolution of the 20th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 96: Transmitting statements of purchases of Treasury notes by banks.]



JANUARY 26, 1813.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[97] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 18th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 97: Transmitting correspondence, etc., relative to the revocation by France of the Berlin and Milan decrees in so far as they affected American vessels.]



JANUARY 27, 1813.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[98] of the Secretary of War, complying with their resolution of the 7th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 98: Relating to enlistments under the "act authorizing the President of the United States to accept and organize certain volunteer military corps," etc.]



JANUARY 30, 1813.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

At the request of the legislature of Pennsylvania, conveyed through the governor of that State, I transmit to Congress copies of its resolutions of the 16th December, 1812.[99]

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 99: Approving of the declaration of war against Great Britain, etc.]



FEBRUARY 13, 1813.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I lay before Congress a statement of the militia of the United States according to the latest returns received by the Department of War.

JAMES MADISON.



FEBRUARY 18, 1813.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[100] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 18th of January, 1813.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 100: Transmitting correspondence relative to affairs between the United States and Spain, etc.]



MARCH 1, 1813.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I lay before Congress a report of the Secretary of the Treasury, containing a statement of proceedings under the "act to regulate the laying out and making a road from Cumberland, in the State of Maryland, to the State of Ohio."

JAMES MADISON.



MARCH 3, 1813.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[101] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 1st instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 101: Transmitting correspondence relative to and text of decree of repeal of the Berlin and Milan decrees.]



WASHINGTON, May 29, 1813.

To the Senate of the United States:

Commissions having been granted during the recess of the Senate to the following persons, I now nominate them to the same offices respectively annexed to their names: Albert Gallatin, John Quincy Adams, and James A. Bayard to be jointly and severally envoys extraordinary and ministers plenipotentiary to negotiate and sign a treaty of peace with Great Britain under the mediation of the Emperor of Russia, to negotiate and sign a treaty of commerce with Great Britain; and the said John Quincy Adams, Albert Gallatin, and James A. Bayard to be jointly and severally envoys extraordinary and ministers plenipotentiary to negotiate and sign a treaty of commerce with Russia.

* * * * *

JAMES MADISON.



WASHINGTON, June 3, 1813.

To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with their resolution of the 3d instant, the Senate are informed that the office of the Secretary of the Treasury is not vacated, and that in the absence of Albert Gallatin, commissioned as one of the envoys to treat with Great Britain and Russia, the duties of that office are discharged by William Jones, Secretary of the Navy, authorized therefor according to the provisions of the act of Congress entitled "An act making alterations in the Treasury and War Departments," passed May 8, 1792.

JAMES MADISON.



WASHINGTON, June 5, 1813.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I lay before Congress copies of certain legislative acts of Pennsylvania,[102] transmitted for that purpose by the governor of that State.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 102: "A supplement to an act to incorporate a company for the purpose of cutting and making a canal between the river Delaware and the Chesapeake Bay" and extracts from the act mentioned.]



JUNE 7, 1813.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[103] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 3d instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 103: Transmitting correspondence relative to an interchange of ministers with the Swedish Government.]



WASHINGTON, July 12, 1813.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[104] of the Secretary of State, containing the information requested by their resolution of the 21st of June last.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 104: Relating to the British declaration and order in council of April 21, 1812.]



WASHINGTON, July 12, 1813.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[105] of the Secretary of State, containing the information requested by their resolutions of the 21st of June last.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 105: Relating to the French decree of April 28, 1811, purporting to be a definitive repeal of the Berlin and Milan decrees, etc.]



WASHINGTON, July 28, 1813.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[106] of the Acting Secretary of the Treasury, containing the information requested by their resolution of the 27th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 106: Relating to the loan of $16,000,000 authorized by act of February 8, 1813.]



DECEMBER 20, 1813.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[107] of the Acting Secretary of the Treasury, complying with the resolution of the 13th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 107: Transmitting statement of amount of duties accruing on goods, wares, and merchandise imported into the United States from July 1 to December 31, 1812, etc.]



JANUARY 6, 1814.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I communicate, for the information of Congress, the report of the Director of the Mint of the operation of that establishment during the last year.

JAMES MADISON.



JANUARY 10, 1814.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[108] of the Acting Secretary of the Treasury, complying with their resolution of the 31st December, 1813.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 108: Transmitting a statement of the quantity and estimated value of spirits distilled from materials other than grain imported into the United States from the West Indies and American colonies from October 1, 1804, to September 30, 1812.]

JANUARY 14, 1814.



To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to Congress an account of the contingent expenses of the Government for the year 1813.

JAMES MADISON.



JANUARY 15, 1814.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[109] of the Acting Secretary of the Treasury, complying with their resolution of the 11th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 109: Transmitting a digest of the number, nature, extent, situation, and value of the arts and manufactures of the United States.]



JANUARY 18, 1814.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I lay before Congress a report of the Acting Secretary of the Treasury, containing a statement of proceedings under the "act to regulate the laying out and making a road from Cumberland, in the State of Maryland, to the State of Ohio."

JAMES MADISON.



JANUARY 18, 1814.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[110] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 13th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 110: Relating to the mediation of Russia in the war between the United States and Great Britain.]



JANUARY 18, 1814.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[111] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 11th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 111: Relating to the reception by the French Government of the United States minister to that court.]



JANUARY 19, 1814.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[112] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 12th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 112: Stating that no communication from the French minister prescribing the conditions on which his sovereign would treat of amity and commerce with the United States is on file in the Department of State.]



JANUARY 31, 1814.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[113] of the Secretary of War, complying with their resolution of the 31st of December last.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 113: Relating to the cause of the failure of the army on the northern frontier.]



FEBRUARY 3, 1814.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate of the United States reports[114] of the Secretary of War and Secretary of the Navy, complying with their resolution of the 3d ultimo.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 114: Transmitting statements of foreign and domestic articles consumed in clothing the Army and Navy of the United States in 1813, and estimates for 1814.]



FEBRUARY 10, 1814.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[115] of the Acting Secretary of the Treasury, complying with their resolution of the 30th July, 1813.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 115: Transmitting accounts of United States ministers, consuls, etc., from commencement of present Government expenses incurred in and payments made under treaty with Algiers, and accounts of all other expenditures in relation to the Barbary Powers, including those occasioned by war with Tripoli and making of peace with that Regency.]



FEBRUARY 14, 1814.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

At the request of the legislature of Pennsylvania, conveyed through the governor of that State, I transmit to Congress copies of its resolutions of the 18th ultimo.[116]

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 116: Commending the "decisive spirit and firmness which the national authorities have manifested in securing hostages for the safety of those defenders of the Republic who are threatened with the penalties of treason against Great Britain," and pledging under all circumstances to support the Government in every measure of just retaliation.]



MARCH 22, 1814.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

At the request of the legislature of Pennsylvania, conveyed through the governor of that State, I transmit to Congress copies of its resolutions of the 10th instant.[117]

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 117: Expressing disapprobation of the action of the governor of a sister State in issuing a proclamation ordering a detachment of militia of that State then in the United States service to desert and return to their respective homes, and also expressing disapprobation of the threatened resistance of another State to any action of Congress directing an inquiry by the President into the constitutionality of the act of said governor, and pledging to support the General Government in all lawful and constitutional measures to bring to justice all infractors of the Constitution and laws of the United States and all abettors and aiders of the enemies thereof.]



MARCH 28, 1814.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[118] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 26th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 118: Transmitting copies of certain commissions granted by Presidents Washington and Madison during the recess of the Senate.]



APRIL 9, 1814.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[119] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 2d instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 119: Transmitting lists of ministers, their secretaries, and consuls appointed by the several Presidents during the recess of the Senate.]



APRIL 16, 1814.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[120] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolutions of the 2d of February and 9th of March.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 120: Transmitting list of American prisoners sent to England for trial by the British commander in Canada; statement of the grounds on which the British Government refused to deliver up American seamen impressed into the British service, and statement of the conduct of the British Government toward American seamen on board British ships of war.]



APRIL 16, 1814.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[121] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 13th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 121: Transmitting extract of a letter from the United States minister at Paris touching relations with France.]



OCTOBER 3, 1814.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[122] from the Department of State, complying with their resolution of the 26th ultimo.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 122: Stating that the relations of the United States with the continental powers of Europe continue to be those of peace and amity; that measures have been taken to continue diplomatic relations with France under the existing Government and to renew those with Spain and the United provinces of the Low Countries.]



WASHINGTON, October 13, 1814.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I now transmit to Congress copies of the instructions to the plenipotentiaries of the United States charged with negotiating a peace with Great Britain, as referred to in my message of the 10th instant.[123]

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 123: See Vol. I, p. 551.]



OCTOBER 28, 1814.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[124] from the Department of State, complying with their resolution of the 15th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 124: Relating to retaliation upon prisoners of war.]



NOVEMBER 18, 1814.

To the Senate of the United States:

I lay before the Senate, for their consideration whether they will advise and consent to the ratification thereof, a treaty concluded on the 22d day of July last with the tribes of Indians called the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanese, Senecas, and Miamies.

I lay before the Senate also, for the like purpose, an instrument entitled "Articles of agreement and capitulation made and concluded on the 9th day of August last between Major-General Jackson and the chiefs, deputies, and warriors of the Creek Nation of Indians."

These communications are accompanied by documents having relation to them.

JAMES MADISON.



JANUARY 2, 1815.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I lay before Congress a report of the Secretary of the Treasury, containing a statement of proceedings under the "act to regulate the laying out and making a road from Cumberland, in the State of Maryland, to the State of Ohio."

JAMES MADISON.



JANUARY 10, 1815.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I communicate, for the information of Congress, the report of the Director of the Mint of the operation of that establishment during the last year.

JAMES MADISON.



JANUARY 10, 1815.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to Congress an account of the contingent expenses of the Government for the year 1814.

JAMES MADISON.



JANUARY 14, 1815.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report of the Secretary of War, complying with their resolution of the 19th December.[125]

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 125: Relating to measures authorized by the President in pursuance of the "act to enable the President of the United States, under certain contingencies, to take possession of the country lying east of the river Perdido and south of the State of Georgia and the Mississippi Territory, and for other purposes," for the purpose of possessing and occupying any part of the country mentioned in said act.]



FEBRUARY 16, 1815.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[126] of the Acting Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of yesterday.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 126: Transmitting correspondence and protocols of conferences between United States envoys at Ghent and ministers of Great Britain.]



FEBRUARY 23, 1815.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[127] from the Acting Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 15th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 127: Relating to affairs between the United States and the Barbary Powers.]



WASHINGTON, February 28, 1815.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[128] from the Postmaster-General, complying with their resolution of the 15th of December last.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 128: Transmitting statement of number of post-offices and miles of post-roads in each State, net amount of postages for six months ending June 30, 1814, etc.]



WASHINGTON, February 28, 1815.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[129] from the Acting Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 24th of October last.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 129: Relating to the sale of negroes taken from the United States by British forces.]



JANUARY 8, 1816.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I communicate, for the information of Congress, the report of the Director of the Mint of the operation of that establishment during the last year.

JAMES MADISON.



JANUARY 26, 1816.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

In compliance with the resolution of the 24th instant, I transmit two letters from the envoy extraordinary and minister-plenipotentiary of Spain to the Secretary of State, with his answer.[130]

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 130: Relating to demand of Spain for possession of West Florida; to unlawful expeditions against Spanish possessions; to the exclusion from ports of the United States of the flags of revolting provinces of Spain; to the attitude of the United States toward the Mexican revolution; to vessels of the United States condemned in ports of Spain; to the free navigation of the Mississippi; to the boundaries of Louisiana, etc.]



WASHINGTON, January 31, 1816.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit a report[131] of the Secretary of State, complying with the resolution of the 4th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 131: Relating to the massacre of American prisoners at Dartmoor prison, England.]



FEBRUARY 13, 1816.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report from the Secretary of War, complying with their resolution of the 5th instant.[132]

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 132: Relating to the reduction of the late Army to a peace establishment.]



MARCH 11, 1816.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[133] of the Secretary of the Treasury, complying with their resolution of the 17th of February.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 133: Transmitting statements of receipts and expenditures of the city of Washington from 1791 to 1815, inclusive, and of moneys advanced by the United States to said city.]



MARCH 12, 1816.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I lay before Congress a report of the Secretary of the Treasury, containing a statement of proceedings under the act to regulate the laying out and making a road from Cumberland, in the State of Maryland, to the State of Ohio, with a statement of past appropriations and an estimate of required appropriations.

JAMES MADISON.



MARCH 22, 1816.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[134] from the Secretary of the Treasury, complying with their resolution of the 29th of February last.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 134: Relating to the employment of counsel to assist the Attorney-General in prosecuting cases in the Supreme Court, names of persons so employed, fees paid, etc.]



MARCH 26, 1816.

To the Senate of the United States:

I lay before the Senate, for their advice as to a ratification, articles of a treaty and of a convention which have been concluded with the Cherokee Nation, with documents relating to the losses by the Indians, for which indemnity is stipulated.

JAMES MADISON.



APRIL 4, 1816.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[135] from the Secretary of the Treasury, complying with their resolutions of the 26th March last.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 135: Relating to the survey of the coasts of the United States.]



APRIL 18, 1816.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[136] from the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 17th February last.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 136: Relating to obstructions to American commerce in the provincial and colonial possessions of Great Britain.]



APRIL 29, 1816.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[137] of the Secretary of State on the subject of their resolution of February 28, 1816.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 137: Transmitting lists of impressed American seamen transferred from British ships of war to Dartmoor and other prisons in England and the West Indies and Nova Scotia, and those discharged in England since the treaty of peace.]



JANUARY 6, 1817.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I communicate, for the information of Congress, the report of the Director of the Mint of the operation of that establishment during the last year.

JAMES MADISON.



JANUARY 17, 1817.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to Congress an account of the contingent expenses of the Government for the year 1816.

JAMES MADISON.



JANUARY 23, 1817.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[138] of the Acting Secretary of War, in compliance with their resolution of the 8th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 138: Transmitting statement of claims of New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and North Carolina for militia services during the late war.]



FEBRUARY 7, 1817.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[139] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 28th of last month.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 139: Relating to the deportation of slaves by Great Britain in contravention of the treaty of Ghent, etc.]



FEBRUARY 22, 1817.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[140] of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 20th instant.

JAMES MADISON.

[Footnote 140: Transmitting correspondence between the Governments of the United States and Spain relative to settlement of boundaries, to cession of East Florida by Spain, to indemnification for injuries to American commerce by Spanish vessels, etc.]



WASHINGTON, February 4, 1818.

To the House of Representatives:

Pursuant to a resolution of the House of Representatives of the 31st of December last, requesting information of the number of States which had ratified the thirteenth article of the amendments to the Constitution of the United States,[141] I transmit to the House a detailed report from the Secretary of State, which contains all the information that has been received upon that subject.

No time will be lost in communicating to the House the answers of the governors of the States of South Carolina and Virginia to the inquiries stated by the Secretary of State to have been recently addressed to them when they are received at that Department.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 141: "If any citizen of the United States shall accept, claim, receive, or retain any title of nobility or honor, or shall, without the consent of Congress, accept and retain any present, pension, office, or emolument of any kind whatever from any emperor, king, prince, or foreign power, such person shall cease to be a citizen of the United States, and shall be incapable of holding any office of profit or trust under them, or either of them." This proposed amendment did not become a part of the Constitution, failing of ratification by three-fourths of the States.]



WASHINGTON, February 6, 1818.

To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of the 13th of February, 1817, I now transmit copies of the reports in relation to the surveys and examinations made by naval officers in cooperation with officers of the Corps of Engineers.

JAMES MONROE.



WASHINGTON, February 12, 1818.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

Conformably with a resolution of the House of Representatives of the 6th of this month, I now lay before that House a report received from the Secretary of State, with the copy of the correspondence[142] referred to and requested by that resolution.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 142: Relating to a blockade of the Spanish coast in South America by Spanish forces.]



WASHINGTON, February 13, 1818.

To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with a resolution of the 28th of January last, I now transmit to the Senate a statement of the expenditures upon the public buildings and an account of their progress for the year 1818.

JAMES MONROE.



WASHINGTON, February 18, 1818.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

Conformably with a resolution of the House of Representatives of the 12th instant, I lay before that House a report which I have received from the Department of State, with a copy of the letter communicated with it.[143]

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 143: Relative to the claims of the heirs of Caron de Beaumarchais.]



MARCH 5, 1818.

To the Senate of the United States:

I lay before the Senate, for their consideration and the exercise of their constitutional power of advice and consent respecting the ratification thereof, a treaty concluded on the 22d of January last with the Creek Nation of Indians. This treaty is accompanied by certain documents having relation to it.

JAMES MONROE.



WASHINGTON, March 24, 1818.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

In pursuance of a resolution of the House of Representatives of the 7th instant, I now transmit the report of the Secretary of State, with a statement of the expenses incurred under the fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh articles of the treaty of Ghent, specifying the items of expenditure in relation to each.

JAMES MONROE.



NOVEMBER 26, 1818.

To the Senate of the United States:

I lay before the Senate a report from the Commissioner of the Public Buildings, made in compliance with a resolution of the 28th of January last, requiring a statement of the expenditures upon the public buildings and an account of their progress to be annually exhibited to Congress.

JAMES MONROE.

[The same message was sent to the House of Representatives.]



NOVEMBER 30, 1818.

To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with the resolution of the 17th of April, I transmit to the Senate a report[144] from the Acting Secretary of the Navy, which, with the documents accompanying it, will be found to contain all the information required.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 144: Relating to the navy pension fund.]



DECEMBER 15, 1818.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I lay before the House of Representatives copies of the remainder of the documents[145] referred to in the message of the 17th of last month.

JAMES MONROE.

[The same message was sent to the Senate.]

[Footnote 145: Reports of Theodorick Bland and J.R. Poinsett, commissioners, on the condition of South America, correspondence between the Secretary of State and the Spanish minister relative to affairs between the United States and Spain, etc.]



DECEMBER 18, 1818.

To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with the resolution of the Senate of the 10th instant, I transmit copies of the instructions to the commissioners who negotiated the Indian treaties now before it.

JAMES MONROE.



DECEMBER 28, 1818.

To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of the 17th instant, I transmit to that House a report from the Secretary of State, with the papers and documents accompanying it.[146]

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 146: Relating to affairs between the United States and Spain, the prosecution of Captain Obed Wright for the murder of friendly Indians, etc.]



DECEMBER 28, 1818.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

In compliance with a resolution of the 15th instant, I lay before the House of Representatives a report from the Secretary of State, with the papers and documents accompanying it.[147]

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 147: Relating to affairs between the United States and Spain.]



JANUARY 4, 1819.

To the Senate of the United States:

I lay before the Senate a report from the Secretary of State, accompanied with a copy of a letter from Governor Rabun,[148] which was not communicated on a former occasion from that Department.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 148: Relating to the case of Captain Obed Wright, charged with the murder of friendly Indians.]



DECEMBER 24, 1819.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to Congress a report from the Commissioner of the Public Buildings, which, with the accompanying documents, will exhibit the present state of those buildings and the expenditures thereon during the year ending the 30th of September last.

JAMES MONROE.



JANUARY 18, 1820.

To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with the resolution of the Senate of the 5th instant, the inclosed papers are transmitted to them in confidence, and contain all the information in possession of the Executive respecting the progress of the negotiation with the British Government in relation to the intercourse between the United States and the British colonies.

JAMES MONROE.



WASHINGTON, March 8, 1820.

The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES:

I transmit to the House of Representatives, in pursuance of their resolution of the 22d of last month, a report from the Secretary of State, with the papers containing the information requested by that resolution.[149]

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 149: Relating to the Florida treaty.]



MARCH 10, 1820.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to Congress a report from the Director of the Mint of the operations of that institution during the last year.

JAMES MONROE.



MARCH 17, 1820.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to Congress a report from the Secretary of the Treasury, accompanied with statements of the annual expenditures made in the construction of the road leading from Cumberland, in the State of Maryland, to the State of Ohio from the year 1806 to the year 1820.

JAMES MONROE.



WASHINGTON, March 23, 1820.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate, in pursuance of their resolution of the 1st of February, a report[150] from the Secretary of State, with the information required by that rotation.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 150: Relating to the construction of the first article of the treaty of Ghent, relative to slaves.]



WASHINGTON, March 28, 1820.

To the House of Representatives:

I transmit to the House of Representatives, in pursuance of their resolution of the 31st of January last, a report[151] from the Secretary of the Treasury, with the documents which accompanied it.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 151: Relating to the marine-hospital fund.]



MARCH 30, 1820.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to Congress a general abstract of the militia of the United States, in pursuance of the act of March 2, 1803.

JAMES MONROE.



WASHINGTON, April 18, 1820.

To the Senate of the United States:

I lay before the Senate, in pursuance of their resolution of the 21st of last month, the accompanying report and documents[152] from the Department of State.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 152: Relating to the seizure, sequestration, or confiscation of the ships or other property of citizens of the United States by authority of Sweden.]



WASHINGTON, May 12, 1820.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I communicate to Congress translations of letters from the minister of Spain to the Secretary of State, received since my message of the 9th instant.[153]

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 153: See Vol. II, pp. 70-72.]



NOVEMBER 23, 1820.

The PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE:

In conformity with a resolution of the Senate passed the 28th of January, 1818, I communicate herewith to the Senate the report of the Commissioner of Public Buildings required by that resolution.

JAMES MONROE.

[The same message was addressed to the Speaker of the House of Representatives.]



JANUARY 26, 1821.

To the Senate of the United States:

I lay before the Senate, for their consideration and advice as to a ratification, a treaty concluded between the United States and the Creek Nation of Indians.

JAMES MONROE.



WASHINGTON, February 13, 1821.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit herewith to the Senate a copy of a memorial received from Richard W. Meade,[154] together with a report of the Secretary of State concerning it.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 154: Relating to his claim against Spain for imprisonment.]



WASHINGTON, February 14, 1821.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to Congress a report from the Director of the Mint, inclosing a statement of the Treasurer, submitting the operations of the Mint for the last year.

JAMES MONROE.



DECEMBER 24, 1821.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a treaty recently concluded with the Indian tribes at Chicago, with the papers relating thereto, which is submitted for consideration as to its ratification.

JAMES MONROE.



WASHINGTON, January 7, 1822.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to Congress a report from the Director of the Mint, with a statement of the operations for the last year.

JAMES MONROE.



WASHINGTON, January 15, 1822.

To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with a resolution of the Senate requesting the President "to cause a statement of expenditures upon the public buildings and an account of their progress to be annually laid before Congress at the commencement of each session," I herewith transmit the annual report of the Commissioner of the Public Buildings.

JAMES MONROE.

[The same message was sent to the House of Representatives.]



WASHINGTON, January 28, 1822.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report from the Secretary of State, containing the information required by the resolution of the Senate of the 3d instant, with the documents[155] which accompanied that report.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 155: Relating to relief of sick, disabled, and destitute American seamen in foreign ports in 1818, 1819, and 1820.]



WASHINGTON, January 28, 1822.

To the House of Representatives:

I transmit a report from the Secretary of War, together with the documents which accompany it, containing the information requested by a resolution of the House of Representatives of the 22d instant.[156]

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 156: Relating to Indian affairs.]



WASHINGTON, February 6, 1822.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report from the Secretary of State on the subject required by the resolution of that House of the 22d ultimo,[157] with the documents which accompanied that report.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 157: Relating to that part of the boundary line between the United States and the British Provinces which extends "from the source of the river St. Croix to the northwesternmost head of Connecticut River."]



WASHINGTON, February 7, 1822.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

In compliance with a resolution of the 17th ultimo, I transmit a report from the Secretary of War, which, with the accompanying documents,[158] contains the information requested.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 158: Statements of ordnance and ordnance stores in fortifications, arsenals, etc., and estimates of amounts required, contracted for, etc.]



FEBRUARY 8, 1822.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report from the Secretary of State, containing the information required by the resolution of the Senate of the 1st instant, with the documents which accompanied that report.[159]

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 159: Relating to the appointment of William B. Irish as marshal of the western district of Pennsylvania.]



WASHINGTON, February 12, 1822.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report from the Secretary of State, containing the information[160] required by the resolution of the Senate of the 4th instant.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 160: Relating to the lease of a building on Capitol Hill for the temporary use and accommodation of Congress.]



WASHINGTON, February 15, 1822.

To the House of Representatives:

In compliance with a resolution of the House of Representatives "requesting the President of the United States to cause to be laid before this House any information which he may have of the condition of the several Indian tribes within the United States and the progress of the measures hitherto devised and pursued for their civilization," I now transmit a report from the Secretary of War.

JAMES MONROE.



FEBRUARY 21, 1822.

To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of the 7th instant, requesting the President of the United States to cause to be communicated to the Senate the instructions to the commissioners who negotiated the treaty concluded at Chicago with the Ottowa, Chippeway, and Potawatamie nations of Indians, I herewith transmit a report from the Secretary of War.

JAMES MONROE.



WASHINGTON, February 21, 1822.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report from the Secretary of State, with the documents[161] accompanying it, in pursuance of a resolution of the House of the 17th January last.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 161: Correspondence leading up to and protocol of treaty of Ghent, etc.]



WASHINGTON, March 4, 1822.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit a report from the Secretary of the Navy, communicating information in relation to the Navy of the United States[162] requested by a resolution of the House of Representatives of the 14th ultimo.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 162: List of the navy yards and stations, number and grade of officers attached to each, etc.]



WASHINGTON, March 15, 1822.

To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of the 29th of January, I herewith transmit reports[163] from the Treasury and War Departments, containing all the information in the possession of the Executive embraced by that resolution.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 163: Relating to lands granted to officers and soldiers of Virginia who served in the Revolutionary War.]



WASHINGTON, April 1, 1822.

To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with two resolutions of the 11th ultimo, requesting that the President of the United States cause to be furnished to that House certain detailed information from the Navy Department, I herewith transmit a report from the Secretary of the Navy, with other documents.[164]

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 164: Statements showing names and number of officers belonging to the Navy attached to each navy-yard in the United States, and their compensation for two years ending January 1, 1822.]



APRIL 19, 1822.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit a letter from the Attorney-General on the subject of the resolution of the Senate of the 12th instant, which I have received this day, and which in consequence of his absence was not communicated with the message of the 15th instant.[165]

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 165: See Vol. II, p. 136.]



DECEMBER 15, 1822.

To the Congress of the United States:

I now transmit to both Houses of Congress the report of the Commissioner of Public Buildings made in obedience to a resolution of the Senate passed the 28th day of January, 1818.

JAMES MONROE.



WASHINGTON, January 20, 1823.

To the House of Representatives:

In compliance with the resolution of the 20th of December, requesting information "what appropriations will be required to fortify Thompsons Island, usually called Key West, and whether a naval depot established at that island, protected by fortifications, will not afford facilities in defending the commerce of the United States and in clearing the Gulf of Mexico and the adjacent seas from pirates," I transmit a report from the Secretary of the Navy, which communicates all the information which I am at this time able to give.

JAMES MONROE.



FEBRUARY 6, 1823.

To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of the 28th of January, requesting the President to communicate the instructions to the commissioners nominated to treat with the Indians for the extinguishment of Indian titles in the State of Georgia, I transmit to the Senate a report from the Secretary of War, with the documents referred to in it.

JAMES MONROE.



To the Senate of the United States.

In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of 28th January, 1818, I herewith transmit to Congress the report of the Commissioner of Public Buildings, showing the expenditures on public buildings and other objects committed to his care during the present year.

JAMES MONROE.

DECEMBER 19, 1823.



To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit herewith to the House of Representatives a report from the Secretary of State, together with a digest of recent commercial regulations of foreign countries, prepared in compliance with a resolution of the House of the 30th of January, 1823.

JAMES MONROE.

FEBRUARY 2, 1824.



WASHINGTON, February 2, 1824.

The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report from the Secretary of State, agreeably to a resolution of that House of the 11th of December last, with the papers[166] which accompanied that report.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 166: Relating to French spoliations.]



FEBRUARY 24, 1824.

To the Senate of the United States:

I herewith transmit a report from the Secretary of War, which communicates all the information in possession of the Department which was called for by a resolution of the Senate of the 21st of January, 1824.[167]

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 167: Relating to sites for fortifications at St. Marys and Patuxent rivers, plans for same, and estimates of cost of each fortification.]



WASHINGTON, March 19, 1824.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report from the Secretary of State, with the papers[168] therein referred to, in compliance with a resolution of the House of the 27th of January last.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 168: Relating to the suppression of the African slave trade.]



WASHINGTON, May 7, 1824.

To the Senate of the United States:

I communicate to the Senate copies of additional documents relating to the convention for the suppression of the African slave trade, which have this day been received at the Department of State.

JAMES MONROE.



MAY 24, 1824.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report from the Secretary of State, with an appendix to a report[169] from him already communicated to the House.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 169: Addition to digest of foreign commercial law.]



WASHINGTON, May 25, 1824.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report[170] from the Secretary of State, concerning two resolutions of the Senate of the 8th of January and 1st of March last, which had been referred to him.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 170: Relating to foreign spoliations on American commerce.]



MAY 25, 1824.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report[171] from the Secretary of State, concerning a resolution of that House of the 20th of April last, which was referred to him.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 171: Stating that the correspondence relative to French spoliations and to the claims of France upon the United States for noncompliance with the treaties of alliance and commerce of February 6, 1778, would be communicated at the next session of Congress.]



WASHINGTON, December 13, 1824.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate, for its advice and consent as to the ratification, the treaties concluded and signed on the 4th day of August last between the United States and the Ioway, the Sock, and Fox tribes of Indians.

JAMES MONROE.



WASHINGTON, December 13, 1824.

To the Senate of the United States:

Agreeably to a resolution of the Senate of 28th January, 1818, requesting the President "to cause a statement of expenditures upon the public buildings and an account of their progress to be annually laid before Congress at the commencement of each session," I herewith transmit a report from the Commissioner of Public Buildings, which contains the information required.

JAMES MONROE.

[The same message was sent to the House of Representatives.]



WASHINGTON, January 5, 1825.

To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with the resolution of the Senate of the 17th May last, I transmit a report[172] from the Secretary of the Navy, which contains the information requested.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 172: Relating to the use of canvas, cables, and cordage made of hemp grown in the United States in the equipment vessels of the American Navy.]



WASHINGTON, January 17, 1825.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I herewith transmit to the House a report from the Secretary of State, containing the information required by the resolution of the House of the 16th ultimo, relating to the western boundary of the United States.

JAMES MONROE.



WASHINGTON, January 17, 1825.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

In compliance with a resolution of the House of Representatives of the 28th ultimo, requesting the President to inform that House what terms were offered by applicants for the stock created by the act of the 24th of May last and by whom such terms were offered, I herewith transmit a report from the Secretary of the Treasury, with accompanying papers, which contains the information called for.

JAMES MONROE.



WASHINGTON, January 18, 1825.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I herewith transmit to the House of Representatives a report of the Secretary of War, with a report made to that Department by the commissioners who were appointed under the act of the 3d of March, 1823, entitled "An act to establish an armory on the western waters."

JAMES MONROE.



WASHINGTON, January 18, 1825.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I herewith transmit to the House of Representatives a report of the Secretary of War, with a report made to that Department by the commissioners who were appointed under the act of 3d March, 1823, entitled "An act to establish a national armory on the western waters."

JAMES MONROE.



JANUARY 19, 1825.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit herewith to the Senate a report from the Secretary of State, with the documents desired by their resolution of the 13th instant.[173] In requesting that the originals may eventually be returned it may be unnecessary to add that the negotiations being by common consent to be hereafter resumed, it is important that this communication should be regarded by the Senate as strictly confidential.

JAMES MONROE.

[Footnote 173: Relating to commercial intercourse with the British colonies of the West Indies and Canada; to the boundary under the fifth article of the treaty of Ghent, and the navigation of the St. Lawrence River; to admission of United States consuls into British colonial ports; to the Newfoundland fishery; to maritime questions; to the northwest coast of America.]



WASHINGTON, February 2, 1825.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I herewith transmit a report from the Director of the Mint of the United States, showing the operations of that institution for the last year.

JAMES MONROE.



WASHINGTON, March 1, 1826.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit herewith a report from the Director of the Mint of the United States, showing the operations of that institution for the year 1825.

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.



WASHINGTON, March 15, 1826.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I now submit to the consideration of Congress the propriety of making the appropriation necessary for carrying into effect the appointment of a mission to the congress at Panama.

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.



WASHINGTON, December 8, 1826.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of the 20th of January, 1818, I transmit a report of the Commissioner of the Public Buildings, containing the annual statement of expenditures on those buildings and the account of their progress, required by the said resolution.

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.



WASHINGTON, December 11, 1826.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to Congress sundry additional papers appertaining to the report from the War Department relating to Indian affairs, communicated at the commencement of the session.

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.



WASHINGTON, December 28, 1826.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report from the Secretary of State, containing the information requested by two resolutions of the House relating to certain negotiations[174] with the Government of the United Mexican States.

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.

[Footnote 174: Concerning the boundary line between the United States and Mexico and the return of slaves escaping from the former country into the latter.]



WASHINGTON, January 18, 1827.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

In compliance with a resolution of the House of Representatives of the 6th instant, I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State, together with copies of the correspondence with the Government of the Netherlands relating to discriminating duties.

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.



WASHINGTON, February 24, 1827.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit herewith to Congress a report from the Director of the Mint, with a statement of its operations during the year 1826.

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.



WASHINGTON, December 24, 1827.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate, for their consideration and advice, a convention of friendship, navigation, and commerce between the United States and the Free Hanseatic Republics of Lubeck, Bremen, and Hamburg, signed by the respective plenipotentiaries of the parties on the 20th instant at this city. A copy of the convention is likewise inclosed.

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.



WASHINGTON, January 11, 1828.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to Congress the annual report of the Commissioner of the Public Buildings, made in conformity with a resolution of the Senate of the 28th January, 1818.

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.



WASHINGTON, January 11, 1828.

To the Senate of the United States:

In answer to the inquiry contained in a resolution of the Senate of the 9th instant, I readily express the opinion that the publication of the message[175] and documents to which it alludes may be made without detriment to the public service.

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.

[Footnote 175: Of December 24, 1827 (see Vol. II, p. 393), relative to the negotiation of the convention of November 13, 1826, with Great Britain.]



WASHINGTON, January 21, 1828.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

A report from the Director of the Mint, together with a statement of the operations of that institution during the year 1827, are herewith transmitted to Congress.

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.



WASHINGTON, December 8, 1828.

To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of the 26th of May last, I transmit a report of the Secretary of the Treasury, with statements relative to the estimates and appropriations for the expenses of the year 1828 at the last session of Congress.

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.



WASHINGTON, January 14, 1829.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to Congress a report from the Director of the Mint, with the annual statement exhibiting the operations of that institution during the year 1828.

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.



WASHINGTON, February 25, 1829.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit herewith a statement of the expenses of the General Land Office for the year 1827, as desired by a resolution of the Senate of the 23d instant.

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.



WASHINGTON, February 8, 1830.

To the Congress of the United States:

I transmit to Congress a report from the Director of the Mint, exhibiting the operations of that institution during the year 1829.

ANDREW JACKSON.



JANUARY 12, 1831.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to Congress a report from the Director of the Mint, exhibiting the operations of that institution during the year 1830.

ANDREW JACKSON.



JANUARY 25, 1831.

To the House of Representatives:

I beg leave to call the attention of Congress to the annual report of the inspectors of the penitentiary in the District of Columbia, herewith transmitted.

ANDREW JACKSON.



WASHINGTON, January 16, 1832.

To the Congress of the United States:

I transmit to Congress a report from the Director of the Mint, exhibiting the operations of that institution during the year 1831.

ANDREW JACKSON.



WASHINGTON, January 31, 1832.

To the Congress of the United States:

I herewith transmit, for the information of Congress, the third annual report of the inspectors of the penitentiary in the District of Columbia.

ANDREW JACKSON.



WASHINGTON, January 19, 1833.

To the Senate and House of Representatives:

I transmit herewith the fourth annual report of the board of inspectors of the penitentiary in the District of Columbia, which is required by the act of the 3d of March, 1829, to be laid before Congress.

ANDREW JACKSON.



WASHINGTON, January 19, 1833.

The Honorable the PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE UNITED STATES:

I transmit to Congress a report from the Director of the Mint, exhibiting the operations of that institution during the year 1832.

ANDREW JACKSON.

[The same message was sent to the House of Representatives.]



WASHINGTON, D.C., January 15, 1834.

The Honorable the PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE.

SIR: I transmit to Congress a report from the Director of the Mint, exhibiting the operations of that institution during the year 1833.

ANDREW JACKSON.

[The same message was addressed to the Speaker of the House of Representatives.]



WASHINGTON, January 28, 1934.

To the House of Representatives:

I herewith transmit the annual report of the inspectors of the penitentiary in the District of Columbia, which, agreeably to the act for the government and discipline of the same, is to be laid before Congress.

ANDREW JACKSON.



WASHINGTON, January 10, 1835.

The Honorable the PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE UNITED STATES.

SIR: I herewith transmit to the Senate a report from the Director of the Mint, showing the operations of that institution during the year 1834.

ANDREW JACKSON.

[The same message was addressed to the Speaker of the House of Representatives.]



WASHINGTON, January 12, 1835.

To the Congress of the United States:

I transmit, for the information of Congress, the sixth annual report of the inspectors of the penitentiary for the District of Columbia, made in compliance with the act of the 3d of March, 1829.

ANDREW JACKSON.



WASHINGTON, December 10, 1835.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate of the United States a report[176] of the Secretary of State, to whom was referred the resolutions of that body passed on the 2d and 13th days of February last, together with such portion of the correspondence and instructions requested by the said resolutions as has not been heretofore transmitted and as can be communicated without prejudice to the public interest.

ANDREW JACKSON.

[Footnote 176: Transmitting correspondence which passed between the Governments of the United States and Spain in the negotiation of the treaty of February 17, 1834, instructions given to the minister of the United States during the course of the negotiation, etc.]



WASHINGTON, January 28, 1836.

Hon. JAMES K. POLK, Speaker of the House of Representatives.

SIR: I transmit herewith the seventh annual report of the board of inspectors of the penitentiary in the District of Columbia, which, in pursuance of the act of the 3d of March, 1829, is submitted to Congress.

ANDREW JACKSON.



JANUARY 16, 1838.

To the House of Representatives:

I herewith transmit a report from the Director of the Mint, showing the operations of that institution during the year 1837 and also the progress made toward the completion of the branch mints in North Carolina, Georgia, and Louisiana.

M. VAN BUREN.



WASHINGTON, January 29, 1838.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

In compliance with the act of Congress of the 3d March, 1829, I herewith transmit to Congress the ninth annual report of the board of inspectors of the penitentiary of Washington.

M. VAN BUREN.



WASHINGTON, January 18, 1839.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report of the Director of the Mint, exhibiting the operations of that institution during the year 1838.

M. VAN BUREN.

[The same message was sent to the House of Representatives.]



WASHINGTON, February 6, 1839.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

In compliance with the act of Congress of the 3d March, 1829, I herewith transmit to Congress the tenth annual report of the board of inspectors of the penitentiary of Washington.

M. VAN BUREN.



WASHINGTON, D.C., February 1, 1840.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a report from the Director of the Mint, showing the operations of that institution for the year 1839.

M. VAN BUREN.

[The same message was sent to the House of Representatives.]



WASHINGTON, February 5, 1840.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

In compliance with the act of Congress of the 3d of March, 1829, I herewith transmit to Congress the eleventh annual report of the board of inspectors of the penitentiary of the District of Columbia.

M. VAN BUREN.



FEBRUARY 10, 1840.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit to the Senate a supplementary report received from the Director of the Mint, containing a complete statement of the operations of the branch mint at New Orleans for the year 1839.

M. VAN BUREN.

[The same message was sent to the House of Representatives.]



WASHINGTON, January 27, 1841.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

In compliance with an act of Congress of the 3d of March, 1829, I herewith transmit to Congress the twelfth annual report of the board of inspectors of the penitentiary of the District of Columbia.

M. VAN BUREN.



WASHINGTON, January 31, 1842.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit herewith to the Senate a report of the Director of the Mint, showing the operations of the institution for the year 1841.

JOHN TYLER.

[The same message was sent to the House of Representatives.]



WASHINGTON, January 17, 1843.

To the House of Representatives:

I transmit herewith the report of the inspectors of the penitentiary for the District of Columbia, made in pursuance of the act of Congress of the 3d March, 1829, with the accompanying documents.

JOHN TYLER.



WASHINGTON, March 1, 1843.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit herewith to the Senate a copy of a report received from the Director of the Mint, showing the operations of that institution for the year 1842.

JOHN TYLER.

[The same message was sent to the House of Representatives.]



WASHINGTON, D.C. January 19, 1844.

To the House of Representatives:

I transmit herewith the report of the inspectors of the penitentiary of the District of Columbia for the past year, with the accompanying documents.

JOHN TYLER.



WASHINGTON, D.C., January 20, 1844.

To the House of Representatives:

I transmit herewith the annual report of the Director of the Mint at Philadelphia, exhibiting the operations of the Mint and branch mints for the past year.

JOHN TYLER.



WASHINGTON, February 3, 1845.

To the Senate of the United States:

I transmit herewith to the Senate a report from the Director of the Mint, showing the operations of the institution for the year 1844.

JOHN TYLER.

[The same message was sent to the House of Representatives.]



WASHINGTON, February 11, 1845.

To the House of Representatives:

I herewith transmit the annual report of the inspectors of the penitentiary for this District, together with accompanying documents.

JOHN TYLER.



WASHINGTON, January 28, 1846.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I herewith transmit the annual report of the inspectors of the penitentiary for the District of Columbia, made in compliance with the act of the 3d March, 1829.

JAMES K. POLK.



WASHINGTON, D.C., February 10, 1846.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit herewith the report of the Director of the Mint at Philadelphia, showing the operation of the Mint and branch mints for the year 1845.

JAMES K. POLK.



WASHINGTON, January 16, 1847.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

In compliance with the resolutions of the 3d of March, 1829, I transmit herewith the annual report of the inspectors of the penitentiary for the District of Columbia.

JAMES K. POLK.



WASHINGTON, February 4, 1847.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a report from the Director of the Mint, showing the operations of that institution for the year 1846.

JAMES K. POLK.



WASHINGTON, January 18, 1848.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I herewith transmit the annual report of the inspectors of the penitentiary for the District of Columbia, made in compliance with the act of the 3d March, 1829.

JAMES K. POLK.



WASHINGTON, January 31, 1848.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit herewith the annual report of the Director of the Mint at Philadelphia, showing the operation of the Mint and branch mints for the year 1847.

JAMES K. POLK.



WASHINGTON, January 11, 1849.

To the House of Representatives:

I herewith transmit the annual report of the inspectors of the penitentiary for the District of Columbia, made in compliance with the act of the 3d March, 1829.

JAMES K. POLK.



WASHINGTON, January 22, 1849.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit herewith the annual report of the Director of the Mint at Philadelphia, showing the operations of the Mint and branch mints for the year 1848.

JAMES K. POLK.



WASHINGTON, January 28, 1850.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit herewith the annual report of the Director of the Mint at Philadelphia, showing the operations of the Mint and its branches for the year 1849.

Z. TAYLOR.



EXECUTIVE OFFICE, February 5, 1850.

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I herewith transmit the annual report of the inspectors of the penitentiary for the District of Columbia, made in compliance with the act of the 3d March, 1829.

Z. TAYLOR.



WASHINGTON, January 30, 1851.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit herewith the annual report of the Director of the Mint at Philadelphia, showing the operation of the Mint and branch mints for the year 1850.

MILLARD FILLMORE.



WASHINGTON, February 15, 1851.

The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES:

I have the honor herewith to transmit to the House of Representatives the report of the inspectors of the penitentiary of the United States in this District for the year ending December 31, 1850.

MILLARD FILLMORE.



WASHINGTON, D.C., February 10, 1852.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit herewith the annual report of the Director of the Mint at Philadelphia, showing the operations of the Mint and its branches for the year 1851.

MILLARD FILLMORE.



WASHINGTON, April 2, 1852.

To the House of Representatives:

I transmit herewith the report of the inspector of the penitentiary of the United States in the District of Columbia for the year ending the 31st of December last.

MILLARD FILLMORE.



WASHINGTON, February 8, 1853.

To the Senate and House of Representatives:

I herewith communicate, for the information of Congress, a copy of the report of the Director of the Mint for the past year.

MILLARD FILLMORE.



WASHINGTON CITY, February 10, 1853.

The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES:

I transmit to the House of Representatives herewith a communication from the Secretary of the Interior, accompanied by the annual report of the board of inspectors of the penitentiary of the District of Columbia for the year ending 31st December, 1852, as required by law.

MILLARD FILLMORE.



WASHINGTON, February 1, 1854.

The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES:

I transmit herewith the annual report of the Director of the Mint at Philadelphia, showing the operation of the Mint and branch mints for the year 1853.

FRANKLIN PIERCE.



WASHINGTON, March 3, 1854.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit herewith the annual report of the board of inspectors of the penitentiary for the District of Columbia for the year ending December 31, 1853.

FRANKLIN PIERCE.



WASHINGTON, February 8, 1855.

To the House of Representatives:

I transmit herewith the report of the Director of the Mint, showing the operations of the Mint and its branches for the past year.

FRANKLIN PIERCE.



WASHINGTON, March 27, 1856.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit herewith a report of the operations of the Mint of the United States and its branches, including the assay office, for the year 1855.

FRANKLIN PIERCE.



WASHINGTON, February 3, 1857.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit herewith the report of the Director of the Mint, showing the operations of the Mint and its branches for the last year.

FRANKLIN PIERCE.



PROCLAMATIONS.

[From Laws of the United States of America (John Bioren and W. John Duane, Philadelphia, and R.C. Weightman, Washington City, 1815), Vol. V, p. 511.]

BY GEORGE WASHINGTON, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas by an act supplementary to the act entitled "An act establishing a mint and regulating the coins of the United States," passed on the 3d day of March, 1795, "the President of the United States is authorized, whenever he shall think it for the benefit of the United States, to reduce the weight of the copper coin of the United States, provided such reduction shall not in the whole exceed 2 pennyweights in each cent and in like proportion in a half cent; of which he shall give notice by proclamation;" and

Whereas, on account of the increased price of copper and expense of coinage, I have thought it would be for the benefit of the United States to reduce the weight of the copper coin of the United States 1 pennyweight and 16 grains in each cent and in like proportion in each half cent, and the same has since the 27th day of December last been reduced accordingly:

I hereby give notice thereof and that all cents and half cents coined and to be coined at the Mint of the United States from and after the said 27th day of December are to weigh, the cents each 7 pennyweights and the half cents each 3 pennyweights and 12 grains.

In testimony whereof I, the said George Washington, President of the United States, have caused the seal of the United States to be hereto affixed and signed the same with my hand.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Philadelphia on the 26th day of January, A.D. 1796, and of the Independence of the United States the twentieth.

Go. WASHINGTON.

By the President: TIMOTHY PICKERING, Secretary of State.



[From Claypoole's American Daily Advertiser, Philadelphia, December 28, 1799.]

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas the Congress of the United States, "in honor of the memory of General George Washington," have this day "Resolved, That it be recommended to the people of the United States to wear crape on the left arm as mourning for thirty days," and "that the President of the United States be requested to issue a proclamation notifying to the people throughout the United States the said recommendation:"

Now, therefore, I, John Adams, President of the United States, do hereby proclaim the same accordingly.

[SEAL.]

Given under my hand and the seal of the United States, at Philadelphia, the 24th day of December, A.D. 1799, and of the Independence of the United States the twenty-fourth.

JOHN ADAMS.

By the President: TIMOTHY PICKERING, Secretary of State.



[From the Daily National Intelligencer, December 15, 1860.]

TO THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES.

A RECOMMENDATION.

WASHINGTON, December 14, 1860.

Numerous appeals have been made to me by pious and patriotic associations and citizens, in view of the present distracted and dangerous condition of our country, to recommend that a day be set apart for humiliation, fasting, and prayer throughout the Union.

In compliance with their request and my own sense of duty, I designate Friday, the 4th day of January, 1861, for this purpose, and recommend that the people assemble on that day, according to their several forms of worship, to keep it as a solemn fast.

The Union of the States is at the present moment threatened with alarming and immediate danger; panic and distress of a fearful character prevail throughout the land; our laboring population are without employment, and consequently deprived of the means of earning their bread. Indeed, hope seems to have deserted the minds of men. All classes are in a state of confusion and dismay, and the wisest counsels of our best and purest men are wholly disregarded.

In this the hour of our calamity and peril to whom shall we resort for relief but to the God of our fathers? His omnipotent arm only can save us from the awful effects of our own crimes and follies—our own ingratitude and guilt toward our Heavenly Father.

Let us, then, with deep contrition and penitent sorrow unite in humbling ourselves before the Most High, in confessing our individual and national sins, and in acknowledging the justice of our punishment. Let us implore Him to remove from our hearts that false pride of opinion which would impel us to persevere in wrong for the sake of consistency rather than yield a just submission to the unforeseen exigencies by which we are now surrounded. Let us with deep reverence beseech Him to restore the friendship and good will which prevailed in former days among the people of the several States, and, above all, to save us from the horrors of civil war and "blood guiltiness." Let our fervent prayers ascend to His throne that He would not desert us in this hour of extreme peril, but remember us as He did our fathers in the darkest days of the Revolution, and preserve our Constitution and our Union, the work of their hands, for ages yet to come.

An omnipotent Providence may overrule existing evils for permanent good. He can make the wrath of man to praise Him, and the remainder of wrath He can restrain. Let me invoke every individual, in whatever sphere of life he may be placed, to feel a personal responsibility to God and his country for keeping this day holy and for contributing all in his power to remove our actual and impending calamities.

JAMES BUCHANAN.



EXECUTIVE ORDERS.

[From Sparks's Washington, Vol. X, pp. 11-12.]

NEW YORK, June 8, 1789.

SIR:[177] Although in the present unsettled state of the Executive Departments under the Government of the Union I do not conceive it expedient to call upon you for information officially, yet I have supposed that some informal communications from the Office of Foreign Affairs might neither be improper nor unprofitable. Finding myself at this moment less occupied with the duties of my office than I shall probably be at almost any time hereafter, I am desirous of employing myself in obtaining an acquaintance with the real situation of the several great Departments at the period of my acceding to the administration of the General Government. For this purpose I wish to receive in writing such a clear account of the Department at the head of which you have been for some years past as may be sufficient (without overburthening or confusing the mind, which has very many objects to claim its attention at the same instant) to impress me with a full, precise, and distinct general idea of the affairs of the United States so far as they are comprehended in or connected with that Department.

As I am now at leisure to inspect such papers and documents as may be necessary to be acted upon hereafter or as may be calculated to give me an insight into the business and duties of that Department, I have thought fit to address this notification to you accordingly.

I am, etc.,

GO. WASHINGTON.

[Footnote 177: Addressed to the Secretary of Foreign Affairs, the Secretary of War, the Board of the Treasury, and the Postmaster-General.]



[From American State Papers, Indian Affairs, Vol. I, pp. 96-97.]

INSTRUCTIONS FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES TO THE GOVERNOR OF THE WESTERN TERRITORY—6TH OCTOBER, 1789.

ARTHUR ST. CLAIR, Esq.,

Governor of the Territory of the United States Northwest of the Ohio and Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Northern District.

SIR: Congress having by their act of the 29th of September last empowered me to call forth the militia of the States, respectively, for the protection of the frontiers from the incursions of the hostile Indians, I have thought proper to make this communication to you, together with the instructions herein contained.

It is highly necessary that I should as soon as possible possess full information whether the Wabash and Illinois Indians are most inclined for war or peace. If for the former, it is proper that I should be informed of the means which will most probably induce them to peace. If a peace can be established with the said Indians on reasonable terms, the interests of the United States dictate that it should be effected as soon as possible.

You will therefore inform the said Indians of the dispositions of the General Government on this subject and of their reasonable desire that there should be a cessation of hostilities as a prelude to a treaty. If, however, notwithstanding your intimations to them, they should continue their hostilities or meditate any incursions against the frontiers of Virginia and Pennsylvania or against any of the troops or posts of the United States, and it should appear to you that the time of execution would be so near as to forbid your transmitting the information to me and receiving my further orders thereon, then you are hereby authorized and empowered in my name to call on the lieutenants of the nearest counties of Virginia and Pennsylvania for such detachments of militia as you may judge proper, not exceeding, however, 1,000 from Virginia and 500 from Pennsylvania.

I have directed letters to be written to the executives of Virginia and Pennsylvania informing them of the before-recited act of Congress and that I have given you these conditional directions, so that there may not be any obstructions to such measures as shall be necessary to be taken by you for calling forth the militia agreeably to the instructions herein contained.

The said militia to act in conjunction with the Federal troops in such operations, offensive or defensive, as you and the commanding officer of the troops conjointly shall judge necessary for the public service and the protection of the inhabitants and the posts.

The said militia while in actual service to be on the continental establishment of pay and rations. They are to arm and equip themselves, but to be furnished with public ammunition if necessary; and no charge for the pay of said militia will be valid unless supported by regular musters, made by a field or other officer of the Federal troops, to be appointed by the commanding officer of the troops.

I would have it observed forcibly that a war with the Wabash Indians ought to be avoided by all means consistently with the security of the frontier inhabitants, the security of the troops, and the national dignity. In the exercise of the present indiscriminate hostilities it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to say that a war without further measures would be just on the part of the United States.

But if, after manifesting clearly to the Indians the dispositions of the General Government for the preservation of peace and the extension of a just protection to the said Indians, they should continue their incursions, the United States will be constrained to punish them with severity.

Previous Part     1  2  3  4     Next Part
Home - Random Browse